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Rocks


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5401:Natural History Museum > Rocks

submitted by Museum Administration on 03.11.2004

Serpentinite

Serpentinite is a greenish, ultramafic rock found on Kythera, particularly in the north. 6 cm. Photograph by Peter B Tzannes, 2004

5400:Natural History Museum > Rocks

submitted by Museum Administration on 03.11.2004

Volcanic Rock

Volcanic rock is not formed on Kythera, but is so light that it floats on water, and therefore can wash ashore from faraway places. This piece, found at Diakofty, is 6 cm long, and of a type known as ‘tuff’. Photograph by Peter B Tzannes, 2004

5399:Natural History Museum > Rocks

submitted by Museum Administration on 03.11.2004

Worn Tripoli Limestone

Most of the rock on Kythera is Tripoli limestone, which is probably the most important natural building material on the island. Weather-worn limestone of this type may have a dull, yellowish-gray cast, but a fresh cut reveals the rich, dark color of this rock.

5398:Natural History Museum > Rocks

submitted by Museum Administration on 03.11.2004

Tripoli Limestone

Tripoli limestone is hard and gray, darkened by organic matter in the shallow water where it was formed. The high hills of Kythera and much of the coastline is made of this limestone, which is the most common rock on the island. The old stone houses and the walls that divide the fields are mostly made of Tripoli limestone. 9 cm. Photograph by Peter B Tzannes, 2004

5397:Natural History Museum > Rocks

submitted by Museum Administration on 03.11.2004

Limestone with Calcite

A chunk of Tripoli limestone with a vein of calcite. When rounded and polished by the sea, these rocks form intriguing beach stones. Found on the cliffs above Agia Pelagia, 5 cm. Photograph by Peter B Tzannes, 2004

5396:Natural History Museum > Rocks

submitted by Museum Administration on 03.11.2004

Pori Stone

Margiakos limestone contains clay minerals and organic material, making it lightweight but hard. Known as ‘pori’, it is a good building material, and is most often used to frame doorways and windows in traditional stone houses on Kythera. 9 cm. Photograph by Peter B Tzannes, 2004

5393:Natural History Museum > Rocks

submitted by Museum Administration on 02.11.2004

Almond Stone

Almond stone is a hard, compact limestone that is formed in deep water and therefore contains little organic matter, which accounts for its light color. Common on Kythera, almond stone is often used in outer doorsills, where years of shuffling feet will give it a smooth, polished texture. 8 cm. Photograph by Peter B Tzannes, 2004

5392:Natural History Museum > Rocks

submitted by Museum Administration on 02.11.2004

Almond Stone with Calcite

A bit of almond stone with a vein filled by calcite. 5 cm. Photograph by Peter B Tzannes, 2004

5391:Natural History Museum > Rocks

submitted by Museum Administration on 02.11.2004

Almond Stone with Crystals

Almond stone is a frequent host for calcite crystals, as in this specimen, 10 cm long. Photograph by Peter B Tzannes, 2004

5390:Natural History Museum > Rocks

submitted by Museum Administration on 02.11.2004

Landscape Stone

The fissures in this piece of limestone have been filled with iron oxide, making strange and beautiful designs. 7.5 cm long. Photograph by Peter B Tzannes, 2004

5389:Natural History Museum > Rocks

submitted by Museum Administration on 02.11.2004

Limestone with Holes

Limestone with a pock-marked surface that has been eaten away by lithophagous sea creatures. 6 cm long. Photograph by Peter B Tzannes, 2004

5388:Natural History Museum > Rocks

submitted by Museum Administration on 02.11.2004

Sandstone

Sandstone is commonly found in the seaside cliffs of eastern Kythera, and forms many of the island's promontories, such as the well-known 'profiles' at Paliopoli. This piece is 10.5 cm long. Photograph by Peter B Tzannes, 2004

5387:Natural History Museum > Rocks

submitted by Museum Administration on 02.11.2004

Drilled Sandstone Core

Sandstone core from Kapsali drilling hole, 6 cm long. Gift of Markos Megaloikonomos. Photograph by Peter B Tzannes, 2004

5386:Natural History Museum > Rocks

submitted by Museum Administration on 02.11.2004

Pelites

Pelites is a fine-grained sedimentary rock formed from hardened clay. This triangular piece, 5 cm long, was found on the road between Fratsia and Paliopoli. Photograph by Peter B Tzannes, 2004

5385:Natural History Museum > Rocks

submitted by Museum Administration on 02.11.2004

Pelites with flint core

A broken cube of pelites with a core of red flint, 3.5 cm long. Photograph by Peter B Tzannes, 2004

5384:Natural History Museum > Rocks

submitted by Museum Administration on 02.11.2004

Pelites with flint

A small chunk of red pelites with a band of red flint, 4 cm long. Photograph by Peter B Tzannes, 2004

5383:Natural History Museum > Rocks

submitted by Museum Administration on 02.11.2004

Pelitic face

This charming piece of pelites has a funny face drawn with green aluminum oxide. 3.5 cm long. Photograph by Peter B Tzannes, 2004

5382:Natural History Museum > Rocks

submitted by Museum Administration on 02.11.2004

Pelites with black manganese

Red pelites with veins and patches of black manganese. Photograph by Peter B Tzannes, 2004

5381:Natural History Museum > Rocks

submitted by Museum Administration on 02.11.2004

Dendrites in pelites

Close-up of a piece of red pelites showing dendrites formed by black manganese. Photograph by Peter B Tzannes, 2004

5380:Natural History Museum > Rocks

submitted by Museum Administration on 02.11.2004

Silica dioxide

This rock is found in deep sea deposits, and commonly appears in schists. Pictured is a piece 8 cm long. Photograph by Peter B Tzannes, 2004