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History > Documents

submitted by Kytherian Politics on 26.05.2014

Election results on Kythera. Round 2. May 25th 2014

The second round of the elections occurred on Sunday.

The Results were

.........................................................................................%................Seats

Charchalakis Eystratios Tou Athyanasiou.........57,38...............10

Koukoulis Theodoros Tou Georgiou.......................42,62................4


The new mayor of Kythera will be Charchalakis Eystratios.

He will take office in September. For the past year or so, he has been President of the Enchorios Periousia. (The "crown lands" of Kythera). He used that position with great skill during the recent shipping crisis to launch his campaign. He is young (35 or so), extremely ambitious, very hardworking and intelligent.

History > Documents

submitted by Kytherian Politics on 19.05.2014

Local election results on Kythera. Sunday 18th May, 2014

With 100% of the votes counted the results of the elections on Kythera are:

Candidate..........................................%............................Seats

Koukoulis, Theodore.....................36.99%..........................3

Charchalakis Eystratios............30.45%..........................3

Lourantos Dimitrios.....................20.02%.........................2

Charos Emmanouil.......................12.54%.........................1

History > Documents

submitted by George Poulos on 11.05.2014

The logo of kythera-family.net

has become a ubiquitous and powerful image throughout the Kytherian world" over the past 10 years.

kythera-family.net turns ten. Χρόνια Πολλά. Να τα εκατοστήσεις

I found Vikki Vrettos Fraioli on Kythera-Family.net and mailed her regarding her Hlentzos connection, and since the first email a couple of days ago, I have had many many emails from her with a huge amount of information regarding my relatives. If this website was not available to us, all this information would never have been shared."
Heather de Marco, April 2013

James Prineas:

It is now ten years since we first launched kythera-family.net (kfn). If you don't already know how it came to be, here's a short recap of the story:
The seed was actually sown back in 1996 when I put on a photographic exhibition called "A Village on Kythera" in the Bondi Pavilion. There I met so many lovely Kytherians (and others – like a group of Sicilian grand¬mothers who cried when they saw my pictures because it reminded them of home...). Many of the Kytherians told me of their collections of vintage pictures from Kythera. I would have loved to help them collate and scan and publish their pictures but it wasn't until about 2001 that I found an affordable and practical solution: to use the internet.

Back then, "community sites" were almost unheard of and the founder of Facebook was probably just out of nappies. So I suppose I shouldn't have been surprised that my idea to create an online heritage repository, to which members of the Kytherian community could upload their family material to the site for the rest of the world to share and enjoy, fell on deaf ears in the beginning.

Then a man, who, up until that time, had never used the internet himself, saved the day: Angelo Notaras. Ann Coward suggested I get in touch with him and it didn't take long for Angelo to recognise the potential benefits to the Kytherian community and he put his conside-rable reputation behind the project. He and his equally generous brothers, John and the late Mitch Notaras, put their money where their vision was and helped convince others to financially support the endeavour.

Next came the ebullient George C. Poulos to the party and, when he wasn't fervently preaching to the less internet-savvy members of the Kytherian Association of Australia (KAA) that the internet wasn't just a fad, he was motivating community members to entrust copies of their heritage material to him to upload to the young site. He and Angelo managed to persuade the KAA Board to embrace the concept, and the latter have been loyal supporters ever since, as evidenced by this article.

The initial problem was that the people with the most knowledge and material on Kythera were of a generation who were still fazed by mobile telephones, never mind by "websites", "uploading" and "urls". Ten years on, even if that generation doesn't use the internet or emails regularly themselves, they generally know what it is about and allow their children and grandchildren to upload their family stories and picture to our site.

Over the past ten years the 3,000 registered users have submitted over 19 000 entries to KFN: life stories, maps, recipes, and other documents to the site, which are viewed by around 20 000 visitors each month!

The extensive Message Board on the site gives evidence of the hundreds of connections made by the site between Kytherians separated by thousands of kilometres, or far less. Two of our most avid contributors live only a few kilometres from each other in California, but discovered their family link through our site.

The possible significance of one group photo from Kythera from 1920 with a dozen people in it is exponential: a fifty-year-old in that picture might have had five children and twenty grandchildren and forty great-grandchildren. That makes sixty-five descendents per person in the picture and a total of 780 for all the subjects. Now, how many of those 780 will have ever seen that picture? Not many if it is stored under someone's bed. But online all of them have access if they care to look.

And the nice thing about a website as opposed to a publication is that there is virtually no limit to the amount which can be presented on it. So it's not too late to post your grandmother's Greek passport or your great-great-grandfather's birth certificate. It's the best way to make sure that your own great-grandchildren will be able to find it one day.

The ten-year anniversary of kythera-family was celebrated with a well-attended party held at the Mill Resort, Mitata, Kythera, in July 2013.

In Australia it was celebrated at the Kytherian Association November Family Dance, Westside Reception Lounge, Marrickville on 23 November 2013.

[[picture:"Familydance-0790ts.tif" ID:22315]]

George Poulos:

I agree with James that the key driver of kfn has been Angelo Notaras OAM. I also agree that the success of the web-site can be attributed to a number of superior features inherent in the site: The web-site is generative. One photograph or one story can elicit a great deal of additional inter-related information.

The web-site is connective. Individuals, families, and organisations have been connected, and re-connected. At every level, the spirit of kytheraismos has been greatly enhanced.

The web-site is revelatory. New information is being uncovered all the time, which most of the world’s Kytherians had previously been unaware of.

The number of Kytherians and Philokytherians who, like Heather der Marco, quoted earlier, who have derived immense pleasure from kythera-family.net? Unknowable! What we do know is that an economic and architectonic infrastructure has been put in place to ensure that www.kythera-family.net will be maintained indefinitely. Hence it will always remain a key force in the preservation, maintenance, and enhancement of Kytherian history, culture, artefacts, ethos and heritage.

By its very existence kythera-family.net has helped energise its principals and supporters to create new and exciting projects – many of which most Kytherians around the world would not guess have derived from kfn. These include the publishing accomplishments of the Kytherian World Heritage Fund – as of mid 2014 thirty-one books with a Kytherian theme available for sale in Australia and in Greece.

kfn has also forged powerful links with the Society of Kytherian Studies in Athens, who have also published 25 books with a Kytherian theme in the Greek language, and the Departments of History and Philosophy at Athens University through Professor’s George and Athanassia Leontsinis. Strong links with KIPA and the Kytheriasmos Institute have also been created. The website has already inspired a Masters Thesis in Germany by Angeliki Pentsi, and Alexander Riedmuller will soon publish his Ph.D thesis on the the kfn website in Bamberg, Germany.

kfn aids people in research, sometimes on a daily basis. For example, on the 7th of April 2014, I received an email from a person thanking kfn and me for providing information on the site which helped him with a paper he delivered the previous week to the 10th Panionian Conference. The topic being "Kythira-Smyrna: The steamboat connection between two places during the 19th century and their unknown perspective." Rosa Cassimatis's name found its way into all.

After research I have concluded that Rosa is NOT buried, as most believe, in the Angelo Cavallini tomb in the Saint Spyridon of Kapsali cemetery but was, most likely, buried in Corfu where she died. If she had been buried in Kythera she should have been mentioned on the gravestone, as her (second) husband died much later than her. No such thing. The Corfu Mental Hospital Archives do not report any final resting place, but as she died in 1882 even if she had been buried in the city of Corfu cemetery her grave is probably lost. Again I'd like to thank all contributors to the site who helped me with my research”. This is a tangential Kytherian interest. But the communication indicates into how many different areas kfn managed to penetrate.

kfn inspiration also led to the preservation and archiving of the Fatseas collection of plate glass negative photographs. This in turn led to the publication of the books, A Kytherian Century and Panayotis Fatseas: Kytherian Faces, 1920-1938, and an Exhibition in the prestigious Benaki Museum, Athens.

Other Special Projects included the importation into Kythera of medical and aged care equipment to benefit residents and patients at the Aged Care facility and Hospital at Potamos. The importation into Kythera of Library shelving from the USA, and later the organisation and funding to completion of both the interior and exterior of the Kytherian Municipal Library, the first Lending Library established on Kythera in 3,000 years. Principals of kfn also aided in creating the first Greek Australian Museum of migration in Australia – the Roxy Museum, located within the Roxy Museum ‘complex’ in Bingara.

James Russell Lowell (1819-1891) asserted that "creativity is not the finding of a thing, but the making something out of it after it is found." By that criterion www.kythera-family.net is a very creative entity indeed. Να τα εκατοστήσεις.

You are the authors! Kythera-Family.net - the online cultural archive for Kythera - aims to preserve and reflect the rich heritage of a wonderful island. Members of the community are actively invited to submit their family collection of Kytherian stories, photographs, recipes, oral histories, and home remedies etc. to the site. Uploading directly to the site is easy and free. Thus we can help make available valuable and interesting material for current and future generations, and inspire young Kytherians to learn more about their fascinating heritage.

History > Documents

submitted by Canberra Times on 15.04.2014

Canberra Times Feature on Greek National Day 25 03 2014

Preface: Bringing nations together
Haris D Dafaranos
Ambassador of Greece
––––––––––––
We are honoured to present the current supplement to the readers of the Canberra Times in an effort to bring closer to our Australian friends the Hellenic culture in her multiple facets.

Many thanks to all the Greek-Australian friends from the business community of Canberra who sponsored the supplement again this
year.

We are very happy to focus on interesting dimensions, such as the Greek presidency of the Council of Ministers of the European Union, and angles regarding Greek studies in Australia, as well as the contribution of eminent Greek- Australian intellectuals, such as Christos Tsiolkas and George Megalogenis.

Last but not least, it is due to the hospitality and democratic= ethos of Australia that the Greeks, among different ethnic groups, have put down roots many years ago, blossomed and evolved as Greek-Australians.

Read more of the supplement by viewing / downloading a .pdf version here:

Canberra Times Feature on Greek National Day 25 03 2014.pdf

History > Documents

submitted by Kytherian World Heritage Fund on 22.03.2014

One Year on Kythera book

please add a caption here

History > Documents

submitted by Lafcadio Hearn Files on 15.03.2014

The front cover of Lafcadio Hearn's Kotto. One of three books to be

translated and published in 2014.

[This is the first time in history that entire Lafacdio Hearn books have been translated, with a view to having them printed and published]

Μεταφράζοντας τον Λευκάδιο Χερν στα ελληνικά ギリシャ語訳ラフカディオ・ハーン

Τέτη Σώλου: Οι μεταφράσεις μου των έργων του Λευκάδιου Χερν και οι σημειώσεις μου σχετικά με το έργο και τη ζωή του.

Η ιστορία ενός συμβόλου


Πριν από πολλά χρόνια η Άννα μου είχε χαρίσει ένα κόσμημά της. Μια καρφίτσα από αλπακά. Η αξία του κοσμήματος είναι μικρή. Η «από διαθέσεως αξία», που λένε τα νομικά βιβλία είναι μεγάλη, μια και το δώρο είναι από τη γιαγιά μου που κι εκείνης της το είχε δώσει η προγιαγιά μου. Οικογενειακό κειμήλιο μ' άλλα λόγια.

H καρφίτσα της γιαγιάς. Xρυσάνθεμο Kαρφίτσα

Η συναισθηματική του αξία έγινε ακόμα πιο μεγάλη, όταν συνάντησα την ίδια καρφίτσα σε μια παλιά φωτογραφία της Αλεξάνδρας Παπαδοπούλου. Ναι, ναι της πρώτης Ελληνίδας διηγηματογράφου, που την αγαπώ πολύ και που παρ' όλο που έζησε λίγους μήνες στη Θεσσαλονίκη, εγώ την έχω συνδέσει με την αγαπημένη μου πόλη. Το βιβλίο που έχω γράψει για τη Θεσσαλονίκη ξεκίνησε από ένα μικρό κείμενό της.

Αλεξάνδρα Παπαδοπούλου

Στην μοναδική φωτογραφία της που σώζεται, η Αλεξάνδρα Παπαδοπούλου φοράει μια καρφίτσα ίδια, ολόιδια με το δώρο της γιαγιάς. Τυχαίο;

Ο Λευκάδιος Χερν και η Ιαπωνία που γνώρισα μέσα από τα γραπτά του μ' έφεραν μπροστά στο ιτσιμοντζιγκινού. Στο χρυσάνθεμο που είναι το σύμβολο του αυτοκράτορα. Συνδέθηκε με την αυτοκρατορική οικογένεια εξ αιτίας της ομοιότητάς του με τον ήλιο.

Xρυσάνθεμο Iαπωνία

Στην ιαπωνική μυθολογία η θεά του ήλιου, η Αματεράσου, έφερε στον κόσμο τον Τζιμμού, τον πρώτο αυτοκράτορα της Ιαπωνίας. Το αυτοκρατορικό έμβλημα παρουσιάζει ένα χρυσό χρυσάνθεμο με δεκαέξι πέταλα, γνωστό ως ιτσιμοντζιγκινού.

Τζιμμού, ο πρώτος αυτοκράτορας της Ιαπωνίας

Το χρυσάνθεμο, που μοιάζει με τον ήλιο που τόσο λαμπερός φαίνεται πίσω από τον Τζιμμού, βρήκα πως είναι ένα παγκόσμιο σύμβολο. Ιάπωνες, Ασσσύριοι, Σουμέριοι, Αιγύπτιοι ως το Μεξικό είχαν συγκινηθεί από αυτό το σύμβολο.
Το ίδιο και οι αρχαίοι Έλληνες. Από το παλάτι του Μίνωα στην Κνωσσό μέχρι τον τάφο του Φιλίππου συναντάμε αυτόν τον συνδυασμό του παντοδύναμου ήλιου με το λουλούδι σε πλήρη άνθιση αποτυπωμένο σε τοιχογραφίες, αγγεία, λάρνακες, αγάλματα.

Ψάχνοντας χτες το βράδυ τα χαρτιά μου σύνδεσα όλες αυτές τις πληροφορίες κι έκανα συνειρμούς που δεν είχα κάνει πρωτύτερα. Η καρφίτσα της γιαγιάς και της Αλεξάνδρας Παπαδοπούλου, το λαμπερό σύμβολο της χώρας του Ανατέλλοντος Ήλιου και της Αρχαίας Ελλάδας από την Κρήτη μέχρι τη Μακεδονία... και όχι μόνο.

Το σήμα της σειράς των έργων του Λευκάδιου Χερν σε μετάφραση Τέτης Σώλου

Είναι ταιριαστό να συνοδεύει τη σειρά των έργων του Λευκάδιου Χερν, του οικουμενικού ανθρώπου με το ανοιχτό μυαλό, ένα οικουμενικό σύμβολο πνευματικής δύναμης και ακμής. Ο ίδιος ο Λευκάδιος δεν γνώρισε παρακμή. Ο θάνατος τον βρήκε στα 54 χρόνια του έχοντας αφήσει σπουδαίο συγγραφικό έργο κι έχοντας ενδεχομένως άλλα τόσα να γράψει.

Το εξώφυλλο του Κοττό

History > Documents

submitted by Lafcadio Hearn Files on 15.03.2014

Jimmu, the first Emperor of Japan. Part of the story about

translating 3 books by Lafcadio Hearn into English

[This is the first time in history that entire Lafacdio Hearn books have been translated, with a view to having them printed and published]

Μεταφράζοντας τον Λευκάδιο Χερν στα ελληνικά ギリシャ語訳ラフカディオ・ハーン

Τέτη Σώλου: Οι μεταφράσεις μου των έργων του Λευκάδιου Χερν και οι σημειώσεις μου σχετικά με το έργο και τη ζωή του.

Η ιστορία ενός συμβόλου


Πριν από πολλά χρόνια η Άννα μου είχε χαρίσει ένα κόσμημά της. Μια καρφίτσα από αλπακά. Η αξία του κοσμήματος είναι μικρή. Η «από διαθέσεως αξία», που λένε τα νομικά βιβλία είναι μεγάλη, μια και το δώρο είναι από τη γιαγιά μου που κι εκείνης της το είχε δώσει η προγιαγιά μου. Οικογενειακό κειμήλιο μ' άλλα λόγια.

H καρφίτσα της γιαγιάς. Xρυσάνθεμο Kαρφίτσα

Η συναισθηματική του αξία έγινε ακόμα πιο μεγάλη, όταν συνάντησα την ίδια καρφίτσα σε μια παλιά φωτογραφία της Αλεξάνδρας Παπαδοπούλου. Ναι, ναι της πρώτης Ελληνίδας διηγηματογράφου, που την αγαπώ πολύ και που παρ' όλο που έζησε λίγους μήνες στη Θεσσαλονίκη, εγώ την έχω συνδέσει με την αγαπημένη μου πόλη. Το βιβλίο που έχω γράψει για τη Θεσσαλονίκη ξεκίνησε από ένα μικρό κείμενό της.

Αλεξάνδρα Παπαδοπούλου

Στην μοναδική φωτογραφία της που σώζεται, η Αλεξάνδρα Παπαδοπούλου φοράει μια καρφίτσα ίδια, ολόιδια με το δώρο της γιαγιάς. Τυχαίο;

Ο Λευκάδιος Χερν και η Ιαπωνία που γνώρισα μέσα από τα γραπτά του μ' έφεραν μπροστά στο ιτσιμοντζιγκινού. Στο χρυσάνθεμο που είναι το σύμβολο του αυτοκράτορα. Συνδέθηκε με την αυτοκρατορική οικογένεια εξ αιτίας της ομοιότητάς του με τον ήλιο.

Xρυσάνθεμο Iαπωνία

Στην ιαπωνική μυθολογία η θεά του ήλιου, η Αματεράσου, έφερε στον κόσμο τον Τζιμμού, τον πρώτο αυτοκράτορα της Ιαπωνίας. Το αυτοκρατορικό έμβλημα παρουσιάζει ένα χρυσό χρυσάνθεμο με δεκαέξι πέταλα, γνωστό ως ιτσιμοντζιγκινού.

Τζιμμού, ο πρώτος αυτοκράτορας της Ιαπωνίας

Το χρυσάνθεμο, που μοιάζει με τον ήλιο που τόσο λαμπερός φαίνεται πίσω από τον Τζιμμού, βρήκα πως είναι ένα παγκόσμιο σύμβολο. Ιάπωνες, Ασσσύριοι, Σουμέριοι, Αιγύπτιοι ως το Μεξικό είχαν συγκινηθεί από αυτό το σύμβολο.
Το ίδιο και οι αρχαίοι Έλληνες. Από το παλάτι του Μίνωα στην Κνωσσό μέχρι τον τάφο του Φιλίππου συναντάμε αυτόν τον συνδυασμό του παντοδύναμου ήλιου με το λουλούδι σε πλήρη άνθιση αποτυπωμένο σε τοιχογραφίες, αγγεία, λάρνακες, αγάλματα.

Ψάχνοντας χτες το βράδυ τα χαρτιά μου σύνδεσα όλες αυτές τις πληροφορίες κι έκανα συνειρμούς που δεν είχα κάνει πρωτύτερα. Η καρφίτσα της γιαγιάς και της Αλεξάνδρας Παπαδοπούλου, το λαμπερό σύμβολο της χώρας του Ανατέλλοντος Ήλιου και της Αρχαίας Ελλάδας από την Κρήτη μέχρι τη Μακεδονία... και όχι μόνο.

Το σήμα της σειράς των έργων του Λευκάδιου Χερν σε μετάφραση Τέτης Σώλου

Είναι ταιριαστό να συνοδεύει τη σειρά των έργων του Λευκάδιου Χερν, του οικουμενικού ανθρώπου με το ανοιχτό μυαλό, ένα οικουμενικό σύμβολο πνευματικής δύναμης και ακμής. Ο ίδιος ο Λευκάδιος δεν γνώρισε παρακμή. Ο θάνατος τον βρήκε στα 54 χρόνια του έχοντας αφήσει σπουδαίο συγγραφικό έργο κι έχοντας ενδεχομένως άλλα τόσα να γράψει.

Το εξώφυλλο του Κοττό

History > Documents

submitted by Lafcadio Hearn Files on 15.03.2014

The sun symbol of Japan. Part of the story about.....

Translating 3 books by Lafacdio Hearn into Greek.

[This is the first time in history that entire Lafacdio Hearn books have been translated, with a view to having them printed and published]

Μεταφράζοντας τον Λευκάδιο Χερν στα ελληνικά ギリシャ語訳ラフカディオ・ハーン

Τέτη Σώλου: Οι μεταφράσεις μου των έργων του Λευκάδιου Χερν και οι σημειώσεις μου σχετικά με το έργο και τη ζωή του.

Η ιστορία ενός συμβόλου


Πριν από πολλά χρόνια η Άννα μου είχε χαρίσει ένα κόσμημά της. Μια καρφίτσα από αλπακά. Η αξία του κοσμήματος είναι μικρή. Η «από διαθέσεως αξία», που λένε τα νομικά βιβλία είναι μεγάλη, μια και το δώρο είναι από τη γιαγιά μου που κι εκείνης της το είχε δώσει η προγιαγιά μου. Οικογενειακό κειμήλιο μ' άλλα λόγια.

H καρφίτσα της γιαγιάς. Xρυσάνθεμο Kαρφίτσα

Η συναισθηματική του αξία έγινε ακόμα πιο μεγάλη, όταν συνάντησα την ίδια καρφίτσα σε μια παλιά φωτογραφία της Αλεξάνδρας Παπαδοπούλου. Ναι, ναι της πρώτης Ελληνίδας διηγηματογράφου, που την αγαπώ πολύ και που παρ' όλο που έζησε λίγους μήνες στη Θεσσαλονίκη, εγώ την έχω συνδέσει με την αγαπημένη μου πόλη. Το βιβλίο που έχω γράψει για τη Θεσσαλονίκη ξεκίνησε από ένα μικρό κείμενό της.

Αλεξάνδρα Παπαδοπούλου

Στην μοναδική φωτογραφία της που σώζεται, η Αλεξάνδρα Παπαδοπούλου φοράει μια καρφίτσα ίδια, ολόιδια με το δώρο της γιαγιάς. Τυχαίο;

Ο Λευκάδιος Χερν και η Ιαπωνία που γνώρισα μέσα από τα γραπτά του μ' έφεραν μπροστά στο ιτσιμοντζιγκινού. Στο χρυσάνθεμο που είναι το σύμβολο του αυτοκράτορα. Συνδέθηκε με την αυτοκρατορική οικογένεια εξ αιτίας της ομοιότητάς του με τον ήλιο.

Xρυσάνθεμο Iαπωνία

Στην ιαπωνική μυθολογία η θεά του ήλιου, η Αματεράσου, έφερε στον κόσμο τον Τζιμμού, τον πρώτο αυτοκράτορα της Ιαπωνίας. Το αυτοκρατορικό έμβλημα παρουσιάζει ένα χρυσό χρυσάνθεμο με δεκαέξι πέταλα, γνωστό ως ιτσιμοντζιγκινού.

Τζιμμού, ο πρώτος αυτοκράτορας της Ιαπωνίας

Το χρυσάνθεμο, που μοιάζει με τον ήλιο που τόσο λαμπερός φαίνεται πίσω από τον Τζιμμού, βρήκα πως είναι ένα παγκόσμιο σύμβολο. Ιάπωνες, Ασσσύριοι, Σουμέριοι, Αιγύπτιοι ως το Μεξικό είχαν συγκινηθεί από αυτό το σύμβολο.
Το ίδιο και οι αρχαίοι Έλληνες. Από το παλάτι του Μίνωα στην Κνωσσό μέχρι τον τάφο του Φιλίππου συναντάμε αυτόν τον συνδυασμό του παντοδύναμου ήλιου με το λουλούδι σε πλήρη άνθιση αποτυπωμένο σε τοιχογραφίες, αγγεία, λάρνακες, αγάλματα.

Ψάχνοντας χτες το βράδυ τα χαρτιά μου σύνδεσα όλες αυτές τις πληροφορίες κι έκανα συνειρμούς που δεν είχα κάνει πρωτύτερα. Η καρφίτσα της γιαγιάς και της Αλεξάνδρας Παπαδοπούλου, το λαμπερό σύμβολο της χώρας του Ανατέλλοντος Ήλιου και της Αρχαίας Ελλάδας από την Κρήτη μέχρι τη Μακεδονία... και όχι μόνο.

Το σήμα της σειράς των έργων του Λευκάδιου Χερν σε μετάφραση Τέτης Σώλου

Είναι ταιριαστό να συνοδεύει τη σειρά των έργων του Λευκάδιου Χερν, του οικουμενικού ανθρώπου με το ανοιχτό μυαλό, ένα οικουμενικό σύμβολο πνευματικής δύναμης και ακμής. Ο ίδιος ο Λευκάδιος δεν γνώρισε παρακμή. Ο θάνατος τον βρήκε στα 54 χρόνια του έχοντας αφήσει σπουδαίο συγγραφικό έργο κι έχοντας ενδεχομένως άλλα τόσα να γράψει.

Το εξώφυλλο του Κοττό

History > Documents

submitted by James Victor Prineas on 04.02.2014

Stamps from the Occupation

This set of 6 stamps were first issued in Greece, in 1937. Kythera, one of the Ionian islands was occupied in 1941 , by Italy and Germany (The AXIS) The local Greek stamps, were overprinted with the words' CERIGO Occupazione Militare Italiana', These six stamps have been back-stamped on the reverse with the 'Fasces' an axe and bundled sticks, which was the symbol of the Fascists.They are un-mounted mint. They are 5, 10, 20, 40, 50, and 80 Lepta.

History > Documents

submitted by The House Of Stone on 23.01.2014

The signge for The House of Stone

Karvounades, Kythera.

Central road, on the left comming from Hora.

(On the site of the old Sempreviva Taverna.)

6936641422

2736033069

Email The House of Stone, Kythera, Greece

Destan Kataro

History > Documents

submitted by Stephen Trifyllis on 08.03.2014

`TICKET TO RIDE `

a truly remarkable find , my father Theodore Trifyllis from trifyllianika his one way ticket to Sydney, Australia via port said and Fremantle in 1938...my father was just 14 years of age when he left , now 90 years of age , one lovely story he tells is that he was waving to kythera with a hanky in his hand as the island disappeared from view around kavo maila while his parents stood on the sacred mollo at agia pelagia .... a wonderful and sad story , he returned to kythera 20 years later to visit again his parents and built them a brand new little house in the late 1950`s in trifyllianika. and as of this year I have just finished with great pride and honour the renovations of my grandparents house... my father now 90 and unfortunately heavy with dementia , and a past memory that has now virtually dimmed ... I so much miss his wonderful wonderful stories of the island when he was a young boy, I thank him so much for all those memories that made me fall in love with the island from a young age growing up in Toowoomba Queensland ...I think the first words I ever spoke was the word KYTHERA ... thanks'' babba '' for your superb memories , yarns , stories, I will never forget them, of a truly lovely magnificent place ...which means so much to a lot of other people ... god bless you Theo ... FOOT NOTE ... its about time we give serious consideration if allowed to erect a statue on the mollo [ jetty ] at agia pelagia in a mark of respect and to honour those thousands of sons, daughters, families that left for Australia, America from that jetty , that is the jetty of tears as all those people left from that jetty and in some cases never returned to the island again , for goodness sake the support shown to other areas of past kytherian history from picture theatre's windmills, books of the island etc.. pales into insignificance to the sad sorrow that happened through out the last 100 years... for future generation's to remember and reflect the immense migration from kythera to foreign countries and to a uncertain future... so come on all you so called kythera lovers ... LETS GET THIS HAPPENING ..!!

History > Documents

submitted by Bill P Cassimatis on 17.12.2013

From the Funeral card of Peter (Paul) Alex Cassimatis

View / download a copy of the Funeral card here:

Paul Cassimatis Funeral Card.pdf

Born in Karavas, Kythera, Greece on 16th February 1935 to Alexandros and Maria Cassimatis.

In 1949 Peter migrated to Australia. He was 14 years old when he arrived; He started work at Warren in a café.

At age 24 he married Helen Sophios in Sydney. Peter and Helen were blessed with three children, Alex, John and Bill.
Sadly Helen passed away in 1971.

At age 48 Peter married Beryl Coroneos (Palmer) in Brisbane.

Peter lovingly welcomed two daughters-in-law, Voula and Martine.
Peter also celebrated the arrival of six grandchildren, Paul, Ellen, Maree,
Lauren, Peter and Olivia.

Peter sadly passed away on Monday 25th November 2013.

Aged 78

May his memory be eternal.

Peter (Paul) Alex Cassimatis

Never stopped working for his family; a true father, grandfather and
friend to many and loved by all.

In God’s care you rest with above
In our hearts you rest with love
Memories of you are ours to keep
Our words are few but our love is deep.


Details of the Funeral

Thursday 28th November 2013

Officiating
Father Chris Vergas

St Raphael, Nicholas and Irene Greek Orthodox Church
Forbes Street
Liverpool

Commencing at 10.30am

Following the Service the committal will take place at Liverpool Cemetery

Please join us for refreshments at
The Church Hall
Forbes Street
Liverpool

The family of the Late Peter (Paul) Alex Cassimatis sincerely appreciate and thank you for your comforting support and expressions of sympathy.

History > Documents

submitted by I Viaggiatori on 16.12.2013

Section from the DVD cover of the film Dall' Italia All' Australia

The film Dall' Italia All' Australia with music by I Viaggiatori is now available on DVD!

The DVD includes the film, music from the recording Suitcase Serenata, the original passenger lists, an introduction by Tony De Bolfo and other background information and images.

Click here to order the DVD, and other products from the I Viaggiatori Store

Click here to view / download a copy of the Melbourne Passenger List

Click here to view / download a copy of the Sydney Passenger List

Click here to view / download a copy of the Brisbane Passenger List

The Film, Dall 'Italia All' Australia

In 1924, the Italian film director Angelo Drovetti embarked on an epic 8,000-nautical-mile voyage with his movie camera. The result, Dall’Italia All’Australia (From Italy to Australia), is regarded by many as the most comprehensive film ever made of a migrant voyage. ‘Dall’Italia All’Australia’ chronicles the voyage of the Regina d’Italia (Queen of Italy) - one of three passenger ships first built for the Lloyd Sabaudo Line at the turn of last century.

The film showcases the panoramic views witnessed by Italian, Yugoslav, Greek, Arabic and Jewish migrants as they stood atop the deck of the old steamer during their seven-week world odyssey from Genoa to Australia, by way of Egypt & Sri Lanka, arriving in September 1924.

The result, Dall'Italia All'Australia (From Italy to Australia), is regarded by many as the most comprehensive film ever made of a migrant voyage.

‘Dall’Italia All’Australia’ chronicles the voyage of the Regina d’Italia (Queen of Italy) - one of three passenger ships first built for the Lloyd Sabaudo Line at the turn of last century.

Dall’Italia All’Australia, of 60 minutes duration first screened in Italy in May 1925. The film chronicles the voyage of the passenger steam ship Regina d’Italia (Queen of Italy) – one of the three ships first built for the Lloyd Sabaudo Shipping Line at the turn of the century.

Author Anthony De Bolfo, who discovered the film, introduces and commentates on the film, with Italian folk music by acclaimed musicians Kavisha Mazzella (singer, guitar, accordion) and Irini Vela (bouzouki, mandolin, guitar) and the Viaggiatori - David De Santi (accordion) and Mark Holder-Keeping (saxophone, clarinet).

About the Performance

The film is black and white and in DVD format.

It has Italian intertitles. A programe booklet is available with English translation of the intertitles.

The film is 60 minutes in duration.

The film is usually presented in 2 parts with an intermission of 15 minutes.

The musicians are positioned in front of the film screen and to one side and perform live Italian folk tunes and songs while the film is showing.

Kavisha has selected arranged the music and tunes to work in with the film images.

The Band, I Viaggiatori

Kavisha Mazzella (singer, guitar, accordion, percussion)
Irine Vela (bouzouki, guitar, mandolin)
David De Santi (piano accordion)
Mark Holder-Keeping (saxophone, clarinet).

I Viaggiatori is a truly multicultural and cosmopolitan combination with Kavisha Mazzella and Irine Vela from Melbourne and Mark Holder-Keeping and David De Santi from Wollongong. They bring together varying musical experiences but combine to present sensitive and harmonious renditions of new and old Italian folk songs. Kavisha grew up in the Italian quarter of Fremantle while David grew up in the Illawarra! They present music they performed for the silent Italian documentary Dall’ Italia All’ Australia.

Previous major performances

2013 The Factory Theatre Marrickville
2013 Illawarra Music Festival Concert, City Diggers Wollongong
2012 Australian Worldwide Music Expo, Melbourne
2012 Piers Festival, South Melbourne
2011 Global Carnival Bellingen
2010 Port Fairy Folk Festival (film and music)
2010 Yungaburra Folk Festival, Qld (film and music)
2010 and 2007 National Folk Festival, Canberra (film and music)
2010 and 2008 Brunswick Music Festival (film and music)
2009 Fremantle Town Hall (film and music)
2009 Adelaide’s Hellenic Cultural Festival ODYSSEY (film and music)
2009 Greek Festival of Sydney (film and music)
2009 Illawarra Folk Festival (film and music)
2008 Italian Week in Wollongong, Bowral, Milton (film and music)
National Maritime Museum, 2008, 2009 (film and music)
Chauvel Cinema, Sydney 2009 (film and music)

History > Documents

submitted by Kytherian World Heritage Fund on 05.12.2013

Kristina Williamson's book, in the process of being created

Author: Kristina Williamson

When Published: 2013

Edition: 1st English/Greek Edition, 2013

Publisher: Kytherian World Heritage Fund

Available: Available from the Kytherian World Heritage Fund, and the Kytherian Association in Australia.

George C. Poulos: 02 93888320

Email George Poulos

Email Angelo Notaras

Order more of the 30+ books from the KWHF catalogue by downloading the Order Form, here:

/download/Book_Order_Form.pdf

Kytherian Association of Australia, Book Orders

or Email Administration, Kytherian Association of Australia

In early 2014 will be available in the United States of America, and on Kythera. Contact Kristina Williamson, by email</a> or <a href="mailto:stathatos@arkiotis.com">John Stathatos, by email.

Keep up-to-date with events surrounding the book by visiting, http://1yearonkythera.blogspot.com.au/

Description:
Photographs by Kristina Williamson.
Book design by Lean Koransky and Anthony Scerri
Foreword translated by John Stathatos
All other translations by Despina Christodoulou

ISBN: 978-0-9872473-1-5

“Few young artists have the depth of artistic vision that informs Ms. Williamson’s photography. Her images are complex and sophisticated psychological essays. Her photographic record of island life and society is a study crucial to its history and serves as comparison in determining both the changes and the survival of the island’s social and geographic landscapes.”

Artemis Zenetou, Executive Director, Fulbright Foundation - Greece

The Story


One Year on Kythera is a photographic documentary of the Greek island of Kythera, its inhabitants and its culture. With the help of a J. William Fulbright grant, I was able to spend over one calendar year living and photographing on this beautiful island.

Over the years, Kythera has suffered from massive waves of emigration of its people abroad to the point of near depopulation. These mass migrations caused the population of Kythera to drop from about 13,000 at the beginning of the twentieth century to a current mid-winter population of 2,500, leaving entire villages stripped of younger generations and some completely abandoned. To the remaining Kytherians, these deserted homes and communities stand as visual reminders of a society once unified by tradition now transformed by ambitions of a different life abroad.

One Year on Kythera is a contemporary look into the lives of those who have chosen to remain on the island: what ways they maintain a traditional way of life and in what ways their lifestyles are changing.

I would like to extend my most sincere thanks to the people of Kythera who warmly accepted me into their community, lives, and homes, and to the J. William Fulbright Foundation, whose generous grant made this project possible.

Books and photo prints will be available for purchase via this website and other fine retailers in January 2014. Please sign up for our mailing list to stay up to date with the tour.

Kristina Williamson. Biography

KRISTINA WILLIAMSON is an American artist born in Pen Argyl, Pennsylvania in 1980. In 2003, Williamson graduated from Parsons School of Design in New York with a BFA in photography and in 2004 was awarded a Fulbright grant to photograph life on the Greek island of Kythera. Her work has been showcased in solo exhibitions in Greece, New York, and Washington D.C., as well as various group exhibitions in the U.S. and abroad. Williamson currently lives and works in Brooklyn, New York.

www.kristinawilliamson.com

May I photograph you?

I remember the first time I asked this question. It was in Perlegkianika, a village near where I was living on the Greek island of Kythera. I was walking through on my way home when I saw an old man and woman sitting together by a grey stone wall. They were both wearing similar blue-grey outfits and sitting there so peacefully that they seemed almost a part of the wall itself. I asked if I could photograph them. They nodded. The woman was Stavroula; we were to meet many times after that first encounter, and I photographed her often. Each time I passed through the village she would come out of her house and either take me for a walk to show me something or invite me in to offer some eggs or tomatoes.

Another remarkable woman I met in Perlegkianika was Theochari, of the Blue Garage photograph on the cover of this book. When we first met, I understood only a few words of Greek, but she did not seem to mind. She would invite me into her home, make me lunch, and show me photographs of her family. We somehow arranged that I should drive her to the nearby market on Sundays to sell vegetables from her garden. Seated together on a bench in the square, she gave me a running commentary—of which I understood only fragments—on the goings-on and passersby. At day’s end, we’d pack up and I would be sent home with all the remaining vegetables.

I came to Kythera because I wanted to tell the story of life on the island. Over the years, hope for better opportunities drove many Kytherians to emigrate, leaving behind a dwindling population. I was interested in those who chose to remain on Kythera, and the intermingling of traditional and contemporary cultures reflected in their daily activities, homes, possessions, and surrounding environments.

Inevitably, I would also be telling a story about my experiences on the island. I remember being worried at first. What if I can’t do this project? I had made the decision to come and photograph life on this island, but what if the people concerned did not want to be photographed? I soon discovered that the Kytherians were in fact far more interested in hearing my own story and finding out what brought me to their island. They barely noticed I was shooting in between questions: “What village are you from? What are you doing here? You are not Greek? Why Kythera? Are you married? You are here alone? Will you stay for dinner? You will stay for dinner.”

Although it was my first time in Greece, I remember how strangely familiar the island seemed to me. Certainly Kythera was a big contrast to my life in New York, but it was not all that different from the small town in Pennsylvania where I grew up. Although I did not recognize faces right away, I was recognizing characters which were instantly familiar, perhaps because they reminded me of people from my hometown. Michalis from the gas station near Potamos (who repaired my tires at least once every couple of weeks) shared a disposition with Johnny, my hometown cobbler.

I spent countless hours with Kytherians of every age and degree. That they often spoke few words of English and that my Greek lacked fluency seemed largely inconsequential at the time. I found that, by way of our mutual intrigue and curiosity, I had unwittingly become a part of their community. Such exchanges of interest, generosity, and affection allowed me to indeed capture daily life on the island. Through this work, I had wanted to share the island’s story in photographs, but the Kytherians had larger plans, accepting me warmly into their community, lives, and homes.

Everyone I met on Kythera assured me that I would remain forever: I would be one of those who came to the island on holiday and never left. In a way, they were right. Though I no longer live on Kythera, I still retain a deep love for the island and continue to return. On Kythera, time moves more slowly. There is time to be with friends and family. Time to dance. Time to witness the drama of the tides rolling in, the clouds rolling out, and the intensity of summer reverberating off white-washed walls. These images of an island and its inhabitants are a celebration of a place which changed me and which is itself, however slowly but inevitably, subject to change.

From the National Herald

Fulbright Best and Brightest from the Arts, Science, Research, Law

WILLIAMSON, KRISTINA
Photographer
(Fulbright in 2004/2005, from U.S.)


“I arrived on the Greek island of Kythera in August 2004, a 24-year old American photographer not knowing a single person and not speaking Greek,” writes Brooklyn based Williamson in her statement of purpose about her Fulbright experience.

The Pennsylvania-born Fine Arts graduate of Parsons School of Design embarked on a life-changing experience in Kythera, focusing on the islanders who had remained after the mass immigration exodus from the island in past years – as well as on new arrivals. Her eye and lens captured a lot in her time there – which ultimately was a year and a half.

Kythera Photographic Encounters

Founder/photographer John Stathatos notes that she retained an outsider observer’s perspective, lauding her work with all of Kythera’s inhabitants: “...she was easily accepted by these groups and hence able to record, with discretion but also considerable empathy, both private and public moments of their lives.” Otherworldly color and texture is captured - whether in moody water/landscapes, still portraits of people’s backs or frank fronts (as that of a woman with a stuffed Tweetie bird which hung in her stark bedroom), community action shots (such as an Annunciation Day cross dive) – with both familiar, lived-in elderly bodies and unpredictable children’s gestures alike.

Williamson’s time on the island resulted in solo exhibitions in Kythera, The Greek Consulate in New York, as well as the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in DC. The One Year in Kythera images can be found on her website www.kristinawilliamson.com.

She went on to take part in group exhibits in New York, Miami, Hollywood (CA) as well as a solo exhibit at the Brooklyn’s Insest Gallery. She received the Jeunes Talents 2009 award, where emerging U.S. photographers photograph France.

History > Documents

submitted by Kythera Library on 21.11.2013

Poster of the Kytherian Municipal Library

These posters advertise, throughout the island, one of the most significant cultural achievement's in the island of Kythera's history.

Kytherian Municipal Library

The kythera-family.net, Main Page

See also, www.facebook.com/KytheraLibrary.

This facebook site is devoted to the new public library in the village of Kontolianika, which amongst other services is running a paperback exchange scheme. The library is staffed by volunteers. Opening times are: 6-8 pm except for Sundays & Tuesdays, and 10.00-3.00 pm Saturdays.

DONATIONS to the Kytherian Municipal Library

The Kytherian Municipal Library requires ongoing financial assistance, in order to continue to provide the high level of service that it has instigated over the past few years.

If you wish to donate to this extrordinary Kytherian public resource, you can deposit funds directly into:

National Bank of Greece
ΠΟΛΙΤΙΣΤΙΚΗ ΕΤΑΙΡΕΙΑ ΚΥΘΗΡΩΝ
GR28 0110 3800 0000 3802 9603 891
Swift - Bic: ETHNGRAA

In Australia, contact George Poulos.
George Poulos, email
Or, phone, Sydney, (02) 93888320

In America, contact Vikki Vrettos Fraioli, Corresponding Secretary of the Kytherian Society of California (KSOCA):
Vikki Vrettos Fraioli, email

Where is the Library located?

The Kytherian Municipal Library

The Kytherian Municipal Library. The sunshine version .

The Municipal Library of Kythera is located just off the central road through Kythera. If you take the Ayios Ilias turn off, it is the first building you see on your right hand side.

Ayios Elias turnoff to the Kytherian Municipal Library

The Library is located near the centre of the island. In the map provided, it's exact position is the dot "i" in the word Kondelianika - just a little below where the bottom edge of the letter "L" spells "Lib" for "Library, in blue.

Location of the Municipal Library of Kythera

To gain a clearer picture download a .pdf of the map here:

MAP Location of Municipal Library of Kythera Lib.pdf

Interior of the Library

The main room in the Kytherian Muncipal Library

The main library room is spacious, and houses many significant books. The shelving continues around all walls in the main room. The shelving depicted was provided by Kytherians from California. The full story of how Cynthia Cavalenes helped organise a container of shelving to be delivered from the Alhambra Municipality to Kythera is related below in this entry.

The Childrens Library is the first narrow room to the left as you enter the Kytherian Municipal Library

The Childrens Library is the first narrow room to the left as you enter the Kytherian Municipal Library.

It contains many of the books that formed the Children's Library at Livathi, which had to unfortunately close down. This childrens library has been resurrected within the Kytherian Municipal Library. Children borrow books form this library consistently. They also attend in sizable school groups and undertake various activities. In this photograph the library has been set up for "chess classes"..

The Archive and storage room of the Kytherian Municpal Library. It lies on the left hand side as you first enter the Library. (Opposite the Children's Library). In October 2013 a door was placed in this room. The room also contains a steel shelving unit, to house more valuable books, files and archives. In October 2013 the precious Koksma archive was placed there.

A storage room (apothiki) has been constructed on the eastern (Ayios Elias) side of the Library. It has a sloping roof down to the exterior fence wall. This is the view from the exterior of the storage room.

This is the entry and passageway into the large storage room in the Kytherian Municipal Library. It opens up into a much larger space in the farthest / northern part of the room.

The storage room is quite spacious. It is a very necessary area of the building, as more and more persons are donating books to the Library.

Well appointed toilets have been constructed next to the large storage room. One of them caters to diabled persons. An wheelchair access ramp to the tiolets was built during the August 2013 renovation of the building.

Donated books awaiting cataloguing. Now that the Library has been established to a very high standard, Kytherians and Athenians are donating superior books in large quantities. It is anticipated that this trend will continue.

Refurbishment and transformation of the Library. August 2013

The transformation was undertaken with the generous assitance of the Nicholas Anthony Aroney Trust, and the Kytherian Association of Australia, (KAA) both located in Sydney, Australia, and the Kytherian Society of California (KSOCA), based in Los Angeles, USA.

New marble signs, written in both Greek and English announce the opening of the Kytherian Municipal Library

New marble signs, written in both Greek and English announce the opening of the Kytherian Municipal Library in 2012. Note the freshly painted walls. Painting was undertaken in the summer of 2013.

The courtyard of the Municipal Library in 2011-June 2013, in need of refurbishment

The courtyard as it existed 2011- April 2013, was grossly inadequate. It discouraged persons attending the Library at all.

Superb end product following the refurbishment of the rear courtyard of the Kytherian Municipal Library

The courtyard after the refurbishment of August 2013. This is the view from the rear door to the archway on the eastern wall. The condition of the courtyard now is a great improvement to the state of the courtyard as it existed in the years leading up to mid-2013.

Looking over the beautifully constructed eastern wall into the courtyard

View of the courtyard facing the township of Ayios Elias. The pergola has been constructed on the northern wall.

Pergola against the northern wall in the courtyard of the Kytherian Municipal Library

The pergola on the northern wall of the courtyard. This has been equipped with electrical power and lighting, and can now be used for evening cultural events and performances.

The indefatigable volunteers

The opening of the Library has been a great source of pride for residents of the island, as well as those living in the Kytherian diaspora.

The Library functions because of the dedication of a number of volunteers. Two of the main "drivers" have been John Stathatos and Dimitris Koutrafouris.

John Stathatos (centre) introducing Professor and Mrs George Huxley to the library during the course of their 2013 visit to the island

Dimitris Koutrafouris is an extremely dedicated volunteer to the Kytherian Municipal Library

Dimitris Koutrafouris is very dedicated to the Library, and spends innumerable hours there. Here he is entering details about a book into the Central catalogue. Many persons are donating books to the Library in large quantities.

Other volunteers who work tirelessly include, Sara Scopsi-Tzanne, Yianna Karavokyri, Heleni Rousketou, and Fotini Yiamtsidou.

These volunteers are assisted by Maria Lourantou (teacher in Chora Primary School), Heleni Drivakou (teacher in Potamos Primary School), Maria Lepoura (chess teacher), Sofia Nezi and Alex Veneris.

Note that the volunteers conceive the function of Library to be much more than a mere lending library. In addition it will act as a research institution, and a centre of culture for the island of Kythera, fostering, art, theatre, poetry, photography, and audiovisual creativity, amongst other activities. The Library is also heavily integrated with the schools on the island, providing a venue for many school students activities, as can be evidenced by photographs that appear later in this entry. Above all the volunteers want the Library to be "zodino" (alive) - a place where multifarious activities occur on an on-going basis.

Summer 2013 building developments. How the renovations and transformation occurred.

It was decided in 2012, that the exterior of the Library needed a good makeover and landscaping.

Design for the courtyard of the Kythera Municipal Library

The design depicted was created pro bono by architect Elias Vassiliadis.

Download a .pdf of the landscaping plan here:

SXOLEIO KONTOLIANIKA.pdf

Architect Elias Vassiliadis, Engineer, Ioannis Skinna, George Poulos, and Building Supervisor, Refaat Khalil

Ioannis Skinna also offered his services for free. In addition to those in the photograph above, all stages of the work was supervised by Mayor Theothoris Koukoulis, and Deputy-Mayor, Michaelis Protopsaltis, John Stathatos, Director of the Kytherian Cultural Association, and Library Chairman, Dimitris Koutrafouris, manager of the National Bank of Greece, in Potamos.

Grammos re-building the piers for the pergola in the courtyard of the Kythera Municipal Library

Master tradesman Grammos had to rebuild the original columns for the pergola from the start.

Architect, Elias Vassiliadis, incorporated the inspired idea of incorporating a "bezoula" in the courtyard. Visitors to the courtyard automatically gravitate to the "bezoula" and inevitably sit on it. It will also be useful as extra sitting space for both day and nightime events which will be held in the Library's courtyard.

The "bezoula" (sitting bench) being built. The large construction team worked efficiently and quickly to refurbish the courtyard. .

The Library Committee decided to lay "coritzo" in the courtyard. The finish is aesthetically beautiful and will last a long time.

Laying the "coritzo'' tiles in the courtyard of the Kytherian Municipal Library

Laying the "coritzo'' tiles in the courtyard of the Kytherian Municipal Library 2

Laying the "coritzo'' tiles in the courtyard of the Kytherian Municipal Library 3

The old iron, rusty and dangerous ironwork on the southern wall (closest to camera) was removed, and a stone wall, in keeping with other walls around the exterior of the Library, constructed in it's place.

The ironwork wall as it existed (all the way along the Eastern wall), before the August 2013 renovation of Kytherian Municipal Library

The vegetation from the adjoining block, that had overgrown this wall was removed, at the same time as the iron fence top. One of the advantages of this action, was that the owner of the neighbouring, Panayotis Defterevos (Panayotis Rent A Car), upon seeing his property cleared and levelled out, very kindly offered the very sizable adjoining space as a car park, to cater for events that will be staged at the Library in the future.

Orestes performing the difficult task of affixing a gutter to the Kytherian Municipal Library

Orestes performing the difficult task of affixing a gutter to the Kytherian Municipal Library. The building had been constructed and maintained without a gutter to take water away from the walls. This would have caused inevitable dampness problems inside the building in due course.

Note that the paint work on the walls is of a very low standard. The entire Library was re-painted during August 2013, which enhanced the aesthetic and water-proofing capacity of the building immeasurably.

2012-2013

Dimitris Koutrafouris, Spokesman for the Library, and Manager of the National Bank of Greece, Hora, Kythera. Long term vision for the island, and a deep thank you to the volunteers


It is always a shame when a school is forced to close. But there is always a sense of triumph when a school, like the closed Primary School in Kontolianika, finds an “adaptive re-use”, and reopens. Over the month of May 2013, all the necessary preparations for the establishment and operation of a Public Library on Kythera were completed. After a long period of prevarication, a firm commitment was finally made to establish of a large public library in the centre of the island. That has been achieved as a result of persistent and optimistic efforts of various political and cultural entities on the island, as well as individuals associated with those entities. The Library, in addition to promoting the love of books will perform broader educational missions. This cultural coalition has effectively combined their efforts, powers, intentions, desires, skills and resources for the benefit of the island.

The Library had been administered from September 2012, by the municipal clerk Calliope Kasimati, from the Graduate School of Management of Cultural Resources at the University of Peloponnese. Her appointment was a temporary one. During her tenure she was assisted by an informal and ever-expanding group of volunteers. They arrived unsolicited and ‘magically” grew in number. Working together, these volunteers will ensure that the Library will stay open, irrespective of national and local economic developments, and municipal affairs.

The volunteer’s first task was to organise the seven thousand volumes which occupied the large, single classroom, as well as numerous forgotten books still packed away in boxes. These had come into the possession of the municipality from 14 November 2011, after the Children’s and Adolescent Library in Livadi closed down. They had been packed away properly, and have been rescued from the ravages of moisture, dust and rodents. The losses have been reduced to a minimum.

The volunteers have already completed the registration, sorting, restoration and classification of books. This has been achieved by “working overtime”, including performing extra work every Saturday. The work has been undertaken with big dreams, unexpected improvisations, and with the enthusiastic assistance of volunteers, teachers and children.

Children unpacking and enjoying the books

Other students in advanced countries with a rich educational and cultural heritage enjoy the privilege of libraries as a ‘given’, and a right. They benefit greatly as a result of having access to public libraries. We, in the circumstances that we find ourselves in, on our favourite little island, have had to struggle to achieve the same privileges. This need to build up the Library ‘from scratch’ has made us appreciate what we have achieved so much more. Working together we will find a way to turn previous shortcomings into creative power. It is not often that people are given the opportunity to become a pioneers, patrons and participants in the birth of such an exalted and beautiful institution.

Children undertake many activities at the Library

Children performing school work at the Library. Children undertake many activities here, that they would otherwise not be encouraged to perform.

Young Kytherians learning chess at the Library

Young Kytherians learning how to play chess, under the tutelage of Dimitris Koutrafouris.

Children enjoy playing with an Ipad in the Library

The Kytherian Association of Australia (KAA) donated six Ipads for Kytherian children to use in the Library.

It is not all play for the children. They also help to run and maintain the Library. Here children help to sort and stack books for the Children's Library.

Fall 2013

for the Group of Volunteers

The Municipal Library of Kythera

Dimitris Koutrafouris

See also, April 2013 Report by George C Poulos. George is an Honorary Member of the Friends of Kythera Library

Re-design of the Courtyard - 2012-2013

One of the "finishing touches" that needs to be completed is the re-design of the external (back) courtyard. Architect Elias Vassiliadis has very kindly drawn up - free of charge - a plan drawn for the library grounds. The cost estimate for the work is approximately 11,000 euro's. The Library Committee and overseas friends hope to secure the money, fairly quickly, so they can put this work out to tender.

The design is elegant. There will be two alternative specifications for the covered area at the back, (6), one calling for a lightweight wood and bamboo pergola, and the other for a more substantial tiled roof; this will require two alternative cost figures. One substantially higher than the other. In either case, the covered area will be open at the front and sides.

The curved wall (1) will be of roughly dressed stone with a smooth upper surface, 50 cm high, so as to provide extra seating. Between this low wall and the boundary wall will be an area for planting, as will be area (3) alongside the access path.

Area (2), under the pergola and in front of the steps leading up to the library, will be smooth concrete, probably with some stone and terracotta decorative elements. Likewise the approach path, (4).

The main area of the courtyard, (5) will be fine gravel over a base layer of coarse gravel. Not only is this a lot cheaper and more environmentally friendly than concreting everything, it also allows for natural drainage. If, instead, we were to concrete or seal the entire area, we would also have to provide for underground drainage. Insulated electrical outlets and water points will be provided along the perimeter wall.

The Library Committe, and overseas Friends have also asked for estimates for the provision of guttering for the main building, including buried drainage of the runoff.

2011

A Municipal Library. Considered critical infrastructure in most countries in the world.


The new municipal library is planned to open in Kondeleanika, Kythera. It is fully refurbished, and ready to be "fitted out" to fulfill its purpose - to become the first accessible lending library on the island of Kythera for 6,000 years.

The problem seems to be that Municipality of Kythera, has run out of money to equip it properly.

In Greece, Provinces (States) and the National government take no economic responsibility for local Libraries. This is a tragedy.

In 'western' countries such as Australia, America & Canada, and most countries in Europe, Asia, North & South America, all small communities and all small townships maintain a Local Lending Library. There is no town with a population of 3,300, the population of Kythera, that does not have a well established and equipped library, in place.

The citizens of a town of this size would not tolerate not having an operational Library. It would be considered unacceptable, and prejudicial to their children's future.

The Americans enter the campaign:

A group of Americans, under the leadership of Cynthia Cavalenes-Jarvis of Alhambra, California which is located in the western San Gabriel Valley region of Los Angeles County, California, were inspired by Kythera's Mayor, Theodore Koukoulis to provide shelving for the library. Cynthia, her two sisters (Candace Weiss and Toni Cavalenes) and her cousin (Kendra Rosner) met the Mayor in September 2008 while visiting in the Municipality of Kythera building. This meeting was arranged through George Poulos, Public Relations Officer of the Kytherian Association of Australia, and Trustee of the Kytherian World Heritage Fund. At that meeting Cynthia inquired what the needs of Kythera are and the Mayor responded "bookshelves" for the proposed library.

Cynthia organised the financing for the Bookshelves Project in the USA, and George Poulos, under the auspices of the Kytherian World Heritage Fund, organised funds in Australia. By May 2009, Cynthia could report "that we have come a long way in the fund raising. If everyone that committed funds comes through we have raised $6,460. That leaves us with a need for $1,540 more for shipping plus the cost of the container, $2,500. I have no doubt we will get there. We still have some fund raising events up our sleeves, but I haven't had time to work on them just yet".

By the end of the Bookshelves Project she could report with some pride: "This project certainly does qualify as "great." If it did not, we would not have had so many people and organizations supporting it. We have had eight organizations (and their members) including Soroptimist International of Alhambra-San Gabriel-San Marino, Rotary International of Alhambra, KAA, KSOC, KSNY, AHEPA, Daughters of Penelope of Santa Barbara, two companies (providing in-kind assistance) and over fifty individuals (including a film/television celebrity) who have donated to this cause. I think as a grass roots project, that speaks volumes."

Just days after returning from her first visit to Kythera, Cynthia found the inspiraation for this project. During the ribbon cutting ceremony for the City of Alhambra's new municipal library, she realized that the City (where she works) may no longer need the bookshelves that remained in the decommissioned old library and that there could be an oppotunity to obtain some of them for Kythera's proposed library of which Mayor Koukoulis had spoken.

Photographs of the shelving in situ in California

Although locating bookshelves and obtaining them may appear to be an easy task, the bureaucratic red tape involved in obtaining property belonging to a municipality can be quite daunting. In January 2009, Cynthia reported: "I just received a message from the Director of Public Works who states that used bookshelves do not have much value on the auction market and are only worth about $120 per ton for the recycled steel, minus the agents commission. The shelves will have to be declared surplus and of no significant value, at which time I will be able to obtain them for Kythera for the suggested price of $1 per shelf unit. I accepted that price without hesitation. It might only cost about $100 to purchase the shelves.

I have a tentative February 10th presentation date with the Rotary to see if they will assist in this project. Also, since I am a member of the Soroptimists of Alhambra-San Gabriel-San Marino, I might be able to convince them to help with the project. The shipping might cost about $10,000 and the soroptimists' help in fundraising will be invaluable. I'll know more after the presentations.

The City is anxious to mobilize removal of the shelves, so as I expected, I am under a tight timeframe to move them out of the old library."

Cynthia also faced numerous additional logistical challenges.
A. How to remove the shelving units from the old Alhambra Library, and where to store them?

In August 2009 Cynthia reported "We don't have the container yet. Half the shelves are stored indoors at a warehouse that belongs to a Rotarian and half are stored in my backyard (It's summer here so it's alright & they are covered). But they have to be moved before the rains come.

The City didn't want volunteers to dismantle the shelves in the City owned library building for liability reasons, so City staff moved them out of the library, but they cannot be stored on City property. It took a crew of six people a week to dismantle and bundle the components for the shelves. They transported them to Al's Towing in Alhambra where they are stored until we can shiip them.

It took a huge effort to get the shelves dismantled and into storage and it was very chaotic. I left someone else in charge who's concept differred from mine. Once I inventoried the equipment, I found that we didn't have the proper number and size of shelves to go with the respective frames so another work party was dispatched (2 more days) to go back into the old library to gather the pieces we were missing. The second batch was transported to my backyard. Another tricky piece of the puzzle - now that the shelves are out of the old library, City staff can't be used to load the container. A local church that has offered help from their youth group, but volunteer labor can be unpredictable and I am worried about the continuity of the project. Although many of the staff that have been working on this project might offer to volunteer to load the container, as the director of the department for which they work I can't allow that because it could be perceived as coercion from me. So the Soroptimists will provide a stipend to them (funded through the fundraising effort) for their work. One of the staff happens to also work for a shipping company. He has experience organizing the loading of containers. I have asked him (on behalf of the Soroptimists) to be the lead person in the task of loading of the container. So between the City staff who are familiar with the project and the volunteers from the church the container will be properly loaded.

I won't lie, it's been a difficult project. I've lost a lot of sleep over the whole thing. The nice thing is that all of these people really are dedicated to the project, so I know they will come through. I am trying to get the shelves shipped in the next couple of weeks, but I can't bring the container into the warehouse until we are ready to ship because of the inconvenience it will cause the warehouse owner. Now that I am telling the shipper I'm ready to move forward, I am getting frustrating information from them."

B. Will it be better to own the shipping container the shelves are to be sent in, or just use the one provided by the shipper?

One of Cynthia's contacts advised her that "most people don't own the container. I think there is more paperwork involved and it might be more work to pass through Customs. So I think shippers don't want to deal with that and try to discourage it."

Although there would be no additonal charge to use a container provided by the international shipping company, once the container arrived in Pireaus the load would have to moved to another container (at a cost to the project for the labor to do so) because the international shipper did not service Kythera and for liablity reasons could not allow their container to be loaded onto another vessel. The cost of shipping from Pireaus to Kythera would be $1,500 U.S. Once the container arrived on Kythera it would have to be immediately unloaded and returned to the vessel. Any additional time on the island would result in a rental charge for the container. The transport of the emplty container back to Pireaus would cost an additional $1,500 U.S. After extensive research, Cynthia located a "sea worthy" container with the appropriate inspection certificate at a cost of $2,500 U.S. Determining that the cost of transferring the load in Piraeus, potentially paying rent while the container was on Kythera and shipping the container back to Piraeus could be just as costly and possibly more costly, than purchasing the container outright, Cynthia decided purchasing the container was the better choice.

C. Can a free or inexpensive location be found to store the shelves until they could be shipped?

If storage space had to be rented it would prove costly. Ultimately space in a warehouse in Alhambra was donated by Rotarian, Al Pavone, owner of Al's Towing which had limited indoor space that could be used to store the shelves. This saved a tremendous amount of money since the shelves were in storage for approximately six months before they could be shipped. "We are finalizing our inventory to see what components we still need to get from the old library before we ship. We have been authorized to go back into the building and take whatever we still need. We are in really good shape. It looks like we have about 30-eight foot long wall sections, about 25-eight foot long free standing double sided sections, and 2-eight foot long display/counter units. The next hurdle will be weight. these bookshelves are steel. They are HEAVY!!! Hopefully we will be able to send the whole lot.

I can't tell you how many people have asked if they could go Kythera to help reassemble the bookshelves on the island. I told the staff that disassembled them that I'm sure they would be welcome, but they would have to fund their own way there. I'm attaching a photo of the crew with some of the dismantled shelves in the background.

Everyone is really excited about this project!"

Vikki Vrettos Fraioli posted an extended report on the Message Board, 31.05.2009.

The Shelving project was reported in the kythera-family Newsletter in June, 2009 , and July, 2009

John Stathatos acts as the Kytherian connection

John Stathatos is a great advocate for Hellenic and Kytherian culture on the island. He is the Director of the Kythera Cultural Association. John has been engaged in numerous cultural Projects, such as Photographic Encounters, and the restoration of the Fatseas collection of photographs, which were featured in a Benaki Museum exhibition.

He is a great advocate for the Municipal Library.
In October 2009, he wrote to Cindy and George advising / asking that:

1. You may add my name to any document. My address is Strapodi, Chora, Kythera 80100.
2. The container will be unloaded alongside or behind the new municipal library in Agios Elias, Kythera.
3. There is equipment on the island to unload the container. I will try to find out the cost, and can probably get it done for free, but I obviously need a few days to get the details.
4. Has Tina (Anoni) chosen a haulage company to carry the container from Piraeus to Kythera? If not, I might be able to get a discount rate from a local trucking company. Again, I would need till Monday or Tuesday to confirm this.
5. I saw the mayor today and brought him up to date.
6. Do we have even a very rough ballpark figure for arrival on Kythera?

On the 12th January, 2010, the shelving arrived on Kythera, and was unpacked on the same day, and packed away safely in the Library at Kontolianika.

John Stathatos announced:

"As it happened, the right crane to offload the whole container was out of commission. Fortunately work had finished on the inside of the library, which is nice and dry, so I got the municipality to provide some labour, and we got everything unloaded in a couple of hours.

Above, are couple of photos; we’ll take more when it comes time to assemble the shelves. (See below).

Congratulations on completing the final lap of your grand project!"

The Project was written up in the December 2009 issue of Kytheraismos newspaper

Cynthia sent an excited email to her many Shelving Project supporters:

"This is so coool! See article below regarding bookshelves project. It was run in the local Kytherian newspaper, Kytheraismos, and is posted on the kythera-family.net website. I know most of you cannot read it so once I get the translation, I'll send it along.

Gay (Kinman - a fellow Soroptimist)! you made the paper!!!! Aren't you glad you showed up that cold morning for the loading of the container?????

Organisations mentioned (that I can recognize - I don't speak or read Greek) - Alhambra, Soroptimist International, Rotary, Kythera Society of CA, Kythera Association of AU, Kythera Association of NY."

History > Documents

submitted by Kytherian World Heritage Fund on 09.11.2013

Kythera From the Air

Author: James Prineas

When Published: 2013

Publisher: Kytherian World Heritage Fund

Available: In Australia from the Kytherian World Heritage Fund & The Kytherian Association of Australia

George C. Poulos: 02 93888320

Email George Poulos

Email Angelo Notaras

Order more of the 30+ books from the KWHF catalogue by downloading the Order Form, here:

/download/Book_Order_Form.pdf

Kytherian Association of Australia, Book Orders

or Email Administration, Kytherian Association of Australia

In Europe, available from James Prineas.
Email James Prineas

From 2014, thye book will be avaialble from all good book shops on the island of Kythera.

Description: Beautiful coffee table book printed on 118gsm art paper. 272 pages. Hardback.

ISBN: 978-0-9872473-2-2

Other contributors:

Essays: Kiriaki Mavromattes-Orfanos
Translation: Irini Renieri
Greek Editing: Elena Panagopoulou
Plane piloted by: Kyprianos Biris

The book contains photographs of the various villages and places on the island of Kythera, taken from the air.

Subjects: Kythera, also known as 'Cerigo', is a Greek island situated between the southern tip of the Peloponnese and Crete. Its more than sixty villages reveal their organic development from neolithic to modern times. Roads twist like climbing plants into almost every corner of the island. These 280 aerial photographs taken in the verdant winter months, capture the beauty of the entire island.

View / Download a .pdf of 8 sample pages, (pp.72-79) here:

Prineas_sample_ pp72-79.pdf

Some reactions to the book:

Georgia Pine, California, USA.

"I've been enjoying the various photos and reading the essays. It's going to take a while to get through it as it is heavy to handle. What a terrific legacy for all of us and for future generations! Great idea to include surnames with each village."

Dimitris Koutrafouris, the Bank Manager of the National Bank of Greece, branch, Potamos, Kythera, placed the book on display in the summer of 2013.

As locals and Kytherians of the diaspora thumbed through the book, their first instinct was to try and find their own houses, or those of their grandparents and relatives.

Most were not satisfied until that were certain that they had found their houses. Often they had to solicit the help of realtives and friends to help locate them.

The book contains virtually every structure on the island, in every part of the island, which makes it a very valuable Kytherian resource.

History > Documents

submitted by Kytherian Book Review on 30.10.2013

The Mediterranean Diet by Dr Catherine Itsiopoulos

Author: Dr Catherine Itsiopoulos

When Published: 2013

Publisher: Pan Macmillan Australia

Available: All good book shops

Description: Paperback. 224 page/s.

ISBN: 9781742610825

RRP $34.99

Review at goodfood

A wealth of good health

Date October 29, 2013

Carla Grossetti


Stick to the periphery of the supermarket and you will find all you need to embrace the Mediterranean diet, as Carla Grossetti writes.

Taste of the Mediterranean

None of the ingredients featured in Dr Catherine Itsiopoulos's The Mediterranean Diet have scary chemical names or need numeric identification.

Instead, the core components of the Mediterranean diet are olive oil, leafy greens, eggs, fruit and nuts, legumes, fermented dairy products, seafood, a small amount of red meat and a minuscule amount of sugar.

As head of the department and associate professor in dietetics and human nutrition at LaTrobe University, Itsiopoulos's book, published in August, is a happy nod to both her Greek heritage and more than two decades of dedicated research into the Mediterranean diet.

Dr Catherine Itsiopoulos is dedicated to the Mediterranean diet:

"Most of the recipes used in the book were provided by either my mum or my mum-in-law," says Itsiopoulos, who, as well as being a passionate home cook, has more than 25 years of clinical and academic nutrition experience.

"I've grown up on this diet but it wasn't until I graduated from dietetics that I looked at this way of eating from a research perspective. Research conducted over the past 60 years has proven the diet can promote weight loss, aid cancer recovery, slow Alzheimer's, prevent diabetes, heart disease and promote longevity," says Itsiopoulos, whose parents migrated to Australia from Greece in the 1960s.

Itsiopoulos who, at 170cm, has weighed between 58 and 62 kilograms all her adult life and has a BMI of 21, is a walking advertisement for the diet.

The 50-year-old believes it's the ubiquitous olive oil that makes the Mediterranean diet more satisfying than a low-fat diet and therefore easier to adhere to. As well as a traditional menu, there is a weight-loss menu with a daily kilojoule intake of 7000 kilojoules (which includes dishes high in fibre, vitamin C and folate and low in kilojoules) and a healthy menu for chronic disease prevention.

"People do not eat excess calories on this diet because that drizzle of extra virgin olive oil makes it so satisfying. It's a lifestyle diet. Yes, it works because it's palatable but it also works because it encourages you to slow down and eat in a social environment. It's not a quick fix. It's a way of life," she says.

A review article published this year, in the highly respected New England Journal of Medicine, entitled ''Prevencion con Dieta Mediterranea'' (PREDIMED) ranked a Mediterranean diet supplemented with extra virgin olive oil or nuts as the model most likely to provide protection against coronary heart disease.

The April edition reported the results of the study, which surveyed 7447 people aged 55 to 80 - some of whom were at high cardiovascular risk - over 4.8 years:

"Salient components of the Mediterranean diet reportedly associated with better survival include moderate consumption of ethanol [mostly from wine], low consumption of meat and high consumption of vegetables, fruits, nuts, legumes, fish, and olive oil."

While Itsiopoulos concedes many people living in the countries that surround the Mediterranean have moved away from healthy eating patterns, her own research was based on the traditional timeworn peasant-style diet. Her major research interest lies in the positive effects of this diet in a society that faces a rising incidence of lifestyle-related diseases.

"The diet that is the most-often prescribed diet in the world and the one that is most often quoted in scientific studies is the Cretan-Mediterranean diet that originated from the island of Crete following World War II. Research has found that people eating this diet had almost no traces of heart disease," says Itsiopoulos, who lives in the Melbourne suburb of Moonee Ponds with her Greek-Australian husband Savvas Koutsis and teenage daughters Tiana and Vivienne.

Itsiopoulos says research backed by science has also shown that, despite being high in fat, the Mediterranean diet - which was heritage-listed by UNESCO in 2010 - uses olive oil rather than butter, which does not necessarily lead to weight gain.

"The one key ingredient that binds all the diets of the Mediterranean is olive oil, which is well known for its role in the prevention of heart disease.

''There's also less meat, more veg," says Itsiopoulos, whose findings have been published in journals such as Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases and the Journal of Hepatology.

"Although the diet is high in fat, it's also high in fibre, with almost a kilogram of fresh fruit and vegetables per day, small portions of lean meat, a regular intake of fish and snacks of dried fruit, nuts and yoghurt," she says.

Traditional Greek-Mediterranean recipes featured in the book include: favas santorinis (split pea dip), keftedakia (little meatballs), dolmathakia (vegetarian-stuffed vineleaves) and fassoulada (white bean soup). Itsiopoulous has also modified many of the heavier mains, such as moussaka, to feature grilled vegetables over meat as the "heroes of the dish".

"Making eating a pleasure is one of the cornerstones of the diet. You don't feel like you are missing out," she says.

The Mediterranean Diet (published by Pan Macmillan Australia, RRP $34.99).

Author Information:

Catherine Itsiopoulos is the Head of Department and Associate Professor in Dietetics and Human Nutrition at LaTrobe University. Catherine has more than 25 years of clinical, academic and project management experience. Recent positions Catherine has held include Associate Professor and Head of Discipline Nutrition and Dietetics at the University of Canberra, Accreditation, Recognition and Education Services Manager with the Dieticians' Association of Australia and Fellow of the Centre of Clinical Research Excellence in Clinical Science in Diabetes at the University of Melbourne.

History > Documents

submitted by Kytherian World Heritage Fund on 18.10.2013

Kytherian Surnames (English Edition)

Author: Emmanuel Kalligeros

When Published: 2012

Publisher: Kytherian World Heritage Fund (KWHF)

Book Price: A$50.00 plus postage

ISBN: 978 0 9872473 0 8

Description: Large, hard bound book. Brown cover with gold lettering. A replica of the original soft cover from the Greek edition has been placed on the inside page.

Availablity: In Australia from KWHF & the The Kytherian Association of Australia

George C. Poulos: 02 93888320

Email George Poulos

Email Angelo Notaras

Order more of the 30+ books from the KWHF catalogue by downloading the Order Form, here:

/download/Book_Order_Form.pdf

In Kythera, Athens and Greece, is available from the author:

Mr Emmanuel Kalligeros,
31 Megistis St,
Kalamaki 174 55,
tel. (+30)210-9827436
fax (+30)210-9885982

Email Emmanuel Kalligeros

Also at the Archives Book Shop at the "Kastro", and all good bookshops, on the island of Kythera.

A translation of the original Greek edition which was published in 2004. Three organisations, the Nicholas Anthony Aroney Trust, The Kytherian Association of Australia, and the Kytherian World Heritage Fund, co-contributed significant funds to translate the original, and typeset, print and distribute the English version of this book.

A second printing of the original Greek version ensures that the Greek book remains in print. It is still available from most of the better book shops on the island of Kythera, and from the author - Emmanuel Kalligeros.

Description:

An historical, geographical and linguistic approach to the derivation of all / most Kytherian Surnames on Kythera.

This 670-page book contains a study of 256 family names from Kythera, their history on the island and their further dispersion to the broader area of the Kytherian Diaspora.

Kytherian Surnames remains one of the most iconic books with a Kytherian theme, that has ever been printed.

There is a lengthy introduction about the study of all family names that includes tables, indexes and an extensive bibliography on the documentation of the data mentioned in it. Every last name is analysed in detail regarding the family's history on Kythera and in the regions that influenced the island; its geographical mobility before reaching the island as well as its subsequent spread; its linguistic origin and further useful data.

Readers have the opportunity to wander into the magic world of names, to track down the family name of their interest and once they finish the book they will have a good overview of the human story of Kythera as well as of an important part of the island’s history.

From the 13th century onwards there is enough evidence of the existence of some family names on Kythera. Their main core is formed around the 16th century and, from then on, they travel within as well as outside the island. Many names from Kythera derive from nicknames, professions or other sources.

Prologue, by the by the President of the Society of Kytherian Studies, Professor Nikos Petrohilos

Even if the Introduction to Manolis Kalligeros’s study of Kytherian surnames was comprised of only the penultimate section entitled “Clarifications, idiosyncrasies, conclusions”, the reader would still be able to certify the deep and significant love that the author has for his homeland, the sweet “nostos” that entraps him and unerringly guides his writing, which for him is a source of inspiration in the search for and return to roots.

This is a book filled with several hundred pages and much labour. After an Introduction and general discussion of Kytherian surnames, the author proceeds to detail the idiosyncrasies of Kytherian bynames, distinguishing between:
a) surnames that derive from bynames developed in Kythera;
b) surnames from other regions, which appear on Kythera as bynames and form surnames;
c) surnames that have disappeared but which remain in the local repository of names as bynames; and
d) surnames that become bynames of other surnames.

This is followed by a section on the relations between some surnames and toponyms, immediately after which the movement of surnames to and from the Peloponnese and to and from Crete is examined. It is of course natural that, considering the period of almost six centuries of Venetian rule over Kythera, the researcher feels the need to dedicate a large section of his Introduction to the Venetian presence on the island, as well as the Kytherian presence in Venice, which had an unavoidable effect on the formation of Kytherian surnames.

Manolis Kalligeros subsequently focuses on different special cases and categories, factors in the formation of surnames such as piracy, merchants and sailors, administrative staff, soldiers and clerics, the diaspora and refugees, “nobles and popolani”, surnames with a Turkish etymology. He concludes his long Introduction by vividly underscoring the “dark points” of research, the difficulties of which no one can doubt.

The study closes with an alphabetic table of the long series of Kytherian surnames, which readers of the newspaper Kythiraika will have already encountered.

The Society of Kytherian Studies is especially delighted to be able to present this captivating and most useful work to all those Kytherian – and not only – readers who wish to research or simply to learn about the history of their surnames.

This is an exceptionally interesting collection and an exhaustive onomatological study, which in essence never ends and will be open to corrections, additions and changes. The amazing work of a Kytherian, the Vice President and active member of our Society’s Board of Directors, who loves his homeland with a passion, working vigorously and selflessly for it, and who has given us rewarding evidence of his successful research, specifically on our island and its history.

History > Documents

submitted by Kytherian Book Review on 10.10.2013

Ευχές αναθεματισμοί και εξορκισμοί - Blessings, Curses and Exorcisms

Author: Jim Saltis

When Published: 2013

Publisher: Jim Saltis

Available: From Jim Saltis or Tina Andrew. 02 9399 9767

Email, Jim Saltis

Description: Paperback

Language: GREEK

ISBN: 9780646583938

Dewey Number: A823.4

The launch was conducted at the Australian Hellenic Educational Progressive Association (AHEPA) Hall, 394 Princes Hwy
Rockdale NSW 2216, from 6:00 pm on Sunday 1st October, 2013.

The launch was hosted by the Association of Greek Writers and Artists Australia ( EELKA ) in collaboration with the Center for Literature and Poetry " Kostis Palamas " AHEPA.

The master of ceremonies for the evening was the Secretary of the Union Litsa Diakovasili. Dsicussion of the book was hosted by the President of the Union, Popi Anastasiadis Mallianou, and excerpts read by : Kiki Betty, Bethlehem Georgelli , Dimitra Milatou and Rosa Gialopouli, Board members of EELKA. Many passages were read from the book, and all acknowledged that the style and flow of Jim's novel was exceptional.

Visitors welcomed the President of AHEPA's Kostis Palamas " Mr. George Lianos.The presentation was attended by the Consul General of Greece Dr Stavros Kyrimis, and many other distinguished members of EELKA & AHEPA.

The launch was attended by a substantial number of people, as can be testified by this photograph.

Jim's friend, Tina Andrew accompanied him. This was appropriate as Tina's father Angelo Christianos was one of the founding members of AHEPA. He attended , one of the first AHEPA meetings held at Scone in 1935. A photograph of the Scone meeting adorns the AHEPA Hall.

Many of Jim and Tina's exctended family, attended the launch.

The book is based on Jim Saltis's personal experiences, growing up as he did in a family of 7 children, in the pre-WW2 period in Alexandria, Egypt.

Authors Prefactory Remarks

Alexandria, Egypt, was the city of my birth, nurture and finally my departure in January 1949 without any hatred or wickedness.

I started writing my book Blessings, Curses and Exorcisms back in 1988, after my divorce. I bought a unit at Camspsie and attempted to reorganise my life as a bachelor. My days were grey and the nights were endless. I was craving for same sleep but it refused to intervene and bring some relief to my aching body and a break to my forever active brain. I named the Book “Mrs Stamata.” which was the name of the mother. It took many years to return to the skeletal draft and complete it.

The novel is a collection of experiences that I encountered, fictions that were creations of my cerebral fantasies the perpetually moving mind and my invisible soul.

All the persons that you will encounter in the story were real. Even the beautiful Flora (Madeline) who lived a daringly prodigal life was lucky to meet Milton and experience the immensity and tranquillity of true love. I compromised the tragedy of Alekos and Sofia’s love and gave a happy ending because of the philanthropic action of her boss Leon. Stamata died but she lives on as a ghost at the Greek section of the cemetery at Chatby awaiting the next Resurrection.

Now all of us who were born in Egypt and more particular in the cosmopolitan Alexandria we have dispersed at all corners of this hospitable planet. We travelled to new seas; we flew in skies and lands of places that we have learned in our Geography lessons. Most of us are well established in our new countries and we live carefree existences.

Yet we are grateful that we were born in Egypt.

This is Jim's second book. His first book, My Four Homes was published in both Greek and English.

Jims speech at the My Four Homes Book Launch

Download an interview with Jim Saltis on SBS Radio, Australia, here:

jim-saltis.mp3

This interview refers mainly to Jims previous book, My Four Homes, but also makes reference to Blessings, Curses and Exorcisms.

Ευχές αναθεματισμοί και εξορκισμοί

Παρουσιάστρια: Πόπη Αναστασιάδου-Μαλλιάνου

Ο Δημήτρης Πρωτοψάλτης, γνωστός και ως Jim Saltis στο μυθιστόρημα του Ευχές αναθεματισμοί και εξορκισμοί μας πηγαίνει πίσω στο παρελθόν και μας κάνει να νοσταλγούμε και να ονειρευόμαστε. Μας περιγράφει με έντονα χρώματα μια Αίγυπτο που δεν υπάρχιε πια. Την Αίγυπτο της δεκαετίας του 1930. Βαθύς ψυχολόγος και γνώστης των ηθών της εποχής, μας αναλύει εκτενώς κοινονικά φαινόμενα. Μέσα από την ιστορία της ζωής μιας οικογένειας με επτά παιδιά μας περιγράφει ρεαλιστικά την Αίγυπτο και ιδίως την Αλέξάνδρια εκείνης της εποχής, την αγαπημένη του Αλεξάνδρια, την Αλεξάνδρια στην οποία γεννήθηκε(Βηθλεέμ Μπήκανε στο τράμ για το Μπακός...το εξαιρετικό προσωπικό του και την ακρίβεια του. ) Μια έντονη αίσθηση ιστορικότητας χαρακτηρίζει αυτό το μυθιστόρημα, όπως και το προηγoύμενο μυθιστόρημα του (Τα τέσσερα σπιτια) Στα βιβλία αυτά ο συγγραφέας αναλύει και τεκμηριώνει την πολιτική σήψη που υπάρχει στην δεκαετία του 30. Ο Πρωτοψάλτης είναι κοσμοπολίτης. Στο πίσω εξώφυλλο του βιβλίου του μας λέει; Σήμερα όλοι που γεννηθήκαμε στην μαγευτική πόλη της Αλεξάνδριας και στην Αίγυπτο ζούμε σκορπισμένοι στον φιλόξενο πλανήτη. Ταξιδέψαμε σε καινούργιες θάλασσες και πετάξαμε σε ουρανούς και πατρίδες που μάθαμε από τα βιβλία της Γεωγραφίας.

Το φάσμα των πάσης φύσεως προβληματισμών του είναι ευρύτατο. Αντλεί τα θέματα του από το παρελθόν που έχουν όμως απόλυτη σχέση με τα σημερινά δρώμενα. Εξετάζει όλες τις πτυχές της κοινωνίας με καταπληκτική οξυδέρκεια. Επίσης μας αναφέρει τις διάφορες δυσιδαιμονίες και προκαταλήψεις που υπήρχαν εκείνη την εποχή όπως π.χ. το χύσιμο του λαδιού που το θεωρούσαν μεγάλη γρουσουζιά. Κακός οιωνός όπως έλεγαν. (ΔήμητραΤο Μπουκάλι με το λάδι γλυστρησε από το χέρι της...μα τι φταίει πάλι ο άνθρωπος σκέφθηκε.)Πάνω σ’αυτές τις δυσιδαιμονίες και προκαταλήψεις βασίζεται και ο τίτλος του βιβλίου του Δημήτρη. Ευχές, αναθεματισμοί και εξορκισμοί. και μας μιλά και για τα μάγια που έκαναν για να σταματήσουν ανεπιθήμητους γάμους, η για να εκδικηθούν κάποιον που τους είχε ενοχλήσει η απλώς κάποιον που δεν συμπαθούσαν. Διάφοροι επιτήδιοι εκμετάλευονταν τις προκαταλήψεις αυτές και κέρδιζαν χρήματα από τα ανύποπτα θύματα που πίστευαν σ’αυτά που τους έλεγαν ότι δηλ, τα μάγια θα φέρουν το ποθητό απότέλεσμα. Παρ’ολό που αυτά που περιγράφει ο Πρωτοψάλτης στο βιβλίο του έχουν λάβει χώρα στος αρχές του 20 ου αιώνα το θέμα είναι πολύ επίκαιρο διότι κάθε τόσο βλέπουμε στα μέσα ενημέρωσης παρόμοιες καταστάσεις και στις μέρες μας, όπως τους δύο μάγους που συνέλαβε μερικά χρόνια πρίν, η αστυνομία στα Δυτικά προάστεια του Σύδνευ, που είχαν πελάτες-θύματα με Πανεπιστημιακή μόρφωση.(Κική Είμαι έτοιμη τώρα κυρία...Αμα το φέρεις τότε θα κάνουμε και το επόμενο βήμα.)

Αφίνοντας την φαντασία του ελεύθερη ο Πρωτοψάλτης, ζωντανεύει το παρελθόν κατά τον πιο θελκτικό τρόπο. Ο χρόνος, οι βαθειές εσωτερικές δονήσεις τα πάθη συνθέτουν ένα αρμονικό σύνολο. Με απλά λόγια με πέννα που ρέει, μας παρασέρνει να τον παρακολουθήσουμε με τον πιο αβίαστο τρόπο (Δήμητρα Θυμάμαι καλά τον πολιτικό τους γάμο...η ευτυχία μπήκε στο σπιτικό τους.)

Δεν λείπει το ρεαλιστικό στοιχείο, ενώ οι κοινονικές συνθήκες της εποχής αναλύονται με αξιοπρόσεκτη ακρίβεια. Οι διαγραφές των χαρακτήρων του είναι ακριβείς ενώ οι χώροι και οι περιγραφές των τοπίων αποδίνονται θαυμάσια (Βηθλεέμ,Ομως σκόρπιες σκέψεις χτυπούσαν την πόρτα του μυαλού της...και ο Θεός της είχε χαρίσει 7 παιδιά. .)Ρόζα.Αραπάδες.... της ερωμένης του)
Επίσης ο συγραφέας μας περιγράφει με μαθηματική ακρίβεια τον έρωτα, σαρκικό και πνευματικό σε μια εποχή δύσκολη, υποκριτική, σεμνότυφη, εποχή σεξουαλικής καταπίεσης. Οι ήρωες του, αγαπούν πολύ, στη ζωή τους. Αγαπούν δίχως σεμνοτυφίες και όρια και πολλές φορές περνούν τα σύνορα και σπάνουν τα καλούπια της ηθηκής με ολέθρια αποτελέσματα(.ΡόζαΗΦλώρα γύρισε στο σπίτι της....που αρνήθηκε την οικογένεια της.)

Βαθύς γνώστης της ανθρώπινης φύσης μας περιγράφει με έντονες μελανές πινελιέςτην καθοδική πορεία ατόμων-θυμάτων, που παραδίνονται σε ακραία πάθη και καταστρεπτικές συνήθειες επιρεάζοντας αρνητικά την ζωή τους και τις ζωές προσφυλών τους προσώπων. (Κική Είχε επιθυμήσει να περάσει....από την οικογένεια της.)

Μια άλλη πρωτοτυπία του βιβλίου είναι ότι συχνά παρεμβάλλονται διάφορα σχόλια και φιλοσοφικές παρατηρήσεις. Στος τέλος του βιβλίου υπάρχουν πολλές ωραίες φωτογραφίες κτιρίων και τοπίων εκείνης της εποχής.
Συνοψίζωντας μπορούμε να πούμε ότι το (Ευχές αναθεματισμοί και εξορκισμοί είναι ένα πρωτότυπο, αξιοπρόσεκτο έργο που αξίζει να διαβαστεί.

Συγχαρητήρια λοιπόν στον Δημήτρη Πρωτοψάλτη και του ευχόμαστε να δεί το έργο του διαδεδομένο διαχρονικά και πάντα με ανοδική πορεία.

Πόπη Αναστασιάδη-Μαλλιάνου
Πρόεδρος Ελλήνων Λογοτεχνών
Και
Καλλιτεχνών Αυστραλίας(ΕΕΛΚΑ)

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