kythera family kythera family
  

Oral History

History > Oral History

"History is the witness that testifies to the passing of time; it illumines reality, vitalizes memory, provides guidance in daily life and brings us tidings of antiquity."
Cicero (106 BC - 43 BC), Pro Publio Sestio

There are many categories in this section - they are now visible in the navigation on the left. By choosing any one of them you can view the entries, and by clicking on the add to... links at the top right of each category page, you can easily submit your own entry.

Please note! There are dozens of historic and fascinating photographs to be found in the Kythera Cultural Archive section of this site.


Showing 61 - 80 from 98 entries
Show: sorted by:

History > Oral History

submitted by George Poulos on 24.12.2004

Nick Mentis. Karavas, Tenterfield, Sydney.

From:

Janis Wilton.
Immigrants in the Bush.
Cafes and Cafe Owners.

Armidale College of Advanced Education.
1989.
81 x A4 pages.

Peter Tsicalas (see, Culture, subsection, Bibliography), desribes this book in the following way:

"...mainly compiled from taped interviews she did with four Greeks on the New England Tablelands in 1983. She’s put together a great story accompanied by many old photos ...

History > Oral History

submitted by George Poulos on 06.12.2004

Theo Kepreotes recalls the Kytherians of Gunnedah, NSW, in the 20th century.

[From records maintained at the Water Tower Museum, Gunnedah.

For other Kytherian history re: Gunnedah, search under Gunnedah.

Written by Theo Kepreotes, [Maroubra], 1996(?) and reproduced with permission.

Theo was instrumental liasing with Gunnedah Council to have the Car Parks of Gunnedah named after Kytherian pioneers. For photographs, see separate entries.]

The majority of Gunnedah's early Greeks originated from the island of ...

History > Oral History

submitted by George Poulos on 16.11.2004

Antonius Notaras. Reminiscing about his life.

[[picture:"Notaras, Antonius.jpg" ID:5579]]

Antonius Notaras, was one of the fascinating characters interviewed by Suzanne Falkiner for her 1985 book, Australians Today. (Publisher, George Allen and Unwin). Also reproduced in the Sydney Morning Heralds'
Good Weekend Magazine
in the same year.

I still feel Greek after 50 years as an Australian

Before I came to Sydney, one of the men came back to the island (Kythera) ...

History > Oral History

submitted by Spyro Calocerinos on 04.03.2005

I REMEMBER

I remember when Mussolini demanded from the Greek Government to allow free passage to his troops through Greece and received the unexpected answer "OXI" NO!! which is still celebrated on the 28th of October

I remember, the pride of the Greeks when the Italians were defeated in Northern Greece and Albania.

I remember,the promises made to Greece by our Friendly and strong nations,for being brave to fight on their side and the world said ...

History > Oral History

submitted by Spyro Calocerinos on 23.10.2004

Viron Dapontes and the handgrenade

Viron, was well known in Hora for his many fearless acts and this is one of them, but it turned out to be very costly.

On the night of the 31st of August 1944, the Germans set fire to their ammunition on their Headquarters of Trahilas (near Kapsali) and the explosions and display of "fireworks", was by far the best we had seen. Obviously, the Germans didn't want their ammunition in the hands of their enemy. They went to Kapsali and left Kythera on the 4th of September.

Some ...

History > Oral History

submitted by Spyro Calocerinos on 18.01.2011

The street sign on the way to Hora's Kastro

Some time after the Germans left Kythera, (to be exact on the 27th of January 1945) a British cargo ship loaded with rice,wheat and flour,anchored in Kapsali.The ship was under the supervision of a British battle ship,whose Captain was Captain Frederick Rand.He was the first official appointed by the liberated Greek Government as a caretaker,to oversee the peaceful existence of all political parties in Kythera.

At this point,I must explain that there were a number of political conflicts ...

History > Oral History

submitted by George Poulos on 12.10.2004

A young Kytherian boys' interaction with the Italian troops stationed on Kythera. Tony Fardoulys remembers.

[Tony is a Real Estate agent in Liverpool, Sydney, Australia. In the past decade he has travelled to Kythera every Kytherian summer. Town of origin: Ayia Pelagia. Parachoukli Alai].

Food sharing.

The Italians used to go to Ayia Pelagia a lot. They used to give us whatever food they had left over in "billy cans" - and we would go back and share it with the family.

They were very good to us. They were very good......

The Germans ...

History > Oral History

submitted by George Poulos on 16.03.2005

Sea Mines. Nurki. (Greek). A fascination with dynamite.

[Tony Fardoulys is a Real Estate agent in Liverpool, Sydney, Australia. In the past decade he has travelled to Kythera every Kytherian summer. Town of origin: Ayia Pelagia. Parachoukli Alai. He recalls the following about sea mines].

Sea mines - are called nurki or nurkes (plural). They were big and round ....about 1½ metres wide. They had detonators every 7-8 inches ( 16 cm's). Many of them washed ashore in Kythera.

To immobilise them they were dragged ...

History > Oral History

submitted by George Poulos on 12.10.2004

The Day they blew the church at Ayia Pelagia to Kingdom Come. Tony Fardoulys' account.

[Tony is a Real Estate agent in Liverpool, Sydney, Australia. In the past decade he has travelled to Kythera every Kytherian summer. Town of origin: Ayia Pelagia. Parachoukli Alai].

In 1942, He remembers as a young child of 9 years of age, watching a ship come towards the shoreline at Ayia Pelegia. "I was watching...because I had nothing else to do." This ship was being guarded by a small aeroplane.....I remember it so clearly.....it would curl up towards Panagia Thespina, then ...

History > Oral History

submitted by George Poulos on 11.10.2004

The Day they blew the church at Ayia Pelagia to Kingdom Come.

In 1942, a bomb appeared on the beach near Firi Ammos. It had failed to detonate. It remained on the beach for many months.

The feast day of Ayia Patrikia, was traditionally celebrated in the small church of Ayia Patrikia - which is situated between Karavas and Ayia Pelagia. [As of early Oct 2004, no photograph of Ayia Patrikia has been posted to the web-site]. In 1942, this ceremony drew its usual very large crowd.

In the meantime, three Karavitithes, Haralambos Coroneos ...

History > Oral History

submitted by George Poulos on 15.05.2004

Prika - The Glory Box - Dimitra Fratzeskakis (nee, Zantiotis), remembers

The Glory Box of Yesterday

Many traditions have been erased by the redefinition of female roles in modern society. Changes in these roles were slow in reaching Kythera, and even though village women were often the back-bone of the family, a woman wasn't ready for a marriage unless her 'prika'- glory box was complete.

Apart from all the responsibilities of sustaining a household, the baking of bread and presiding over thew cooking hearth, most women's daily duties included ...

History > Oral History

submitted by Giannis Cassimatis on 14.05.2004

A chapter of Cassimatis family history

The Cassimatis family originated from the village of Keramoto of Kythera island. The first Manolis Cassimatis (that is, the first of who some memory still remains), otherwise known as Gerontomagas married a woman named Aneta, with whom he had six children, one daughter, Katerina, and five sons, Theodoros, Giannis, Nikos, Andreas and Panagiotis. Katerina had three daughters with her husband Dimitrio, Alexandra, Koula and Aneta. It is however the five sons who concern this chapter of the family history, ...

History > Oral History

submitted by Rowan Parkes on 05.05.2004

A sailors tales I

It was May of the year 1985. An old fisherman and his young inexperienced assistant and friend had thrown out their nets just off a beach near Myrtidia the night before, and that morning intended to bring them in. The weather however was very fresh, and the strong breeze of the evening before had climaxed into a harsh wind howling round the crags. The boat was no more than 5m long, with very little equipment and no anchor and the wind caused havoc from the moment they set out to retrieve the nets. ...

History > Oral History

submitted by George Poulos on 31.05.2004

Katsoolis, Peter & Chrisanthi & son, George - 1978 - Oral History

I have appropriated the following Oral History transcript from the site -

http://www.cybernaut.com.au/greeksinoz/interviews/interviews.htm#FIRST%20GENERATION%20KYTHERIANS

The site includes transcripts of lengthy interviews with 5 Kytherians.

Another feature of the site is access to sound recordings of the interviews. In May, 2004, I noted that this facility had "broken down". In fact the site gave the impression that it had not been maintained for some ...

History > Oral History

submitted by Ioanna Kaligerou on 21.01.2004

Reading the lead

Apart from tea leaves and apple dunking etc, another way of reading the future was done with lead. One melted the lead and then when it was hot it was poured into cold water at which point it became solid, and it was supposed that the "reader" could foresee the future through the patterns in the lead.
One young woman got her "lead done" and sent a friend to take it to the reader, as it was a long way for that time. When her friend got there the reader took one look at the lead and said: "Is ...

History > Oral History

submitted by Alexandra Ermolaeff on 20.01.2004

Queen of the Octopus

Sophie Poulos (Tzortzopoulos) was born in Gladstone, QLD, Australia to a Kytherian father and an Australian mother.

In 1978 her father Nikolas Tzortzopoulos took his family to live on Kythera. They lived in the scholi (the former agricultural school) in Karavas. Sophie was 14 years old at the time. This is what she remembers about the early days of living on the island.


(This story is transcribed from an audio interview with Alex Ermolaeff recorded in 2000)

History > Oral History

submitted by Alexandra Ermolaeff on 24.02.2004

The story of Michael Panaretos

[[picture:"tzannes8.jpg" ID:884]]
This is a copy of a photograph of Michael Panaretos. The original is in the Cultural Centre in Potamos. The photo was taken after he returned to Greece from the Belgian Congo.

Michael Panaretos left Kythera when his parents refused him permission to marry a girl they thought unsuitable. He vanished without a trace. He was about 22 at the time. His father in his will left him a one third share of his estate. This third share was to ...

History > Oral History

submitted by Alexandra Ermolaeff on 20.01.2004

Prof Manuel J Aroney: First trip to Kythera 1966

Extract from the memoirs of Prof Manuel J Aroney (Beys)

For Australian academics in the sciences, it is almost mandatory to go on study leave to prestige universities or research institutes in the United Kingdom, Western Europe or North America, to gain experience and reputation at international level and, hopefully, to impress a luminary or two who could provide valuable support in subsequent career moves

In 1965 I had been serving the University of Sydney ...

History > Oral History

submitted by Alexandra Ermolaeff on 06.02.2004

(01) Dimitrios Aronis-Beys: Departure from the Motherland

(An extract from the memoirs of Prof. Manuel J. Aroney)

[[picture:"military2.jpg" ID:827]]
My father Dimitrios Aronis and colleague doing military service in the Gendarmerie in Greece. Photograph taken circa 1906 prior to Dimitrios leaving for Australia.

A sombre mood hung over the village of Aroniadika on the Greek island of Kythera as on this day in 1908 one of its favourite sons was leaving. Dimitrios Aronis, son of Emmanuel Aronis (Beys or ...

History > Oral History

submitted by Alexandra Ermolaeff on 04.12.2003

(02) Dimitrios Aronis-Beys: The American Experience 1916 -19

(An extract from the memoirs of Prof. Manuel J. Aroney)

The city of Boston, located not far from the large metropolis of New York in the north-eastern part of the United States, was a magnet for immigrants because of manufacturing and other industries close by. A number of Dimitrios’ family from Kythera had chosen to settle there and were doing their utmost to become established. For each of them a large volume could be written about their life experiences in the new land ...