Your Questions to the Mayor! You might remember that we interviewed the mayor of Kythera last year and sent the interview out in a newsletter and posted it on the Kythera-Family.net site (which you can read here: http://www.kythera-family.net/index.php?nav=211-221&cid=550&did=15634&pageflip=1). We'd like to repeat the interview this year (and each year) and, since Kythera-Family.net is your site too, we'd like you to send us any questions you'd like us to put to the Mayor (and deputy mayor, as we'll be interviewing him too a week later). >Water problems? In Mitata, my family village, a few friends reported mammoth water bills, although they don't live on the island most of the year. Altogether 4 homes in Mitata, all owned by non-permanent residents of Kythera, who usually live in Australia, the USA or northern Europe, had water bills of over four thousand euros in 2008. (The average for those living permanently in the village is around four hundred euros a year). One of the water-bills for a four-month period was for 1800 cubic litres of water. That's 1.8 million litres of water! Putting that in perspective: the average water-tank truck on Kythera can carry 4 cubic litres of water, and would have to be filled 450 times to move that much water: over a four month period it would have to be filled 5 times a day, every day of every month for 4 months. That's once every 5 hours, day and night. And a tap running at max would take about 5 hours to fill a water truck, which wouldn't leave the water truck any time to empty itself somewhere else. Unless the person removing the water had two water trucks... Let's face it, it's a pretty unlikely scenario. Our questions to your readers: 1. have you heard of similar instances of abnormally high kytherian water bills? 2. do you have any suggestions as to how the water bills could be so high? So far we can only think of five possible reasons: a. the bills are correct and that much water was indeed used b. all four meters were faulty c. someone at the water department has made a big mistake d. someone has been surreptitiously taking huge amounts of water from the homes e. someone is tampering with the meter's numbers. Thanks for any help you can give us on this, and don't forget to get some questions for the mayor to us! Best, James Prineas & the KFN Team .._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _ Messageboard Topic >Interviewees for doctorate sought! Dear members of the Kytherian Community, My name is Alexander Riedmüller. I am posting this message to ask for your assistance as interviewees during my research stay in Sydney between October 08th and 20th as part of my doctorate "Global Community: www.kythera-family.net. Transnational Migration, New Media and Identity".   Following Questions will be key issues in my PhD research project: - Who "makes” - in a more and more globalised, multicultural and multimedial influenced world - "culture" for whom, how and why? - What does it mean to be "Kytherian" in everyday life in the much more multi-ethnic Australian society?  - Beyond its virtual image on www.kythera-family.net - does some sort of a "global” Kytherian Community really exist, and, if yes,on which personal and institutional links, relations and institutions is this community based on? - Which specific relations and interactions do exist between the Kytherian Community in Australia and the inhabitants of the Island of Kythera? - What is the role of official institutions of the Kytherian Community in Australia for processes of formation and transmission of "transnational” and perhaps even "multiethnic" or "multicultural" identities? - How do "identity concepts” change between generations? And what interests me most: - What is the role of emerging social and cultural online-networks like www.kythera-family.net within all these processes? It would be great if some members of the Community could give me a deeper "insight” into their everyday lives as "Tsirigotes" in Australia. If you're interested to show me your "world", please contact me under the following e-mail address: alexander_riedmueller@t-online.de With great thanks for your kind attentiveness, Yours, Alexander Riedmüller M.A. .._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _... Messageboard Topic >Kytherian Society of California - Panigyri of the Myrtidiotisa Sunday, October 11, 2009 10:00 a.m. Church Services & Artoklasia St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church 1260 Davis Street San Jose, CA 95126 408 426-2770 12:30 p.m. Luncheon Bold Knight Bistro 840 N. 1st Street San Jose, CA 95112 408 297-2170 Salmon al Forno $36 Chicken Mushroom Plate $30 Veggie Primavera $26 Child's Burger Plate $15 Price includes beverage (coffee, tea or soda) Salad, dessert and 20% gratuity No Host Bar For more info contact: Vikki Vrettos Fraioli vikvf@mac.com .._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _... >Our Stay on Kythera in the 1950s by Maria of Lourandianika The difference between Kytherian girls on the island and those of us brought up in Australia became obvious to us on the first night after we arrived when my sister and I, sharing a bedroom, were woken by pebbles hitting our windows. We could not believe what we saw when we went to the window: outside were two girls, riding a motorcycle, asking us to sneak out to have fun. This was not something we expected, as we believed the upbringing of girls on Kythera would be at least as strict as it was in Australia. Needless to say, we did not leave our bedroom, out of fear of being caught, and not adventurous enough to contemplate such an adventure. One of these girls was named Marika. She became my closest friend, and we spent the following months on Kythera, inseparable. When I returned to Kythera many years later, a woman appeared in the doorway as I sat with my cousin Koula in my father's family home. This woman was wearing work clothes, and stood nervously wringing her hands. I jumped up, running to her, as she began excusing her clothes, but I did not see this. Standing before me was my Marika, my childhood friend, who had come directly from her work in the fields, not knowing what to expect. We held each other, tears pouring down our cheeks, and the years slipped away, and we were once again the two young girls who had forged such a strong friendship, that no years could diminish. We talked for hours, speaking even of the first night when she had thrown pebbles at my bedroom window.  There were also many times of humour. Remembering my sister saying that she would wear her hair in a "French Roll" the following day, and my aunts, confused, asking about the oven, and how was it to be cooked? Such simple and loveable times are what will always stay with me, never to be forgotten. My grandparents, now growing older, had to leave their home to live with a daughter in Upper Livathi. Their home in Lourandianika was a simple dwelling, but filled with memories, which must have made it hard for them to leave. The births and the raising of their children, seeing their youngest daughter marry, leaving the island to start a new life so far away, their son, a man of great stature, such a wonderful son, leaving also to start his life anew so far away. Two remaining daughters married and stayed on Kythera, always being there for their parents, living in Upper Livathi, but their hearts belonged in our home village of Louradianika. My grandparents had their chickens taken from Louradianika to be with them. The chickens were used to roaming freely, but they also needed to start a new life in a new chicken coop, built especially for them by their son in law. They also needed to adapt to changes. I visited my grandparents almost every day in their new home, and one day, my grandmother suggested that I go and see the new chicken coop. I felt that maybe the adults wished to speak of matters not considered suitable for my young ears. I happily went to see where the chickens were now kept, but, as I left, I did not close the door, nor put the latch in place. To my horror, there was a stream of chickens escaping, and as I chased them, the faster they ran. Night was approaching, and I had no choice but to go to my grandmother and confess my actions, as I realised I could not catch them and return them to their new coop. The mischievous teenager in me was gone, and a frightened young girl took her place. I went to my grandmother, seeing her sitting in her usual chair, in my aunt's kitchen, and as I looked at her, with tears filling my eyes. I saw her beautiful blue eyes, so gentle, the blond hair, now going grey, wearing her white scarf, made of fabric which did not allow it to ever slip, her arms laying on her ample bosom. As she saw my distress, she gently asked me what was troubling me? As I lay my head on her lap, I told her that I had not closed the latch on the new chicken coop, and her chickens had escaped, and as hard as I tried, running after them, the faster they ran, until I lost sight of them. How her words have stayed with me, a lifetime later. "Allo kako min sou lahi pethi mou". "May nothing worse befall you my child", spoken so gently, as she stroked my head, and wiped away my tears. The wonderful people of Upper Livadi came out in force that evening, with their lanterns, not stopping, nor asking questions, but went directly to round up the flock of chickens. It took several hours, but finally, at eleven o'clock that night, the last of the rogue chickens was safely back in its coop. Needless to say, I never again forgot to close the door and place the latch in place. My grandmother explained to me that the chickens needed time to get accustomed to their new surroundings. My beloved Uncle Nick returned to Kythera to care for his elderly parents. Always the good son, life in Australia was not what he wanted, and his feeling of responsibility and love of his parents caused him to return to Kythera, giving his parents the greatest gift of all: making it possible for them to return to Louradianika, to see out their days.  He continued living in the family home after they passed, and eventually had to himself. This large man, who was in my life from the day of my birth, had returned to Louradianika, to be the son all parents wished for. One day when I returned to Kythera as an adult, I sat on the wooden bench which had been my bed, during the days I had spent at Louradianika as a teenager, remembering the days I had spent there. A piece of timber sprung open under the touch of my hand, and inside, my beloved uncle had hidden the valuable family silverware. As I looked at the other arm of this furniture, it also sprung open, and it also was filled with silver cutlery. I closed the hinged pieces, and left his hidden treasure there. This would be what he would have wanted. This gentle giant, with the heart to match. One day, as he was taking his daily walk, the heart of this gentle giant failed him, and as he lay alone, God reached out and gently lifted him to be with his parents once again. As Kytherians we have many stories to tell, but, let us not lose our way, and our humour, and as we remember some light-hearted moments of life on Kythera, making it the memorable place which will forever be in our hearts. This article is dedicated to the memory of my Uncle Nick. A man with a heart of gold, and always in my heart. Maria (Marcellos) Whyte maria.wwhyte@gmail.com 4 Trinity Crescent., Sippy Downs Queensland 4556. .._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _ Messageboard Topic >CATSOULIS Hello my name is Sandrine, I am from France, so please excuse my bad English... I found this site on which, maybe one of you, can give me a clue about a mysterious person of my grand-pa's familly... Georges CATSOULIS He was told to be born in 1929 but no one knows where. As he wanted to marry my grand-father's aunt, the family tried to help him to become French but he was not able to find any papers telling where he was from exactly, he was telling that he was Greek, he was also hardly speaking French. So they probably never got married. He died in 1965 in Aveyron area in France from a fire-doamp explosion in a coal mine where he was working. The only documents I have about him are my grant-father's memory and a picture of his grave in France. Can any of you give me a clue to find who he was? Thanks for the help you can give us, Best regards from France, Sandrine PS: don't hesitate to contact me by mail: burkinickles@yahoo.fr .._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _... Guestbook Entry >Vanessa Veneris - Sydney I'm half Kytherian and was born in Sydney. I'm the daughter of Harry Veneris who lives in Sydney. Other half is Finnish, so the Kytherians also have a Scandinavian connection! Guestbook Entry >Kosmas Zaglanikis - Melbourne, Australia Love the island! Love my family and its history. Look forward to returning, maybe one day for good.' /> Kytherian Society of California - Panigyri of the Myrtidiotisa Sunday, October 11, 2009 10:00 a.m. Church Services & Artoklasia St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church 1260 Davis Street San Jose, CA 95126 408 426-2770 12:30 p.m. Luncheon Bold Knight Bistro 840 N. 1st Street San Jose, CA 95112 408 297-2170 Salmon al Forno $36 Chicken Mushroom Plate $30 Veggie Primavera $26 Child's Burger Plate $15 Price includes beverage (coffee, tea or soda) Salad, dessert and 20% gratuity No Host Bar For more info contact: Vikki Vrettos Fraioli vikvf@mac.com .._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _... >Our Stay on Kythera in the 1950s by Maria of Lourandianika The difference between Kytherian girls on the island and those of us brought up in Australia became obvious to us on the first night after we arrived when my sister and I, sharing a bedroom, were woken by pebbles hitting our windows. We could not believe what we saw when we went to the window: outside were two girls, riding a motorcycle, asking us to sneak out to have fun. This was not something we expected, as we believed the upbringing of girls on Kythera would be at least as strict as it was in Australia. Needless to say, we did not leave our bedroom, out of fear of being caught, and not adventurous enough to contemplate such an adventure. One of these girls was named Marika. She became my closest friend, and we spent the following months on Kythera, inseparable. When I returned to Kythera many years later, a woman appeared in the doorway as I sat with my cousin Koula in my father's family home. This woman was wearing work clothes, and stood nervously wringing her hands. I jumped up, running to her, as she began excusing her clothes, but I did not see this. Standing before me was my Marika, my childhood friend, who had come directly from her work in the fields, not knowing what to expect. We held each other, tears pouring down our cheeks, and the years slipped away, and we were once again the two young girls who had forged such a strong friendship, that no years could diminish. We talked for hours, speaking even of the first night when she had thrown pebbles at my bedroom window.  There were also many times of humour. Remembering my sister saying that she would wear her hair in a "French Roll" the following day, and my aunts, confused, asking about the oven, and how was it to be cooked? Such simple and loveable times are what will always stay with me, never to be forgotten. My grandparents, now growing older, had to leave their home to live with a daughter in Upper Livathi. Their home in Lourandianika was a simple dwelling, but filled with memories, which must have made it hard for them to leave. The births and the raising of their children, seeing their youngest daughter marry, leaving the island to start a new life so far away, their son, a man of great stature, such a wonderful son, leaving also to start his life anew so far away. Two remaining daughters married and stayed on Kythera, always being there for their parents, living in Upper Livathi, but their hearts belonged in our home village of Louradianika. My grandparents had their chickens taken from Louradianika to be with them. The chickens were used to roaming freely, but they also needed to start a new life in a new chicken coop, built especially for them by their son in law. They also needed to adapt to changes. I visited my grandparents almost every day in their new home, and one day, my grandmother suggested that I go and see the new chicken coop. I felt that maybe the adults wished to speak of matters not considered suitable for my young ears. I happily went to see where the chickens were now kept, but, as I left, I did not close the door, nor put the latch in place. To my horror, there was a stream of chickens escaping, and as I chased them, the faster they ran. Night was approaching, and I had no choice but to go to my grandmother and confess my actions, as I realised I could not catch them and return them to their new coop. The mischievous teenager in me was gone, and a frightened young girl took her place. I went to my grandmother, seeing her sitting in her usual chair, in my aunt's kitchen, and as I looked at her, with tears filling my eyes. I saw her beautiful blue eyes, so gentle, the blond hair, now going grey, wearing her white scarf, made of fabric which did not allow it to ever slip, her arms laying on her ample bosom. As she saw my distress, she gently asked me what was troubling me? As I lay my head on her lap, I told her that I had not closed the latch on the new chicken coop, and her chickens had escaped, and as hard as I tried, running after them, the faster they ran, until I lost sight of them. How her words have stayed with me, a lifetime later. "Allo kako min sou lahi pethi mou". "May nothing worse befall you my child", spoken so gently, as she stroked my head, and wiped away my tears. The wonderful people of Upper Livadi came out in force that evening, with their lanterns, not stopping, nor asking questions, but went directly to round up the flock of chickens. It took several hours, but finally, at eleven o'clock that night, the last of the rogue chickens was safely back in its coop. Needless to say, I never again forgot to close the door and place the latch in place. My grandmother explained to me that the chickens needed time to get accustomed to their new surroundings. My beloved Uncle Nick returned to Kythera to care for his elderly parents. Always the good son, life in Australia was not what he wanted, and his feeling of responsibility and love of his parents caused him to return to Kythera, giving his parents the greatest gift of all: making it possible for them to return to Louradianika, to see out their days.  He continued living in the family home after they passed, and eventually had to himself. This large man, who was in my life from the day of my birth, had returned to Louradianika, to be the son all parents wished for. One day when I returned to Kythera as an adult, I sat on the wooden bench which had been my bed, during the days I had spent at Louradianika as a teenager, remembering the days I had spent there. A piece of timber sprung open under the touch of my hand, and inside, my beloved uncle had hidden the valuable family silverware. As I looked at the other arm of this furniture, it also sprung open, and it also was filled with silver cutlery. I closed the hinged pieces, and left his hidden treasure there. This would be what he would have wanted. This gentle giant, with the heart to match. One day, as he was taking his daily walk, the heart of this gentle giant failed him, and as he lay alone, God reached out and gently lifted him to be with his parents once again. As Kytherians we have many stories to tell, but, let us not lose our way, and our humour, and as we remember some light-hearted moments of life on Kythera, making it the memorable place which will forever be in our hearts. This article is dedicated to the memory of my Uncle Nick. A man with a heart of gold, and always in my heart. Maria (Marcellos) Whyte maria.wwhyte@gmail.com 4 Trinity Crescent., Sippy Downs Queensland 4556. .._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _ Messageboard Topic >CATSOULIS Hello my name is Sandrine, I am from France, so please excuse my bad English... I found this site on which, maybe one of you, can give me a clue about a mysterious person of my grand-pa's familly... Georges CATSOULIS He was told to be born in 1929 but no one knows where. As he wanted to marry my grand-father's aunt, the family tried to help him to become French but he was not able to find any papers telling where he was from exactly, he was telling that he was Greek, he was also hardly speaking French. So they probably never got married. He died in 1965 in Aveyron area in France from a fire-doamp explosion in a coal mine where he was working. The only documents I have about him are my grant-father's memory and a picture of his grave in France. Can any of you give me a clue to find who he was? Thanks for the help you can give us, Best regards from France, Sandrine PS: don't hesitate to contact me by mail: burkinickles@yahoo.fr .._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _... Guestbook Entry >Vanessa Veneris - Sydney I'm half Kytherian and was born in Sydney. I'm the daughter of Harry Veneris who lives in Sydney. Other half is Finnish, so the Kytherians also have a Scandinavian connection! Guestbook Entry >Kosmas Zaglanikis - Melbourne, Australia Love the island! Love my family and its history. Look forward to returning, maybe one day for good." />
kythera family kythera family
  

Newsletter Archive

Newsletter Archive > September 2009

16839: Newsletter Archive

submitted by James Victor Prineas on 12.09.2009

September 2009

Dear Friends of Kythera,

it's been raining cats and dogs on Kythera - this is the wettest September I've every experienced here. Feels more like late October. Little rivers run down the roads, the builders are all huddled in the cafes with their little cups of coffee, and the cisterns are probably half full already! When the sun does shine, the views are magnificent: you can see the details of the mainland in the north, and Antikythera and even Crete don't seem that far away at all. The skies and sunsets are great as well - you can see a few pictures of them here: http://www.facebook.com/album.php?aid=108068&id=530120368
Perfect hiking weather - we walked from Mitata to Paliopoli the day before yesterday and there was water running in a few valleys! - but that's a topic for our next newsletter.

>Your Questions to the Mayor!
You might remember that we interviewed the mayor of Kythera last year and sent the interview out in a newsletter and posted it on the Kythera-Family.net site (which you can read here: http://www.kythera-family.net/index.php?nav=211-221&cid=550&did=15634&pageflip=1). We'd like to repeat the interview this year (and each year) and, since Kythera-Family.net is your site too, we'd like you to send us any questions you'd like us to put to the Mayor (and deputy mayor, as we'll be interviewing him too a week later).

>Water problems?
In Mitata, my family village, a few friends reported mammoth water bills, although they don't live on the island most of the year. Altogether 4 homes in Mitata, all owned by non-permanent residents of Kythera, who usually live in Australia, the USA or northern Europe, had water bills of over four thousand euros in 2008. (The average for those living permanently in the village is around four hundred euros a year). One of the water-bills for a four-month period was for 1800 cubic litres of water. That's 1.8 million litres of water! Putting that in perspective: the average water-tank truck on Kythera can carry 4 cubic litres of water, and would have to be filled 450 times to move that much water: over a four month period it would have to be filled 5 times a day, every day of every month for 4 months. That's once every 5 hours, day and night. And a tap running at max would take about 5 hours to fill a water truck, which wouldn't leave the water truck any time to empty itself somewhere else. Unless the person removing the water had two water trucks... Let's face it, it's a pretty unlikely scenario.
Our questions to your readers:
1. have you heard of similar instances of abnormally high kytherian water bills?
2. do you have any suggestions as to how the water bills could be so high? So far we can only think of five possible reasons:
a. the bills are correct and that much water was indeed used
b. all four meters were faulty
c. someone at the water department has made a big mistake
d. someone has been surreptitiously taking huge amounts of water from the homes
e. someone is tampering with the meter's numbers.

Thanks for any help you can give us on this, and don't forget to get some questions for the mayor to us!

Best,

James Prineas & the KFN Team

.._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _

Messageboard Topic

>Interviewees for doctorate sought!

Dear members of the Kytherian Community,

My name is Alexander Riedmüller. I am posting this message to ask for your assistance as interviewees during my research stay in Sydney between October 08th and 20th as part of my doctorate "Global Community: www.kythera-family.net. Transnational Migration, New Media and Identity".  

Following Questions will be key issues in my PhD research project:
- Who "makes” - in a more and more globalised, multicultural and multimedial influenced world - "culture" for whom, how and why?
- What does it mean to be "Kytherian" in everyday life in the much more multi-ethnic Australian society? 
- Beyond its virtual image on www.kythera-family.net - does some sort of a "global” Kytherian Community really exist, and, if yes,on which personal and institutional links, relations and institutions is this community based on?
- Which specific relations and interactions do exist between the Kytherian Community in Australia and the inhabitants of the Island of Kythera?
- What is the role of official institutions of the Kytherian Community in Australia for processes of formation and transmission of "transnational” and perhaps even "multiethnic" or "multicultural" identities?
- How do "identity concepts” change between generations?

And what interests me most:
- What is the role of emerging social and cultural online-networks like www.kythera-family.net within all these processes?

It would be great if some members of the Community could give me a deeper "insight” into their everyday lives as "Tsirigotes" in Australia.

If you're interested to show me your "world", please contact me under the following e-mail address:
alexander_riedmueller@t-online.de

With great thanks for your kind attentiveness,

Yours,

Alexander Riedmüller M.A.

.._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _...

Messageboard Topic

>Kytherian Society of California - Panigyri of the Myrtidiotisa

Sunday, October 11, 2009
10:00 a.m.
Church Services & Artoklasia

St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church
1260 Davis Street
San Jose, CA 95126
408 426-2770

12:30 p.m. Luncheon
Bold Knight Bistro
840 N. 1st Street
San Jose, CA 95112
408 297-2170

Salmon al Forno $36
Chicken Mushroom Plate $30
Veggie Primavera $26
Child's Burger Plate $15

Price includes beverage (coffee, tea or soda)
Salad, dessert and 20% gratuity

No Host Bar

For more info contact:

Vikki Vrettos Fraioli
vikvf@mac.com

.._ _ _..._ _ _..._ _ _...

>Our Stay on Kythera in the 1950s
by Maria of Lourandianika

The difference between Kytherian girls on the island and those of us brought up in Australia became obvious to us on the first night after we arrived when my sister and I, sharing a bedroom, were woken by pebbles hitting our windows. We could not believe what we saw when we went to the window: outside were two girls, riding a motorcycle, asking us to sneak out to have fun.

This was not something we expected, as we believed the upbringing of girls on Kythera would be at least as strict as it was in Australia. Needless to say, we did not leave our bedroom, out of fear of being caught, and not adventurous enough to contemplate such an adventure. One of these girls was named Marika. She became my closest friend, and we spent the following months on Kythera, inseparable.

When I returned to Kythera many years later, a woman appeared in the doorway as I sat with my cousin Koula in my father's family home. This woman was wearing work clothes, and stood nervously wringing her hands.

I jumped up, running to her, as she began excusing her clothes, but I did not see this. Standing before me was my Marika, my childhood friend, who had come directly from her work in the fields, not knowing what to expect.

We held each other, tears pouring down our cheeks, and the years slipped away, and we were once again the two young girls who had forged such a strong friendship, that no years could diminish. We talked for hours, speaking even of the first night when she had thrown pebbles at my bedroom window. 

There were also many times of humour. Remembering my sister saying that she would wear her hair in a "French Roll" the following day, and my aunts, confused, asking about the oven, and how was it to be cooked? Such simple and loveable times are what will always stay with me, never to be forgotten.

My grandparents, now growing older, had to leave their home to live with a daughter in Upper Livathi. Their home in Lourandianika was a simple dwelling, but filled with memories, which must have made it hard for them to leave. The births and the raising of their children, seeing their youngest daughter marry, leaving the island to start a new life so far away, their son, a man of great stature, such a wonderful son, leaving also to start his life anew so far away. Two remaining daughters married and stayed on Kythera, always being there for their parents, living in Upper Livathi, but their hearts belonged in our home village of Louradianika.

My grandparents had their chickens taken from Louradianika to be with them. The chickens were used to roaming freely, but they also needed to start a new life in a new chicken coop, built especially for them by their son in law. They also needed to adapt to changes.

I visited my grandparents almost every day in their new home, and one day, my grandmother suggested that I go and see the new chicken coop. I felt that maybe the adults wished to speak of matters not considered suitable for my young ears. I happily went to see where the chickens were now kept, but, as I left, I did not close the door, nor put the latch in place. To my horror, there was a stream of chickens escaping, and as I chased them, the faster they ran. Night was approaching, and I had no choice but to go to my grandmother and confess my actions, as I realised I could not catch them and return them to their new coop. The mischievous teenager in me was gone, and a frightened young girl took her place. I went to my grandmother, seeing her sitting in her usual chair, in my aunt's kitchen, and as I looked at her, with tears filling my eyes. I saw her beautiful blue eyes, so gentle, the blond hair, now going grey, wearing her white scarf, made of fabric which did not allow it to ever slip, her arms laying on her ample bosom. As she saw my distress, she gently asked me what was troubling me?

As I lay my head on her lap, I told her that I had not closed the latch on the new chicken coop, and her chickens had escaped, and as hard as I tried, running after them, the faster they ran, until I lost sight of them. How her words have stayed with me, a lifetime later. "Allo kako min sou lahi pethi mou". "May nothing worse befall you my child", spoken so gently, as she stroked my head, and wiped away my tears.

The wonderful people of Upper Livadi came out in force that evening, with their lanterns, not stopping, nor asking questions, but went directly to round up the flock of chickens. It took several hours, but finally, at eleven o'clock that night, the last of the rogue chickens was safely back in its coop. Needless to say, I never again forgot to close the door and place the latch in place. My grandmother explained to me that the chickens needed time to get accustomed to their new surroundings.

My beloved Uncle Nick returned to Kythera to care for his elderly parents. Always the good son, life in Australia was not what he wanted, and his feeling of responsibility and love of his parents caused him to return to Kythera, giving his parents the greatest gift of all: making it possible for them to return to Louradianika, to see out their days.  He continued living in the family home after they passed, and eventually had to himself. This large man, who was in my life from the day of my birth, had returned to Louradianika, to be the son all parents wished for.

One day when I returned to Kythera as an adult, I sat on the wooden bench which had been my bed, during the days I had spent at Louradianika as a teenager, remembering the days I had spent there. A piece of timber sprung open under the touch of my hand, and inside, my beloved uncle had hidden the valuable family silverware. As I looked at the other arm of this furniture, it also sprung open, and it also was filled with silver cutlery. I closed the hinged pieces, and left his hidden treasure there. This would be what he would have wanted. This gentle giant, with the heart to match. One day, as he was taking his daily walk, the heart of this gentle giant failed him, and as he lay alone, God reached out and gently lifted him to be with his parents once again.

As Kytherians we have many stories to tell, but, let us not lose our way, and our humour, and as we remember some light-hearted moments of life on Kythera, making it the memorable place which will forever be in our hearts.

This article is dedicated to the memory of my Uncle Nick. A man with a heart of gold, and always in my heart.

Maria (Marcellos) Whyte
maria.wwhyte@gmail.com
4 Trinity Crescent.,
Sippy Downs
Queensland 4556.

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Messageboard Topic

>CATSOULIS

Hello my name is Sandrine, I am from France, so please excuse my bad English...

I found this site on which, maybe one of you, can give me a clue about a mysterious person of my grand-pa's familly... Georges CATSOULIS

He was told to be born in 1929 but no one knows where.
As he wanted to marry my grand-father's aunt, the family tried to help him to become French but he was not able to find any papers telling where he was from exactly, he was telling that he was Greek, he was also hardly speaking French.
So they probably never got married.
He died in 1965 in Aveyron area in France from a fire-doamp explosion in a coal mine where he was working.
The only documents I have about him are my grant-father's memory and a picture of his grave in France.

Can any of you give me a clue to find who he was?
Thanks for the help you can give us,
Best regards from France,

Sandrine

PS: don't hesitate to contact me by mail: burkinickles@yahoo.fr

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Guestbook Entry

>Vanessa Veneris - Sydney

I'm half Kytherian and was born in Sydney. I'm the daughter of Harry Veneris who lives in Sydney. Other half is Finnish, so the Kytherians also have a Scandinavian connection!


Guestbook Entry

>Kosmas Zaglanikis - Melbourne, Australia

Love the island! Love my family and its history. Look forward to returning, maybe one day for good.

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