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Photos > Architecture

submitted by Kytherian Cultural Exchange on 31.07.2012

A water canal at Mylopotamos which fed the numerous water mills in the area

Water travelled along a series of canals, througout Mylopotamos - ll interlinked. Water would fall from a height into a designated water mill wheel, turning the wheel, and then the stone, and hence crushing the wheat.

Mills were owned by individual families.

Those who grew wheat, but had no mills, would bring their wheat - often with great difficulty - to the mill on a designated day.

A week later - the miller would have the flour ready for "pick up".

Once the water had passed through a mill - it would move on - further down the canals, to "turn another mill".

The engineering principles involved were quite ingenious.

Photos > Architecture

submitted by Dean Coroneos on 24.07.2012

The bell tower at Logothetianika

Due to generous contributions from the Australian-Kytherian diaspora - the bell-tower in Logothetianika has been restored.

It has not been operational for a number of decades.

Now, again, it chimes on the hour.

It can be heard from as far away as Potamos - and further afield on still day.

Photos > Architecture

submitted by Dean Coroneos on 24.07.2012

The bell-tower in Logothetianika

Due to generous contributions from the Australian-Kytherian diaspora - the bell-tower in Logothetianika has been restored.

It has not been operational for a number of decades.

Now, again, it chimes on the hour.

It can be heard from as far away as Potamos - and further afield on still day.

Photos > Architecture

submitted by Vasilia Uhrweiss (nee Margetis) on 21.06.2012

Lianos family home on Kythera, built by my grandfather, George Lianos

The Life story of George and Agapi Lianos

The Lianos Comino Odyssey


My Grandparents were Agapi and George Lianos from Kythera,Greece. Papou was born on the 9th June1873 in the village of Liananika to Emmanuel and Relia, farm owners. He was the only son and had four sisters, Irene, Kerani, Marigo and Stavroula. Agapi's birth date was in 1867.

He worked on the farm with his parents and at the age of twenty four married Agapi the seventeen year old daughter of Anthony and Theodora Comino on the 15th February 1897.

My Grandparents Agapi and George Lianos c. 1900

His parents gave them some land with a two room house on it and it was there that their first child Stavroula was born on the 31st July 1898. But conditions were very hard in Kythera so they decided that Papou should go to Australia to try his luck. Also his wife's brothers, Dimitrios, Menas and Nicholas,and her Uncles Zacharias and Ioanis Comino, were already settled in Sydney, which would be a great help to him, he hoped.

He arrived in Pireaus on 16th September 1898 where he arranged his papers and passport and arranged for his passage to Sydney. On the 20th September 1898 he left on an Egyptian Steam boat for Port Said where he stayed for several days. Then on the 28th September 1898 he boarded a new German steamer called the Barbarossa, and set sail for his new life in Australia.

After a lovely and uneventful trip he arrived at Circular Quay Sydney on the 30th of October 1898 and was met by his brothers-in-law and taken to lodgings and instructed in what was to be his life for some time to come. A bad joke was played on him by his brothers-in-law, who had put him in a bug infested room on his first night in Australia, but then gave him a room in one of their homes.

And it was hard. From the 3rd November 1898 he had to get up at 3.a.m. to go to the markets to collect oysters and fish and bring the produce back to the cellar and clean the fish and open the oysters. He then had to go upstairs to scrub the floor, clean the tables and wash the cutlery in preparation for the evening work in the restaurant. Then he had to go back to the cellar to open more oysters. Then it was back to the pantry to wash up the cutlery and dishes from the restaurant after it closed. He went to bed at midnight, and then the routine started again. He had Sundays off but had to clean his room and wash his clothes. Then he dressed up in the best clothes he had and went for a walk in the Domain but he had to be home by 5p.m. to prepare himself for the next day. And so it went on.

My Grandparents Agapi and George Lianos, early in their married life, with Emmanuel and Stavroula

During the next four years he had a series of good and bad experiences in business and family dealings, but he was finally doing well enough to bring his wife and child to join him. In November 1900 they were a united family again. They worked very hard in the latest business they had purchased which was very successful. Their first child to be born in Australia was Emmanuel born on 3rd January 1903. Their next child was Theodora born on 29th January 1905, and on 20th March 1907 another daughter Aspacia was born. He then made the decision to return to Greece and on the16th April 1907 left on the Orient Liner Ormes.

However Theodora became very ill and they had to disembark at Colombo, a decision which saved her life. They stayed there for fifteen days and continued on their journey on the Ortona, and arrived in Pireaus on the 7th June 1907, where they stayed for fifteen days and then travelled to their intended destination Agia Pelagia where they were greeted with great joy by his father and sisters. From there they travelled to their village Liananika and were greeted with great enthusiam by the villagers.

They spent the next few years (3yrs and 10mths to be exact) having a happy time. During this time another son Anthony was born on the 28th January 1908 and Papou built a beautiful home and furnished it with the best furniture which he bought from a shop in Pireaus owned by an in.law J.Venathis. The house was started on the 15th May and completed on the 28th November 1908.

The Lianos family home on Kythera, built by my grandfather, George Lianos, is depicted at the head of this entry.
Unfortunately he was persuaded by some in-laws to lend them money for their business ventures and then refused to repay him. As he was not receiving the monies due to him from his investments in Australia from his in-laws whom he trusted, he was forced to return to Australia to investigate things. His intention was to return to Greece in a couple of years. So in October 1910, they left Cerigo (as it was called then) and arrived back in Australia on the 7th February 1911, and took over his shop from his brother-in-law Menas Comino and was shocked to see how little money there was for him. However he worked very hard and built the business up and started doing well again . During this time another son Menas, was born on the 1th April 1911 and business was really booming. But he was too trusting of his in-laws and was tricked by them once again and he had many business problems as a result of their actions. About this time another daughter Coralia was born on the 24th April 1913.

At the end of 1912, he intended to sell up everything and return to Greec but once again he was persuaded by his in-laws to do otherwise and made bad decisions which cost him dearly. He opened a lolly shop and milk bar in Elizabeth St. Sydney but again he had bad partners and lost a lot of money. Another son Theodore was born on the 13th December 1914.

Then war had started in Europe in 1914, and business plunged dramatically because the soldiers behaved like larrikins and refused to pay for food and drinks and threatened to smash the windows (which they did once) if he complained. It was a bad time for all shopkeepers. He then went into business at 661 George St,and it was from there that his first daughter Stella married John Aroney in the 1st August 1917, and the wedding reception was held at the George St business and the 100 guests sang and danced till 2.a.m. It was the first genuine Cerigotis wedding held in Australia.

Cosmopolitan Oyster Parlour in Pitt St, owned by the Comino brothers - my grandmothers uncles, c 1900

Business was improving and his landlord then offered to sell him the shop and the one next door but the price was too high and he refused. It was then sold to a Theo Marks and when the current lease expired, his terms for a new lease were excessive and not worth while considering. But he had bills to pay, the wine licence and fittings being a few things to pay. His brother-in-law Menas told him that if he walked away from everything, because the bills were so small no one would chase him for it. But it was bad advice. With his wife and family and new son Socrates born on the 20th January 1918 they left Sydney for Murwillimbah where his daughter Stella and her husband John were in business and John offered him a small shop next door to theirs to open a business. But Theo Marks in Sydney did not walk away from monies owing to him and sent a summons to Murwillumbah. The severe flu epidemic had hit Australia and Papou was ill and unable to go to Sydney to defend the summons so he was declared bankrupt.

But things were no better in Murwillumbah as John Aroney had sold the small shop to help his brother return to Greece, and would not give Papou a larger share of his shop as compensation for the money he had put in renovating the smaller shop. They returned to Sydney and settled in Palmer St. Papou was out of work for five months and only Emanuel was working. He worked in Uncle Mena's and Uncle Nicholas' shop making five to ten gallons of ice cream every morning and serving in the restaurant at night. This helped to pay off the bankruptcy so that his father would not dip into the little money he had left.

Papou then opened a shop in Oxford St and fitted it out but it was not a success and he had to close it. And that was the last of his money. Another daughter Diamantoula was born on the 4th August 1920. Then in October 1921, they decided to go to Gunnedah and bought a broken down shop which he renovated completely as a milk bar. He put in a soda fountain and the business started to build up. It was there that great plans were made for the future and Papou thought he was on his way again at last.

But as the saying goes "Man proposes and God disposes" and so it was with my Grandfather.

Another son Constantine was born on the 4th October 1922. There were eleven children born to Agapi and George Lianos.

My mother with her 10 brothers and sisters

Back row: Aspacia, Menas, Theodora and Stavroula. Seated: Theodore, Diamantoula, Emanuel, Anthony, Socrates, Coralia and Constantine sitting on stool.

My Grandparents Agapi and George Lianos later in life – in 1942

My grandmother died soon after this photograph was taken, at age 62, in July 1942.

My grandfather in 1960, surrounded by his eleven children

8 remaining children of George and Agapi Lianos, 1987, in Uncle Tony's home, in Killarney Heights

Gravesite of the Lianos family, Botany Cemetery, Sydney

Photos > Architecture

submitted by Gaye Hegeman on 29.07.2011

Doorway carving

Decorative carving above the doorway of a very old house, opposite the church Agios Ioannis in Trifillianika. Is this a family crest? What do the symbols represent?

Photos > Architecture

submitted by Kytherian Biographies Project on 16.04.2011

Simoni Zafiropoulou's house in Kalokerines

Simoni Zafiropoulou was born in Athens, and continues to live in Athens. She is the widow of Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Professor, Edwin Kuh. (More about Edwin Kuh, at the end of this brief biography of Simoni).

In 2006 she adopted, the then 7 year old, Katya.

From 2004 she has maintained the position of Honorary Fellow in the Diplomatic Office of the Presidency of the Greek Republic, responsible for cultural affairs. (She is the Cultural Advisor to the President of Greece.)

She maintains a summer residence on Kythera, in the town of Kalokerines (Kalokairines). Those of you who know Kalokerines well, will know where her house is. As you pass the Windmill, and the main platteia which houses the church of Agios Spyridonas, if you head towards Myrtithia, the first standing house on the left, which is rose-coloured, is Simoni’s.

Curriculum Vitae

STUDIES


Law of Athens. Lawyer. Ph.D. in Economics and Sociology of Development, University of Paris Pantheon Sorbonne. Studies on the École Pratique des Hautes Études, in Paris, "Histoire et Cinéma".

LANGUAGES

Fluent in French and English. Working knowledge of Italian and Spanish

EXPERIENCE

March 2004 - present: Honorary Fellow in Diplomatic Office of the Presidency of the Greek Republic, responsible for cultural affairs.

1999 - 2004: Associate Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs and Diplomatic Adviser to both the Office of the Presidency of the Republic, responsible for cultural affairs.

2000: curated the exhibition of Art MFA.
1996 - 1999: Adviser to the Minister for Cultural Affairs.

1995: Adviser to the Ministry of Development in Industrial Archaeology.

1985 - 1990: Cultural Counsellor of Greece in the U.S.

1983 - 1985: Member of the Board of ERT

1983: Assistant to the Council for Equality of Two Friends. In this capacity, establishing the first Women's Agricultural Association in Petra Lesvos.
President of NGO "Development Horizons" oriented to improve the living standards of women and children in Third World countries.

Published Books she has written or edited:

2003: FOLLOWING THE FOOTSTEPS OF THE GREAT - 2300 YEARS LATER. Miletus in Greek and English. Photo journey in the footsteps of Macedon army. (Praised by the Academy of Athens) in September 2009: Reissue the daily News.

2002: THE WOMAN IN TIME. Miletus, Greek, English, German edition. Enhanced Edition reissue of 1985. Photo Album featuring life from ancient Greece to modern Greece.

1993: GREECE IN POETRY. Harry N. Abrams, New York ("Book of the Month Club"). Illustrated anthology of Greek poetry.

1992: GREECE AND THE SEA. Athens College, NY. Album Greek poetry and art.

Edwin Kuh, 1925-1986.

Simoni’s husband Edwin Kuh, died on Monday 9th June, 1986. He was involved in Democratic Party politics in the United States of America. He was an adviser to Robert F. Kennedy during Kennedy's 1968 campaign for the Democratic presidential nomination and to the party's 1972 nominee, former Sen. George McGovern of South Dakota.

Later, Kuh also served on U.S. President's Materials Policy Commission and the Economic Advisory Panel of the U.S. Postal Service and was adviser to the governments of Greece, China and Costa Rica.

John Kenneth Galbraith, economics professor emeritus at Harvard, said Kuh also should be remembered for an early contribution to the idea of affirmative action. "Some 15 or more years ago, he was one of a group of economists who urged that the civil rights movement be affirmed by a 10-year program by which large corporations and the federal, state and local governments would bring minorities and women into higher-level employment in the same proportions that they existed in the working force," Galbraith said.

It was in the field of Economics, and in particular the pioneer in field of econometrics that he established a world wide reputation. He headed Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Center for Computational Research in Economics and Management Science from its inception in 1978, and was credited with discovering econometrics, a theory holding that productivity varies at stages in the business cycle. He noted that productivity improves sharply during the cycle's recovery phase, peaks before the economy peaks and declines before the economy slides into recession. The systems Kuh developed are widely used in Europe by major banks and research organizations.

Little wonder that the seminal book he edited with David A. Belsley in 1985, Model Reliability, is still available through MIT Press. The book details how to assess the specification, strengths, weaknesses, limits, and sensitive features of a particular economic model.

Edwin Kuh was a man of considerable social, cultural, political, and intellectual stature.

Photos > Architecture

submitted by Jim Cassimatis on 09.04.2011

Tsikalaria - Family House

Tsikalaria - Cassimatis (Xeros) Family House. The basement of this house was once used to warehouse Coca Cola, Sprite and Amstel Beer as Theodoros Cassimatis used to be the distributer of these products on the Island. Now it is just used as a holiday house by the family during the summer months, like many other houses in Kythera.

Photos > Architecture

submitted by Jim Cassimatis on 20.03.2011

Tsikalaria - Toilet at the back of a house

Toilet at the back of the "Xeros" house in Tsikalaria. The photo shows the full length of the walk to the toilet starting from the back door of the house. Imagine having to get up out of bed to go to the toilet in the middle of winter. The toilet uses an old style pit. Maybe that's why it had to be so far away from the house?

Photos > Architecture

submitted by Jim Cassimatis on 20.03.2011

Tsikalaria

Tsikalaria - Houses along the main street of Tsikalaria, including the "Xeros" family house on the left.

Photos > Architecture

submitted by George Khalil on 06.09.2010

George Khalil - Mastertradesman, Karavas, Kythera

George is competent in a number of trades, including, painting, rendering, tiling, contruction of fences & structures, and general handyman work.

He also has the ability to organise other tradesmen, to perform their duties on time and to specification.

He always arrives to the job either early or on time, and never lets you down.

The walls in the photo are his own construction.

George has high recomendations from Polyzoi Theothoros, of Ayia Pelagia, George C Poulos, and Peter Faros, of Sydney, and Harry Souris, of Brisbane, for whom he has done extensive work.

Mobile Phone: 6970070607

Contact George by EMAIL, here

Photos > Architecture

submitted by George Poulos on 29.11.2008

Here Lefcadio Hearn was born 27 June 1850 to Rosa Cassamatis

The house of Rosa.

It is the last house on the left as you enter the precinct of the Kastro in Hora.

(View looking down from the Kastro. The house in question is the unpainted house, at the top of the stairs, with scaffolding on the right hand side wall.)

In mid 2008 it was being renovated.

Photos > Architecture

submitted by George Poulos on 29.11.2008

The home where Rosa Cassimatis lived.

Rosa was the mother of Lafcadio Hearn.

It is the last house on the left as you enter the precinct of the Kastro in Hora.

(View looking down from the Kastro. The house in question is the unpainted house, at the top of the stairs, with scaffolding on the right hand side wall.)

In mid 2008 it was being renovated.

Photos > Architecture

submitted by Peter Bouras on 08.11.2008

Keramari Spings, Karavas.

The place were the weekly washing was done in past years.

Photos > Architecture

submitted by Peter Bouras on 08.11.2008

Keramari Spings, Karavas.

At sunset.

Photos > Architecture

submitted by Dean Coroneos on 06.11.2008

Superb French owned home.

Superb and unique design.

Gerakari, at the north of the island.

Photos > Architecture

submitted by George Poulos on 05.11.2008

Sempreviva window.

Hora

Photos > Architecture

submitted by George Poulos on 05.11.2008

The School at Hora

An institution that needs to engage far more with both kythera-family, and the extended Kytherian community beyond Kythera.

Photos > Architecture

submitted by George Poulos on 24.10.2008

Stable wall at sunset. Lourandianika, 2008.

Towards the end of the road that leads to the village.

The photograph of this building has been added here in response to a plea in the Sept 2008 Newsletter, from Maria (Marcellos) Whyte.

Maria's email here

"I respectfully ask for any assistance my fellow Kytherians may be able to give me, as a tribute to my family, not to allow Louradianika be forgotten. I have no photos, only memories which are as vivid today, as they were when I was a girl of 15, but I would like to share this village of happy memories with my fellow Kytherians".

There is only one entry road to the village of Lourandianika, because about 50 metres past the small church of Ayios Yeoryi the road ends.

Although it is not clear from the road sign photographs, the road runs off to Lourandianika on an angle at the signpost, (and not on the same plane as Firi Ammos and Kalamos).

View of the signpost from behind and above, towards Kato Livathi

Map showing clearly the turnoff down to Lourandianika

The church of Ayios Yeoryi is small, but extremely well maintained. I had not read the Newsletter at the time I visited, so I did not not look carefully for, or at, the gravesites around the church.

Church of Ayios Yeoryios, Lourandianika. View Facing North

Church of Ayios Yeoryios, Lourandianika. View Facing South

Church of Ayios Yeoryios, Lourandianika. View across the rooftop at sunset

Cousin Theo Poulos and I were stunned by the quality of the fully sealed tarred road that leads to this cul-de-sac. If every road on the island was sealed to this quality, then.....

There are about 5 houses in the village. We met the elderly residents who live in the last well maintained traditional cottage.

House at the end of the road in Lourandianika

Elderly male. Lourandianika. 2008

The elderly lady declined to be photographed.

Frontage of the last house on the road to Lourandianika

Ruined House. Towards the end of the road leading to Lourandianika

Looking into the ruined house, Lourandianika

Stable wall at sunset. Lourandianika, 2008

The second last house on the left as you drive to the Church is quite large, modern, and extremely well maintained. Unfortunately by the time we went to photograph it, the night had set it, and our photographs did not develop properly.

The village of Lourandianika gave us the impression of our own village, Karavas - an idyllic setting, far from noise, cares, and woes. A little world unto itself.

Photos > Architecture

submitted by George Poulos on 24.10.2008

Looking into the ruined house, Lourandianika.

One of the few ruins in the area.

The photograph of this building has been added here in response to a plea in the Sept 2008 Newsletter, from Maria (Marcellos) Whyte.

Maria's email here

"I respectfully ask for any assistance my fellow Kytherians may be able to give me, as a tribute to my family, not to allow Louradianika be forgotten. I have no photos, only memories which are as vivid today, as they were when I was a girl of 15, but I would like to share this village of happy memories with my fellow Kytherians".

There is only one entry road to the village of Lourandianika, because about 50 metres past the small church of Ayios Yeoryi the road ends.

Although it is not clear from the road sign photographs, the road runs off to Lourandianika on an angle at the signpost, (and not on the same plane as Firi Ammos and Kalamos).

View of the signpost from behind and above, towards Kato Livathi

Map showing clearly the turnoff down to Lourandianika

The church of Ayios Yeoryi is small, but extremely well maintained. I had not read the Newsletter at the time I visited, so I did not not look carefully for, or at, the gravesites around the church.

Church of Ayios Yeoryios, Lourandianika. View Facing North

Church of Ayios Yeoryios, Lourandianika. View Facing South

Church of Ayios Yeoryios, Lourandianika. View across the rooftop at sunset

Cousin Theo Poulos and I were stunned by the quality of the fully sealed tarred road that leads to this cul-de-sac. If every road on the island was sealed to this quality, then.....

There are about 5 houses in the village. We met the elderly residents who live in the last well maintained traditional cottage.

House at the end of the road in Lourandianika

Elderly male. Lourandianika. 2008

The elderly lady declined to be photographed.

Frontage of the last house on the road to Lourandianika

Ruined House. Towards the end of the road leading to Lourandianika

Looking into the ruined house, Lourandianika

Stable wall at sunset. Lourandianika, 2008

The second last house on the left as you drive to the Church is quite large, modern, and extremely well maintained. Unfortunately by the time we went to photograph it, the night had set it, and our photographs did not develop properly.

The village of Lourandianika gave us the impression of our own village, Karavas - an idyllic setting, far from noise, cares, and woes. A little world unto itself.

Photos > Architecture

submitted by George Poulos on 24.10.2008

Ruined House. Towards the end of the road leading to Lourandianika.

One of the few ruins in the area.

The photograph of this building has been added here in response to a plea in the Sept 2008 Newsletter, from Maria (Marcellos) Whyte.

Maria's email here

"I respectfully ask for any assistance my fellow Kytherians may be able to give me, as a tribute to my family, not to allow Louradianika be forgotten. I have no photos, only memories which are as vivid today, as they were when I was a girl of 15, but I would like to share this village of happy memories with my fellow Kytherians".

There is only one entry road to the village of Lourandianika, because about 50 metres past the small church of Ayios Yeoryi the road ends.

Although it is not clear from the road sign photographs, the road runs off to Lourandianika on an angle at the signpost, (and not on the same plane as Firi Ammos and Kalamos).

View of the signpost from behind and above, towards Kato Livathi

Map showing clearly the turnoff down to Lourandianika

The church of Ayios Yeoryi is small, but extremely well maintained. I had not read the Newsletter at the time I visited, so I did not not look carefully for, or at, the gravesites around the church.

Church of Ayios Yeoryios, Lourandianika. View Facing North

Church of Ayios Yeoryios, Lourandianika. View Facing South

Church of Ayios Yeoryios, Lourandianika. View across the rooftop at sunset

Cousin Theo Poulos and I were stunned by the quality of the fully sealed tarred road that leads to this cul-de-sac. If every road on the island was sealed to this quality, then.....

There are about 5 houses in the village. We met the elderly residents who live in the last well maintained traditional cottage.

House at the end of the road in Lourandianika

Elderly male. Lourandianika. 2008

The elderly lady declined to be photographed.

Frontage of the last house on the road to Lourandianika

Ruined House. Towards the end of the road leading to Lourandianika

Looking into the ruined house, Lourandianika

Stable wall at sunset. Lourandianika, 2008

The second last house on the left as you drive to the Church is quite large, modern, and extremely well maintained. Unfortunately by the time we went to photograph it, the night had set it, and our photographs did not develop properly.

The village of Lourandianika gave us the impression of our own village, Karavas - an idyllic setting, far from noise, cares, and woes. A little world unto itself.