Presents for your Hosts For those of you coming to Kythera, you might be wondering what to bring your friends and relatives there. I have an idea. They are something Kytherians rarely buy for themselves but will help them save money when they have them, which should warm the thrifty Kytherian heart. You can even buy them on the island when you get there and save having to tote them all the way. My suggestion? Energy-saving light-bulbs. You can get them in Livathi (and probably other places) and they cost about four or five euros if my memory serves me correctly. They only use a sixth of the energy of normal globes, but in fact the savings are far greater according to an article I just read. To create the one unit of electricity you might use, ten units have to be created. What happens to the other 90%? It's lost in transmission and conversion and getting the fossil fuel and maintaining the power plant etc.. Which means a 60W bulb actually requires 600 Watts of power per hour, while an energy-saving 10W one, which produces the same amount of light as the old 60W bulb does, only 100W of power production. A saving of 500W per hour! The user saves more than 80% on energy costs, and the carbon pollution reduction is huge. If you have some suggestions for the perfect presents for relatives on Kythera, let us know! >Write for us! The response to the wonderful articles which appear regularly in these newsletters has been enormously positive. We are proud to feature another from Maria of Lourandianika below. I'm sure many of you have poignant stories about your connection to Kythera. Why don't you write one for the newsletter too? They don't have to be long (but can) and we edit them before we send them out so you'll have support in that way too. It could be about time you spent on the island, a funny incident associated with Kytherians, the life-story of a relative or even about your impression of Kythera, even if you've never been there! If you need ideas just let me know and I'll send you over a list. Be generous with your love of Kythera and share it with us all by writing a story which will be read by thousands of international Kytherians! >Wireless on the Island My request in the last newsletter for information regarding online hotspots brought in a wealth of information which will help all of us who need to go online this summer. Many thanks to Irene Baveas, Chris Alfred, Arthur Georgopoulos, Gloria Latham and Karen Dupske for their efforts. Here a short overview of possibilities: Hora: Fos Fanari (coffee shop) Kapsali: Vanilla (crepe shop) Tsikalaria: "My Computer" (computer shop) Livathi: "Polyedro" (electronic and video store) Potamos: Astikon (the big cafeneon) and the second "Polyedro" Kalamos: Vilana Studios Pelagia: one of the cafés in the middle of the main group - the wireless signal reaches all the way to the beach. For laptop users you can also get a "Cosmote on the Go" USB-Stick. More detailed information is listed below. If I've missed any please let me know! I look forward to seeing many of you on the island this Kytherian summer. >James Prineas, james@kythera-family.net .._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _ >Details regarding the wireless and DSDPA networks: >Irene Baveas: The new coffee shop Fos Fanari " in Hora seemed to be the place where everyone was with their laptops.  Access was very good. Also 'Vanilla " crepe shop in Kapsali. The computer shop "My Computer" at Tsikalaria has about 4 up to date public computers at reasonable rates.  This shop is especially efficient. The smaller of the electrical shops in Livadi: "Polyedro". The Astikon coffee shop in Potamos. Potamos: The computer shop "Polyedro" down the road from Astikon opposite the flower/plant shop, has two computers. >Arthur Georgopoulos           Now, I was in Kythera last year in late July and I had internet access at the first kafenio on the right as you enter Potamos. Also at Ayia Pelagia you can actually sit on the beach opposite a  cafe which just has sweets and coffee. Im sorry I don't remember its name. Finally at Kapsali there is another cafe near the car hire office that has it too. They are all WiFi and they are designed to attract customers to drink whilst working on there computers BUT in true Kytherian style I sat on the beach and done my work. I hope this helps you with your internet map and look forward to hearing from you soon.                  >Chris Alfred - Kalamos at Vilana Studios apartments We also had 3G HSDPA. We got a cheap promotional unlimited plan and left the USB device and SIM with our family on the Island. 3G HSDPA is very fast and worked well where there is good mobile coverage. Some tips if you want 3G HSDPA:   - Use COSMOTE (OTE) for good coverage   - You could use any EU 3G device and just purchase a COSMOTE SIM      Make sure the 3G device is not locked to a particular carrier.   - You might be able to get a pre-pay SIM, probably only from the mainland   - Getting a mobile plan can be difficult - see below!   - For the geeks: keep a 'ping' running so you get shorter latencies An interesting catch is that connection plan forms require 'Greek heritage'. Our Greek passport says we were born in Australia and so could not apply for direct debit, as required by the plan, even though we have a Greek bank account. This is a big problem for the many immigrants in Greece. > Gloria Latham I think the fastest connection is at the creperie Banila in Kapsali. I use "cosmote on the go" when I'm on the island which should allow me access anywhere. It costs 30 euros per month. Even with this set up, the connection in Plateia Amos is terrible. It gets better as I move south on the island ..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _ >Topic: Peter James Lorandos I am looking to find ancestors on Kythera and don't know how to do so.  My grandfather was born on Kythera in 1899 or 1900.  His name was Peter James Lorandos.  My grandfather died when I was 7 and my mother was never interested in family history, so all information has been lost.  How can I go about finding information? Thanks, Karen, kkdupske@gmail.com .._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _ >Topic: George Souris - Hughenden Does anyone have any information on George Souris from Hughenden Queensland? He was married to Maria. I would like to know the name of George's mum. I would like to trace any first cousins. Any information would be appreciated. Thank you Voula Amassah(Souris), amassah@optusnet.com.au .._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _ >Topic: Manea-Fouris My grandfather Spero Manea came to Australia in 1908 eventually settling in Albany. His parents were Giannis Emanuel Manea and Maria Fouris. Giannis was a priest. I have a copy of my great grandfathers will which was executed in 1929 before the Solicitor of Potamos Magistrate (Chris Efstathiou Papamatou). My great grandfathers name is written as John Emanuel Kastrisos, Priest. In the will he bequeaths property to his wife Maria nee John Soury. The will was witnessed by several persons including Athanasiou Michael Protopsaltou in the village of Kastrisianika. Any information to expand our knowledge of family would be gratefully received. Mark Manea, mark@manea.id.au .._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _ >SS MISR-VOYAGE TO AUSTRALIA 1947 My Mother Violet (Stavroula) Dimitratos (nee Theodorakakis/Cordato) travelled from Potamos Kythera to Australia on the SS MISR in 1947 along with 17 other Kytherians. Its journey was controversial and hit news headlines in Australia. Her account of this journey as well as other Greeks can be found on the Sydney Morning Herald website set up to commemorate the 50th anniversary of its voyage: www.smh.com.au/multimedia/misr/theodorakakis.html Maria Mihailidis .._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _ >Young Men from Kythera. by Maria of Lourandianika   In the early 1900's life on Kythera was very hard. Families were usually big, the island was poor and a lack of work made it very difficult for the many children to be properly fed and looked after. This resulted in many of the boys, some barely in their teens, to leave their homes and parents and go to other parts of the world to start a new life. Some chose to go to South Africa, but many went to America or Australia. My father, coming from a family of 4 sons and 3 daughters chose to come to Australia in the early 1900's. Arriving in Sydney, he and four other Kytherian young men started an oyster bar and fish cafe and restaurant in a three storey building in Darlinghurst which they called the "Canberra Cafe". The kitchen was located in the basement, the oyster bar and cafe on street level and formal restaurant on the first floor. The top floor consisted of the men's sleeping quarters. As the business prospered, the five men took turns to return back to Kythera, to find a bride to marry and return to their business in Sydney and begin their family. As a young girl, I vividly remember the marble-top tables covered with a white cloth and red fabric napkins ready for customers to come and enjoy a quick meal downstairs or to dine in the more formal restaurant upstairs. What I will never forget is how well groomed my father was. He always placed great importance on his appearance and how well groomed he always was, as he welcomed the patrons coming into the cafe and restaurant.   As the years went by, the "Canberra Cafe" became a beacon for many Kytherians, particularly from the villages of Livadi, Kato Livadi and Kalamos, arriving in Sydney. With very little or no money, and not being able to speak English, they were helped by my father and the other partners to start their new life in Australia. With the help they were given, it enabled many of them to establish their own cafes in many country towns of NSW.   Such a far cry from the island life, where a sheep would be slaughtered, and in the open hung from a heavy hook, with the villagers collecting to purchase the piece of meat they required to feed their families. The large container under the slaughtered sheep filling with blood, and the island dogs lapping the blood.   And I think back to the open shed where the looms turned out such beautiful blankets. Different textures used, as my grandmother chose a heavier texture, and my beloved aunt a silken type, which was so soft and warm. Now the shed has been replaced by a bakery where the locals go daily to buy their fresh bread, instead of baking it at home as I remembered when I was a child. My sister would go the the home of the only island doctor and would learn the delicate craft of making doilies with just a sewing needle and cotton from a reel. I would go with my father, doing what I loved most. Hunting and shooting pheasants and rabbits, which became a meal on so many occasions.   These memories of my father will stay with me forever, even now, so many years after his passing away. The well groomed man, loved by the Kytherian community. In my heart, my father is always with me. On some days, when I smell cigarette smoke in my bedroom, I know my father is with me, for me, this a sign that he is with me, & still watching over me.   (I dedicate this article in memory of my beloved father, his spirit with God, but always with me)   >by Maria (Marcellos) Whyte, maria.wwhyte@gmail.com .._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _ 19 May 2009 >FOVERI: NIK CONOMOS DEBUT SINGLE Singer, songwriter and producer Nik Conomos will be launching his debut single Foveri at the Melbourne Hotel on Saturday 23rd May 2009 as part of Brisbane’s Premier Greek event Nemesis featuring leading Greek Australian Dj, Krazy Kon. An up and coming Greek Australian musician living in Brisbane, Nik has family ties in Kalamos and Varadika, Kythera and along with his uncle, Nikita Conomos who plays with the Main Band on Kythera, enjoys entertaining others with his musical talents. Foveri is an up-tempo, instantly catchy song that will get you dancing and singing along in no time. You & Me is an English version of Foveri for those who do not understand the Greek language and rounding off the CD, a slower more emotional track titled Yiati Den Eise has been added to give a glimpse of Nik’s diversity and a preview of what is in store for future releases. Over the past 5 years, Nik has been quietly working behind the scenes writing and producing his own original Greek and English tracks. Using a fresh and more modern approach to his Greek compositions inspired by his Australian upbringing and musical influences from America and the UK, Nik is looking forward to bringing his unique style to Nemesis and beyond. “I am fortunate to be able to combine my passion for music with my Greek background and produce music that will cross both English and Greek speaking audiences” said Conomos. Foveri is available for purchase at www.nikconomos.com and download from the iTunes store. Click http://www.kythera-family.net/index.php?nav=166-168&cid=362&did=16613&pageflip=1 to listen to Foveri. www.nikconomos.com www.myspace.com/nikconomos become a fan on facebook: www.facebook.com/pages/Nik-Conomos/110307513968' /> James Prineas, james@kythera-family.net .._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _ >Details regarding the wireless and DSDPA networks: >Irene Baveas: The new coffee shop Fos Fanari " in Hora seemed to be the place where everyone was with their laptops.  Access was very good. Also 'Vanilla " crepe shop in Kapsali. The computer shop "My Computer" at Tsikalaria has about 4 up to date public computers at reasonable rates.  This shop is especially efficient. The smaller of the electrical shops in Livadi: "Polyedro". The Astikon coffee shop in Potamos. Potamos: The computer shop "Polyedro" down the road from Astikon opposite the flower/plant shop, has two computers. >Arthur Georgopoulos           Now, I was in Kythera last year in late July and I had internet access at the first kafenio on the right as you enter Potamos. Also at Ayia Pelagia you can actually sit on the beach opposite a  cafe which just has sweets and coffee. Im sorry I don't remember its name. Finally at Kapsali there is another cafe near the car hire office that has it too. They are all WiFi and they are designed to attract customers to drink whilst working on there computers BUT in true Kytherian style I sat on the beach and done my work. I hope this helps you with your internet map and look forward to hearing from you soon.                  >Chris Alfred - Kalamos at Vilana Studios apartments We also had 3G HSDPA. We got a cheap promotional unlimited plan and left the USB device and SIM with our family on the Island. 3G HSDPA is very fast and worked well where there is good mobile coverage. Some tips if you want 3G HSDPA:   - Use COSMOTE (OTE) for good coverage   - You could use any EU 3G device and just purchase a COSMOTE SIM      Make sure the 3G device is not locked to a particular carrier.   - You might be able to get a pre-pay SIM, probably only from the mainland   - Getting a mobile plan can be difficult - see below!   - For the geeks: keep a 'ping' running so you get shorter latencies An interesting catch is that connection plan forms require 'Greek heritage'. Our Greek passport says we were born in Australia and so could not apply for direct debit, as required by the plan, even though we have a Greek bank account. This is a big problem for the many immigrants in Greece. > Gloria Latham I think the fastest connection is at the creperie Banila in Kapsali. I use "cosmote on the go" when I'm on the island which should allow me access anywhere. It costs 30 euros per month. Even with this set up, the connection in Plateia Amos is terrible. It gets better as I move south on the island ..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _ >Topic: Peter James Lorandos I am looking to find ancestors on Kythera and don't know how to do so.  My grandfather was born on Kythera in 1899 or 1900.  His name was Peter James Lorandos.  My grandfather died when I was 7 and my mother was never interested in family history, so all information has been lost.  How can I go about finding information? Thanks, Karen, kkdupske@gmail.com .._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _ >Topic: George Souris - Hughenden Does anyone have any information on George Souris from Hughenden Queensland? He was married to Maria. I would like to know the name of George's mum. I would like to trace any first cousins. Any information would be appreciated. Thank you Voula Amassah(Souris), amassah@optusnet.com.au .._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _ >Topic: Manea-Fouris My grandfather Spero Manea came to Australia in 1908 eventually settling in Albany. His parents were Giannis Emanuel Manea and Maria Fouris. Giannis was a priest. I have a copy of my great grandfathers will which was executed in 1929 before the Solicitor of Potamos Magistrate (Chris Efstathiou Papamatou). My great grandfathers name is written as John Emanuel Kastrisos, Priest. In the will he bequeaths property to his wife Maria nee John Soury. The will was witnessed by several persons including Athanasiou Michael Protopsaltou in the village of Kastrisianika. Any information to expand our knowledge of family would be gratefully received. Mark Manea, mark@manea.id.au .._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _ >SS MISR-VOYAGE TO AUSTRALIA 1947 My Mother Violet (Stavroula) Dimitratos (nee Theodorakakis/Cordato) travelled from Potamos Kythera to Australia on the SS MISR in 1947 along with 17 other Kytherians. Its journey was controversial and hit news headlines in Australia. Her account of this journey as well as other Greeks can be found on the Sydney Morning Herald website set up to commemorate the 50th anniversary of its voyage: www.smh.com.au/multimedia/misr/theodorakakis.html Maria Mihailidis .._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _ >Young Men from Kythera. by Maria of Lourandianika   In the early 1900's life on Kythera was very hard. Families were usually big, the island was poor and a lack of work made it very difficult for the many children to be properly fed and looked after. This resulted in many of the boys, some barely in their teens, to leave their homes and parents and go to other parts of the world to start a new life. Some chose to go to South Africa, but many went to America or Australia. My father, coming from a family of 4 sons and 3 daughters chose to come to Australia in the early 1900's. Arriving in Sydney, he and four other Kytherian young men started an oyster bar and fish cafe and restaurant in a three storey building in Darlinghurst which they called the "Canberra Cafe". The kitchen was located in the basement, the oyster bar and cafe on street level and formal restaurant on the first floor. The top floor consisted of the men's sleeping quarters. As the business prospered, the five men took turns to return back to Kythera, to find a bride to marry and return to their business in Sydney and begin their family. As a young girl, I vividly remember the marble-top tables covered with a white cloth and red fabric napkins ready for customers to come and enjoy a quick meal downstairs or to dine in the more formal restaurant upstairs. What I will never forget is how well groomed my father was. He always placed great importance on his appearance and how well groomed he always was, as he welcomed the patrons coming into the cafe and restaurant.   As the years went by, the "Canberra Cafe" became a beacon for many Kytherians, particularly from the villages of Livadi, Kato Livadi and Kalamos, arriving in Sydney. With very little or no money, and not being able to speak English, they were helped by my father and the other partners to start their new life in Australia. With the help they were given, it enabled many of them to establish their own cafes in many country towns of NSW.   Such a far cry from the island life, where a sheep would be slaughtered, and in the open hung from a heavy hook, with the villagers collecting to purchase the piece of meat they required to feed their families. The large container under the slaughtered sheep filling with blood, and the island dogs lapping the blood.   And I think back to the open shed where the looms turned out such beautiful blankets. Different textures used, as my grandmother chose a heavier texture, and my beloved aunt a silken type, which was so soft and warm. Now the shed has been replaced by a bakery where the locals go daily to buy their fresh bread, instead of baking it at home as I remembered when I was a child. My sister would go the the home of the only island doctor and would learn the delicate craft of making doilies with just a sewing needle and cotton from a reel. I would go with my father, doing what I loved most. Hunting and shooting pheasants and rabbits, which became a meal on so many occasions.   These memories of my father will stay with me forever, even now, so many years after his passing away. The well groomed man, loved by the Kytherian community. In my heart, my father is always with me. On some days, when I smell cigarette smoke in my bedroom, I know my father is with me, for me, this a sign that he is with me, & still watching over me.   (I dedicate this article in memory of my beloved father, his spirit with God, but always with me)   >by Maria (Marcellos) Whyte, maria.wwhyte@gmail.com .._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _ 19 May 2009 >FOVERI: NIK CONOMOS DEBUT SINGLE Singer, songwriter and producer Nik Conomos will be launching his debut single Foveri at the Melbourne Hotel on Saturday 23rd May 2009 as part of Brisbane’s Premier Greek event Nemesis featuring leading Greek Australian Dj, Krazy Kon. An up and coming Greek Australian musician living in Brisbane, Nik has family ties in Kalamos and Varadika, Kythera and along with his uncle, Nikita Conomos who plays with the Main Band on Kythera, enjoys entertaining others with his musical talents. Foveri is an up-tempo, instantly catchy song that will get you dancing and singing along in no time. You & Me is an English version of Foveri for those who do not understand the Greek language and rounding off the CD, a slower more emotional track titled Yiati Den Eise has been added to give a glimpse of Nik’s diversity and a preview of what is in store for future releases. Over the past 5 years, Nik has been quietly working behind the scenes writing and producing his own original Greek and English tracks. Using a fresh and more modern approach to his Greek compositions inspired by his Australian upbringing and musical influences from America and the UK, Nik is looking forward to bringing his unique style to Nemesis and beyond. “I am fortunate to be able to combine my passion for music with my Greek background and produce music that will cross both English and Greek speaking audiences” said Conomos. Foveri is available for purchase at www.nikconomos.com and download from the iTunes store. Click http://www.kythera-family.net/index.php?nav=166-168&cid=362&did=16613&pageflip=1 to listen to Foveri. www.nikconomos.com www.myspace.com/nikconomos become a fan on facebook: www.facebook.com/pages/Nik-Conomos/110307513968" />
kythera family kythera family
  

Newsletter Archive

Newsletter Archive > Late May 2009

16669: Newsletter Archive

submitted by James Victor Prineas on 10.06.2009

Late May 2009

Dear Friends of Kythera,

I'm always amazed at how many of you make it all the way to Kythera from Australia – I find it enough trouble to get there from Germany, only 3 hours away. Of course it's not always possible to travel to the island every year, or even regularly. That's where we hope Kythera-Family.net can help. A place you can visit when you're feeling home-sick for Kythera.

>Presents for your Hosts
For those of you coming to Kythera, you might be wondering what to bring your friends and relatives there. I have an idea. They are something Kytherians rarely buy for themselves but will help them save money when they have them, which should warm the thrifty Kytherian heart. You can even buy them on the island when you get there and save having to tote them all the way. My suggestion? Energy-saving light-bulbs. You can get them in Livathi (and probably other places) and they cost about four or five euros if my memory serves me correctly. They only use a sixth of the energy of normal globes, but in fact the savings are far greater according to an article I just read. To create the one unit of electricity you might use, ten units have to be created. What happens to the other 90%? It's lost in transmission and conversion and getting the fossil fuel and maintaining the power plant etc.. Which means a 60W bulb actually requires 600 Watts of power per hour, while an energy-saving 10W one, which produces the same amount of light as the old 60W bulb does, only 100W of power production. A saving of 500W per hour! The user saves more than 80% on energy costs, and the carbon pollution reduction is huge.

If you have some suggestions for the perfect presents for relatives on Kythera, let us know!

>Write for us!
The response to the wonderful articles which appear regularly in these newsletters has been enormously positive. We are proud to feature another from Maria of Lourandianika below. I'm sure many of you have poignant stories about your connection to Kythera. Why don't you write one for the newsletter too? They don't have to be long (but can) and we edit them before we send them out so you'll have support in that way too. It could be about time you spent on the island, a funny incident associated with Kytherians, the life-story of a relative or even about your impression of Kythera, even if you've never been there! If you need ideas just let me know and I'll send you over a list. Be generous with your love of Kythera and share it with us all by writing a story which will be read by thousands of international Kytherians!

>Wireless on the Island
My request in the last newsletter for information regarding online hotspots brought in a wealth of information which will help all of us who need to go online this summer. Many thanks to Irene Baveas, Chris Alfred, Arthur Georgopoulos, Gloria Latham and Karen Dupske for their efforts. Here a short overview of possibilities:
Hora: Fos Fanari (coffee shop)
Kapsali: Vanilla (crepe shop)
Tsikalaria: "My Computer" (computer shop)
Livathi: "Polyedro" (electronic and video store)
Potamos: Astikon (the big cafeneon) and the second "Polyedro"
Kalamos: Vilana Studios
Pelagia: one of the cafés in the middle of the main group - the wireless signal reaches all the way to the beach.
For laptop users you can also get a "Cosmote on the Go" USB-Stick.

More detailed information is listed below. If I've missed any please let me know!

I look forward to seeing many of you on the island this Kytherian summer.
>James Prineas, james@kythera-family.net

.._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _

>Details regarding the wireless and DSDPA networks:

>Irene Baveas:
The new coffee shop Fos Fanari " in Hora seemed to be the place where everyone was with their laptops.  Access was very good.
Also 'Vanilla " crepe shop in Kapsali.
The computer shop "My Computer" at Tsikalaria has about 4 up to date public computers at reasonable rates.  This shop is especially efficient.
The smaller of the electrical shops in Livadi: "Polyedro".
The Astikon coffee shop in Potamos.
Potamos: The computer shop "Polyedro" down the road from Astikon opposite the flower/plant shop, has two computers.


>Arthur Georgopoulos          
Now, I was in Kythera last year in late July and I had internet access at the first kafenio on the right as you enter Potamos. Also at Ayia Pelagia you can actually sit on the beach opposite a  cafe which just has sweets and coffee. Im sorry I don't remember its name. Finally at Kapsali there is another cafe near the car hire office that has it too. They are all WiFi and they are designed to attract customers to drink whilst working on there computers BUT in true Kytherian style I sat on the beach and done my work. I hope this helps you with your internet map and look forward to hearing from you soon.
                

>Chris Alfred
- Kalamos at Vilana Studios apartments
We also had 3G HSDPA. We got a cheap promotional unlimited plan and left the USB device and SIM with our family on the Island. 3G HSDPA is very fast and worked well where there is good mobile coverage.
Some tips if you want 3G HSDPA:
  - Use COSMOTE (OTE) for good coverage
  - You could use any EU 3G device and just purchase a COSMOTE SIM
     Make sure the 3G device is not locked to a particular carrier.
  - You might be able to get a pre-pay SIM, probably only from the mainland
  - Getting a mobile plan can be difficult - see below!
  - For the geeks: keep a 'ping' running so you get shorter latencies

An interesting catch is that connection plan forms require 'Greek heritage'. Our Greek passport says we were born in Australia and so could not apply for direct debit, as required by the plan, even though we have a Greek bank account. This is a big problem for the many immigrants in Greece.


> Gloria Latham
I think the fastest connection is at the creperie Banila in Kapsali. I use "cosmote on the go" when I'm on the island which should allow me
access anywhere. It costs 30 euros per month. Even with this set up, the connection in Plateia Amos is terrible. It gets better as I move south on the island
..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _

>Topic: Peter James Lorandos
I am looking to find ancestors on Kythera and don't know how to do so.  My grandfather was born on Kythera in 1899 or 1900.  His name was Peter James Lorandos.  My grandfather died when I was 7 and my mother was never interested in family history, so all information has been lost.  How can I go about finding information?
Thanks,
Karen, kkdupske@gmail.com
.._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _

>Topic: George Souris - Hughenden
Does anyone have any information on George Souris from Hughenden Queensland? He was married to Maria. I would like to know the name of George's mum. I would like to trace any first cousins. Any information would be appreciated.
Thank you
Voula Amassah(Souris), amassah@optusnet.com.au
.._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _

>Topic: Manea-Fouris
My grandfather Spero Manea came to Australia in 1908 eventually settling in Albany. His parents were Giannis Emanuel Manea and Maria Fouris. Giannis was a priest. I have a copy of my great grandfathers will which was executed in 1929 before the Solicitor of Potamos Magistrate (Chris Efstathiou Papamatou). My great grandfathers name is written as John Emanuel Kastrisos, Priest. In the will he bequeaths property to his wife Maria nee John Soury. The will was witnessed by several persons including Athanasiou Michael Protopsaltou in the village of Kastrisianika.
Any information to expand our knowledge of family would be gratefully received.
Mark Manea, mark@manea.id.au
.._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _

>SS MISR-VOYAGE TO AUSTRALIA 1947
My Mother Violet (Stavroula) Dimitratos (nee Theodorakakis/Cordato) travelled from Potamos Kythera to Australia on the SS MISR in 1947 along with 17 other Kytherians. Its journey was controversial and hit news headlines in Australia. Her account of this journey as well as other Greeks can be found on the Sydney Morning Herald website set up to commemorate the 50th anniversary of its voyage:
www.smh.com.au/multimedia/misr/theodorakakis.html
Maria Mihailidis

.._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _

>Young Men from Kythera.
by Maria of Lourandianika
 
In the early 1900's life on Kythera was very hard. Families were usually big, the island was poor and a lack of work made it very difficult for the many children to be properly fed and looked after. This resulted in many of the boys, some barely in their teens, to leave their homes and parents and go to other parts of the world to start a new life.

Some chose to go to South Africa, but many went to America or Australia. My father, coming from a family of 4 sons and 3 daughters chose to come to Australia in the early 1900's. Arriving in Sydney, he and four other Kytherian young men started an oyster bar and fish cafe and restaurant in a three storey building in Darlinghurst which they called the "Canberra Cafe". The kitchen was located in the basement, the oyster bar and cafe on street level and formal restaurant on the first floor. The top floor consisted of the men's sleeping quarters. As the business prospered, the five men took turns to return back to Kythera, to find a bride to marry and return to their business in Sydney and begin their family.

As a young girl, I vividly remember the marble-top tables covered with a white cloth and red fabric napkins ready for customers to come and enjoy a quick meal downstairs or to dine in the more formal restaurant upstairs. What I will never forget is how well groomed my father was. He always placed great importance on his appearance and how well groomed he always was, as he welcomed the patrons coming into the cafe and restaurant.
 
As the years went by, the "Canberra Cafe" became a beacon for many Kytherians, particularly from the villages of Livadi, Kato Livadi and Kalamos, arriving in Sydney. With very little or no money, and not being able to speak English, they were helped by my father and the other partners to start their new life in Australia. With the help they were given, it enabled many of them to establish their own cafes in many country towns of NSW.
 
Such a far cry from the island life, where a sheep would be slaughtered, and in the open hung from a heavy hook, with the villagers collecting to purchase the piece of meat they required to feed their families. The large container under the slaughtered sheep filling with blood, and the island dogs lapping the blood.
 
And I think back to the open shed where the looms turned out such beautiful blankets. Different textures used, as my grandmother chose a heavier texture, and my beloved aunt a silken type, which was so soft and warm. Now the shed has been replaced by a bakery where the locals go daily to buy their fresh bread, instead of baking it at home as I remembered when I was a child. My sister would go the the home of the only island doctor and would learn the delicate craft of making doilies with just a sewing needle and cotton from a reel. I would go with my father, doing what I loved most. Hunting and shooting pheasants and rabbits, which became a meal on so many occasions.
 
These memories of my father will stay with me forever, even now, so many years after his passing away. The well groomed man, loved by the Kytherian community. In my heart, my father is always with me. On some days, when I smell cigarette smoke in my bedroom, I know my father is with me, for me, this a sign that he is with me, & still watching over me.
 
(I dedicate this article in memory of my beloved father, his spirit with God, but always with me)
 
>by Maria (Marcellos) Whyte, maria.wwhyte@gmail.com

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19 May 2009
>FOVERI: NIK CONOMOS DEBUT SINGLE

Singer, songwriter and producer Nik Conomos will be launching his debut single Foveri at the Melbourne Hotel on Saturday 23rd May 2009 as part of Brisbane’s Premier Greek event Nemesis featuring leading Greek Australian Dj, Krazy Kon.

An up and coming Greek Australian musician living in Brisbane, Nik has family ties in Kalamos and Varadika, Kythera and along with his uncle, Nikita Conomos who plays with the Main Band on Kythera, enjoys entertaining others with his musical talents.

Foveri is an up-tempo, instantly catchy song that will get you dancing and singing along in no time. You & Me is an English version of Foveri for those who do not understand the Greek language and rounding off the CD, a slower more emotional track titled Yiati Den Eise has been added to give a glimpse of Nik’s diversity and a preview of what is in store for future releases.

Over the past 5 years, Nik has been quietly working behind the scenes writing and producing his own original Greek and English tracks. Using a fresh and more modern approach to his Greek compositions inspired by his Australian upbringing and musical influences from America and the UK, Nik is looking forward to bringing his unique style to Nemesis and beyond.

“I am fortunate to be able to combine my passion for music with my Greek background and produce music that will cross both English and Greek speaking audiences” said Conomos.

Foveri is available for purchase at www.nikconomos.com and download from the iTunes store.

Click http://www.kythera-family.net/index.php?nav=166-168&cid=362&did=16613&pageflip=1 to listen to Foveri.
www.nikconomos.com
www.myspace.com/nikconomos
become a fan on facebook: www.facebook.com/pages/Nik-Conomos/110307513968

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