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submitted by Barbara Zantiotis on 27.03.2016

Happy 88th Birthday!

My father, Stephen Zantiotis just celebrated his 88th birthday.  My dad was born in Weston, NSW in 1928.  His parents were Peter Steve Zantiotis from Agia Anastasia and Ekaterini (Katina) Moulos from Logothetianika.  

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by Barbara Zantiotis on 05.03.2016

George, Peter and Katina 1977

George and Peter were brothers.  Peter was my paternal grandfather and Katina (Protopsaltis) was George's wife.

George and my grandfather were born in Agia Anastasia in 1911 and 1898 respectively.  Their parents were Stavros Zantiotis and Eugenia Souris. Katina was born in 1924 and passed away in 2000.  George passed away in 2005 and my grandfather in 1981.

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by Karavitiko Symposium, Sydney on 22.02.2016

The icon of Ayios Haralambos adorned with fresh flowers, with the new laburum of Ayios Haralambos

on display at the Karavitiko Symposium function. The function was held at the Venus Reception Lounge, Kogarah, on Sunday 22nd of February, 2016.

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by Kytherian Cultural Exchange on 16.02.2016

Building cultuarl identity through reading

The Weekend Neos Kosmos, (Melbourne)

Saturday 13th February 2016, Page 16

Author Melina Mallos has a winning formula for bringing children in touch with their cultural heritage that Cat while on holiday to her parents' birthplace

ANASTASIA TSIRTSAKIS


One can't think of the beautiful cobbled streets of the Greek islands without the meow of a cat springing to mind.
Whch is why the feline is the perfect protagonist for Melina Mallos' children's book Catch that Cat, which seeks to put children in touch with their Greek cultural heritage.

"A lot (of children] haven't travelled to Greece before. And now,as the generations are progressing, a lot of their grandparents aren't even talking to them in Greek," Melina explains. "So tile book was really about providing opportunities for kids to connect to their Greek heritage, as well as the language,and instil in them a desire to visit Greece and know more about their culture."

The Brisbane-based author was inspired to write Catch that Cat while on holiday to her parents birthplace of Kythera in 2007.

"My aunty lived in Athens and they had a cat in their apartment. They decided to take it to Kythera and leave it on the island; so this cat went from an urban city landscape to rural country. "The cat's still alive and lives on the island.and it survives by the neighbours feeding it," she says.

Keeping the book connected to its roots on the Greek island, the picture book is also being stocked by local booksellers and stores in Kythera. "I noticed there wasn't a souvenir book for kids on the island.So that's another reason I wrote the book, because I thought it was a missed opportunity for so many visitors who come; it's a good little gift that people could take back and share with their kids and grandkids", Melina explains.

Since the book's launch at Brisbane's Greek Festival in May last year,it has been well received both Down Under and in Greece. But for the author, her debut into the world of children's literature was very significant, in that she finally found a way to marry her background in early childhood education and passion for art.

Working with publishers at the Kytherian World Heritage Fund, administered under the auspices of the Kytherian Association of Australia, gave Melina the opportunity to collaborate with Athens­ based illustrator and translator Tety Solou.

With the book available in two editions - bilingual - both Greek and English - and in English alone - it has made it possible for people outside the Greek community to connect with the book's content. "I've been surprised there's been a broader appeal to people who don't have a Greek background. I get a lot of feedback about the
catchy rhyme in it," she says.

Aside from writing, Melina is a leading developer of collaborative
community projects and culturally enriching programs for children. Committed to sharing her knowledge on teaching cultural sensitivities with Australia's parents,she manages
to do so through regular guest blogging, article writing, public speaking and training. "I help children create bonds with their community and culture in order to build a strong sense of self, strengthen their relationships, increase their self-confidence, and experience meaningful connections," says Melina.

But don't worry, that's not the last we'll see of that cat.The author is currently working on her second children's book, a collaborative project through tile Cat Welfare Association of Kythera.

English only versions of Catch that Cat are available for purchase through www.catchthatcat.com (the website also includes free downloadoble kids' activities related to the Australian curriculum for promoting intercultural understanding).

For the bilingual edition, email secretary@kytherianassociation.com.au or phone (02) 9599 6998.

Melina is also available to deliver book readings and workshops for your community, school or cultural festival and can be contacted via her website.

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by Barbara Zantiotis on 28.01.2016

Anna and Stamatoula - 23/01/16

These two lovely ladies have been friends since they grew up together in Perlegiannika.
Anna (Kyrani) Zantiotis (Anastasopoulos) is my mum and Stamatoula Varipatis (Comino) is the mother of Father Constantine Varipatis, priest of St Stylianos Church in Gymea, NSW.
Father Constatine's daughter, Stamatia is married to my godson, Terry Gerovasilis, grandson of Father Nicholas Bozikis, priest of St Nicholas Church, Marrickville, NSW.
This photo was taken at the christening of George Gerovasilis, son of Terry and Stamatia and Stamatoula's great grandson!

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by Peter Makarthis on 26.01.2016

Clary Castrission- Australia Day Ambassador

Clary Castrission addresses the Australia Day Ceremony at Delungra NSW 26 January 2016.

Left to Mr Peter Caddy, M.C ; Clary Castrission Australia Day Ambassador ; Mayor Paul Harmon, Inverell Shire Council

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submitted by Vikki Vrettos Fraioli on 14.01.2016

The Archaeology of Kythera presentation in San Francisco - Jan. 9, 2016

On Saturday, January 9, 2016 the Kytherian Society of California sponsored an event entitled, The Archaeology of Kythera. Aproximately 60 people, gathered at Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church in San Francisco, CA to hear Dr. Lita Tzortzopoulou Gregory & Dr. Timothy Gregory share their research and new book, The Archaeology of Kythera.
Members and friends had the opportunity to mingle and enjoy refreshments offered by the Kytherian Society..
Tim and LIta shared a powerpoint presentation of slides as well as leading a delightful discussion of archaeoogical sites on the island. The audience was engaged in the conversation as many questions and points of view were shared in the hour long event.
Following the event several KSOCA members enjoyed a wonderful dinner with Lita and TIm at the Boulevard Cafe in Daly City.

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by Vikki Vrettos Fraioli on 14.01.2016

Members of the Kytherian Society of California with Dr. Lita Tzortzopoulou and Dr. Timothy Gregory

From Left to Right: Cathy Zamenes, Cynthia Cavalenes-Jarvis, Vikki Vrettos Fraioli, Lita & Tim, Melissa Neofes-Mischak, Elaine Moulos, Ted Zamenes, and Connie Khanachet

***********************
On Saturday, January 9, 2016 the Kytherian Society of California sponsored an event entitled, The Archaeology of Kythera. Aproximately 60 people, gathered at Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church in San Francisco, CA to hear Dr. Lita Tzortzopoulou Gregory & Dr. Timothy Gregory share their research and new book, The Archaeology of Kythera.
Members and friends had the opportunity to mingle and enjoy refreshments offered by the Kytherian Society..
Tim and LIta shared a powerpoint presentation of slides as well as leading a delightful discussion of archaeoogical sites on the island. The audience was engaged in the conversation as many questions and points of view were shared in the hour long event.
Following the event several KSOCA members enjoyed a wonderful dinner with Lita and TIm at the Boulevard Cafe in Daly City.

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by Vikki Vrettos Fraioli on 14.01.2016

The Archaeology of Kythera - Jan 9,2016, San Francisco

Melissa Neofes-Mischak, Recording Secretary of he Kytherian Society of California, presents Lita and Tim with a small token of our appreciation for their wonderful presentation.

*************

On Saturday, January 9, 2016 the Kytherian Society of California sponsored an event entitled, The Archaeology of Kythera. Aproximately 60 people, gathered at Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church in San Francisco, CA to hear Dr. Lita Tzortzopoulou Gregory & Dr. Timothy Gregory share their research and new book, The Archaeology of Kythera.
Members and friends had the opportunity to mingle and enjoy refreshments offered by the Kytherian Society..
Tim and LIta shared a powerpoint presentation of slides as well as leading a delightful discussion of archaeoogical sites on the island. The audience was engaged in the conversation as many questions and points of view were shared in the hour long event.
Following the event several KSOCA members enjoyed a wonderful dinner with Lita and TIm at the Boulevard Cafe in Daly City.

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by Vikki Vrettos Fraioli on 14.01.2016

The Archaeology of Kythera with Dr. Lita Tzortzopoulou & Dr. Timothy Gregory

On Saturday, January 9, 2016 the Kytherian Society of California sponsored an event entitled, The Archaeology of Kythera. Aproximately 60 people, gathered at Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church in San Francisco, CA to hear Dr. Lita Tzortzopoulou Gregory & Dr. Timothy Gregory share their research and new book, The Archaeology of Kythera.
Members and friends had the opportunity to mingle and enjoy refreshments offered by the Kytherian Society..
Tim and LIta shared a powerpoint presentation of slides as well as leading a delightful discussion of archaeoogical sites on the island. The audience was engaged in the conversation as many questions and points of view were shared in the hour long event.
Following the event several KSOCA members enjoyed a wonderful dinner with Lita and TIm at the Boulevard Cafe in Daly City.

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by Vikki Vrettos Fraioli on 14.01.2016

Dr. Timothy Gregory at Presenting a Powerpoint on The Archaeology of Kythera

Dr. Timothy Gregory presenting a powerpoint at The Archaeology of Kythera event hosted by the Kytherian Society of California, in San Francisco on January 9, 2016

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by Eptanesian Union Greece on 19.12.2015

Minas Coroneo's private collector's stamp issued through Hellenic Post

Professor Minas Coroneo, wins the award for Kythera, along with Dr Manolis Kalokerinos, at the 3rd Presentation of Ionian (Eptanisian) Union of Greece, Awards.

The awards were held on December 13, 2015,
December 13, 2015 in the National History Museum of the Old Parliament Building.

Invitation to Minas Coroneos to attend the ceremony to receive his award:

The awards ceremony takes place as an expression of respect and pride for Ionians who have excelled in various fields (art, science, culture, etc.) and helped to highlight their place of origin in their own special and unique way.

Consequently, we inform you that unanimously we have chosen among 14 personalities from the Ionian Islands, you Minas Coroneo from the island of Kythera, based on the undeniable recognition that you are one of the most distinguished ophthalmologists in the world. We would be deeply and emotionally honoured to have you and your present at the awards ceremony.

Please be advised that the IONIAN UNION of GREECE to further honour the winners will proceed to create a private collector's stamp - of philatelic value - through the Hellenic Post Office - in the form of a special commemorative series. (A day cover, will utilise your photo, and to be allocated to you).

Hoping for a the positive response to our invitation. Thank you in advance, and wish you every personal and professional success.

The Board of IONIAN UNION of GREECE

The President
Eleni Konofaou
The General. Secretary
Maria Grammatikou
First Deputy Speaker: Evangelos Giannoulatos
Deputy President: Katerina Dragona
Treasurer: Dimitris Mauropous
Assistant Secretary: Angelina Bears
Assistant Treasurer: Gerasimos Rosolymos
Public Relations: Eleftherios Katopodis
Advisors:
Thomas Katsaros
Dimitrios Argyros
Kavvada Basilica
Manias Chrysostom
Loutas Nikolaos
Helen Death
Nikos Glytsos


Report by Lefkada News:

Ionian Islands awards in the old Parliament House

12/14/2015 Views


On Sunday afternoon members of the Ionian Union gathered in the centre of Athens to honour Ionians who have made Ionia (the Eptanisian (seven islands)) proud. For the 3rd year, Old Parliament House, hosted in its imposing hall representatives of the the arts, sciences, and entrepreneurship. From Corfu in the north to Kythera, in the south, Paxos, Ithaca, Lefkada, Zakynthos, and Kefalonia.

They brought together all the leading Ionians who in their professional pathways have managed to make the Ionian Islands a proud and innovative place, and put on show the ‘values and greatness of our island’. The evening began with the greeting of the Union of the Ionian Islands president, Helen Konofaou and poetic rendition entitled "flashed light and how the young person came to know himself”. It was directed by Peter Gallia with Giorgos Vlachos, Katerina Georgakis and Petros Gallia.

Vicky Leandros from Corfu was the first to receive her award. Vicky is a grand and consummate artist, but one of great modesty. She worked alongside Hector Botrini. She said, it all started in Corfu when they built their first restaurant – the wonderful Etrusco. The packed room then waited impatiently for the presentation to Paxos. This was because the award to Paxos was to be presented to Christopher Papakaliatis. The premier of his avant-garde second film "Another World” had occurred just a few days before. The audience delighted in Christopher’s success. He talked about returning to Paxos. About his childhood trips to the island, and the nostalgia. What can you say about the other award for Paxos? Spyros Katsimi. The journalist, writer. The words would be few.

Then it was the turn of Lefkada. And the whole room applauded interminably on hearing the name of Elias Logothetis, of Froufalou, in Lefkada. Although the award was for all the Ionian Islands ..., he said, with his unique brand of humour has, his heart was pounding in Lefkada. The award was received by the deputy of the Cultural Centre, Spyros Arvanitis.

The next award from Lefkada was for a man who is deceased, but still helps and supports, always during the difficult times for Lefkada and Greece. One of these was the recent earthquake. And it was none other than the late Spyros Sklavenitis, owner of the super market SKLAVENITIS. Lefkada was always the dearest place in his life. He passed on his love for Lefkada to his children, who today continue his work. His daughter Maria obviously moved, received the award and spoke of the ‘father of Lefkada’, from the heart. "We will always be next to Lefkas, she said, because we learnt our love of Lefkada from our father. “This even though we grew up in Piraeus; we feel that our life begins from Lefkada ". The award was presented to Maria Sklavenitis by MP Thanassis Kavvadas.

This year Kefalonia honoured Akis Tselenti. Akis is a Seismologist. "The earthquakes should be our friend there in the Ionian islands”, he said. “Thanks to earthquakes we have these beautiful beaches” He also spoke about the dignity of the Cephalonian against the devastating passage of Enceladus. Second Cephalonian to be awarded was Thanos Ascetic, a neurologist, and a psychiatrist specializing in sexual health issues.

Ithaca awarded the teacher John Karantzi – and a doctor and healthcare worker who had excelled abroad, Constantine Rosolymo. Zakynthos honoured a woman who was well received. The businesswoman Vagionia Stasinopoulou. The owner of Empnefstria which sells ‘fresh’ cosmetics, through 250 stores around the world. The business was begun utilising simple recipes from her Zakynthian grandmother.

A moving moment for audience occurred when the mother of the second Zakynthian awardee, the internationally famous tenor, Thimou Flemotomou, received the award for her child, thanking the organizers profusely.

Manolis Kalokerinos, for years the President of the Panhellenic Medical Association and director of the First Surgical Clinic of the General State Athens, from Kythera, needs no introduction. "It's our doctor," exclaimed those who came to the old parliament to honour him. And that was enough to distinguish this great personality from ‘Tsirigo’. Kythera also honoured the great scientist in the field of ophthalmology, from Australia, Minas Coroneo, who has performed extraordinary work in the field of the bionic eye.

[[picture:"IMG_5433.jpg" ID:23280]]

An award was made also to the benefactor of the classical music festival Paxos - late Englishman, John Gough. Gough possessed the vision to begin this unique festival 26 years ago. The award was presented to the organiser of the festival, Eleftheria Arvanitaki.

The master of ceremonies for the event was journalist Peter Koumplis.

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by News Corp Network on 11.12.2015

The original Mad max ... Mel Gibson with George Miller at the 2015 AACTA Awards held at The Star in Pyrmont, Sydney. Picture Richard Dobson Source News Corp Australia

held at The Star in Pyrmont, Sydney. Picture Richard Dobson Source: News Corp Australia

George Miller named best director and Max Mad: Fury Road best film at the 2015 Australian Academy of Cinema and Television Arts Awards (AACTA Awards)

December 9 2015 9, 2015


George Miller’s epic film Mad Max: Fury Road has been crowned the best film of the Australian industry’s biggest year at the box office since the 1990s.
The action-packed revival of Miller’s 1970s franchise took out the AACTA Award for Best Film at the Australian Academy of Cinema and Television Arts’ star-studded ceremony on Wednesday night at The Star Event Centre in Sydney.
Having already scooped awards for Cinematography, Sound, Music Score, Editing, Production Design and Visual Effects at last week’s craft awards, Mad Max: Fury Road, which starred Tom Hardy and Charlize Theron, took its total tally to eight AACTAs when Miller was awarded Best Director.
The 70-year-old Miller had fought for years to get another Mad Max movie off the ground — Fury Road eventually had to be shot in Namibia after drought-breaking rains turned Australia’s red desert sands green.
But while the post-apocalyptic blockbuster was largely shot overseas and backed by Hollywood studio Warner Bros, it qualified as an Australian film thanks to its director and funding from local bodies.
The original Mad max ... Mel Gibson with George Miller at the 2015 AACTA Awards held at The Star in Pyrmont, Sydney. Picture: Richard Dobson
Miller was given his best director gong by his original Mad Max, Mel Gibson, who is back in town to make his film Hacksaw Ridge.
He seemed genuinely thrilled to present the award to his old colleague.
“Oh hey, it’s George,” he said as he opened up the envelope. Miller praised his Mad Max: Fury Road crew saying “this wasn’t an easy film to make”.

Held the dream for 36 years ... Director George Miller poses with the AACTA Award for Best Film for Mad Max: Fury Road Picture: Mark Metcalfe / Getty Images for AFI Source:Getty Images

Smaller films shined in the AACTA Awards’ acting categories, with The Dressmakerstar Kate Winslet named Best Lead Actress and castmates Judy Davis and Hugo Weaving claiming the Supporting Actor gongs.
Englishwoman Winslet winning over Charlize Theron’s Mad Max performance may come as a surprise to some, with the South African-born star currently featuring prominently in Oscars predictions over in the US.
Winslet recorded her very funny thank you speech for Best Lead Actress in a feature film from overseas.
“They said I ought to put something together on the off-chance I might win this award. But I’m sure I haven’t because it should go to a local and I am indeed an outsider.
I did put on lipstick just in case. I loved being a part of The Dressmaker. Thank you.”
Unsurprisingly, The Dressmaker stitched up the People’s Choice Award for Favourite Australian Film — Aussies have delivered the Victorian-shot film over $16 million in ticket sales so far.
Meanwhile, Aussie stalwart Michael Caton was recognised for a performance that spanned comedy and moments of heavy drama, winning Best Actor for his role as a taxi driver diagnosed with only months to live in Last Cab to Darwin. It was his first AACTA award.
Cate Blanchett called for more of the country’s actors on screen as she tearfully accepted one of the highest honours in the Australian film industry.
As had been announced, Blanchett was given the Longford Lyell Award for an outstanding contribution to Australian screen by actors Richard Roxburgh and Hugo Weaving.
“Oh I’ve become one of those ridiculous people who cries it’s just a f!@#ing award,” a teary Blanchett said as she accepted the gong.
A cavalcade of Hollywood directors, including Martin Scorsese, Ron Howard and Robert Redford, delivered video messages congratulating Blanchett.
Blanchett said that more Australian actors should be cast.
“It’s not a quota ... it needs to be fought for,” Blanchett said.
She also acknowledged how happy she was the award she received had had a name change to include Australian 19th century actress and film producer, Lottie Lyell.
“Thank you for recognising Lottie Lyell,” she said.
“I think it’s fantastic AACTAs is coming into the 21st century,” she said in a nod towards gender equality, as the film industry works towards having 50/50 gender equity in upcoming Australian projects.
Backstage, Blanchett said the Australian industry needed to be celebrated for being small and unique, and it should stop trying to emulate other industries around the world.
“I love this industry so deeply and am so very proud to be a part of it that it always pains me so much that we talk ourselves down,” she said.
“We are a small industry and that’s a virtue, I think it makes us unique.”
Directors Ridley Scott and Martin Scorsese both lamented the fact they’d only had the chance to work with Blanchett once and would love to do it again. Robert Redford also paid Blanchett a great tribute.
“You are brilliant and you do honour to your craft,” Ron Howard said.
The director of her upcoming film Carol, Todd Haynes, called the actress “a beacon, a galaxy and a mensch.”
The AACTA Awards’ TV categories were dazzled by Channel 7’s Peter Allen — Not the Boy Next Door, which sang and danced its way to seven statuettes.
That haul included Best Actor awards for the two Peters: Jackson for his Lead role as the grown up Allen and teenager Ky Baldwin for his Supporting work as the young Allen.
Sigrid Thornton’s transformation into the legendary Judy Garland was rewarded with the Best Supporting Actress AACTA.
Not the Boy Next Door was also named Best Telemovie or Miniseries.
Ten’s repackaged MasterChef Australia won in a crowded Best Reality Series category, while the ABC’s new series Glitchwon Best Drama ahead of more experienced and fancied rivals Wentworth, Miss Fisher’s Murder Mysteries and Love Child.
Pamela Rabe’s consistently terrifying character The Freak in Foxtel drama Wentworth won her Best Actress.

Mad Max: Fury Road grossed $21.7 million at the Australian box office and $520 million internationally.

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submitted by Sydney Morning Herald on 09.12.2015

Home care gives the elderly freedom

Sydney Morning Herald. Money Matters Pages 4 & 5
December 8, 2015

Bina Brown
Personal Finance Writer


Lisa Slater helps Jack Moulos get ready for an outing. Photo: Peter Rae

Every Monday, Better Caring careworker Lisa Slater collects Jack Moulos, 91, from his home in Sydney's eastern suburbs. Together with Jack's sister, Nell, 93, they head off to an art gallery, the Botanic Gardens and somewhere for lunch. For three hours, Jack's 89-year-old wife, Doreen, gets to do her own thing.

"Lisa is amazing with Dad and Aunty Nell. She throws herself into it and she is always taking them to interesting places, making it lively and extending their social contacts. Importantly, we know he is being looked after," says the daughter of Jack and Doreen, Carolyn Cox.

Lisa came to the Moulos family after an extensive search of the different caring options available for someone suffering dementia.

"The free services with Department of Veterans Affairs are fantastic but there were certain things like taking people out just for fun that they were not able to do. We wanted Dad to be engaged and Mum to have a break," Carolyn says.
Better Caring is an online platform where care workers and community members are matched according to their skills and needs. They negotiate their own hours and charges to suit each other.

Lisa, a former registered nurse, was recognised by the extended Moulos family as having the personality and credentials that would work for Jack, who is one of a handful of clients that Lisa cares for each week in some capacity.

"Better Caring allows me to be in control of who I care for and when. Jack and his sister Nell and I have a lot of fun finding new things to do each week," Lisa says.

Jack and Doreen are also on a government-subsidised home care package which gives them about seven hours a week of subsidised personal care services, including showering, shaving, help with physio exercises, cleaning and household chores and gardening.
The carers providing this assistance also serve as companions around the house and can take Jack for a short walk to the beach if the weather's right.

According to the government there are more than 350,000 people employed in the aged care sector, working in residential and community settings. By 2050 an estimated 827,100 people will be required to deliver a range of services to the 3.5 million elderly people expected to need them, the majority of them in their own home.

Given the choice, most older Australians would prefer to stay in their own home.

One way of making this happen is through an income-tested government subsidised home care package, delivered by approved providers to members of the community. There is also the Commonwealth home support program service as well as numerous providers offering a range of services on a privately funded basis.

To receive a home care package a person must first be assessed by health professionals within the Aged Care Assessment Team (ACAT) or the Aged Care Assessment Service (ACAS) in Victoria, who will then determine the appropriate level of support. (ACATs are arranged through myagedcare.gov.au).

There are four levels of home care package, ranging from low-level care (levels one and two) up to high-level care (levels three and four).

Customers can choose from a range of products, services and care solutions including domestic and shopping services, personal care, social activities, transport, home and garden maintenance, clinical and allied health services and the buying of equipment such as a walking frame.

The government provides a base level of funding, starting at $7822 a year for a level one package up to $47,567 for a level four.

For this everyone is asked to pay a basic care fee of $137.76 a fortnight (17.5 per cent of the single person rate of the basic Age Pension). Depending on your income you may be asked to contribute to your package but no one will be asked to pay more than $10,211.48 a year or $61,268 over a lifetime.

Once assessed as being eligible for a package it is up to the individual to find a provider in their area who has that package and can provide the services required. The number of hours of help provided depends on the type of service, but a level two package generally equates to about five hours and a level four between 10 and 15 hours.

Older Australians choosing to delay a transition to residential aged care and stay at home for longer means demand for three and four packages is high, says IRT Group chief executive Nieves Murray, whose organisation has about 700 Home Care Packages. Last year IRT provided in-home care to more than 2000 customers.

It is not unusual to be put on a wait list and customers can apply free of charge to be added to an unlimited number of provider wait lists, Murray says.

If you can afford it, you can bypass the government home care packages and secure any services you need privately with a home-care provider.

It is also possible to get a government package and top it up with privately funded care.

Since July 1, 2015, providers have been required to deliver all home care packages on a consumer-directed care basis, which gives customers greater control and choice over the type of care and services they receive, how and when they are delivered and who delivers them.

From February 2017, the funding package will be allocated directly to the consumer, further empowering them to choose any provider able to deliver their support and care services.
Bina Brown is a director of Third Age Matters, which organises aged care placement but not home care.

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by Barbara Zantiotis on 24.05.2015

Cute cousins!

Left to right - Peter Poulos, Me, Con, Terry and Dennis Poulos.
This photo was taken in 1971.
Peter and Con are brothers as are Terry and Dennis.
Peter and Con's father, Denis was the sibling of Terry and Dennis's father, Con and my mother, Anna.
Poulos was shortened from Anastasopoulos.

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by Barbara Zantiotis on 23.05.2015

Illawarra Symphony Orchestra - 1947

My father, Stephen Zantiotis was born in 1928. He began playing the violin when he was four years old. He entered numerous eisteddfods in his early years and won on several occasions. In 1942 he joined the Illawarra Symphony Orchestra and played in this orchestra consistently for over sixty years. During this time the orchestra changed its name to the Wollongong Symphony Orchestra (WSO). He was made a Life Member of this orchestra. Whilst playing for the WSO, he also occasionally played in the Sutherland Symphony Orchestra, the WIlloughby Orchestra and was invited on countless occasions to perform in smaller ensembles and musicals.
My father is now 87 and still plays in an orchestra that regularly performs!
These photos were taken at the Civic Theatre in Kembla St, Wollongong on July 28, 1947.
My father is located around the middle of the photo in the middle row holding his violin under his arm and looking directly at the camera.

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by Barbara Zantiotis on 21.05.2015

Con, Theo, George, George, George - 1979

Left to right - Con Simos (obscured), Theo Mavromatis, George Simos, George Simos, George Notaras.
The Simos's are not related.
This was at a party in Wollongong.

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submitted by Barbara Zantiotis on 18.05.2015

Anna & Diamanta - 2010

Anna Zantiotis (Kyrani Anastasopoulos) is my mum and is from Perlegianika. Her dear friend Diamanta Tambakis (Stathis) was from Karvounades.

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by Sydney Morning Herald on 16.05.2015

Seamlessly taking over the role. Tom Hardy in Mad Max Fury Road.

Mad Max: Fury Road: Here's what you need to know?

Sydney Morning Herald

May 14, 2015

Garry Maddox


It's been 36 years since the first Mad Max movie, but very little has changed.

Thinking about seeing Mad Max: Fury Road but wondering whether it's a movie for you?

That will be a popular question as director George Miller's fourth instalment in the action movie series opens around the world. Given that it is 30 years since Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome, filmgoers will be wondering, do they need to be familiar with the other Mad Max movies? And if they've caught some of the footage, who are those wild looking characters with strange names like Imperator Furiosa and Immortan Joe?

The first thing you need to know – don't worry, no spoilers – is ........
You don't need to have seen the previous instalments:


Sometimes you watch a sequel and spend the first half of the movie wondering "should I know who that is?" and "how do those two know each other?" But Mad Max: Fury Road is entirely self-contained, with everything you need to know explained in first five minutes.

No doubt the movie will spark renewed interest in Miller's first three instalments – the raw Mad Max (1979), the classic Mad Max 2 (1981) and the inventive-but-not-quite-as-good Mad Max: Beyond Thunderdome​ (1985).

The landmark action series turned Mel Gibson into a star and sparked a hundred copycats across popular culture – none more obvious than Kevin Costner's​ Waterworld.

However there are subtle references to previous instalments:

Although mostly shot in Namibia, it has Australian energy.
Although mostly shot in Namibia, it has Australian energy.
Fans of the first three Mad Max movies will enjoy seeing Max wearing his iconic leather jacket, a moment featuring a hurdy-gurdy and the kill switches in the War Rig. But Max doesn't have a dog this time round, although Miller promises there is one in a planned sequel.

It is neither a prequel nor a sequel:M

Don't worry about where the movie sits in the Mad Max chronology. Miller quietly suggests it might take place between Mad Max 2 and Beyond Thunderdome​ but it doesn't matter. "It's revisiting the world," he says.

The story takes place in a brilliantly conceived world, even if you don't understand it on first viewing:

Miller has created a new dark age with a logic behind every element on the screen. "All the worst-case scenarios we see in the news come to pass all at once," he says. "Economic collapse, power-grid collapse, oil wars, water wars and things we just didn't see coming. There's wholesale organ failure of all the things that glue us together.

"You jump 45 years into the future. All the coastal cities so far as we know have been razed. Great gangs have marauded​ like locusts across the land. In the centre of a continent like Australia, there's a new dominance hierarchy, where all the resources are controlled."

No Mel Gibson or his dog from the original Mad Max.

Immortan​ Joe controls artesian water from his citadel and trades with other warlords who run Gas Town, which has the fuel, and the Bullet Farm, which has the weapons. With computer systems wiped out, the wasteland is filled with whatever can be cobbled together from a more robust technological era.

So the social structure, characters, vehicles, costumes, weapons and even the dialogue and the gestures are all "found objects" that have been recycled by survivors.

Miller says his team had two rules in creating the world. "Just because it's after the apocalypse, it doesn't mean people can't​ make beautiful things," he says. "And just because it's the wasteland, it doesn't mean people lose their sense of humour."

You don't need to be an action movie fan:

If the last movie you watched was Fast & Furious 7 and you're hanging out for the eighth, you won't be disappointed by Fury Road. It has large-scale spectacle, wild stunts and a dazzlingly original vision for a post-apocalyptic world. But Miller has been smart enough to redefine the action movie by bringing in a female warrior, Charlize Theron's Imperator Furiosa​, who shares the screen with Tom Hardy's Max Rockatansky.

​The plot in a line: Furiosa​ drives a truck known as the War Rig across the desert, pursued by marauding warriors, to help the five young wives of a warlord named Immortan​ Joe (Hugh Keays-Byrne) escape, teaming up with Max along the way.

Tom Hardy is a credible Max:

He is still one of those actors that many people half recognise. He was British agent Ricki Tarr in Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy, the masked Bane in The Dark Knight Rises, conman Eames in Inception and troubled Welsh driver Ivan Locke in Locke. He has taken over from Gibson seamlessly, though Miller had planned to cast Heath Ledger until his tragic death.

Those wild stunts were real:

Miller and producer Doug Mitchell take pride in getting through a gruelling shoot over 135 days – featuring 300 stunts – with no-one seriously injured, let alone killed.

They went "old school", doing it on set rather than creating stunts, vehicles and explosions with computer graphics. It works.

Max's iconic car is in it:

In the opening scene, Max drives an updated version of his famous supercharged Interceptor, called the Razor Cola. Like every other vehicle in the movie, it has been battered, "weaponised" and decorated for war.

But Mel Gibson isn't:

There were rumours of a cameo for Gibson after Miller cast Hardy but they are not true. Miller thought it would jar to have him bob up.

It's very much an Australian film:

While it is backed by Hollywood studio Warner Bros and was mostly shot in Namibia, Fury Road benefited substantially from Australia's filmmaking incentives. And it has a raw, rambunctious energy and an originality that is entirely Miller's.

What a year it is for Australian directors with action movies. First, James Wan triumphed with Fast & Furious 7; now Miller looks like doing the same with a very different breed of vehicles in Mad Max: Fury Road.

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by Barbara Zantiotis on 13.05.2015

Stephen Zantiotis & Katy Tamvakis - 22/07/1986

Katy Tamvakis (Komninou) is the first cousin of my mother Anna (Kyrani Anastasopoulos). Stephen is my dad. This photo was taken at Katy's house in Athens.