Bring Back Barbarossa? by Anna Cominos   Sorry for being off-line for so long, it wasn't really a case of being absent but more of having brain-freeze... it has been a long and endless winter. >FAQ's* about current Kytherian matters *"frequently asked questions" + We do have a local ship connection with Neapoli and now there is finally a twice weekly . - The ship looks like a double-Lego construction built by 4 year-old and pasted together. Once you reach Neapoli you still had an 8 hour drive to Athens....tedious + Interviews with Kythera's Mayor appeared in the local print press quoting him as saying the windmills were not going ahead and that the Kytherian Diaspora would be immediately advised if otherwise. - The applications for the licensing of windmill parks on Kythera to the Regulatory Authority for Energy are still apparently being received: www.rae.gr + Globalization comes to the island with the first Chinese clothing store opening in Tsikalaria - Globalization comes to the island with petty-crime on a sharp increase + Sunflowers and wild-flowers are a bloom. - The flowers have been flowering since late January, making their bloom 3 months early. After picking olives for a month just before Christmas, I have settled into the translating chair working with the up-lifting Panayiota (Pia) Panaretos as we transform Tzeli Hadjidimitriou's Unexplored Kythera & Anti-Kythera from a 350 page Greek-language guide book to an English-language "must read". It has been interesting revising the history section of the book as certain Kytherian characteristics became apparent to me over the centuries. Administered since ancient times by a long-line of foreign rulers that reads like a historical who's who – the Phoenicians, Minoans, Athenians, Spartans, Venetians, British, Russians and for a blink of an eye, the French, Kythera is a fascinating amateur anthropological study. Life under the microscope. Historically and perhaps even genetically, Tsirigotes have always had someone - often cruel - looking over their shoulder as they laboured as slaves. There is no historical mention of uprising or defiance (apart from the odd beheading of nobles), but I'll bet there was a lot of whinging. And so the hard-working Kytherian immigrants bloomed in foreign environments (Australia, America, Smyrna etc.) where they settled into established social/economic structures, while existing on the periphery and living their lives as 'outsiders'. So when power to administer themselves finally comes they don't how to exercise it, as they don't have any previous experience... but have their eye on the thrones that the colonisers have relinquished! "Big Deal? So what?" you ask? How can the warlords and pirates of yesterday have any bearing on today? That was then this is now? The recent chaos that has exploded throughout Greece/Kythera seems unprecedented: state-instilled nepotism, the December 2008 Athen's Riots, the 2008 kidnapping of a shipping tycoon, the February 2009 helicopter escape of prisoners, the burglary of some Kytherian Summer homes and, last but not least, the 2009 theft of lambs from Agio Theodoros. It feels like anarchy, random violence and systematic neglect of state infrastructure. When did Greece/Kythera go from being a high ideal to this sorry state? Well, despite embracing and even demanding multiculturalism for its population abroad, Greece/Kythera has, despite the existence of a large migrant population itself, stubbornly stuck to monoculturalism. The decay of the former communist countries surrounding Greece, particularly Albania, has been a double-edge sword. Yes, the recent migrant workers have renewed Kythera and Greece, refilling the schools and filling the void of affordable workers, but the lack of presence of the Greek state has meant it is a free-for all: there is no integration or assimilation. So Greece/Kythera is going through growing pains and the acne scars are not pretty. But what is most alarming is the absence of planning: how do you make a mono-culture as idiosyncratic as the Greek, multicultural? Perhaps Greece will find the light again and evolve a new system of governing. Fingers crossed... but it feels like a shaky boat trip till then. Don't be put off if you're planning to dip your feet into Kythera's waters this year. Like a sleepy porch dog, the sea and landscape of our magic island welcomes all. Anna Cominos (acominos@hotmail.com) .._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _   >Kythera as the Best Medicine: Memories of the Red Poppies                   Being confined to bed as I am, I must be realistic: I may not be able to return to the island where my heart belongs, but at least I have my memories. Those recollections of me as a girl of 15, of which I have written of before, are still so real to me. So many years have passed, but the vision of a field of red poppies which I would pass daily, as I walked through the cold winds to go to Kato Livadi from Louradianika, to collect the milk my grandmother needed, are with me every day. I would stop, as I walked, and was mesmerised by the beauty of the field beside the road from Louradianika, leading to Kato Livadi. Returning, I would stop again, and look in wonderment at the vivid colours before me. And experiencing the elements, where one day it could be so perfect, and the next, the winds so strong. This is all part of the beauty of Kythera. I remember my best friend back then on Kythera, Marika: the happiness our friendship gave me. We two, typical of any teenagers, gave our parents many headaches with our girlish pranks. Another time, being a typical teenager of 16, I developed a crush on a young man. We would meet at the cemetery where we would chat. He wanted to go to Australia too, like so many other young Kytherians. Someone must have seen us and reported it to my parents who ruled out any more meetings. A schoolgirl's crush. Innocent, but not permissible. Returning some years ago, I found a monument had been placed at Kapsali: my young man had gone out into the sea to fish in his small boat, and drowned during a terrible storm. His body was never recovered. Such a sad sight. Another memory: a family picnic at Agia Pelagia. The pebbles on the ground - not the sand we find on the beaches here in Queensland - were difficult to walk on. With my relatives who cared so deeply about me, all deceased now, called by God, but, their spirit lives on in Kythera. When I returned some years ago, I could still feel their presence around me.   Memories such as going to Vroulea, where the olives were to be picked. I had my lamb, whose mother had rejected it, following me wherever I went. Many people of Livadi would see us daily, and as we would pass the small shops, their owners smiling and waving as they watched me on my way to my grandparents, accompanied by my lamb.   Such memories have given me the strength to continue with my debilitating condition, and accept it. I appreciate the many wonderful people who have entered my life by my writing this column, and I hope my experience may assist others who may also be challenged in their own lives. My illness has progressed and my quality of life has diminished, but, the memories of Kythera, so many years ago, have given me the strength to rise to the challenge, and see another day come and pass. When my days are so difficult, I ask God to help me endure one more day, and then, I go back to my field of red poppies, so magical, and I find the strength which I pray for. My much adored and revered grandfather had spoken to me of the power of the mind. How could I have known then that his words would bring me peace at this stage of my life? Recently, I had yet another operation - so many in over the last year. As I was in the recovery ward at the hospital, I noticed two nurses watching me and speaking quietly between themselves. Finally, one came to me, and asked how I could be so calm, knowing of the pain I was in after a 2 hour operation on my spine. I explained that I felt such peace because I had returned to Kythera and my field of red poppies. There is no form of pain relief which can replace taking one's mind to a "special" place. Maria Whyte (nee Marcellos), maria.wwhyte@gmail.com   .._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _ >New Guestbook Entries 05.03.2009 >Arthur Georgopoulos - Sydney, Australia Family village of origin: Potamos My mother is from Lianianika and father is from Potamos. We have the house next to the car-park in Potamos. Would like to hear from anyone from around the world to share experiences or stories of Kythera. 26.02.2009 >Jerri Powell - Bakersfield, USA Family: Sklavos 16.02.2009 >Stella Nenes - Brisbane, Australia Family village of origin: Potamos Giasas! ti kanete? My father Giorgos Nenes and my mother Panayotitsa Cominos were born in Potamos Kythera, but moved to and married in Australia. The Nenes family of nine immigrated to Australia and the USA. My two sons Vasili, Minas and my husband Bill love travelling, having visited Greece many times and always stay in the great old Potamos house. We are planning another trip to the USA this year (2009). Who knows, this time may even get to meet a Nenes New Yorker :) Pios Xseri? Naste Kala, Vouli xo 08.02.2009 >Alexander Kypriadis - Spain Family village of origin: Karavas I was there just after the earthquake to see my aunt in Potamos. 08.02.2009 >Maria Atsipoulianaki - Brisbane Australia Family village of origin: Aroniathika I am from Kythera and very proud to be Kytherian .._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _ >New Message Board Entries >Where and who are my relatives? Additional information.... submitted by Laura Pavlou-Mudie, 15.03.2009 Hi everybody. My Grandmother, Marietta Logothetis, only child of Minas and Katerina Logothetis of Logothetianika, Kythera. I have no information about Katerina, except to say that her father was a ship's captain and her mother was an Italian from Naples. I think that she too, came from Kythera. Any information is gratefully received. I live in England. Regards, Laura P.S. Minas Logothetis was born around 1846 and, certainly,as an adult, had a factory in Pireaus that processed waste material from the dock areas (for purposes unknown) where he lived with his family. We are led to believe that the family built a church in Logothetianika. Anyone know of and about him, his life and his relatives? Reply - Where and who are my relatives? Additional information.... Submitted by James Gavriles 16.03.2009 You might want to try Telemachos Combes. He has done quite a bit of research on families from Logothetianika. He has a web site and a contact see; http://tilemachos.com/my_newpersonal.htm Reply - Where and who are my relatives? Additional information.... Submitted by Gaye Hegeman 17.03.2009 Hi James, I have just checked out the website of Telemachos Combes, and have many names in common, but all attempts to contact him on the email address on his home page have failed. What do I need to do to contact him? Reply to topic: Where and who are my relatives? Additional information.... Hi Gaye, I contacted Telemachos about a month ago and had no difficulty in raising a reply at that time.  As I said, I'm hoping to obtain information from a number of different quarters and posted a message in the hope that someone might recognise the names.  My grandmother must have had many relatives and I am aware of none of them, except a woman called Alkioni Combis, a cousin, who married a judge and lived in the Dodecanis somewhere. Maybe I'll get lucky and someone will see this message and respond.  Regards, Laura. Reply to topic: Where and who are my relatives? Additional information.... Submitted by Gaye Hegeman 19.03.2009 Managed to get my message through afterall, and would encourage anyone who has Andronicos ancestors from the area between Logotheticanica and Potamos to log onto the following page compiled by Telemachos Coombes: http://tilemachos.com/tree/tree_andronikos.htm and you will be amazed. .._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _... >Ferry on the 28th of April submitted by Hilde Winkelmann, 10.03.2009 Hello! Can anybody help me: Is there a ferry from Piraeus to Kythera in the evening of the 28th of April? Thanks Hilde from Germany .._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _... >Gerakari Grave Sites submitted by Voula Amassah, 28.02.2009 Margaret Tuite has been very helpful with information for Gerakari. Do you have any info on Zacharias, Dimitri or Stavros Souris members from Gerakari? What are your connections to the Souris clan? Do you have any connections to France and Johannesburg Souris members? Curious to know where you live. Polyxene would like info on Kallimeri and Haralambos Ioannis Souris clan from Agia Anastasia. Her email is polymax@sbcglobal.net Thanks Voula Amassah(Souris) Reply - Gerakari grave sites Submitted by Peter Trearchis 28.02.2009 Hi, one of my great-grandmother's aunts Erifyli Panaretos married an Ioannis Dimitrios Souris from Gerakari. He died in 1930 in Piraeus. Ioannis and Erifyli had children Stamatina "Matina," (b. 1896, married Nicholas Coroneos) Fotine, Calliope (b. 1901, died 1918), Aspasia (died 1924), Demetrios (disappeared in 1931), and Marika Souris. Don't know if you ever came across this family. Reply - Gerakari grave sites Submitted by Voula Amassah 01.03.2009 Kanella Souris has done quite a bit of the Souris tree with Polyxene .I will try and follow up on this. Thank you for the information -maybe we have found a link. Do you know about the priest from Gerakari Ioannis that had 13 sons? Regards Voula Amassah (Souris) Reply - Gerakari grave sites Submitted by Peter Trearchis 01.03.2009 OK thank you very much. I do not know anything more about Ioannis since he is related to me through his marriage to Erifyli. All I know is that he was from Gerakari and moved with his family to Piraeus, Greece where he died. .._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _... >Digital Scanner to be provided for the Kytherian Archives submitted by Institute Of Kytheraismos, 27.02.2009 “During the Third Kytheriasmos Symposium (August 2008) the need to digitalise the very valuable Kytherian Archive records was brought to the attention of those present. They expressed a desire to assist and Con Galtos, Peter Corones and Peter Vamvakaris commenced collecting pledges from the attendees. The local Archivist ( Kostas Tsaltas) estimated a cost of about A$30,000 and the goal was to ascertain and purchase what would be the best equipment and software that was needed for the project to proceed in an efficient manner. The informal committee of three Queenslanders worked very hard to determine the needs and cost of the equipment and consulted with some of the most experienced international archival experts. In the meantime Ms Karolina Aslani ( Director of the Kytherian Archives) and Mr Kostas Tsaltas (the Local Archivist) continued with their efforts to obtain the Greek Governments’ assistance for this very historically important project. We are very pleased to advise that on the 20th of February Con Galtos received information from Ms Aslani indicating that the Kytherian Archives had received the needed support from the Greek Government and the digitalisation will commence in May 2009. Con Galtos, Peter Corones and Peter Vamvakaris wish to thank all the Kytherians who so willingly pledged their support and were ready to financially contribute to this project so that the extremely valuable Kytherian records could be properly preserved for future generations.” email to a friend print view Reply - Digital Scanner to be provided for the Kytherian Archives Submitted by Peter Trearchis 27.02.2009 This is wonderful news!! any word how long it will take and if it will then be available online (or at least an index online)? .._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _... >hi i am Chamil Estefhan submitted by CHAMIL ESTEFHAN, 21.02.2009 I am enjoyed to know my family tree in Kythera Chora village. I am looking if is my family tree there in kythera. I am so exiting to know. Waiting for your help. Thanks.' /> Bring Back Barbarossa? by Anna Cominos   Sorry for being off-line for so long, it wasn't really a case of being absent but more of having brain-freeze... it has been a long and endless winter. >FAQ's* about current Kytherian matters *"frequently asked questions" + We do have a local ship connection with Neapoli and now there is finally a twice weekly . - The ship looks like a double-Lego construction built by 4 year-old and pasted together. Once you reach Neapoli you still had an 8 hour drive to Athens....tedious + Interviews with Kythera's Mayor appeared in the local print press quoting him as saying the windmills were not going ahead and that the Kytherian Diaspora would be immediately advised if otherwise. - The applications for the licensing of windmill parks on Kythera to the Regulatory Authority for Energy are still apparently being received: www.rae.gr + Globalization comes to the island with the first Chinese clothing store opening in Tsikalaria - Globalization comes to the island with petty-crime on a sharp increase + Sunflowers and wild-flowers are a bloom. - The flowers have been flowering since late January, making their bloom 3 months early. After picking olives for a month just before Christmas, I have settled into the translating chair working with the up-lifting Panayiota (Pia) Panaretos as we transform Tzeli Hadjidimitriou's Unexplored Kythera & Anti-Kythera from a 350 page Greek-language guide book to an English-language "must read". It has been interesting revising the history section of the book as certain Kytherian characteristics became apparent to me over the centuries. Administered since ancient times by a long-line of foreign rulers that reads like a historical who's who – the Phoenicians, Minoans, Athenians, Spartans, Venetians, British, Russians and for a blink of an eye, the French, Kythera is a fascinating amateur anthropological study. Life under the microscope. Historically and perhaps even genetically, Tsirigotes have always had someone - often cruel - looking over their shoulder as they laboured as slaves. There is no historical mention of uprising or defiance (apart from the odd beheading of nobles), but I'll bet there was a lot of whinging. And so the hard-working Kytherian immigrants bloomed in foreign environments (Australia, America, Smyrna etc.) where they settled into established social/economic structures, while existing on the periphery and living their lives as 'outsiders'. So when power to administer themselves finally comes they don't how to exercise it, as they don't have any previous experience... but have their eye on the thrones that the colonisers have relinquished! "Big Deal? So what?" you ask? How can the warlords and pirates of yesterday have any bearing on today? That was then this is now? The recent chaos that has exploded throughout Greece/Kythera seems unprecedented: state-instilled nepotism, the December 2008 Athen's Riots, the 2008 kidnapping of a shipping tycoon, the February 2009 helicopter escape of prisoners, the burglary of some Kytherian Summer homes and, last but not least, the 2009 theft of lambs from Agio Theodoros. It feels like anarchy, random violence and systematic neglect of state infrastructure. When did Greece/Kythera go from being a high ideal to this sorry state? Well, despite embracing and even demanding multiculturalism for its population abroad, Greece/Kythera has, despite the existence of a large migrant population itself, stubbornly stuck to monoculturalism. The decay of the former communist countries surrounding Greece, particularly Albania, has been a double-edge sword. Yes, the recent migrant workers have renewed Kythera and Greece, refilling the schools and filling the void of affordable workers, but the lack of presence of the Greek state has meant it is a free-for all: there is no integration or assimilation. So Greece/Kythera is going through growing pains and the acne scars are not pretty. But what is most alarming is the absence of planning: how do you make a mono-culture as idiosyncratic as the Greek, multicultural? Perhaps Greece will find the light again and evolve a new system of governing. Fingers crossed... but it feels like a shaky boat trip till then. Don't be put off if you're planning to dip your feet into Kythera's waters this year. Like a sleepy porch dog, the sea and landscape of our magic island welcomes all. Anna Cominos (acominos@hotmail.com) .._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _   >Kythera as the Best Medicine: Memories of the Red Poppies                   Being confined to bed as I am, I must be realistic: I may not be able to return to the island where my heart belongs, but at least I have my memories. Those recollections of me as a girl of 15, of which I have written of before, are still so real to me. So many years have passed, but the vision of a field of red poppies which I would pass daily, as I walked through the cold winds to go to Kato Livadi from Louradianika, to collect the milk my grandmother needed, are with me every day. I would stop, as I walked, and was mesmerised by the beauty of the field beside the road from Louradianika, leading to Kato Livadi. Returning, I would stop again, and look in wonderment at the vivid colours before me. And experiencing the elements, where one day it could be so perfect, and the next, the winds so strong. This is all part of the beauty of Kythera. I remember my best friend back then on Kythera, Marika: the happiness our friendship gave me. We two, typical of any teenagers, gave our parents many headaches with our girlish pranks. Another time, being a typical teenager of 16, I developed a crush on a young man. We would meet at the cemetery where we would chat. He wanted to go to Australia too, like so many other young Kytherians. Someone must have seen us and reported it to my parents who ruled out any more meetings. A schoolgirl's crush. Innocent, but not permissible. Returning some years ago, I found a monument had been placed at Kapsali: my young man had gone out into the sea to fish in his small boat, and drowned during a terrible storm. His body was never recovered. Such a sad sight. Another memory: a family picnic at Agia Pelagia. The pebbles on the ground - not the sand we find on the beaches here in Queensland - were difficult to walk on. With my relatives who cared so deeply about me, all deceased now, called by God, but, their spirit lives on in Kythera. When I returned some years ago, I could still feel their presence around me.   Memories such as going to Vroulea, where the olives were to be picked. I had my lamb, whose mother had rejected it, following me wherever I went. Many people of Livadi would see us daily, and as we would pass the small shops, their owners smiling and waving as they watched me on my way to my grandparents, accompanied by my lamb.   Such memories have given me the strength to continue with my debilitating condition, and accept it. I appreciate the many wonderful people who have entered my life by my writing this column, and I hope my experience may assist others who may also be challenged in their own lives. My illness has progressed and my quality of life has diminished, but, the memories of Kythera, so many years ago, have given me the strength to rise to the challenge, and see another day come and pass. When my days are so difficult, I ask God to help me endure one more day, and then, I go back to my field of red poppies, so magical, and I find the strength which I pray for. My much adored and revered grandfather had spoken to me of the power of the mind. How could I have known then that his words would bring me peace at this stage of my life? Recently, I had yet another operation - so many in over the last year. As I was in the recovery ward at the hospital, I noticed two nurses watching me and speaking quietly between themselves. Finally, one came to me, and asked how I could be so calm, knowing of the pain I was in after a 2 hour operation on my spine. I explained that I felt such peace because I had returned to Kythera and my field of red poppies. There is no form of pain relief which can replace taking one's mind to a "special" place. Maria Whyte (nee Marcellos), maria.wwhyte@gmail.com   .._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _ >New Guestbook Entries 05.03.2009 >Arthur Georgopoulos - Sydney, Australia Family village of origin: Potamos My mother is from Lianianika and father is from Potamos. We have the house next to the car-park in Potamos. Would like to hear from anyone from around the world to share experiences or stories of Kythera. 26.02.2009 >Jerri Powell - Bakersfield, USA Family: Sklavos 16.02.2009 >Stella Nenes - Brisbane, Australia Family village of origin: Potamos Giasas! ti kanete? My father Giorgos Nenes and my mother Panayotitsa Cominos were born in Potamos Kythera, but moved to and married in Australia. The Nenes family of nine immigrated to Australia and the USA. My two sons Vasili, Minas and my husband Bill love travelling, having visited Greece many times and always stay in the great old Potamos house. We are planning another trip to the USA this year (2009). Who knows, this time may even get to meet a Nenes New Yorker :) Pios Xseri? Naste Kala, Vouli xo 08.02.2009 >Alexander Kypriadis - Spain Family village of origin: Karavas I was there just after the earthquake to see my aunt in Potamos. 08.02.2009 >Maria Atsipoulianaki - Brisbane Australia Family village of origin: Aroniathika I am from Kythera and very proud to be Kytherian .._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _ >New Message Board Entries >Where and who are my relatives? Additional information.... submitted by Laura Pavlou-Mudie, 15.03.2009 Hi everybody. My Grandmother, Marietta Logothetis, only child of Minas and Katerina Logothetis of Logothetianika, Kythera. I have no information about Katerina, except to say that her father was a ship's captain and her mother was an Italian from Naples. I think that she too, came from Kythera. Any information is gratefully received. I live in England. Regards, Laura P.S. Minas Logothetis was born around 1846 and, certainly,as an adult, had a factory in Pireaus that processed waste material from the dock areas (for purposes unknown) where he lived with his family. We are led to believe that the family built a church in Logothetianika. Anyone know of and about him, his life and his relatives? Reply - Where and who are my relatives? Additional information.... Submitted by James Gavriles 16.03.2009 You might want to try Telemachos Combes. He has done quite a bit of research on families from Logothetianika. He has a web site and a contact see; http://tilemachos.com/my_newpersonal.htm Reply - Where and who are my relatives? Additional information.... Submitted by Gaye Hegeman 17.03.2009 Hi James, I have just checked out the website of Telemachos Combes, and have many names in common, but all attempts to contact him on the email address on his home page have failed. What do I need to do to contact him? Reply to topic: Where and who are my relatives? Additional information.... Hi Gaye, I contacted Telemachos about a month ago and had no difficulty in raising a reply at that time.  As I said, I'm hoping to obtain information from a number of different quarters and posted a message in the hope that someone might recognise the names.  My grandmother must have had many relatives and I am aware of none of them, except a woman called Alkioni Combis, a cousin, who married a judge and lived in the Dodecanis somewhere. Maybe I'll get lucky and someone will see this message and respond.  Regards, Laura. Reply to topic: Where and who are my relatives? Additional information.... Submitted by Gaye Hegeman 19.03.2009 Managed to get my message through afterall, and would encourage anyone who has Andronicos ancestors from the area between Logotheticanica and Potamos to log onto the following page compiled by Telemachos Coombes: http://tilemachos.com/tree/tree_andronikos.htm and you will be amazed. .._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _... >Ferry on the 28th of April submitted by Hilde Winkelmann, 10.03.2009 Hello! Can anybody help me: Is there a ferry from Piraeus to Kythera in the evening of the 28th of April? Thanks Hilde from Germany .._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _... >Gerakari Grave Sites submitted by Voula Amassah, 28.02.2009 Margaret Tuite has been very helpful with information for Gerakari. Do you have any info on Zacharias, Dimitri or Stavros Souris members from Gerakari? What are your connections to the Souris clan? Do you have any connections to France and Johannesburg Souris members? Curious to know where you live. Polyxene would like info on Kallimeri and Haralambos Ioannis Souris clan from Agia Anastasia. Her email is polymax@sbcglobal.net Thanks Voula Amassah(Souris) Reply - Gerakari grave sites Submitted by Peter Trearchis 28.02.2009 Hi, one of my great-grandmother's aunts Erifyli Panaretos married an Ioannis Dimitrios Souris from Gerakari. He died in 1930 in Piraeus. Ioannis and Erifyli had children Stamatina "Matina," (b. 1896, married Nicholas Coroneos) Fotine, Calliope (b. 1901, died 1918), Aspasia (died 1924), Demetrios (disappeared in 1931), and Marika Souris. Don't know if you ever came across this family. Reply - Gerakari grave sites Submitted by Voula Amassah 01.03.2009 Kanella Souris has done quite a bit of the Souris tree with Polyxene .I will try and follow up on this. Thank you for the information -maybe we have found a link. Do you know about the priest from Gerakari Ioannis that had 13 sons? Regards Voula Amassah (Souris) Reply - Gerakari grave sites Submitted by Peter Trearchis 01.03.2009 OK thank you very much. I do not know anything more about Ioannis since he is related to me through his marriage to Erifyli. All I know is that he was from Gerakari and moved with his family to Piraeus, Greece where he died. .._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _... >Digital Scanner to be provided for the Kytherian Archives submitted by Institute Of Kytheraismos, 27.02.2009 “During the Third Kytheriasmos Symposium (August 2008) the need to digitalise the very valuable Kytherian Archive records was brought to the attention of those present. They expressed a desire to assist and Con Galtos, Peter Corones and Peter Vamvakaris commenced collecting pledges from the attendees. The local Archivist ( Kostas Tsaltas) estimated a cost of about A$30,000 and the goal was to ascertain and purchase what would be the best equipment and software that was needed for the project to proceed in an efficient manner. The informal committee of three Queenslanders worked very hard to determine the needs and cost of the equipment and consulted with some of the most experienced international archival experts. In the meantime Ms Karolina Aslani ( Director of the Kytherian Archives) and Mr Kostas Tsaltas (the Local Archivist) continued with their efforts to obtain the Greek Governments’ assistance for this very historically important project. We are very pleased to advise that on the 20th of February Con Galtos received information from Ms Aslani indicating that the Kytherian Archives had received the needed support from the Greek Government and the digitalisation will commence in May 2009. Con Galtos, Peter Corones and Peter Vamvakaris wish to thank all the Kytherians who so willingly pledged their support and were ready to financially contribute to this project so that the extremely valuable Kytherian records could be properly preserved for future generations.” email to a friend print view Reply - Digital Scanner to be provided for the Kytherian Archives Submitted by Peter Trearchis 27.02.2009 This is wonderful news!! any word how long it will take and if it will then be available online (or at least an index online)? .._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _... >hi i am Chamil Estefhan submitted by CHAMIL ESTEFHAN, 21.02.2009 I am enjoyed to know my family tree in Kythera Chora village. I am looking if is my family tree there in kythera. I am so exiting to know. Waiting for your help. Thanks." />
kythera family kythera family
  

Newsletter Archive

Newsletter Archive > March 2009

16545: Newsletter Archive

submitted by James Victor Prineas on 23.03.2009

March 2009

Dear Friends of Kythera,

Anna is back! After her winter hibernation our star reporter Anna Cominos is back with the island news and views. We also have another poignant article from Maria of Lourandianika with her recollections of the island she loves so much.

I was just on the phone to Kythera with Leonithes Kontosis, ex-Stuttgart engineer and leader of the island's Wind-farm resistance group. Greek but not Kytherian by origin, he lives full-time on Kythera and is working hard to ensure that no mammoth towers are constructed without the consent of the majority of Kytherians. He reported that the island was visited last week by the boss of the biggest wind-generation conglomerate in Greece, "Vector", who told a reporter that his company was all ready to construct wind-farms on Kythera as soon as the permits came through. We'll keep you informed.

If you've received this newsletter regularly you might know that my family and I spent 3 wonderful months on Kythera last year. It went so well that we are now planning to spend a year on Kythera as of this European Summer. Being something of an entrepreneur I intend to try out a few business ideas while there which will hopefully lead to new jobs and income for the islanders. If you have ideas too or want to invest in the island, please send me a mail and we can see if we can find common ground. Kythera has so much potential, from low-impact renewable energy projects (without the mammoth towers - given the ample sun and wind, there is no reason why Kythera can't be energy self-sufficient!), catamaran regatta hosting, to organic medicinal herb production, any of which may not only invigorate the island's economy but also make it more self-sufficient and even more attractive!

While on the island we hope to start building a house on our recently purchased piece of land. So if you have any building suggestions or even building horror-stories, now is the time to send them to me. I could even publish them in the next newsletter or on the website (with the author's permission of course) for the benefit of all readers. Also recommendations on which builders to use and which to beware of, sources for materials and ideas for low-water & maintenance gardens, would be much appreciated.

And for those of you who will be on Kythera this summer, please let me know if you would be interested in a Kythera-family.net dinner party where we could meet and mingle.

Best regards from a sunny but cold Berlin,
James Prineas (james@kythera-family.net)

.._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _


>Bring Back Barbarossa?
by Anna Cominos
 
Sorry for being off-line for so long, it wasn't really a case of being absent but more of having brain-freeze... it has been a long and endless winter.

>FAQ's* about current Kytherian matters
*"frequently asked questions"
+ We do have a local ship connection with Neapoli and now there is finally a twice weekly .
- The ship looks like a double-Lego construction built by 4 year-old and pasted together. Once you reach Neapoli you still had an 8 hour drive to Athens....tedious

+ Interviews with Kythera's Mayor appeared in the local print press quoting him as saying the windmills were not going ahead and that the Kytherian Diaspora would be immediately advised if otherwise.
- The applications for the licensing of windmill parks on Kythera to the Regulatory Authority for Energy are still apparently being received: www.rae.gr

+ Globalization comes to the island with the first Chinese clothing store opening in Tsikalaria
- Globalization comes to the island with petty-crime on a sharp increase

+ Sunflowers and wild-flowers are a bloom.
- The flowers have been flowering since late January, making their bloom 3 months early.

After picking olives for a month just before Christmas, I have settled into the translating chair working with the up-lifting Panayiota (Pia) Panaretos as we transform Tzeli Hadjidimitriou's Unexplored Kythera & Anti-Kythera from a 350 page Greek-language guide book to an English-language "must read". It has been interesting revising the history section of the book as certain Kytherian characteristics became apparent to me over the centuries. Administered since ancient times by a long-line of foreign rulers that reads like a historical who's who – the Phoenicians, Minoans, Athenians, Spartans, Venetians, British, Russians and for a blink of an eye, the French, Kythera is a fascinating amateur anthropological study. Life under the microscope.

Historically and perhaps even genetically, Tsirigotes have always had someone - often cruel - looking over their shoulder as they laboured as slaves. There is no historical mention of uprising or defiance (apart from the odd beheading of nobles), but I'll bet there was a lot of whinging. And so the hard-working Kytherian immigrants bloomed in foreign environments (Australia, America, Smyrna etc.) where they settled into established social/economic structures, while existing on the periphery and living their lives as 'outsiders'. So when power to administer themselves finally comes they don't how to exercise it, as they don't have any previous experience... but have their eye on the thrones that the colonisers have relinquished!

"Big Deal? So what?" you ask? How can the warlords and pirates of yesterday have any bearing on today? That was then this is now?
The recent chaos that has exploded throughout Greece/Kythera seems unprecedented: state-instilled nepotism, the December 2008 Athen's Riots, the 2008 kidnapping of a shipping tycoon, the February 2009 helicopter escape of prisoners, the burglary of some Kytherian Summer homes and, last but not least, the 2009 theft of lambs from Agio Theodoros. It feels like anarchy, random violence and systematic neglect of state infrastructure. When did Greece/Kythera go from being a high ideal to this sorry state?

Well, despite embracing and even demanding multiculturalism for its population abroad, Greece/Kythera has, despite the existence of a large migrant population itself, stubbornly stuck to monoculturalism. The decay of the former communist countries surrounding Greece, particularly Albania, has been a double-edge sword. Yes, the recent migrant workers have renewed Kythera and Greece, refilling the schools and filling the void of affordable workers, but the lack of presence of the Greek state has meant it is a free-for all: there is no integration or assimilation. So Greece/Kythera is going through growing pains and the acne scars are not pretty. But what is most alarming is the absence of planning: how do you make a mono-culture as idiosyncratic as the Greek, multicultural?
Perhaps Greece will find the light again and evolve a new system of governing. Fingers crossed... but it feels like a shaky boat trip till then.

Don't be put off if you're planning to dip your feet into Kythera's waters this year. Like a sleepy porch dog, the sea and landscape of our magic island welcomes all.

Anna Cominos (acominos@hotmail.com)

.._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _

 
>Kythera as the Best Medicine: Memories of the Red Poppies                
 
Being confined to bed as I am, I must be realistic: I may not be able to return to the island where my heart belongs, but at least I have my memories. Those recollections of me as a girl of 15, of which I have written of before, are still so real to me. So many years have passed, but the vision of a field of red poppies which I would pass daily, as I walked through the cold winds to go to Kato Livadi from Louradianika, to collect the milk my grandmother needed, are with me every day.

I would stop, as I walked, and was mesmerised by the beauty of the field beside the road from Louradianika, leading to Kato Livadi. Returning, I would stop again, and look in wonderment at the vivid colours before me. And experiencing the elements, where one day it could be so perfect, and the next, the winds so strong. This is all part of the beauty of Kythera.

I remember my best friend back then on Kythera, Marika: the happiness our friendship gave me. We two, typical of any teenagers, gave our parents many headaches with our girlish pranks.

Another time, being a typical teenager of 16, I developed a crush on a young man. We would meet at the cemetery where we would chat. He wanted to go to Australia too, like so many other young Kytherians. Someone must have seen us and reported it to my parents who ruled out any more meetings. A schoolgirl's crush. Innocent, but not permissible. Returning some years ago, I found a monument had been placed at Kapsali: my young man had gone out into the sea to fish in his small boat, and drowned during a terrible storm. His body was never recovered. Such a sad sight.

Another memory: a family picnic at Agia Pelagia. The pebbles on the ground - not the sand we find on the beaches here in Queensland - were difficult to walk on. With my relatives who cared so deeply about me, all deceased now, called by God, but, their spirit lives on in Kythera. When I returned some years ago, I could still feel their presence around me.
 
Memories such as going to Vroulea, where the olives were to be picked. I had my lamb, whose mother had rejected it, following me wherever I went. Many people of Livadi would see us daily, and as we would pass the small shops, their owners smiling and waving as they watched me on my way to my grandparents, accompanied by my lamb.
 
Such memories have given me the strength to continue with my debilitating condition, and accept it. I appreciate the many wonderful people who have entered my life by my writing this column, and I hope my experience may assist others who may also be challenged in their own lives. My illness has progressed and my quality of life has diminished, but, the memories of Kythera, so many years ago, have given me the strength to rise to the challenge, and see another day come and pass. When my days are so difficult, I ask God to help me endure one more day, and then, I go back to my field of red poppies, so magical, and I find the strength which I pray for. My much adored and revered grandfather had spoken to me of the power of the mind. How could I have known then that his words would bring me peace at this stage of my life?

Recently, I had yet another operation - so many in over the last year. As I was in the recovery ward at the hospital, I noticed two nurses watching me and speaking quietly between themselves. Finally, one came to me, and asked how I could be so calm, knowing of the pain I was in after a 2 hour operation on my spine. I explained that I felt such peace because I had returned to Kythera and my field of red poppies. There is no form of pain relief which can replace taking one's mind to a "special" place.

Maria Whyte (nee Marcellos), maria.wwhyte@gmail.com
 
.._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _

>New Guestbook Entries

05.03.2009
>Arthur Georgopoulos - Sydney, Australia
Family village of origin: Potamos
My mother is from Lianianika and father is from Potamos. We have the house next to the car-park in Potamos. Would like to hear from anyone from around the world to share experiences or stories of Kythera.


26.02.2009
>Jerri Powell - Bakersfield, USA
Family: Sklavos


16.02.2009
>Stella Nenes - Brisbane, Australia
Family village of origin: Potamos
Giasas! ti kanete? My father Giorgos Nenes and my mother Panayotitsa Cominos were born in Potamos Kythera, but moved to and married in Australia. The Nenes family of nine immigrated to Australia and the USA. My two sons Vasili, Minas and my husband Bill love travelling, having visited Greece many times and always stay in the great old Potamos house. We are planning another trip to the USA this year (2009). Who knows, this time may even get to meet a Nenes New Yorker :) Pios Xseri? Naste Kala, Vouli xo


08.02.2009
>Alexander Kypriadis - Spain
Family village of origin: Karavas
I was there just after the earthquake to see my aunt in Potamos.


08.02.2009
>Maria Atsipoulianaki - Brisbane Australia
Family village of origin: Aroniathika
I am from Kythera and very proud to be Kytherian

.._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _

>New Message Board Entries

>Where and who are my relatives? Additional information....
submitted by Laura Pavlou-Mudie, 15.03.2009
Hi everybody. My Grandmother, Marietta Logothetis, only child of Minas and Katerina Logothetis of Logothetianika, Kythera. I have no information about Katerina, except to say that her father was a ship's captain and her mother was an Italian from Naples. I think that she too, came from Kythera. Any information is gratefully received. I live in England. Regards, Laura

P.S. Minas Logothetis was born around 1846 and, certainly,as an adult, had a factory in Pireaus that processed waste material from the dock areas (for purposes unknown) where he lived with his family. We are led to believe that the family built a church in Logothetianika. Anyone know of and about him, his life and his relatives?

Reply - Where and who are my relatives? Additional information....
Submitted by James Gavriles 16.03.2009
You might want to try Telemachos Combes. He has done quite a bit of research on families from Logothetianika.
He has a web site and a contact see; http://tilemachos.com/my_newpersonal.htm

Reply - Where and who are my relatives? Additional information....
Submitted by Gaye Hegeman 17.03.2009
Hi James, I have just checked out the website of Telemachos Combes, and have many names in common, but all attempts to contact him on the email address on his home page have failed. What do I need to do to contact him?

Reply to topic: Where and who are my relatives? Additional information....
Hi Gaye, I contacted Telemachos about a month ago and had no difficulty in raising a reply at that time.  As I said, I'm hoping to obtain information from a number of different quarters and posted a message in the hope that someone might recognise the names.  My grandmother must have had many relatives and I am aware of none of them, except a woman called Alkioni Combis, a cousin, who married a judge and lived in the Dodecanis somewhere. Maybe I'll get lucky and someone will see this message and respond.  Regards, Laura.

Reply to topic: Where and who are my relatives? Additional information....
Submitted by Gaye Hegeman 19.03.2009
Managed to get my message through afterall, and would encourage anyone who has Andronicos ancestors from the area between Logotheticanica and Potamos to log onto the following page compiled by Telemachos Coombes:
http://tilemachos.com/tree/tree_andronikos.htm and you will be amazed.

.._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _...

>Ferry on the 28th of April
submitted by Hilde Winkelmann, 10.03.2009
Hello!
Can anybody help me: Is there a ferry from Piraeus to Kythera in the evening of the 28th of April?
Thanks
Hilde from Germany

.._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _...

>Gerakari Grave Sites
submitted by Voula Amassah, 28.02.2009

Margaret Tuite has been very helpful with information for Gerakari. Do you have any info on Zacharias, Dimitri or Stavros Souris members from Gerakari?
What are your connections to the Souris clan? Do you have any connections to France and Johannesburg Souris members? Curious to know where you live.
Polyxene would like info on Kallimeri and Haralambos Ioannis Souris clan from Agia Anastasia.
Her email is polymax@sbcglobal.net
Thanks
Voula Amassah(Souris)

Reply - Gerakari grave sites
Submitted by Peter Trearchis 28.02.2009
Hi, one of my great-grandmother's aunts Erifyli Panaretos married an Ioannis Dimitrios Souris from Gerakari. He died in 1930 in Piraeus. Ioannis and Erifyli had children Stamatina "Matina," (b. 1896, married Nicholas Coroneos) Fotine, Calliope (b. 1901, died 1918), Aspasia (died 1924), Demetrios (disappeared in 1931), and Marika Souris.
Don't know if you ever came across this family.

Reply - Gerakari grave sites
Submitted by Voula Amassah 01.03.2009
Kanella Souris has done quite a bit of the Souris tree with Polyxene .I will try and follow up on this.
Thank you for the information -maybe we have found a link.
Do you know about the priest from Gerakari Ioannis that had 13 sons?
Regards
Voula Amassah (Souris)

Reply - Gerakari grave sites
Submitted by Peter Trearchis 01.03.2009
OK thank you very much.
I do not know anything more about Ioannis since he is related to me through his marriage to Erifyli. All I know is that he was from Gerakari and moved with his family to Piraeus, Greece where he died.

.._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _...

>Digital Scanner to be provided for the Kytherian Archives
submitted by Institute Of Kytheraismos, 27.02.2009

“During the Third Kytheriasmos Symposium (August 2008) the need to digitalise the very valuable Kytherian Archive records was brought to the attention of those present.

They expressed a desire to assist and Con Galtos, Peter Corones and Peter Vamvakaris commenced collecting pledges from the attendees.

The local Archivist ( Kostas Tsaltas) estimated a cost of about A$30,000 and the goal was to ascertain and purchase what would be the best equipment and software that was needed for the project to proceed in an efficient manner. The informal committee of three Queenslanders worked very hard to determine the needs and cost of the equipment and consulted with some of the most experienced international archival experts.

In the meantime Ms Karolina Aslani ( Director of the Kytherian Archives) and Mr Kostas Tsaltas (the Local Archivist) continued with their efforts to obtain the Greek Governments’ assistance for this very historically important project.

We are very pleased to advise that on the 20th of February Con Galtos received information from Ms Aslani indicating that the Kytherian Archives had received the needed support from the Greek Government and the digitalisation will commence in May 2009.

Con Galtos, Peter Corones and Peter Vamvakaris wish to thank all the Kytherians who so willingly pledged their support and were ready to financially contribute to this project so that the extremely valuable Kytherian records could be properly preserved for future generations.”
email to a friend print view

Reply - Digital Scanner to be provided for the Kytherian Archives
Submitted by Peter Trearchis 27.02.2009
This is wonderful news!!
any word how long it will take and if it will then be available online (or at least an index online)?

.._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _...

>hi i am Chamil Estefhan
submitted by CHAMIL ESTEFHAN, 21.02.2009

I am enjoyed to know my family tree in Kythera Chora village. I am looking if is my family tree there in kythera. I am so exiting to know. Waiting for your help. Thanks.

Leave a comment