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Rocks


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5379:Natural History Museum > Rocks

submitted by Museum Administration on 02.11.2004

Gray flint

Flint is sedimentary rock with a fine, compact texture and a shiny fracture. This piece of gray flint is 2.5 cm long. Photograph by Peter B Tzannes, 2004

5378:Natural History Museum > Rocks

submitted by Museum Administration on 02.11.2004

Red flint

Flint splits in any direction and fractures into sharp edges, which made it a good material for prehistoric tools. This bit of red flint is 3.5 cm long. Photograph by Peter B Tzannes, 2004

5377:Natural History Museum > Rocks

submitted by Museum Administration on 02.11.2004

Black flint and limestone

Flint is a sedimentary form of silica, often found in limestone. This rock contains a core of black flint inside a chunk of compact limestone. 4.5 cm long. Photograph by Peter B Tzannes, 2004

5376:Natural History Museum > Rocks

submitted by Museum Administration on 02.11.2004

Red flint and limestone

Limestone and red flint sandwich, 4 cm long. Photograph by Peter B Tzannes, 2004

5375:Natural History Museum > Rocks

submitted by Museum Administration on 02.11.2004

Zebra Rocks

These wonderful beach stones are made from layered bands of black flint and white almond stone. The longest one pictured is 6 cm; all were found on Paliopoli beach. Photograph by Peter B Tzannes, 2004

5374:Natural History Museum > Rocks

submitted by Museum Administration on 02.11.2004

Breccia

This is a conglomerate in which the fragments are not rounded, but sharp and angular. This one is 8 cm across. Photograph by Peter B Tzannes, 2004

5373:Natural History Museum > Rocks

submitted by Museum Administration on 02.11.2004

Conglomerate

Conglomerate rock, containing rounded bits of other rocks, 5 cm long, found on Paliopoli beach. Photograph by Peter B Tzannes, 2004

5372:Natural History Museum > Rocks

submitted by Museum Administration on 02.11.2004

Mica schist

Metamorphic rock formed from shale or mud, containing sparkling minerals of mica. This specimen, found just north of Potamos, is 11 cm long. Photograph by Peter B Tzannes, 2004

5371:Natural History Museum > Rocks

submitted by Museum Administration on 02.11.2004

Small Gneiss

A small piece of Gneiss, 4 cm long, showing its coarse grain. Photograph by Peter B Tzannes, 2004

5370:Natural History Museum > Rocks

submitted by Museum Administration on 02.11.2004

Gneiss

Metamorphic, coarse-grained rock, often banded. This specimen, showing where the rock has been folded under pressure, is 6.5 cm long. Photograph by Peter B Tzannes, 2004

5369:Natural History Museum > Rocks

submitted by Museum Administration on 02.11.2004

Radiolarites

Metamorphic rock with a hard, compact texture, which may contain dead organic matter and lead. This specimen is 4 cm long. Photograph by Peter B Tzannes, 2004

5368:Natural History Museum > Rocks

submitted by Museum Administration on 02.11.2004

Oxi

This incredible beach stone has veins that spell the Greek word ‘oxi’, meaning ‘no.’ Imagine our amazement when we came upon it on the beach near Agia Pelagia!

5367:Natural History Museum > Rocks

submitted by Museum Administration on 02.11.2004

Euclid VI.2

Beach stone illustrating Euclidean proposition VI.2. Photograph by Peter B Tzannes, 2004

5366:Natural History Museum > Rocks

submitted by Museum Administration on 02.11.2004

Euclid I.27

Beach stone illustrating the Euclidean diagram for Book One, Proposition 27. Photograph by Peter B Tzannes, 2004

5365:Natural History Museum > Rocks

submitted by Museum Administration on 02.11.2004

Seventy

Beach stone with the number 70 inlaid in calcite. Photograph by Peter B Tzannes, 2004

5364:Natural History Museum > Rocks

submitted by Museum Administration on 02.11.2004

Sixteen

Beach stone inscribed XVI, the Roman Numeral for 16. Photograph by Peter B Tzannes, 2004