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submitted by Kytherian Art World on 18.11.2011

Ten Years of Contemporary Art: The James C Sourris AM Collection

Author: Queensland Art Gallery

When Published: 2011

Publisher: Queensland Art Gallery

Available: Good bookshops. Queensland Art Gallery Store, or online:
http://qag.qld.gov.au/exhibitions/current/ten_years_of_contemporary_art_the_james_c_sourris_am_collection/publication

Description: Large Colour book. Hard cover. 158 pages

Ten Years of Contemporary Art: The James C Sourris AM Collection is a snapshot of art from the first decade of the new millennium, acquired for the Gallery’s James C Sourris, AM, Collection. Richly illustrated over 156 pages, this publication includes works by leading Australian artists such as Vivienne Binns, Robert Hunter, Gareth Sansom, Tony Albert, Judy Watson, Vernon Ah Kee, Tim Johnson and more, showcasing exceptional works by senior and emerging Brisbane-based Indigenous and non–Indigenous artists, as well as a key group of Australian video works.

A message from James C Sourris, AM

'Ten Years of Contemporary Art: The James C Sourris AM Collection' is a snapshot of art from the flrst decade of the new millenium, acquired for the Queensland Art Gallery's James C Sourris, AM, Collection. The sole criterion behind the aquisition of works for this collection is that each be of museum quality

A number of people have made direct contributions to this collection and it is only fltting they be publicly acknowledged.

Flrstly to my sister Marica, who has given me wonderful support for this project over the past ten years.

To Doug Hall, AM, who was there at the beginning and without whom there would be no collection. A close freindship with Peter Bellas and Josh Milani has resulted in an extraordinary collaboration acquiring works for the collection.

At my request, and in an attempt to broaden the collection, both Peter and Josh sourced works from other states for my approval.

And lastly, and especially, to Tony Ellwood, Director of the Queensland Art Gallery / Gallery of Modern Art. It was Tony's suggestion, and through his enthusiasm for the project, that this exhibition has come to fruition.

In Conversation with James C Sourris, AM

From, Artlines, Queensland Gallery Magazine, Sept/Oct/Nov, 2011, pp. 32-33.

James C Sourris, AM, has been a generous and dedicated supporter of the Gallery for many years, both through membership of its Foundation Council and as an exceptionally active and focused individual donor to the Gallery’s Collection. Tony Ellwood, the Gallery’s Director, asked James Sourris about the history of his interests in visual art and art museums, when he first started collecting art, and how the focus of his collection has developed.

I remember clearly when I first became interested in art.
The year was 1954 and I was selected by the school principal to be in charge of the Library. On three of four walls were works by Albert Namatjira donated to the college by a wealthy grazier. I was so enamoured with the paintings that I was determined that one day I would own a Namatjira. Little did I know that it would lake me 31 years to achieve my ambition.

During the 90’s I collected a few works mainly for a new home I was building, mostly paintings and ceramics from gallerist Victor Mace, what I would call 'domestic pieces'. The home, designed by family friend Robin Gibson, was to be contemporary minimalist and demanded contemporary art to bring it 'alive'. ln 1997 I was introduced to Peter Bellas, of Bellas Gallery, by my sister Marcia. Peter suggested I should devote my time to collecting contemporary art, and at the time I purchased my first major contemporary work, a wonderful painting by Robert Hunter.

A year later, in 1998, I became a Gallery Foundation Benefactor and enjoyed the exhibitions to such an extent that viewing contemporary art became a habit during my international business trips.

The turning point came when I moved from a 'domestic' collection to works of a public gallery standard. It was time to collect major works, and quality was to be the byword. ln collaboration with Peter Bellas, it was decided that I would collect contemporary art within a clear time frame, namely 2000 to 2010. The start of a new millennium seemed an obvious starting point for the collection.

The collection's interests are in several key areas, and there is a reason for this. Obviously it falls into a number of areas and I have attempted a balance between the various parts. As my interest in contemporary art developed, the criteria for my focus became more clearly defined. Each work purchased needed to be of a standard and quality acceptable to a State gallery or the National Gallery. This view still governs my acquisitions policy today.

In an effort to create a balanced collection, I have included artists in different periods of their careers. For example, senior Australian artists Tim Johnson, Gareth Sansom and Robert Hunter; mid-career artists Eugene Carchesio, Helga Groves, Rosslynd Piggott, Gordon Bennett and Jon Cattapan; and emerging artists like Gareth Donnelly and Lucy Griggs. Add to this mix, traditional and urban Indigenous artists and you can see I have attempted a broad sweep of contemporary art. I have also made a deliberate effort not to be Queensland parochial. This is an Australian and International collection of contemporary art.

Initially, because of my background in film exhibition, the Gallery acquired a number of international and Australian video art works with my funds, by artists such as Brill Viola, William Kentridge and Australia's Patricia Piccinini. While video is used by artists to view a globalised world, equally important is how Australian artists view world events. For example, Madeline Kelly and her nuclear paintings, Judy Watson on the environment, and Gordon Hookey on matters political.
In the mid 90’s - after these video works were acquired – then Director Doug Hall and I agreed to work towards a contemporary art collection for the Queensland Art Gallery to be named 'The James C Sourris Collection'. The discussions took nearly two years, and at the end we agreed that sufficient video art had been acquired and it was time to broaden the Collection to include painting, photography, sculpture and installations. The acquisition of Wang Qingsong's Night Revels of Lao Li and a sculpture by Scott Redford quickly followed, and the collection was up and running.

An interest in books commenced at an early age, probably because both my parents were 'readers'. I recall at 1,2my favourite authors were We Johns and Zane Grey. At 20, I was collecting first editions. The first title I bought as a first edition, which I still retain, was Ian Fleming s Dr No. My reading today is mainly art, biographies and world conflicts.
Recently, at the invitation of Tony Ellwood, I was asked to view material the Gallery wished to acquire for the 'Surrealism' exhibition – original manifestos, exhibition catalogues, journals and books. My view was it was important for the Gallery to own them so they could be displayed during the exhibition with works from France. On the evening of the opening, Mr Didier Ottinger, Deputy Director of the Centre Pompidou, expressed his delight about the way the printed material was integrated with Pompidou collection works, so the exhibition had been substantially enhanced.

This material is now owned by the Gallery under the auspices of 'The James C Sourris Art Collection' and will take its place in the Gallery's Research Library for generations to come . . .I am proud that I was able, in a small way, to contribute to this outstanding exhibition.

History > Documents

submitted by Kytherian Cultural Exchange on 26.10.2011

Kwaidan (1st edition)

Author: Lafcadio Hearn

When Published: 1904

Publisher: Houghton, Mifflin & Co.

Available: Ist edition long since sold out. New editions are available. Also available second hand.

Description: Hard cover

The best work among his works which belong to the genre of retold tales. He rewrote Japanese traditional grotesque tales narrated by his wife, Setsu, in English, having infused literary spirits in them. Hearn wrote this book to persuade the universal truth which he believed is the mental base for human beings to live on. The book has been translated into many languages.

- Takis Efstathiou

History > Documents

submitted by Kytherian Cultural Exchange on 25.10.2011

Glimpses of Unfamiliar Japan I & II (1st edition)

Author: Lafcadio Hearn

When Published: 1894, first edition.

Publisher: Houghton, Mifflin & Co.

Available: First edition out of print. New editions should be available. Second hand editions are available

Description: Hard cover book

Hearn’s first work after his arrival in Japan, and the pinnacle
of his works which belong to the genre of travel books and
reportage. Drawing on his five senses, he expressed the
fundamental culture of Matsue, Izumo and Sanin Area,
provincial areas in Japan, together with his ethnological
observation of the people’s inner joy in a literary way. The
tension between the culture and the people’s inner joy
described has made the book a longtime seller - Takis Efstathiou

History > Documents

submitted by Kytherian Art World on 30.09.2011

Wedding Invitation Envelope - Emmanuel Kavacos and Pauline Pradelle, Paris 1915

The Wedding invitation read:

Mister and Mrs Marius PRADELLE request the honour of your presence at the marriage of Miss Pauline PRADELLE, their daughter, with Mister Emmanuel A. Cavacos.

Mister Theodore A. Cavacos requests the honor of your presence at the marriage of Mister Emmanuel A. CAVACOS, his son, with Miss Pauline PRADELLE.

By reason of the circumstances, entrance to the Marriage which will take place in Paris on Saturday, 2 October 1915, is strictly limited.

Emmanuel Andrew Cavacos was born in Potamos, Kythera, on February 10th, 1885. He emigrated to the United States of America, when he was sixteen years old, and settled in Baltimore, in the suburb of Hampden, where his brother Constantine was living. Another brother Theodore also chose to live in Baltimore. (Theodore was married to fellow Kytherian Pothiti Chlentzos). In Baltimore he formed a close friendship with Charles Fitzpatrick, with whom he communicated for many years. Photographs and Arts Programs which Cavacos sent to Fitzpatrick form the basis for this (preliminary) biographical sketch.

Having displayed a decided artistic aptitude, he was sent to the Maryland Institute to study painting. He devoted four years to this pursuit, whilst at the same time experimenting with sculptural modeling. Ephraim Keyser, the veteran Baltimore sculptor, who for many years was Director of the Rinehart School of Sculpture at the Maryland Institute, was so impressed with the quality of his clay sketches that he advised him to give up painting and devote himself exclusively to sculpture.

Cavacos took this advise, and he made such rapid progress as a student of Ephraim Keyser, that in 1911 he was awarded the Rinehart Scholarship, which enabled him to go to the Beaux Arts School in Paris. In Paris he was known as Emmanuel Andre, Andre being the French version of his middle name, Andrew.

In 1913, one of his works, Aspiration received an Honorable Mention at the Salon des Artistes Francais. The next year his Thinker attracted great attention at the Paris Salon. The first of this “Thinkers” is housed at the Enoch Pratt Free Library, and the second at the Peabody Institute in Baltimore.

In Paris, On October 2nd, 1915, Cavacos married Pauline Pradelle. Pauline was a professional pianist. She practiced her art in the studio where Emmanuel executed his sculptures.

His work made him a well known figure in the art colony of Paris, and he was commissioned to do the portraits of a number of notable citizens, including Mlle. Mistinguett, a prominent actress; Bucot, and Marcelle Ragnon. In 1925 he received a silver medal for a fountain at the International Exhibition of Decorative Arts in Paris. As a tribute to his ability, in 1927, the French Government bestowed upon him the decoration, Officier de l’Acadamie.
In subsequent years he exhibited annually in the Salon, and also at the Salon des Humoristes de Paris, where his dancing figures were highly praised.
His work is in a number of important collections, including that of Queen Marie of Rumania, who purchased one of his marble figures, Grief.

Cavacos’ sculpture has been praised for its variety, able craftsmanship, and for the sense of rhythm it conveys. The French critics emphasized its inherently poetic qualities.

In 1930 Cavacos returned to the United States for the first time in eighteen years. His work was exhibited at the Baltimore Museum of Art in March of that year. His work was also shown in New York, and later in the year at Homeland. A group of 17 of his sculptures were also placed on display in the National Sculpture Society Exhibition in San Francisco. In May, 1930, he and his wife returned to Paris.

Information about Cavacos post 1930 is difficult to obtain. Hopefully someone can shed more light on his life, in particular the period from 1931 – 1976.

We do know that when members of his family died, Cavacos undertook to create a beautiful monument, and to send it to be erected in the Greek section of a Cemetery in Baltimore, where it still stands today.

It seems that his interest in sculpture continued until well into his old age. When granddaughters of Charles Fitzpatrick (his Baltimore friend) visited him in Paris in 1969, they were photographed with him in his art studio. Many sculptures are visible in the room.

Emmanuel Cavacos died in 1976, aged 91.

Background to the biographical sketch, above

Information about Emmanuel Cavacos is not very extensive. Thankfully, Emmanuel seems to have established a friendship with a Baltimore resident called Charles Fitzpatrick. After Cavacos moved permanently to France he continued to correspond with him. Mike Fitzpatrick (aka Piedmont Fossil), Charles Fitzpatrick’s grandson takes up the story. “Cavacos sent photographs of his studio and his sculptures and even an invitation to his wedding in October 1915. Considering that the wedding took place across the Atlantic and the great time and expense it would require to go there -- not to mention that fact that by then France was deep into World War I -- my grandfather was unable to attend. In 1930 Cavacos made a return visit to the United States for a couple of exhibitions, one in his old hometown of Baltimore and one in New York. I don’t know how successful his exhibitions were considering they took place during the first year of the Great Depression, but today his sculptures, if they can be found at all, seem to sell for between several hundred and several thousand dollars each. In the late 1960s my two sisters traveled to Europe and, at the request of my grandfather, they stopped by to visit (the by that time elderly) Mr. Cavacos at his Paris home”.

Thankfully Mike Fitzpatrick has posted the Cavacos photographs from that time on flickr

http://www.flickr.com/photos/piedmont_fossil/sets/72157594585161747/

“Most of the photos in this set were sent to my grandfather by Emmanuel Cavacos soon after he moved to Paris. Almost all of them are inscribed on the reverse in the artist’s own handwriting.”

Cindy Anderson, is a fiancee of Pete Capsanes, who is the grandson of Theodore Andrew Cavacos, brother to Emmanuel and Constantine. These are all Baltimore Cavacos Kytherians. Cindy wrote to KAW:
"We just had Pete's family here and were talking about Emmanual Andrew Cavacos which is Pete's Great Great Uncle and the sculptor who ended up migrating from Greece, to Maryland back to Paris where he died. We have many of his sculpted pieces in the family".

History > Documents

submitted by Kytherian Art World on 30.09.2011

Wedding Invitation - Emmanuel Kavacos and Pauline Pradelle, Paris 1915

Translation of the French:
Mister and Mrs Marius PRADELLE request the honour of your presence at the marriage of Miss Pauline PRADELLE, their daughter, with Mister Emmanuel A. Cavacos.

Mister Theodore A. Cavacos requests the honor of your presence at the marriage of Mister Emmanuel A. CAVACOS, his son, with Miss Pauline PRADELLE.

By reason of the circumstances, entrance to the Marriage which will take place in Paris on Saturday, 2 October 1915, is strictly limited.

Emmanuel Andrew Cavacos was born in Potamos, Kythera, on February 10th, 1885. He emigrated to the United States of America, when he was sixteen years old, and settled in Baltimore, in the suburb of Hampden, where his brother Constantine was living. Another brother Theodore also chose to live in Baltimore. (Theodore was married to fellow Kytherian Pothiti Chlentzos). In Baltimore he formed a close friendship with Charles Fitzpatrick, with whom he communicated for many years. Photographs and Arts Programs which Cavacos sent to Fitzpatrick form the basis for this (preliminary) biographical sketch.

Having displayed a decided artistic aptitude, he was sent to the Maryland Institute to study painting. He devoted four years to this pursuit, whilst at the same time experimenting with sculptural modeling. Ephraim Keyser, the veteran Baltimore sculptor, who for many years was Director of the Rinehart School of Sculpture at the Maryland Institute, was so impressed with the quality of his clay sketches that he advised him to give up painting and devote himself exclusively to sculpture.

Cavacos took this advise, and he made such rapid progress as a student of Ephraim Keyser, that in 1911 he was awarded the Rinehart Scholarship, which enabled him to go to the Beaux Arts School in Paris. In Paris he was known as Emmanuel Andre, Andre being the French version of his middle name, Andrew.

In 1913, one of his works, Aspiration received an Honorable Mention at the Salon des Artistes Francais. The next year his Thinker attracted great attention at the Paris Salon. The first of this “Thinkers” is housed at the Enoch Pratt Free Library, and the second at the Peabody Institute in Baltimore.

In Paris, On October 2nd, 1915, Cavacos married Pauline Pradelle. Pauline was a professional pianist. She practiced her art in the studio where Emmanuel executed his sculptures.

His work made him a well known figure in the art colony of Paris, and he was commissioned to do the portraits of a number of notable citizens, including Mlle. Mistinguett, a prominent actress; Bucot, and Marcelle Ragnon. In 1925 he received a silver medal for a fountain at the International Exhibition of Decorative Arts in Paris. As a tribute to his ability, in 1927, the French Government bestowed upon him the decoration, Officier de l’Acadamie.
In subsequent years he exhibited annually in the Salon, and also at the Salon des Humoristes de Paris, where his dancing figures were highly praised.
His work is in a number of important collections, including that of Queen Marie of Rumania, who purchased one of his marble figures, Grief.

Cavacos’ sculpture has been praised for its variety, able craftsmanship, and for the sense of rhythm it conveys. The French critics emphasized its inherently poetic qualities.

In 1930 Cavacos returned to the United States for the first time in eighteen years. His work was exhibited at the Baltimore Museum of Art in March of that year. His work was also shown in New York, and later in the year at Homeland. A group of 17 of his sculptures were also placed on display in the National Sculpture Society Exhibition in San Francisco. In May, 1930, he and his wife returned to Paris.

Information about Cavacos post 1930 is difficult to obtain. Hopefully someone can shed more light on his life, in particular the period from 1931 – 1976.

We do know that when members of his family died, Cavacos undertook to create a beautiful monument, and to send it to be erected in the Greek section of a Cemetery in Baltimore, where it still stands today.

It seems that his interest in sculpture continued until well into his old age. When granddaughters of Charles Fitzpatrick (his Baltimore friend) visited him in Paris in 1969, they were photographed with him in his art studio. Many sculptures are visible in the room.

Emmanuel Cavacos died in 1976, aged 91.

Background to the biographical sketch, above

Information about Emmanuel Cavacos is not very extensive. Thankfully, Emmanuel seems to have established a friendship with a Baltimore resident called Charles Fitzpatrick. After Cavacos moved permanently to France he continued to correspond with him. Mike Fitzpatrick (aka Piedmont Fossil), Charles Fitzpatrick’s grandson takes up the story. “Cavacos sent photographs of his studio and his sculptures and even an invitation to his wedding in October 1915. Considering that the wedding took place across the Atlantic and the great time and expense it would require to go there -- not to mention that fact that by then France was deep into World War I -- my grandfather was unable to attend. In 1930 Cavacos made a return visit to the United States for a couple of exhibitions, one in his old hometown of Baltimore and one in New York. I don’t know how successful his exhibitions were considering they took place during the first year of the Great Depression, but today his sculptures, if they can be found at all, seem to sell for between several hundred and several thousand dollars each. In the late 1960s my two sisters traveled to Europe and, at the request of my grandfather, they stopped by to visit (the by that time elderly) Mr. Cavacos at his Paris home”.

Thankfully Mike Fitzpatrick has posted the Cavacos photographs from that time on flickr

http://www.flickr.com/photos/piedmont_fossil/sets/72157594585161747/

“Most of the photos in this set were sent to my grandfather by Emmanuel Cavacos soon after he moved to Paris. Almost all of them are inscribed on the reverse in the artist’s own handwriting.”

Cindy Anderson, is a fiancee of Pete Capsanes, who is the grandson of Theodore Andrew Cavacos, brother to Emmanuel and Constantine. These are all Baltimore Cavacos Kytherians. Cindy wrote to KAW:
"We just had Pete's family here and were talking about Emmanual Andrew Cavacos which is Pete's Great Great Uncle and the sculptor who ended up migrating from Greece, to Maryland back to Paris where he died. We have many of his sculpted pieces in the family".

History > Documents

submitted by Kytherian Art World on 30.09.2011

Emmanuel Cavacos. List of sculptures exhibited in Baltimore and New York.

March and April 1930.

Baltimore Museum of Art. March 1st to March 25th 1930.

Mitch Galleries. 108 West 57th Street, March 31st to April 12th 1930.

34 Works were exhibited. These included:


1. Portrait of as Dancer (marble)
2. The Kiss (marble jaune de Sienne)
3. Agony of the Soul (terra cotta)
4. Portait of Dr Herbert A Gibbons (bronze)
5. Youth (terra cotta)
6. The Source (marble jaune de Sienne)
7. Springtime (marble rose de Milan)
8. Grief (marble jaune de Sienne)
9. The Arabesques (bronze)
10. Arabesque (bronze)
11. Arabesque (bronze)
12. Joy (bronze)
13. The Breeze (bronze)
14. Whirlwind (bronze)
15. Le Belle Dherlys (bronze)
16. The Dance (bronze)
17. Little Dancer (bronze)
18. Ash Tray “Faunesse” (bronze)
19. Ash Tray “Faune” (bronze)
20. Little Dancer (bronze)
21. Small Head (bronze)
22. Grief (bronze)
23. Indolence (bronze)
24. Despair (bronze)
25. Springtime (bronze)
26. Fascination (bronze)
27. Danse Du Baiser (bronze)
28. Bacchus (bronze)
29. The Kiss (bronze)
30. Lindbergh (bronze)
31. The Effort (bronze)
32. Strength and Suppleness (bronze)
33. Fascination (bronze)
34. Baby (terra cotta composition Cavacos)


Emmanuel Andrew Cavacos was born in Potamos, Kythera, on February 10th, 1885. He emigrated to the United States of America, when he was sixteen years old, and settled in Baltimore, in the suburb of Hampden, where his brother Constantine was living. Another brother Theodore also chose to live in Baltimore. (Theodore was married to fellow Kytherian Pothiti Chlentzos). In Baltimore he formed a close friendship with Charles Fitzpatrick, with whom he communicated for many years. Photographs and Arts Programs which Cavacos sent to Fitzpatrick form the basis for this (preliminary) biographical sketch.

Having displayed a decided artistic aptitude, he was sent to the Maryland Institute to study painting. He devoted four years to this pursuit, whilst at the same time experimenting with sculptural modeling. Ephraim Keyser, the veteran Baltimore sculptor, who for many years was Director of the Rinehart School of Sculpture at the Maryland Institute, was so impressed with the quality of his clay sketches that he advised him to give up painting and devote himself exclusively to sculpture.

Cavacos took this advise, and he made such rapid progress as a student of Ephraim Keyser, that in 1911 he was awarded the Rinehart Scholarship, which enabled him to go to the Beaux Arts School in Paris. In Paris he was known as Emmanuel Andre, Andre being the French version of his middle name, Andrew.

In 1913, one of his works, Aspiration received an Honorable Mention at the Salon des Artistes Francais. The next year his Thinker attracted great attention at the Paris Salon. The first of this “Thinkers” is housed at the Enoch Pratt Free Library, and the second at the Peabody Institute in Baltimore.

In Paris, On October 2nd, 1915, Cavacos married Pauline Pradelle. Pauline was a professional pianist. She practiced her art in the studio where Emmanuel executed his sculptures.

His work made him a well known figure in the art colony of Paris, and he was commissioned to do the portraits of a number of notable citizens, including Mlle. Mistinguett, a prominent actress; Bucot, and Marcelle Ragnon. In 1925 he received a silver medal for a fountain at the International Exhibition of Decorative Arts in Paris. As a tribute to his ability, in 1927, the French Government bestowed upon him the decoration, Officier de l’Acadamie.
In subsequent years he exhibited annually in the Salon, and also at the Salon des Humoristes de Paris, where his dancing figures were highly praised.
His work is in a number of important collections, including that of Queen Marie of Rumania, who purchased one of his marble figures, Grief.

Cavacos’ sculpture has been praised for its variety, able craftsmanship, and for the sense of rhythm it conveys. The French critics emphasized its inherently poetic qualities.

In 1930 Cavacos returned to the United States for the first time in eighteen years. His work was exhibited at the Baltimore Museum of Art in March of that year. His work was also shown in New York, and later in the year at Homeland. A group of 17 of his sculptures were also placed on display in the National Sculpture Society Exhibition in San Francisco. In May, 1930, he and his wife returned to Paris.

Information about Cavacos post 1930 is difficult to obtain. Hopefully someone can shed more light on his life, in particular the period from 1931 – 1976.

We do know that when members of his family died, Cavacos undertook to create a beautiful monument, and to send it to be erected in the Greek section of a Cemetery in Baltimore, where it still stands today.

It seems that his interest in sculpture continued until well into his old age. When granddaughters of Charles Fitzpatrick (his Baltimore friend) visited him in Paris in 1969, they were photographed with him in his art studio. Many sculptures are visible in the room.

Emmanuel Cavacos died in 1976, aged 91.

Background to the biographical sketch, above

Information about Emmanuel Cavacos is not very extensive. Thankfully, Emmanuel seems to have established a friendship with a Baltimore resident called Charles Fitzpatrick. After Cavacos moved permanently to France he continued to correspond with him. Mike Fitzpatrick (aka Piedmont Fossil), Charles Fitzpatrick’s grandson takes up the story. “Cavacos sent photographs of his studio and his sculptures and even an invitation to his wedding in October 1915. Considering that the wedding took place across the Atlantic and the great time and expense it would require to go there -- not to mention that fact that by then France was deep into World War I -- my grandfather was unable to attend. In 1930 Cavacos made a return visit to the United States for a couple of exhibitions, one in his old hometown of Baltimore and one in New York. I don’t know how successful his exhibitions were considering they took place during the first year of the Great Depression, but today his sculptures, if they can be found at all, seem to sell for between several hundred and several thousand dollars each. In the late 1960s my two sisters traveled to Europe and, at the request of my grandfather, they stopped by to visit (the by that time elderly) Mr. Cavacos at his Paris home”.

Thankfully Mike Fitzpatrick has posted the Cavacos photographs from that time on flickr

http://www.flickr.com/photos/piedmont_fossil/sets/72157594585161747/

“Most of the photos in this set were sent to my grandfather by Emmanuel Cavacos soon after he moved to Paris. Almost all of them are inscribed on the reverse in the artist’s own handwriting.”

Cindy Anderson, is a fiancee of Pete Capsanes, who is the grandson of Theodore Andrew Cavacos, brother to Emmanuel and Constantine. These are all Baltimore Cavacos Kytherians. Cindy wrote to KAW:
"We just had Pete's family here and were talking about Emmanual Andrew Cavacos which is Pete's Great Great Uncle and the sculptor who ended up migrating from Greece, to Maryland back to Paris where he died. We have many of his sculpted pieces in the family".

History > Documents

submitted by Kytherian Art World on 30.09.2011

Biographical Sketch of Emmanuel Cavacos

Included in the Programme for Exhibitions held in Baltimore and New York in March and April 1930.

Baltimore Museum of Art. March 1st to March 25th 1930.

Mitch Galleries. 108 West 57th Street, March 31st to April 12th 1930.

34 Works were exhibited. These included:


1. Portrait of as Dancer (marble)
2. The Kiss (marble jaune de Sienne)
3. Agony of the Soul (terra cotta)
4. Portait of Dr Herbert A Gibbons (bronze)
5. Youth (terra cotta)
6. The Source (marble jaune de Sienne)
7. Springtime (marble rose de Milan)
8. Grief (marble jaune de Sienne)
9. The Arabesques (bronze)
10. Arabesque (bronze)
11. Arabesque (bronze)
12. Joy (bronze)
13. The Breeze (bronze)
14. Whirlwind (bronze)
15. Le Belle Dherlys (bronze)
16. The Dance (bronze)
17. Little Dancer (bronze)
18. Ash Tray “Faunesse” (bronze)
19. Ash Tray “Faune” (bronze)
20. Little Dancer (bronze)
21. Small Head (bronze)
22. Grief (bronze)
23. Indolence (bronze)
24. Despair (bronze)
25. Springtime (bronze)
26. Fascination (bronze)
27. Danse Du Baiser (bronze)
28. Bacchus (bronze)
29. The Kiss (bronze)
30. Lindbergh (bronze)
31. The Effort (bronze)
32. Strength and Suppleness (bronze)
33. Fascination (bronze)
34. Baby (terra cotta composition Cavacos)


Emmanuel Andrew Cavacos was born in Potamos, Kythera, on February 10th, 1885. He emigrated to the United States of America, when he was sixteen years old, and settled in Baltimore, in the suburb of Hampden, where his brother Constantine was living. Another brother Theodore also chose to live in Baltimore. (Theodore was married to fellow Kytherian Pothiti Chlentzos). In Baltimore he formed a close friendship with Charles Fitzpatrick, with whom he communicated for many years. Photographs and Arts Programs which Cavacos sent to Fitzpatrick form the basis for this (preliminary) biographical sketch.

Having displayed a decided artistic aptitude, he was sent to the Maryland Institute to study painting. He devoted four years to this pursuit, whilst at the same time experimenting with sculptural modeling. Ephraim Keyser, the veteran Baltimore sculptor, who for many years was Director of the Rinehart School of Sculpture at the Maryland Institute, was so impressed with the quality of his clay sketches that he advised him to give up painting and devote himself exclusively to sculpture.

Cavacos took this advise, and he made such rapid progress as a student of Ephraim Keyser, that in 1911 he was awarded the Rinehart Scholarship, which enabled him to go to the Beaux Arts School in Paris. In Paris he was known as Emmanuel Andre, Andre being the French version of his middle name, Andrew.

In 1913, one of his works, Aspiration received an Honorable Mention at the Salon des Artistes Francais. The next year his Thinker attracted great attention at the Paris Salon. The first of this “Thinkers” is housed at the Enoch Pratt Free Library, and the second at the Peabody Institute in Baltimore.

In Paris, On October 2nd, 1915, Cavacos married Pauline Pradelle. Pauline was a professional pianist. She practiced her art in the studio where Emmanuel executed his sculptures.

His work made him a well known figure in the art colony of Paris, and he was commissioned to do the portraits of a number of notable citizens, including Mlle. Mistinguett, a prominent actress; Bucot, and Marcelle Ragnon. In 1925 he received a silver medal for a fountain at the International Exhibition of Decorative Arts in Paris. As a tribute to his ability, in 1927, the French Government bestowed upon him the decoration, Officier de l’Acadamie.
In subsequent years he exhibited annually in the Salon, and also at the Salon des Humoristes de Paris, where his dancing figures were highly praised.
His work is in a number of important collections, including that of Queen Marie of Rumania, who purchased one of his marble figures, Grief.

Cavacos’ sculpture has been praised for its variety, able craftsmanship, and for the sense of rhythm it conveys. The French critics emphasized its inherently poetic qualities.

In 1930 Cavacos returned to the United States for the first time in eighteen years. His work was exhibited at the Baltimore Museum of Art in March of that year. His work was also shown in New York, and later in the year at Homeland. A group of 17 of his sculptures were also placed on display in the National Sculpture Society Exhibition in San Francisco. In May, 1930, he and his wife returned to Paris.

Information about Cavacos post 1930 is difficult to obtain. Hopefully someone can shed more light on his life, in particular the period from 1931 – 1976.

We do know that when members of his family died, Cavacos undertook to create a beautiful monument, and to send it to be erected in the Greek section of a Cemetery in Baltimore, where it still stands today.

It seems that his interest in sculpture continued until well into his old age. When granddaughters of Charles Fitzpatrick (his Baltimore friend) visited him in Paris in 1969, they were photographed with him in his art studio. Many sculptures are visible in the room.

Emmanuel Cavacos died in 1976, aged 91.

Background to the biographical sketch, above

Information about Emmanuel Cavacos is not very extensive. Thankfully, Emmanuel seems to have established a friendship with a Baltimore resident called Charles Fitzpatrick. After Cavacos moved permanently to France he continued to correspond with him. Mike Fitzpatrick (aka Piedmont Fossil), Charles Fitzpatrick’s grandson takes up the story. “Cavacos sent photographs of his studio and his sculptures and even an invitation to his wedding in October 1915. Considering that the wedding took place across the Atlantic and the great time and expense it would require to go there -- not to mention that fact that by then France was deep into World War I -- my grandfather was unable to attend. In 1930 Cavacos made a return visit to the United States for a couple of exhibitions, one in his old hometown of Baltimore and one in New York. I don’t know how successful his exhibitions were considering they took place during the first year of the Great Depression, but today his sculptures, if they can be found at all, seem to sell for between several hundred and several thousand dollars each. In the late 1960s my two sisters traveled to Europe and, at the request of my grandfather, they stopped by to visit (the by that time elderly) Mr. Cavacos at his Paris home”.

Thankfully Mike Fitzpatrick has posted the Cavacos photographs from that time on flickr

http://www.flickr.com/photos/piedmont_fossil/sets/72157594585161747/

“Most of the photos in this set were sent to my grandfather by Emmanuel Cavacos soon after he moved to Paris. Almost all of them are inscribed on the reverse in the artist’s own handwriting.”

Cindy Anderson, is a fiancee of Pete Capsanes, who is the grandson of Theodore Andrew Cavacos, brother to Emmanuel and Constantine. These are all Baltimore Cavacos Kytherians. Cindy wrote to KAW:
"We just had Pete's family here and were talking about Emmanual Andrew Cavacos which is Pete's Great Great Uncle and the sculptor who ended up migrating from Greece, to Maryland back to Paris where he died. We have many of his sculpted pieces in the family".

History > Documents

submitted by Kytherian Art World on 30.09.2011

Emmanuel Cavacos Exhibition of Sculptures in New York

Mitch Galleries. 108 West 57th Street, March 31st to April 12th 1930.

Signed by Emmanuel Cavacos.

34 Works were exhibited. These included:


1. Portrait of as Dancer (marble)
2. The Kiss (marble jaune de Sienne)
3. Agony of the Soul (terra cotta)
4. Portait of Dr Herbert A Gibbons (bronze)
5. Youth (terra cotta)
6. The Source (marble jaune de Sienne)
7. Springtime (marble rose de Milan)
8. Grief (marble jaune de Sienne)
9. The Arabesques (bronze)
10. Arabesque (bronze)
11. Arabesque (bronze)
12. Joy (bronze)
13. The Breeze (bronze)
14. Whirlwind (bronze)
15. Le Belle Dherlys (bronze)
16. The Dance (bronze)
17. Little Dancer (bronze)
18. Ash Tray “Faunesse” (bronze)
19. Ash Tray “Faune” (bronze)
20. Little Dancer (bronze)
21. Small Head (bronze)
22. Grief (bronze)
23. Indolence (bronze)
24. Despair (bronze)
25. Springtime (bronze)
26. Fascination (bronze)
27. Danse Du Baiser (bronze)
28. Bacchus (bronze)
29. The Kiss (bronze)
30. Lindbergh (bronze)
31. The Effort (bronze)
32. Strength and Suppleness (bronze)
33. Fascination (bronze)
34. Baby (terra cotta composition Cavacos)


Emmanuel Andrew Cavacos was born in Potamos, Kythera, on February 10th, 1885. He emigrated to the United States of America, when he was sixteen years old, and settled in Baltimore, in the suburb of Hampden, where his brother Constantine was living. Another brother Theodore also chose to live in Baltimore. (Theodore was married to fellow Kytherian Pothiti Chlentzos). In Baltimore he formed a close friendship with Charles Fitzpatrick, with whom he communicated for many years. Photographs and Arts Programs which Cavacos sent to Fitzpatrick form the basis for this (preliminary) biographical sketch.

Having displayed a decided artistic aptitude, he was sent to the Maryland Institute to study painting. He devoted four years to this pursuit, whilst at the same time experimenting with sculptural modeling. Ephraim Keyser, the veteran Baltimore sculptor, who for many years was Director of the Rinehart School of Sculpture at the Maryland Institute, was so impressed with the quality of his clay sketches that he advised him to give up painting and devote himself exclusively to sculpture.

Cavacos took this advise, and he made such rapid progress as a student of Ephraim Keyser, that in 1911 he was awarded the Rinehart Scholarship, which enabled him to go to the Beaux Arts School in Paris. In Paris he was known as Emmanuel Andre, Andre being the French version of his middle name, Andrew.

In 1913, one of his works, Aspiration received an Honorable Mention at the Salon des Artistes Francais. The next year his Thinker attracted great attention at the Paris Salon. The first of this “Thinkers” is housed at the Enoch Pratt Free Library, and the second at the Peabody Institute in Baltimore.

In Paris, On October 2nd, 1915, Cavacos married Pauline Pradelle. Pauline was a professional pianist. She practiced her art in the studio where Emmanuel executed his sculptures.

His work made him a well known figure in the art colony of Paris, and he was commissioned to do the portraits of a number of notable citizens, including Mlle. Mistinguett, a prominent actress; Bucot, and Marcelle Ragnon. In 1925 he received a silver medal for a fountain at the International Exhibition of Decorative Arts in Paris. As a tribute to his ability, in 1927, the French Government bestowed upon him the decoration, Officier de l’Acadamie.
In subsequent years he exhibited annually in the Salon, and also at the Salon des Humoristes de Paris, where his dancing figures were highly praised.
His work is in a number of important collections, including that of Queen Marie of Rumania, who purchased one of his marble figures, Grief.

Cavacos’ sculpture has been praised for its variety, able craftsmanship, and for the sense of rhythm it conveys. The French critics emphasized its inherently poetic qualities.

In 1930 Cavacos returned to the United States for the first time in eighteen years. His work was exhibited at the Baltimore Museum of Art in March of that year. His work was also shown in New York, and later in the year at Homeland. A group of 17 of his sculptures were also placed on display in the National Sculpture Society Exhibition in San Francisco. In May, 1930, he and his wife returned to Paris.

Information about Cavacos post 1930 is difficult to obtain. Hopefully someone can shed more light on his life, in particular the period from 1931 – 1976.

We do know that when members of his family died, Cavacos undertook to create a beautiful monument, and to send it to be erected in the Greek section of a Cemetery in Baltimore, where it still stands today.

It seems that his interest in sculpture continued until well into his old age. When granddaughters of Charles Fitzpatrick (his Baltimore friend) visited him in Paris in 1969, they were photographed with him in his art studio. Many sculptures are visible in the room.

Emmanuel Cavacos died in 1976, aged 91.

Background to the biographical sketch, above

Information about Emmanuel Cavacos is not very extensive. Thankfully, Emmanuel seems to have established a friendship with a Baltimore resident called Charles Fitzpatrick. After Cavacos moved permanently to France he continued to correspond with him. Mike Fitzpatrick (aka Piedmont Fossil), Charles Fitzpatrick’s grandson takes up the story. “Cavacos sent photographs of his studio and his sculptures and even an invitation to his wedding in October 1915. Considering that the wedding took place across the Atlantic and the great time and expense it would require to go there -- not to mention that fact that by then France was deep into World War I -- my grandfather was unable to attend. In 1930 Cavacos made a return visit to the United States for a couple of exhibitions, one in his old hometown of Baltimore and one in New York. I don’t know how successful his exhibitions were considering they took place during the first year of the Great Depression, but today his sculptures, if they can be found at all, seem to sell for between several hundred and several thousand dollars each. In the late 1960s my two sisters traveled to Europe and, at the request of my grandfather, they stopped by to visit (the by that time elderly) Mr. Cavacos at his Paris home”.

Thankfully Mike Fitzpatrick has posted the Cavacos photographs from that time on flickr

http://www.flickr.com/photos/piedmont_fossil/sets/72157594585161747/

“Most of the photos in this set were sent to my grandfather by Emmanuel Cavacos soon after he moved to Paris. Almost all of them are inscribed on the reverse in the artist’s own handwriting.”

Cindy Anderson, is a fiancee of Pete Capsanes, who is the grandson of Theodore Andrew Cavacos, brother to Emmanuel and Constantine. These are all Baltimore Cavacos Kytherians. Cindy wrote to KAW:
"We just had Pete's family here and were talking about Emmanual Andrew Cavacos which is Pete's Great Great Uncle and the sculptor who ended up migrating from Greece, to Maryland back to Paris where he died. We have many of his sculpted pieces in the family".

History > Documents

submitted by Kytherian Art World on 30.09.2011

Program for an Exhibition of Sculpture Emmanuel Cavacos sculptures, Baltimore, 1930

Baltimore Museum of Art. March 1st to March 25th 1930.

34 Works were exhibited. These included:


1. Portrait of as Dancer (marble)
2. The Kiss (marble jaune de Sienne)
3. Agony of the Soul (terra cotta)
4. Portait of Dr Herbert A Gibbons (bronze)
5. Youth (terra cotta)
6. The Source (marble jaune de Sienne)
7. Springtime (marble rose de Milan)
8. Grief (marble jaune de Sienne)
9. The Arabesques (bronze)
10. Arabesque (bronze)
11. Arabesque (bronze)
12. Joy (bronze)
13. The Breeze (bronze)
14. Whirlwind (bronze)
15. Le Belle Dherlys (bronze)
16. The Dance (bronze)
17. Little Dancer (bronze)
18. Ash Tray “Faunesse” (bronze)
19. Ash Tray “Faune” (bronze)
20. Little Dancer (bronze)
21. Small Head (bronze)
22. Grief (bronze)
23. Indolence (bronze)
24. Despair (bronze)
25. Springtime (bronze)
26. Fascination (bronze)
27. Danse Du Baiser (bronze)
28. Bacchus (bronze)
29. The Kiss (bronze)
30. Lindbergh (bronze)
31. The Effort (bronze)
32. Strength and Suppleness (bronze)
33. Fascination (bronze)
34. Baby (terra cotta composition Cavacos)


Emmanuel Andrew Cavacos was born in Potamos, Kythera, on February 10th, 1885. He emigrated to the United States of America, when he was sixteen years old, and settled in Baltimore, in the suburb of Hampden, where his brother Constantine was living. Another brother Theodore also chose to live in Baltimore. (Theodore was married to fellow Kytherian Pothiti Chlentzos). In Baltimore he formed a close friendship with Charles Fitzpatrick, with whom he communicated for many years. Photographs and Arts Programs which Cavacos sent to Fitzpatrick form the basis for this (preliminary) biographical sketch.

Having displayed a decided artistic aptitude, he was sent to the Maryland Institute to study painting. He devoted four years to this pursuit, whilst at the same time experimenting with sculptural modeling. Ephraim Keyser, the veteran Baltimore sculptor, who for many years was Director of the Rinehart School of Sculpture at the Maryland Institute, was so impressed with the quality of his clay sketches that he advised him to give up painting and devote himself exclusively to sculpture.

Cavacos took this advise, and he made such rapid progress as a student of Ephraim Keyser, that in 1911 he was awarded the Rinehart Scholarship, which enabled him to go to the Beaux Arts School in Paris. In Paris he was known as Emmanuel Andre, Andre being the French version of his middle name, Andrew.

In 1913, one of his works, Aspiration received an Honorable Mention at the Salon des Artistes Francais. The next year his Thinker attracted great attention at the Paris Salon. The first of this “Thinkers” is housed at the Enoch Pratt Free Library, and the second at the Peabody Institute in Baltimore.

In Paris, On October 2nd, 1915, Cavacos married Pauline Pradelle. Pauline was a professional pianist. She practiced her art in the studio where Emmanuel executed his sculptures.

His work made him a well known figure in the art colony of Paris, and he was commissioned to do the portraits of a number of notable citizens, including Mlle. Mistinguett, a prominent actress; Bucot, and Marcelle Ragnon. In 1925 he received a silver medal for a fountain at the International Exhibition of Decorative Arts in Paris. As a tribute to his ability, in 1927, the French Government bestowed upon him the decoration, Officier de l’Acadamie.
In subsequent years he exhibited annually in the Salon, and also at the Salon des Humoristes de Paris, where his dancing figures were highly praised.
His work is in a number of important collections, including that of Queen Marie of Rumania, who purchased one of his marble figures, Grief.

Cavacos’ sculpture has been praised for its variety, able craftsmanship, and for the sense of rhythm it conveys. The French critics emphasized its inherently poetic qualities.

In 1930 Cavacos returned to the United States for the first time in eighteen years. His work was exhibited at the Baltimore Museum of Art in March of that year. His work was also shown in New York, and later in the year at Homeland. A group of 17 of his sculptures were also placed on display in the National Sculpture Society Exhibition in San Francisco. In May, 1930, he and his wife returned to Paris.

Information about Cavacos post 1930 is difficult to obtain. Hopefully someone can shed more light on his life, in particular the period from 1931 – 1976.

We do know that when members of his family died, Cavacos undertook to create a beautiful monument, and to send it to be erected in the Greek section of a Cemetery in Baltimore, where it still stands today.

It seems that his interest in sculpture continued until well into his old age. When granddaughters of Charles Fitzpatrick (his Baltimore friend) visited him in Paris in 1969, they were photographed with him in his art studio. Many sculptures are visible in the room.

Emmanuel Cavacos died in 1976, aged 91.

Background to the biographical sketch, above

Information about Emmanuel Cavacos is not very extensive. Thankfully, Emmanuel seems to have established a friendship with a Baltimore resident called Charles Fitzpatrick. After Cavacos moved permanently to France he continued to correspond with him. Mike Fitzpatrick (aka Piedmont Fossil), Charles Fitzpatrick’s grandson takes up the story. “Cavacos sent photographs of his studio and his sculptures and even an invitation to his wedding in October 1915. Considering that the wedding took place across the Atlantic and the great time and expense it would require to go there -- not to mention that fact that by then France was deep into World War I -- my grandfather was unable to attend. In 1930 Cavacos made a return visit to the United States for a couple of exhibitions, one in his old hometown of Baltimore and one in New York. I don’t know how successful his exhibitions were considering they took place during the first year of the Great Depression, but today his sculptures, if they can be found at all, seem to sell for between several hundred and several thousand dollars each. In the late 1960s my two sisters traveled to Europe and, at the request of my grandfather, they stopped by to visit (the by that time elderly) Mr. Cavacos at his Paris home”.

Thankfully Mike Fitzpatrick has posted the Cavacos photographs from that time on flickr

http://www.flickr.com/photos/piedmont_fossil/sets/72157594585161747/

“Most of the photos in this set were sent to my grandfather by Emmanuel Cavacos soon after he moved to Paris. Almost all of them are inscribed on the reverse in the artist’s own handwriting.”

Cindy Anderson, is a fiancee of Pete Capsanes, who is the grandson of Theodore Andrew Cavacos, brother to Emmanuel and Constantine. These are all Baltimore Cavacos Kytherians. Cindy wrote to KAW:
"We just had Pete's family here and were talking about Emmanual Andrew Cavacos which is Pete's Great Great Uncle and the sculptor who ended up migrating from Greece, to Maryland back to Paris where he died. We have many of his sculpted pieces in the family".

History > Documents

submitted by Roxy Theatre, Bingara, NSW on 18.04.2011

Media Release 75th Anniversary Celebrations

OFFICIAL LAUNCH PETERS CAFÉ & MUSEUM

SATURDAY 9TH + SUNDAY 10TH APRIL 2011

BINGARA, NSW

Upload a pdf version of the Media Release, here:

ROXY_MEDIA_RELEASE.pdf


There is nothing remarkable about a story regarding the demise of a Greek café in rural Australia. There is something quite extraordinary however, about such a café being brought back to life.

Forty-five years since serving its last mixed grill, The Roxy Café in Bingara, northern New South Wales, has been faithfully restored to its original splendour.

On Saturday 9th April and Sunday 10th April, The Roxy will celebrate its 75th Anniversary with the launch of the refurbished café and preview of the site of a museum that will be integrated into the venue.

The Roxy was built by three Greek partners from the island of Kythera. Opening in 1936, The Roxy complex boasted an architecturally striking art deco cinema, café, three independent retail premises and a guest house.

The venue operated as a cinema until 1958 when it shut down and spent the next forty years virtually lying dormant. The Roxy Theatre was purchased by the then-Bingara Shire Council in 1999 and fully restored.

In 2004, The Roxy theatre was re-opened to the public as a cinema, performing arts venue and multi-purpose function centre that includes a variety of conferences, seminars, weddings and private functions.

In 2009, the Gwydir Shire Council was the recipient of a substantial grant from the Department of Heritage, Environment, Water and the Arts to restore the art deco café adjoining the cinema and incorporate a museum.

The museum will be dedicated to the history of Greek settlement in country Australia (with a focus on NSW and Queensland). It will become a place of national and international significance that collects, conserves and protects the important cultural associations between people and place. It will pay tribute to the remarkable legacy of the Greek café and cinema operators to ensure the impact they made on the daily lives of millions of people is not forgotten.

The next stage of the project will be to complete the fit-out of museum which is currently a ‘blank canvass.’ With the museum yet to be established, it is the café that will be the star of the show on the 9th and 10th April.

What is particularly unique about the café restoration is the number of fixtures and fittings from the original café that have been brought back to life. Wood paneling, mirrors, cubicles, tables and chairs, as well as the spectacular neon sign that hung under the awning in the 1930s, have all been reinstated.

Greek cafés changed the course of Australia’s cultural history and left a significant legacy on our culinary and cultural landscape. Very few Greek cafes operate as they did 50 years ago. Even fewer complexes that incorporate a functioning cinema and café remain. Once complete, The Roxy may be the only original purpose built theatre with adjoining café operating in New South Wales, possibly in Australia.

The town of Bingara has a great deal to celebrate by launching the café. It is important to note, that while the doors to the café will be thrown open to the public over the April weekend, it will not begin trading commercially until a later date when a suitable operator has been appointed.

The shared narrative of The Roxy’s history exemplifies the Greek migration experience: one that made an outstanding contribution to the development of Australia. It is therefore fitting that following the official launch of the café, a Gala Ball be held. Bringing the glamour of the 1930’s back to Bingara, the Black Tie Gala Ball will be an unforgettable evening of Greek feasting and festivity.

Paying homage to Hollywood’s Golden Age, a superb selection of screenings will light up the silver screen over the weekend. Highlights will include well-known actor John Wood presenting the television episode he filmed featuring The Roxy, as well as the first film ever screened at The Roxy opening in 1936. Roberta, starring Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers.

The 75th Anniversary Celebrations on the 9th and 10th April will be a step back in time into Australia’s future by celebrating an icon to be enjoyed by generations to come.


Enquiries:

Sandy McNaughton
Manager,
The Roxy
Locked Bag 5,
Bingara 2404
NSW
AUSTRALIA

tel: (02) 67 240 003
mob: 0427 241 582

e-mail:

ROXY

History > Documents

submitted by John Fardoulis on 07.03.2011

Pioneers in Kytherian Field Research

Some of the dozens of volunteers participating in KRG organised projects in Kythera during 2010.

History > Documents

submitted by Roxy Theatre, Bingara, NSW on 09.02.2011

Buffer map of distances from the town of Bingara, NSW

Download a .pdf version of the buffer map here:

BingaraBufferDistance 20110208.pdf

(This will allow you to print off a larger version without losing resolution.)

Bingara, is in north western New South Wales, within Gwydir Council Shire.

It is home to the famous Roxy Theatre, Peters (Roxy) Cafe, Roxy Museum. and Roxy Tourist Information Centre.

The story of how this "complex" came to be built is brilliantly told in Peter Prineas' book, Katsehamos and the Great Idea

The buffer map is based on 90 km zones (approx 1 hours driving) from the town of Bingara.

It was kindly drawn up for us by GIS Officer, Danielle Perrett of Gwydir Council.

As you can see all MAJOR cities of Kytherian population Sydney, Brisbane and Canberra are within the 7 hour zone.

The Kytherian Association of Australia (KAA) has never collated data re: Kytherians / Greeks living within zones 1-6.

The Roxy Museum Comm will certainly be making every endeavour to collate this data over the next year +. I am certain that KAA Comm will assist in every possible way. Such a data base would "lengthen" the "reach" of the KAA.

If you, or someone you know of, is a Kytherian / Greek living in zones 1-6 please advise.

Email George C Poulos

We have found in particular that Kytherians / Greeks living within zones 1 & 2 & 3 will go out of there way to travel to Bingara - if they are informed that an event is on there.

Once the very attractive Information Centre is completed (March-April 2011) - (incidentally it is the site of Dr Archie Kalokerinos's surgery during his practice in Bingara) - the Centre will be selling all Kytherian World Heritage Fund books there.

In the meantime if you have information of Kytherians / Greeks living in places like Dubbo, Orange, Bathurst, Tweed Heads, Katoomba, Gold Coast etc etc - with email addresses - please pass them onto George C Poulos - and we will start this more comprehensive data base.

There are numerous entries and photographs about the Roxy "complex" at Bingara on the www.kythera-family.net website. The main web pages are listed below.

MAIN WEB PAGES

Roxy Theatre


http://www.kythera-family.net/index.php?nav=117-119&cid=191&did=2177&pageflip=24


Roxy Café
http://www.kythera-family.net/index.php?nav=117-119&cid=191&did=17330&pageflip=1


Roxy Museum
http://www.kythera-family.net/index.php?nav=117-119&cid=191&did=17535&pageflip=1


Katsehamos and the Great Idea

http://www.kythera-family.net/en/redirect?nav=6-82&cid=123&did=9989&pageflip=3__

Restoration of Kytherian and Hellenic Sacred sites

http://www.kythera-family.net/index.php?nav=117-119&cid=191&did=17857&pageflip=3

History > Documents

submitted by Kytherian World Heritage Fund on 23.12.2010

Sister City Relationship established between Gwydir Shire and Kythera Council

Anglo-Australians, through all 3 tiers of Government, have, over the past 6 years, spent in excess of $3 million restoring what is ostensibly a Kytherian Cinema, and a Kytherian Cafe in the North West NSW Country town of Binagara. They have also created a Greek-Australian Cafe Museum - which is primarily a Kytherian Museum. (See numerous links to the history of the Roxy, below).

The history of the establishment of these very significant buildings has been laid out clearly by Peter Prineas in his book, Katsehamos and the Great Idea.

What this does is ensure that Greek / Kytherian - Australian cultural “shrines” are extant for at least half a century, and probably beyond. The scope, power and quality of this Project is incontrovertible. The Roxy is a beautiful, living, working memorial to the Hellenic and Kytherian “shop-keeping phenomenon”, as Hugh Gilchrist called it in Australians and Greeks. As knowledge about the Roxy grows amongst Greeks and Kytherians in Australia and around the world, the Roxy will become a place of pilgrimage.

The Roxy has been an extraordinary success, and has made the town of Bingara the premier cultural hub of the North West of NSW. (It is a hub for much larger towns such as Tamworth and Armidale, which do not have the cinema's multi-purpose facilities). Much of the success can be sheeted home to the faith, diligence and courage of the Manager of the Roxy, Sandy McNaughton.

The establishment of the Roxy has also given the residents of the town of Bingara and of the Gwydir Shire a deep empathy with the residents of Kythera, and with the Kytherian diaspora worldwide.

As a result, the Mayor of Gwydir Shire, Councillor John Coulton, was moved to write a letter to the Mayor of Kythera, proposing the establishment of a sister-city relationship between the two Municipalities.

Download a .pdf version of the letter in English:

Gwydir - Kythera sister city Letter.pdf

Download a .pdf version of the letter in Greek:

Gwydir - Kythera sister City Letter GREEK.pdf

This proposal was debated by the Council of Kythera in September 2010. The motion was embraced by all factions of the Kythera Council, Nea Demokratia, PASOK, and the Independents, and was passed unanimously.

George C Poulos was present at 12:30 am when this occurred, and thanked the Council of Kythera for displaying such foresight and courage. He also indicated to the Council members that, as they learnt more about the Roxy Complex, and its history, and future prospects, as Kytherians, they would become increasingly proud of what had been accomplished in Bingara by the Gwydir Shire.

He also pointed out that this established a link between Kythera and an agrarian Council in Australia, and he hoped that a further link would soon be established with a city Council in Sydney, namely the Kogarah Shire Council, whose chambers adjoin the Church of Myrtidiotissa. They all indicated that if a similar proposal as that of Gwydir Shire came before the chamber, they would look upon it very favourably.

All were certain that as the relationship between Gwydir and Kythera, developed and deepened, immense benefits would accrue to both partners. We all await this very exciting eventuality.

Central Web-links:

Roxy Theatre

Roxy Café

Roxy Museum

Katsehamos and the Great Idea

Overview of the history of the Roxy, published in the Royal Historical Society magazine

History > Documents

submitted by Peter (Panagiotis) Prineas on 26.10.2010

Britain's Greek Islands

Front cover of the book:

Published October 2009
Soft cover, 415 pages, bibliog., notes, index.
ISBN 9780980672213
Published by Plateia Press

'BRITAIN'S GREEK ISLANDS' was launched by Associate Professor Vrasidas Karalis of the Department of Modern Greek at Sydney University's Nicholson Museum on 14 October 2009. Professor Karalis has described the book as 'a labour of love, meticulously researched' and 'a fascinating personal account of the Seven Islands which were "British" before becoming Greek'.

The book tells the story of five decades in the early nineteenth century when the British ruled Kythera and the Ionian Islands. It is a very readable history, painstakingly assembled from hundreds of hand-written letters and documents, most previously unpublished.

It conveys the texture and detail of life, society and politics in the island of Cerigo (Kythera) and the Ionian Islands (then known as Corfu, Paxo, Santa Maura, Ithaca, Cephalonia and Zante) and illuminates important but largely forgotten events.

Based on extensive research in the archives, and illustrated with maps, photographs and historic prints, 'Britain's Greek Islands' reveals the sometimes turbulent relations that existed in the Protectorate named the 'United States of the Ionian Islands'.

The narrative is placed within the wider history of Europe and the Near East, from the Napoleonic Wars, through the Greek War of Independence, the Crimean War, and conflicts over the 'Eastern Question' that resonate to this day.


ORDERS AND INQUIRIES

By post: Plateia Press 32 Calder Road Darlington NSW 2008 AUSTRALIA.

Email: pprineas@ozemail.com.au

Telephone: 61 2 9319 1513

Mobile: 0429 322 857.

RETAIL PRICE
AUD$38.50 (plus postage and packing)

PAYMENT
Australia - Visa, Mastercard, cheque or money order
Overseas - Visa, Mastercard, international transfer or money order

'BRITAIN'S GREEK ISLANDS' is also available from selected bookshops, including Gleebooks and Abbeys in Sydney.

History > Documents

submitted by John Stathatos on 17.08.2010

Poster, Kytherian Initiative Open Meeting, 23/08/10

Kytherian Initiative meeting, 23 August 2010, Chora

History > Documents

submitted by Roxy Theatre, Bingara, NSW on 21.06.2010

Bingara within the north west of New South Wales.

Map shows the location of Bingara, in relationship to the North West of New South Wales, the New South Wales coastline, and the Queensland border.

The Kytherian "sacred sites", Roxy Theatre, Roxy Cafe, and Roxy Museum are located in Bingara.

Roxy THEATRE Main Page

Roxy CAFE Main Page

Roxy MUSEUM Main Page. Overview of the history of the Roxy, published in the Royal Historical Society magazine

Katsehamos and the Great Idea, the BOOK, Main Page

History > Documents

submitted by Kytherian World Heritage Fund on 26.04.2010

The Greek Military Cross awarded to Oswald Pearce

Anzacs of `second Gallipoli' seek restitution

Article from: The Australian

Apr 22, 2010 10:30am

ANZACS from the forgotten Greek campaign are seeking belated recognition


On the 21st April, 2010, the Kytherian World Heritage Fund staged a function at NSW Parliament House featuring Maria Hill's book, Diggers and Greeks. "Ossie" was the special guest.

Oswald Pearce, 91, is one of the forgotten Anzacs. And if he has retained a rapid-fire sense of humour in his twilight years, it is not enough to mask a grievance that stretches back more than half a century.

"The Brits, they just dropped us in it," says Mr Pearce, a widower from Dobroyd Point, in Sydney's inner west. "But no one really knows anything about it."

"Ossie" Pearce was a sergeant in the 2/1st Field Regiment of the Australian 6th Division, which had been dispatched to northern Greece in April 1941 to confront the Germans. The campaign marked the reformation of the Anzacs, with Australians posted alongside New Zealanders in combat for the first time since war had been waged with a crumbling Ottoman Empire 26 years earlier. And it would prove every bit as suicidal.

Inspired by Winston Churchill to prove to the US that Britain stayed loyal to its non-commonwealth allies, and thus convince the US to join the war, the conflict lasted barely two months. Men with rifles were forced to oppose Panzer tank units and fleets of bombers. Three divisions versus more than 10. It was a fighting retreat from the start, first to the ports of southern Greece and then to Crete.

"A couple of times, there we were, an artillery unit without any guns," Mr Pearce laughs. "We were up against it."

In all, about 6200 Australians were captured as prisoners of war -- representing 83 per cent of all Australians held by Germany and Italy during World War II.

To add insult to injury, British Field Marshal Henry Maitland Wilson then ordered that no Australian should receive military honours for service at the Aegean battlefront. So even though Greece awarded Mr Pearce and his fellow Diggers the Greek Military Cross for their service, the Anzacs would not be recognised by their own governments.

Mr Pearce has twice written to federal defence ministers asking for this campaign to be recognised. Twice his pleas have been ignored. But for the 18 "forgotten Anzacs" from this campaign who are still alive today, there may yet be hope.

Historian Maria Hill has released a new book, Diggers and Greeks, and she is now marshalling her own campaign to have these veterans finally and formally recognised with a new medal, the Greek Star.

Article from: The Australian

History > Documents

submitted by Kytherian World Heritage Fund on 24.04.2010

Plans for the Roxy Cafe, the Tourist Information Centre, and the Roxy Museum

PLANS. .pdf versions.

PLANS_Ground_Floor.pdf

PLANS_First_Floor.pdf

PLANS_Elevations_Exteriors.pdf

PLANS_Section_Diagrams.pdf


The $1.4 million Grant

The Australian federal government approved a grant of $1.4 million dollars in November 2009, to Gwydir Shire Council, in order to restore the Roxy Cafe, the Tourist Information Centre, and to create a Roxy Museum, which will be a "Greek-Australian" Museum, and ostensibly a "Kytherian-Australian" Museum.

This will be the only Greek-Australian Museum outside of Melbourne, Victoria.

It will also be the only operational "Kytherian Museum" in Australia, and the World. [The Kytherian Museum in Hora, Kythera, is closed as of 2010.]

This expenditure of $1.4 million, must be added to a previous expenditure, by various Local, State, and Federal Governments, of $1.6 million, to restore the Roxy Theatre.

It is extraordinary that in a town of 1300 residents, such large sums of money have been expended on these projects.

Lets not be under any illusions about this. The Roxy Cinema, Roxy Cafe, and Roxy Boarding House, are "Kytherian" creations. This has been well researched by Peter Prineas, and beautifully explicated in his book Katsehamos and the Great Idea. All are "Kytherian" heritage structures of the first order.

They will all soon be restored to high levels of design excellence, and become living memorials to Kytherian heritage in Australia.

History > Documents

submitted by Kytherian World Heritage Fund on 22.04.2010

Con Fardouly's Thank you letter.

After a Kytherian-Greek & Australian Greek, visit to the Roxy Theatre, Bingara, NSW.

Con was obviously very moved by the experience.

History > Documents

submitted by Karavitiko Symposium, Sydney on 02.04.2010

Con George Poulos. Navy Licence, (Ναυτικον Φυλλαλιον)

Last two pages.

Con disembarked from the S.S. Olga, registered in Piraeus, in Adelaide, South Australia.

The date was 29th April, 1948.

Con was 31½ years of age.

Cons Obituary and Life Story

It would be a long time before he returned to Greece.