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submitted by Sydney Morning Herald on 28.10.2013

Racy name gets results

Best-seller ... the Lesbian Delight dessert at Xanthi. Photo: Steven Siewert

Desserts are often given names as left-field as pop stars' children but this still raised eyebrows when it appeared this year on the menu at Xanthi restaurant.

The Lesbian Delight has already become a bestseller for the restaurant at Westfield Sydney.

''It just seemed like an appropriate name for a dessert using ingredients from the island of Lesbos, including pineapple, which recently started growing there,'' says the dessert's creator, chef David Tsirekas. ''It is sweet, delicious and feminine in nature.''

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by Kytherian World Heritage Fund on 17.10.2013

O Kosmos advertisement and infomercial for the Big Fat Greek Book Launch & Fair, 23 OCTOBER 2013

You are invited to the launch of many new Greek books, together with other published books in the English and Greek language. With over 30 back titles, this is the biggest Greek book fair ever.

All Welcome. Admittance Free

Of special interest is Kytherian Surnames, a 800 page historical record
of Kytherian families and Kythera From The Air and A Year in Kythera, excellent colour pageant of photos of the Island.

Where:

ST SPYRIDON
CHURCH HALL
KENSINGTON


When:

6.00 – 9.00PM WEDNESDAY

23 OCTOBER 2013


After the book launch all are invited to tea, coffee and refreshments.

HELP US RAISE FUNDS FOR ST SPYRIDON SCHOOL

If you have any books of a Greek nature, published in Greek or English edition, on any subject, you no longer need, then bring them along as a donation and if sold all proceeds to the school.

The Kytherian World Heritage Fund, as sponsor of this evening’s book fair, will also donate a percentage of it’s sales of books to the school.

RSVP: Kathy Samios
(02) 9349 1849
By 20th October


Download a .pdf version of the advertisement here:

Kosmos Ad 15 10 2013.pdf

Download a .pdf invitation to the Big Fat Greek Book Launch & Fair, here:

Greek Book Launch Ad SS.pdf

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by Kytherian World Heritage Fund on 15.10.2013

Committee members of AHEPA and Association of Greek Writers and Artists Australia ( EELKA )

along with the newly appointed Greek Consul of Sydney Dr Stavros Kyrimis, and Jim Saltis...at the launch of Jim's latest book Ευχές αναθεματισμοί και εξορκισμοί.

The English translation is Blessings, Curses and Exorcisms.

The launch was conducted at the Australian Hellenic Educational Progressive Association (AHEPA) Hall, 394 Princes Hwy
Rockdale NSW 2216, from 6:00 pm on Sunday 1st October, 2013.

The launch was hosted by the Association of Greek Writers and Artists Australia ( EELKA ) in collaboration with the Center for Literature and Poetry " Kostis Palamas " AHEPA.

The master of ceremonies for the evening was the Secretary of the Union Litsa Diakovasili. Dsicussion of the book was hosted by the President of the Union, Popi Anastasiadis Mallianou, and excerpts read by : Kiki Betty, Bethlehem Georgelli , Dimitra Milatou and Rosa Gialopouli, Board members of EELKA. Many passages were read from the book, and all acknowledged that the style and flow of Jim's novel was exceptional.

Visitors welcomed the President of AHEPA's Kostis Palamas " Mr. George Lianos.The presentation was attended by the Consul General of Greece Dr Stavros Kyrimis, and many other distinguished members of EELKA & AHEPA.

The launch was attended by a substantial number of people, as can be testified by this photograph.

Jim's friend, Tina Andrew accompanied him. This was appropriate as Tina's father Angelo Christianos was one of the founding members of AHEPA. He attended , one of the first AHEPA meetings held at Scone in 1935. A photograph of the Scone meeting adorns the AHEPA Hall.

Many of Jim and Tina's extended family, attended the launch.

The book is based on Jim Saltis's personal experiences, growing up as he did in a family of 7 children, in the pre-WW2 period in Alexandria, Egypt.

Authors Prefactory Remarks

Alexandria, Egypt, was the city of my birth, nurture and finally my departure in January 1949 without any hatred or wickedness.

I started writing my book Blessings, Curses and Exorcisms back in 1988, after my divorce. I bought a unit at Camspsie and attempted to reorganise my life as a bachelor. My days were grey and the nights were endless. I was craving for same sleep but it refused to intervene and bring some relief to my aching body and a break to my forever active brain. I named the Book “Mrs Stamata.” which was the name of the mother. It took many years to return to the skeletal draft and complete it.

The novel is a collection of experiences that I encountered, fictions that were creations of my cerebral fantasies the perpetually moving mind and my invisible soul.

All the persons that you will encounter in the story were real. Even the beautiful Flora (Madeline) who lived a daringly prodigal life was lucky to meet Milton and experience the immensity and tranquillity of true love. I compromised the tragedy of Alekos and Sofia’s love and gave a happy ending because of the philanthropic action of her boss Leon. Stamata died but she lives on as a ghost at the Greek section of the cemetery at Chatby awaiting the next Resurrection.

Now all of us who were born in Egypt and more particular in the cosmopolitan Alexandria we have dispersed at all corners of this hospitable planet. We travelled to new seas; we flew in skies and lands of places that we have learned in our Geography lessons. Most of us are well established in our new countries and we live carefree existences.

Yet we are grateful that we were born in Egypt.

This is Jim's second book. His first book, My Four Homes was published in both Greek and English.

Jims speech at the My Four Homes Book Launch

Download an interview with Jim Saltis on SBS Radio, Australia, here:

jim-saltis.mp3

This interview refers mainly to Jims previous book, My Four Homes, but also makes reference to Blessings, Curses and Exorcisms.

Author: Jim Saltis

When Published: 2013

Publisher: Jim Saltis

Available: From Jim Saltis or Tina Andrew. 02 9399 9767

Email, Jim Saltis

Book Details

Description: Paperback

Language: GREEK

ISBN: 9780646583938

Dewey Number: A823.4

Ευχές αναθεματισμοί και εξορκισμοί

Παρουσιάστρια: Πόπη Αναστασιάδου-Μαλλιάνου

Ο Δημήτρης Πρωτοψάλτης, γνωστός και ως Jim Saltis στο μυθιστόρημα του Ευχές αναθεματισμοί και εξορκισμοί μας πηγαίνει πίσω στο παρελθόν και μας κάνει να νοσταλγούμε και να ονειρευόμαστε. Μας περιγράφει με έντονα χρώματα μια Αίγυπτο που δεν υπάρχιε πια. Την Αίγυπτο της δεκαετίας του 1930. Βαθύς ψυχολόγος και γνώστης των ηθών της εποχής, μας αναλύει εκτενώς κοινονικά φαινόμενα. Μέσα από την ιστορία της ζωής μιας οικογένειας με επτά παιδιά μας περιγράφει ρεαλιστικά την Αίγυπτο και ιδίως την Αλέξάνδρια εκείνης της εποχής, την αγαπημένη του Αλεξάνδρια, την Αλεξάνδρια στην οποία γεννήθηκε(Βηθλεέμ Μπήκανε στο τράμ για το Μπακός...το εξαιρετικό προσωπικό του και την ακρίβεια του. ) Μια έντονη αίσθηση ιστορικότητας χαρακτηρίζει αυτό το μυθιστόρημα, όπως και το προηγoύμενο μυθιστόρημα του (Τα τέσσερα σπιτια) Στα βιβλία αυτά ο συγγραφέας αναλύει και τεκμηριώνει την πολιτική σήψη που υπάρχει στην δεκαετία του 30. Ο Πρωτοψάλτης είναι κοσμοπολίτης. Στο πίσω εξώφυλλο του βιβλίου του μας λέει; Σήμερα όλοι που γεννηθήκαμε στην μαγευτική πόλη της Αλεξάνδριας και στην Αίγυπτο ζούμε σκορπισμένοι στον φιλόξενο πλανήτη. Ταξιδέψαμε σε καινούργιες θάλασσες και πετάξαμε σε ουρανούς και πατρίδες που μάθαμε από τα βιβλία της Γεωγραφίας.

Το φάσμα των πάσης φύσεως προβληματισμών του είναι ευρύτατο. Αντλεί τα θέματα του από το παρελθόν που έχουν όμως απόλυτη σχέση με τα σημερινά δρώμενα. Εξετάζει όλες τις πτυχές της κοινωνίας με καταπληκτική οξυδέρκεια. Επίσης μας αναφέρει τις διάφορες δυσιδαιμονίες και προκαταλήψεις που υπήρχαν εκείνη την εποχή όπως π.χ. το χύσιμο του λαδιού που το θεωρούσαν μεγάλη γρουσουζιά. Κακός οιωνός όπως έλεγαν. (ΔήμητραΤο Μπουκάλι με το λάδι γλυστρησε από το χέρι της...μα τι φταίει πάλι ο άνθρωπος σκέφθηκε.)Πάνω σ’αυτές τις δυσιδαιμονίες και προκαταλήψεις βασίζεται και ο τίτλος του βιβλίου του Δημήτρη. Ευχές, αναθεματισμοί και εξορκισμοί. και μας μιλά και για τα μάγια που έκαναν για να σταματήσουν ανεπιθήμητους γάμους, η για να εκδικηθούν κάποιον που τους είχε ενοχλήσει η απλώς κάποιον που δεν συμπαθούσαν. Διάφοροι επιτήδιοι εκμετάλευονταν τις προκαταλήψεις αυτές και κέρδιζαν χρήματα από τα ανύποπτα θύματα που πίστευαν σ’αυτά που τους έλεγαν ότι δηλ, τα μάγια θα φέρουν το ποθητό απότέλεσμα. Παρ’ολό που αυτά που περιγράφει ο Πρωτοψάλτης στο βιβλίο του έχουν λάβει χώρα στος αρχές του 20 ου αιώνα το θέμα είναι πολύ επίκαιρο διότι κάθε τόσο βλέπουμε στα μέσα ενημέρωσης παρόμοιες καταστάσεις και στις μέρες μας, όπως τους δύο μάγους που συνέλαβε μερικά χρόνια πρίν, η αστυνομία στα Δυτικά προάστεια του Σύδνευ, που είχαν πελάτες-θύματα με Πανεπιστημιακή μόρφωση.(Κική Είμαι έτοιμη τώρα κυρία...Αμα το φέρεις τότε θα κάνουμε και το επόμενο βήμα.)

Αφίνοντας την φαντασία του ελεύθερη ο Πρωτοψάλτης, ζωντανεύει το παρελθόν κατά τον πιο θελκτικό τρόπο. Ο χρόνος, οι βαθειές εσωτερικές δονήσεις τα πάθη συνθέτουν ένα αρμονικό σύνολο. Με απλά λόγια με πέννα που ρέει, μας παρασέρνει να τον παρακολουθήσουμε με τον πιο αβίαστο τρόπο (Δήμητρα Θυμάμαι καλά τον πολιτικό τους γάμο...η ευτυχία μπήκε στο σπιτικό τους.)

Δεν λείπει το ρεαλιστικό στοιχείο, ενώ οι κοινονικές συνθήκες της εποχής αναλύονται με αξιοπρόσεκτη ακρίβεια. Οι διαγραφές των χαρακτήρων του είναι ακριβείς ενώ οι χώροι και οι περιγραφές των τοπίων αποδίνονται θαυμάσια (Βηθλεέμ,Ομως σκόρπιες σκέψεις χτυπούσαν την πόρτα του μυαλού της...και ο Θεός της είχε χαρίσει 7 παιδιά. .)Ρόζα.Αραπάδες.... της ερωμένης του)
Επίσης ο συγραφέας μας περιγράφει με μαθηματική ακρίβεια τον έρωτα, σαρκικό και πνευματικό σε μια εποχή δύσκολη, υποκριτική, σεμνότυφη, εποχή σεξουαλικής καταπίεσης. Οι ήρωες του, αγαπούν πολύ, στη ζωή τους. Αγαπούν δίχως σεμνοτυφίες και όρια και πολλές φορές περνούν τα σύνορα και σπάνουν τα καλούπια της ηθηκής με ολέθρια αποτελέσματα(.ΡόζαΗΦλώρα γύρισε στο σπίτι της....που αρνήθηκε την οικογένεια της.)

Βαθύς γνώστης της ανθρώπινης φύσης μας περιγράφει με έντονες μελανές πινελιέςτην καθοδική πορεία ατόμων-θυμάτων, που παραδίνονται σε ακραία πάθη και καταστρεπτικές συνήθειες επιρεάζοντας αρνητικά την ζωή τους και τις ζωές προσφυλών τους προσώπων. (Κική Είχε επιθυμήσει να περάσει....από την οικογένεια της.)

Μια άλλη πρωτοτυπία του βιβλίου είναι ότι συχνά παρεμβάλλονται διάφορα σχόλια και φιλοσοφικές παρατηρήσεις. Στος τέλος του βιβλίου υπάρχουν πολλές ωραίες φωτογραφίες κτιρίων και τοπίων εκείνης της εποχής.
Συνοψίζωντας μπορούμε να πούμε ότι το (Ευχές αναθεματισμοί και εξορκισμοί είναι ένα πρωτότυπο, αξιοπρόσεκτο έργο που αξίζει να διαβαστεί.

Συγχαρητήρια λοιπόν στον Δημήτρη Πρωτοψάλτη και του ευχόμαστε να δεί το έργο του διαδεδομένο διαχρονικά και πάντα με ανοδική πορεία.

Πόπη Αναστασιάδη-Μαλλιάνου
Πρόεδρος Ελλήνων Λογοτεχνών
Και
Καλλιτεχνών Αυστραλίας(ΕΕΛΚΑ)

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by Kytherian World Heritage Fund on 12.11.2013

Members of the extended family of Jim Saltis & Tina Andrews

along with the newly appointed Greek Consul of Sydney Dr Stavros Kyrimis...at the launch of Jim Saltis's latest book Ευχές αναθεματισμοί και εξορκισμοί.

Jim Saltis & Tina Andrews with their families:

Back Row
Hanna Saltis, Steven Kingdom, Paula Anastassiou, Emmanuel Fardoulis,
Angelo Andrew, John Andrew, James Andrew.

Fourth Row
Amalia Anastassiou, Renee Anastassiou, Melina andrew.

Middle row
Elaine Andrew, Maria Andrew, Natassa Andrew, Tina Andrew.

Front row
Jim Saltis, Angelique Anastassiou, Katina Andrew.
Consul Dr Stavros Kyrimis.

The English translation is Blessings, Curses and Exorcisms.

The launch was conducted at the Australian Hellenic Educational Progressive Association (AHEPA) Hall, 394 Princes Hwy
Rockdale NSW 2216, from 6:00 pm on Sunday 1st October, 2013.

The launch was hosted by the Association of Greek Writers and Artists Australia ( EELKA ) in collaboration with the Center for Literature and Poetry " Kostis Palamas " AHEPA.

The master of ceremonies for the evening was the Secretary of the Union Litsa Diakovasili. Dsicussion of the book was hosted by the President of the Union, Popi Anastasiadis Mallianou, and excerpts read by : Kiki Betty, Bethlehem Georgelli , Dimitra Milatou and Rosa Gialopouli, Board members of EELKA. Many passages were read from the book, and all acknowledged that the style and flow of Jim's novel was exceptional.

Visitors welcomed the President of AHEPA's Kostis Palamas " Mr. George Lianos.The presentation was attended by the Consul General of Greece Dr Stavros Kyrimis, and many other distinguished members of EELKA & AHEPA.

The launch was attended by a substantial number of people, as can be testified by this photograph.

Jim's friend, Tina Andrew accompanied him. This was appropriate as Tina's father Angelo Christianos was one of the founding members of AHEPA. He attended , one of the first AHEPA meetings held at Scone in 1935. A photograph of the Scone meeting adorns the AHEPA Hall.

Many of Jim and Tina's extended family, attended the launch.

The book is based on Jim Saltis's personal experiences, growing up as he did in a family of 7 children, in the pre-WW2 period in Alexandria, Egypt.

Authors Prefactory Remarks

Alexandria, Egypt, was the city of my birth, nurture and finally my departure in January 1949 without any hatred or wickedness.

I started writing my book Blessings, Curses and Exorcisms back in 1988, after my divorce. I bought a unit at Camspsie and attempted to reorganise my life as a bachelor. My days were grey and the nights were endless. I was craving for same sleep but it refused to intervene and bring some relief to my aching body and a break to my forever active brain. I named the Book “Mrs Stamata.” which was the name of the mother. It took many years to return to the skeletal draft and complete it.

The novel is a collection of experiences that I encountered, fictions that were creations of my cerebral fantasies the perpetually moving mind and my invisible soul.

All the persons that you will encounter in the story were real. Even the beautiful Flora (Madeline) who lived a daringly prodigal life was lucky to meet Milton and experience the immensity and tranquillity of true love. I compromised the tragedy of Alekos and Sofia’s love and gave a happy ending because of the philanthropic action of her boss Leon. Stamata died but she lives on as a ghost at the Greek section of the cemetery at Chatby awaiting the next Resurrection.

Now all of us who were born in Egypt and more particular in the cosmopolitan Alexandria we have dispersed at all corners of this hospitable planet. We travelled to new seas; we flew in skies and lands of places that we have learned in our Geography lessons. Most of us are well established in our new countries and we live carefree existences.

Yet we are grateful that we were born in Egypt.

This is Jim's second book. His first book, My Four Homes was published in both Greek and English.

Jims speech at the My Four Homes Book Launch

Download an interview with Jim Saltis on SBS Radio, Australia, here:

jim-saltis.mp3

This interview refers mainly to Jims previous book, My Four Homes, but also makes reference to Blessings, Curses and Exorcisms.

Author: Jim Saltis

When Published: 2013

Publisher: Jim Saltis

Available: From Jim Saltis or Tina Andrew. 02 9399 9767

Email, Jim Saltis

Book Details

Description: Paperback

Language: GREEK

ISBN: 9780646583938

Dewey Number: A823.4

Ευχές αναθεματισμοί και εξορκισμοί

Παρουσιάστρια: Πόπη Αναστασιάδου-Μαλλιάνου

Ο Δημήτρης Πρωτοψάλτης, γνωστός και ως Jim Saltis στο μυθιστόρημα του Ευχές αναθεματισμοί και εξορκισμοί μας πηγαίνει πίσω στο παρελθόν και μας κάνει να νοσταλγούμε και να ονειρευόμαστε. Μας περιγράφει με έντονα χρώματα μια Αίγυπτο που δεν υπάρχιε πια. Την Αίγυπτο της δεκαετίας του 1930. Βαθύς ψυχολόγος και γνώστης των ηθών της εποχής, μας αναλύει εκτενώς κοινονικά φαινόμενα. Μέσα από την ιστορία της ζωής μιας οικογένειας με επτά παιδιά μας περιγράφει ρεαλιστικά την Αίγυπτο και ιδίως την Αλέξάνδρια εκείνης της εποχής, την αγαπημένη του Αλεξάνδρια, την Αλεξάνδρια στην οποία γεννήθηκε(Βηθλεέμ Μπήκανε στο τράμ για το Μπακός...το εξαιρετικό προσωπικό του και την ακρίβεια του. ) Μια έντονη αίσθηση ιστορικότητας χαρακτηρίζει αυτό το μυθιστόρημα, όπως και το προηγoύμενο μυθιστόρημα του (Τα τέσσερα σπιτια) Στα βιβλία αυτά ο συγγραφέας αναλύει και τεκμηριώνει την πολιτική σήψη που υπάρχει στην δεκαετία του 30. Ο Πρωτοψάλτης είναι κοσμοπολίτης. Στο πίσω εξώφυλλο του βιβλίου του μας λέει; Σήμερα όλοι που γεννηθήκαμε στην μαγευτική πόλη της Αλεξάνδριας και στην Αίγυπτο ζούμε σκορπισμένοι στον φιλόξενο πλανήτη. Ταξιδέψαμε σε καινούργιες θάλασσες και πετάξαμε σε ουρανούς και πατρίδες που μάθαμε από τα βιβλία της Γεωγραφίας.

Το φάσμα των πάσης φύσεως προβληματισμών του είναι ευρύτατο. Αντλεί τα θέματα του από το παρελθόν που έχουν όμως απόλυτη σχέση με τα σημερινά δρώμενα. Εξετάζει όλες τις πτυχές της κοινωνίας με καταπληκτική οξυδέρκεια. Επίσης μας αναφέρει τις διάφορες δυσιδαιμονίες και προκαταλήψεις που υπήρχαν εκείνη την εποχή όπως π.χ. το χύσιμο του λαδιού που το θεωρούσαν μεγάλη γρουσουζιά. Κακός οιωνός όπως έλεγαν. (ΔήμητραΤο Μπουκάλι με το λάδι γλυστρησε από το χέρι της...μα τι φταίει πάλι ο άνθρωπος σκέφθηκε.)Πάνω σ’αυτές τις δυσιδαιμονίες και προκαταλήψεις βασίζεται και ο τίτλος του βιβλίου του Δημήτρη. Ευχές, αναθεματισμοί και εξορκισμοί. και μας μιλά και για τα μάγια που έκαναν για να σταματήσουν ανεπιθήμητους γάμους, η για να εκδικηθούν κάποιον που τους είχε ενοχλήσει η απλώς κάποιον που δεν συμπαθούσαν. Διάφοροι επιτήδιοι εκμετάλευονταν τις προκαταλήψεις αυτές και κέρδιζαν χρήματα από τα ανύποπτα θύματα που πίστευαν σ’αυτά που τους έλεγαν ότι δηλ, τα μάγια θα φέρουν το ποθητό απότέλεσμα. Παρ’ολό που αυτά που περιγράφει ο Πρωτοψάλτης στο βιβλίο του έχουν λάβει χώρα στος αρχές του 20 ου αιώνα το θέμα είναι πολύ επίκαιρο διότι κάθε τόσο βλέπουμε στα μέσα ενημέρωσης παρόμοιες καταστάσεις και στις μέρες μας, όπως τους δύο μάγους που συνέλαβε μερικά χρόνια πρίν, η αστυνομία στα Δυτικά προάστεια του Σύδνευ, που είχαν πελάτες-θύματα με Πανεπιστημιακή μόρφωση.(Κική Είμαι έτοιμη τώρα κυρία...Αμα το φέρεις τότε θα κάνουμε και το επόμενο βήμα.)

Αφίνοντας την φαντασία του ελεύθερη ο Πρωτοψάλτης, ζωντανεύει το παρελθόν κατά τον πιο θελκτικό τρόπο. Ο χρόνος, οι βαθειές εσωτερικές δονήσεις τα πάθη συνθέτουν ένα αρμονικό σύνολο. Με απλά λόγια με πέννα που ρέει, μας παρασέρνει να τον παρακολουθήσουμε με τον πιο αβίαστο τρόπο (Δήμητρα Θυμάμαι καλά τον πολιτικό τους γάμο...η ευτυχία μπήκε στο σπιτικό τους.)

Δεν λείπει το ρεαλιστικό στοιχείο, ενώ οι κοινονικές συνθήκες της εποχής αναλύονται με αξιοπρόσεκτη ακρίβεια. Οι διαγραφές των χαρακτήρων του είναι ακριβείς ενώ οι χώροι και οι περιγραφές των τοπίων αποδίνονται θαυμάσια (Βηθλεέμ,Ομως σκόρπιες σκέψεις χτυπούσαν την πόρτα του μυαλού της...και ο Θεός της είχε χαρίσει 7 παιδιά. .)Ρόζα.Αραπάδες.... της ερωμένης του)
Επίσης ο συγραφέας μας περιγράφει με μαθηματική ακρίβεια τον έρωτα, σαρκικό και πνευματικό σε μια εποχή δύσκολη, υποκριτική, σεμνότυφη, εποχή σεξουαλικής καταπίεσης. Οι ήρωες του, αγαπούν πολύ, στη ζωή τους. Αγαπούν δίχως σεμνοτυφίες και όρια και πολλές φορές περνούν τα σύνορα και σπάνουν τα καλούπια της ηθηκής με ολέθρια αποτελέσματα(.ΡόζαΗΦλώρα γύρισε στο σπίτι της....που αρνήθηκε την οικογένεια της.)

Βαθύς γνώστης της ανθρώπινης φύσης μας περιγράφει με έντονες μελανές πινελιέςτην καθοδική πορεία ατόμων-θυμάτων, που παραδίνονται σε ακραία πάθη και καταστρεπτικές συνήθειες επιρεάζοντας αρνητικά την ζωή τους και τις ζωές προσφυλών τους προσώπων. (Κική Είχε επιθυμήσει να περάσει....από την οικογένεια της.)

Μια άλλη πρωτοτυπία του βιβλίου είναι ότι συχνά παρεμβάλλονται διάφορα σχόλια και φιλοσοφικές παρατηρήσεις. Στος τέλος του βιβλίου υπάρχουν πολλές ωραίες φωτογραφίες κτιρίων και τοπίων εκείνης της εποχής.
Συνοψίζωντας μπορούμε να πούμε ότι το (Ευχές αναθεματισμοί και εξορκισμοί είναι ένα πρωτότυπο, αξιοπρόσεκτο έργο που αξίζει να διαβαστεί.

Συγχαρητήρια λοιπόν στον Δημήτρη Πρωτοψάλτη και του ευχόμαστε να δεί το έργο του διαδεδομένο διαχρονικά και πάντα με ανοδική πορεία.

Πόπη Αναστασιάδη-Μαλλιάνου
Πρόεδρος Ελλήνων Λογοτεχνών
Και
Καλλιτεχνών Αυστραλίας(ΕΕΛΚΑ)

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by Kytherian World Heritage Fund on 17.10.2013

Popi Anastasiadis Mallianou, addressing the audience

...at the launch of Jim Saltis's latest book Ευχές αναθεματισμοί και εξορκισμοί.

The English translation is Blessings, Curses and Exorcisms.

The launch was conducted at the Australian Hellenic Educational Progressive Association (AHEPA) Hall, 394 Princes Hwy
Rockdale NSW 2216, from 6:00 pm on Sunday 1st October, 2013.

The launch was hosted by the Association of Greek Writers and Artists Australia ( EELKA ) in collaboration with the Center for Literature and Poetry " Kostis Palamas " AHEPA.

The master of ceremonies for the evening was the Secretary of the Union Litsa Diakovasili. Dsicussion of the book was hosted by the President of the Union, Popi Anastasiadis Mallianou, and excerpts read by : Kiki Betty, Bethlehem Georgelli , Dimitra Milatou and Rosa Gialopouli, Board members of EELKA. Many passages were read from the book, and all acknowledged that the style and flow of Jim's novel was exceptional.

Visitors welcomed the President of AHEPA's Kostis Palamas " Mr. George Lianos.The presentation was attended by the Consul General of Greece Dr Stavros Kyrimis, and many other distinguished members of EELKA & AHEPA.

The launch was attended by a substantial number of people, as can be testified by this photograph.

Jim's friend, Tina Andrew accompanied him. This was appropriate as Tina's father Angelo Christianos was one of the founding members of AHEPA. He attended , one of the first AHEPA meetings held at Scone in 1935. A photograph of the Scone meeting adorns the AHEPA Hall.

Many of Jim and Tina's extended family, attended the launch.

The book is based on Jim Saltis's personal experiences, growing up as he did in a family of 7 children, in the pre-WW2 period in Alexandria, Egypt.

Authors Prefactory Remarks

Alexandria, Egypt, was the city of my birth, nurture and finally my departure in January 1949 without any hatred or wickedness.

I started writing my book Blessings, Curses and Exorcisms back in 1988, after my divorce. I bought a unit at Camspsie and attempted to reorganise my life as a bachelor. My days were grey and the nights were endless. I was craving for same sleep but it refused to intervene and bring some relief to my aching body and a break to my forever active brain. I named the Book “Mrs Stamata.” which was the name of the mother. It took many years to return to the skeletal draft and complete it.

The novel is a collection of experiences that I encountered, fictions that were creations of my cerebral fantasies the perpetually moving mind and my invisible soul.

All the persons that you will encounter in the story were real. Even the beautiful Flora (Madeline) who lived a daringly prodigal life was lucky to meet Milton and experience the immensity and tranquillity of true love. I compromised the tragedy of Alekos and Sofia’s love and gave a happy ending because of the philanthropic action of her boss Leon. Stamata died but she lives on as a ghost at the Greek section of the cemetery at Chatby awaiting the next Resurrection.

Now all of us who were born in Egypt and more particular in the cosmopolitan Alexandria we have dispersed at all corners of this hospitable planet. We travelled to new seas; we flew in skies and lands of places that we have learned in our Geography lessons. Most of us are well established in our new countries and we live carefree existences.

Yet we are grateful that we were born in Egypt.

This is Jim's second book. His first book, My Four Homes was published in both Greek and English.

Jims speech at the My Four Homes Book Launch

Download an interview with Jim Saltis on SBS Radio, Australia, here:

jim-saltis.mp3

This interview refers mainly to Jims previous book, My Four Homes, but also makes reference to Blessings, Curses and Exorcisms.

Author: Jim Saltis

When Published: 2013

Publisher: Jim Saltis

Available: From Jim Saltis or Tina Andrew. 02 9399 9767

Email, Jim Saltis

Book Details

Description: Paperback

Language: GREEK

ISBN: 9780646583938

Dewey Number: A823.4

Ευχές αναθεματισμοί και εξορκισμοί

Παρουσιάστρια: Πόπη Αναστασιάδου-Μαλλιάνου

Ο Δημήτρης Πρωτοψάλτης, γνωστός και ως Jim Saltis στο μυθιστόρημα του Ευχές αναθεματισμοί και εξορκισμοί μας πηγαίνει πίσω στο παρελθόν και μας κάνει να νοσταλγούμε και να ονειρευόμαστε. Μας περιγράφει με έντονα χρώματα μια Αίγυπτο που δεν υπάρχιε πια. Την Αίγυπτο της δεκαετίας του 1930. Βαθύς ψυχολόγος και γνώστης των ηθών της εποχής, μας αναλύει εκτενώς κοινονικά φαινόμενα. Μέσα από την ιστορία της ζωής μιας οικογένειας με επτά παιδιά μας περιγράφει ρεαλιστικά την Αίγυπτο και ιδίως την Αλέξάνδρια εκείνης της εποχής, την αγαπημένη του Αλεξάνδρια, την Αλεξάνδρια στην οποία γεννήθηκε(Βηθλεέμ Μπήκανε στο τράμ για το Μπακός...το εξαιρετικό προσωπικό του και την ακρίβεια του. ) Μια έντονη αίσθηση ιστορικότητας χαρακτηρίζει αυτό το μυθιστόρημα, όπως και το προηγoύμενο μυθιστόρημα του (Τα τέσσερα σπιτια) Στα βιβλία αυτά ο συγγραφέας αναλύει και τεκμηριώνει την πολιτική σήψη που υπάρχει στην δεκαετία του 30. Ο Πρωτοψάλτης είναι κοσμοπολίτης. Στο πίσω εξώφυλλο του βιβλίου του μας λέει; Σήμερα όλοι που γεννηθήκαμε στην μαγευτική πόλη της Αλεξάνδριας και στην Αίγυπτο ζούμε σκορπισμένοι στον φιλόξενο πλανήτη. Ταξιδέψαμε σε καινούργιες θάλασσες και πετάξαμε σε ουρανούς και πατρίδες που μάθαμε από τα βιβλία της Γεωγραφίας.

Το φάσμα των πάσης φύσεως προβληματισμών του είναι ευρύτατο. Αντλεί τα θέματα του από το παρελθόν που έχουν όμως απόλυτη σχέση με τα σημερινά δρώμενα. Εξετάζει όλες τις πτυχές της κοινωνίας με καταπληκτική οξυδέρκεια. Επίσης μας αναφέρει τις διάφορες δυσιδαιμονίες και προκαταλήψεις που υπήρχαν εκείνη την εποχή όπως π.χ. το χύσιμο του λαδιού που το θεωρούσαν μεγάλη γρουσουζιά. Κακός οιωνός όπως έλεγαν. (ΔήμητραΤο Μπουκάλι με το λάδι γλυστρησε από το χέρι της...μα τι φταίει πάλι ο άνθρωπος σκέφθηκε.)Πάνω σ’αυτές τις δυσιδαιμονίες και προκαταλήψεις βασίζεται και ο τίτλος του βιβλίου του Δημήτρη. Ευχές, αναθεματισμοί και εξορκισμοί. και μας μιλά και για τα μάγια που έκαναν για να σταματήσουν ανεπιθήμητους γάμους, η για να εκδικηθούν κάποιον που τους είχε ενοχλήσει η απλώς κάποιον που δεν συμπαθούσαν. Διάφοροι επιτήδιοι εκμετάλευονταν τις προκαταλήψεις αυτές και κέρδιζαν χρήματα από τα ανύποπτα θύματα που πίστευαν σ’αυτά που τους έλεγαν ότι δηλ, τα μάγια θα φέρουν το ποθητό απότέλεσμα. Παρ’ολό που αυτά που περιγράφει ο Πρωτοψάλτης στο βιβλίο του έχουν λάβει χώρα στος αρχές του 20 ου αιώνα το θέμα είναι πολύ επίκαιρο διότι κάθε τόσο βλέπουμε στα μέσα ενημέρωσης παρόμοιες καταστάσεις και στις μέρες μας, όπως τους δύο μάγους που συνέλαβε μερικά χρόνια πρίν, η αστυνομία στα Δυτικά προάστεια του Σύδνευ, που είχαν πελάτες-θύματα με Πανεπιστημιακή μόρφωση.(Κική Είμαι έτοιμη τώρα κυρία...Αμα το φέρεις τότε θα κάνουμε και το επόμενο βήμα.)

Αφίνοντας την φαντασία του ελεύθερη ο Πρωτοψάλτης, ζωντανεύει το παρελθόν κατά τον πιο θελκτικό τρόπο. Ο χρόνος, οι βαθειές εσωτερικές δονήσεις τα πάθη συνθέτουν ένα αρμονικό σύνολο. Με απλά λόγια με πέννα που ρέει, μας παρασέρνει να τον παρακολουθήσουμε με τον πιο αβίαστο τρόπο (Δήμητρα Θυμάμαι καλά τον πολιτικό τους γάμο...η ευτυχία μπήκε στο σπιτικό τους.)

Δεν λείπει το ρεαλιστικό στοιχείο, ενώ οι κοινονικές συνθήκες της εποχής αναλύονται με αξιοπρόσεκτη ακρίβεια. Οι διαγραφές των χαρακτήρων του είναι ακριβείς ενώ οι χώροι και οι περιγραφές των τοπίων αποδίνονται θαυμάσια (Βηθλεέμ,Ομως σκόρπιες σκέψεις χτυπούσαν την πόρτα του μυαλού της...και ο Θεός της είχε χαρίσει 7 παιδιά. .)Ρόζα.Αραπάδες.... της ερωμένης του)
Επίσης ο συγραφέας μας περιγράφει με μαθηματική ακρίβεια τον έρωτα, σαρκικό και πνευματικό σε μια εποχή δύσκολη, υποκριτική, σεμνότυφη, εποχή σεξουαλικής καταπίεσης. Οι ήρωες του, αγαπούν πολύ, στη ζωή τους. Αγαπούν δίχως σεμνοτυφίες και όρια και πολλές φορές περνούν τα σύνορα και σπάνουν τα καλούπια της ηθηκής με ολέθρια αποτελέσματα(.ΡόζαΗΦλώρα γύρισε στο σπίτι της....που αρνήθηκε την οικογένεια της.)

Βαθύς γνώστης της ανθρώπινης φύσης μας περιγράφει με έντονες μελανές πινελιέςτην καθοδική πορεία ατόμων-θυμάτων, που παραδίνονται σε ακραία πάθη και καταστρεπτικές συνήθειες επιρεάζοντας αρνητικά την ζωή τους και τις ζωές προσφυλών τους προσώπων. (Κική Είχε επιθυμήσει να περάσει....από την οικογένεια της.)

Μια άλλη πρωτοτυπία του βιβλίου είναι ότι συχνά παρεμβάλλονται διάφορα σχόλια και φιλοσοφικές παρατηρήσεις. Στος τέλος του βιβλίου υπάρχουν πολλές ωραίες φωτογραφίες κτιρίων και τοπίων εκείνης της εποχής.
Συνοψίζωντας μπορούμε να πούμε ότι το (Ευχές αναθεματισμοί και εξορκισμοί είναι ένα πρωτότυπο, αξιοπρόσεκτο έργο που αξίζει να διαβαστεί.

Συγχαρητήρια λοιπόν στον Δημήτρη Πρωτοψάλτη και του ευχόμαστε να δεί το έργο του διαδεδομένο διαχρονικά και πάντα με ανοδική πορεία.

Πόπη Αναστασιάδη-Μαλλιάνου
Πρόεδρος Ελλήνων Λογοτεχνών
Και
Καλλιτεχνών Αυστραλίας(ΕΕΛΚΑ)

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by Kytherian Book Review on 15.10.2013

Jim Saltis and Tina Andrews sseated front and far right

...at the launch of his latest book Ευχές αναθεματισμοί και εξορκισμοί.

The English translation is Blessings, Curses and Exorcisms.

The launch was conducted at the Australian Hellenic Educational Progressive Association (AHEPA) Hall, 394 Princes Hwy
Rockdale NSW 2216, from 6:00 pm on Sunday 1st October, 2013.

The launch was hosted by the Association of Greek Writers and Artists Australia ( EELKA ) in collaboration with the Center for Literature and Poetry " Kostis Palamas " AHEPA.

The master of ceremonies for the evening was the Secretary of the Union Litsa Diakovasili. Dsicussion of the book was hosted by the President of the Union, Popi Anastasiadis Mallianou, and excerpts read by : Kiki Betty, Bethlehem Georgelli , Dimitra Milatou and Rosa Gialopouli, Board members of EELKA. Many passages were read from the book, and all acknowledged that the style and flow of Jim's novel was exceptional.

Visitors welcomed the President of AHEPA's Kostis Palamas " Mr. George Lianos.The presentation was attended by the Consul General of Greece Dr Stavros Kyrimis, and many other distinguished members of EELKA & AHEPA.

The launch was attended by a substantial number of people, as can be testified by this photograph.

Jim's friend, Tina Andrew accompanied him. This was appropriate as Tina's father Angelo Christianos was one of the founding members of AHEPA. He attended , one of the first AHEPA meetings held at Scone in 1935. A photograph of the Scone meeting adorns the AHEPA Hall.

Many of Jim and Tina's extended family, attended the launch.

The book is based on Jim Saltis's personal experiences, growing up as he did in a family of 7 children, in the pre-WW2 period in Alexandria, Egypt.

Authors Prefactory Remarks

Alexandria, Egypt, was the city of my birth, nurture and finally my departure in January 1949 without any hatred or wickedness.

I started writing my book Blessings, Curses and Exorcisms back in 1988, after my divorce. I bought a unit at Camspsie and attempted to reorganise my life as a bachelor. My days were grey and the nights were endless. I was craving for same sleep but it refused to intervene and bring some relief to my aching body and a break to my forever active brain. I named the Book “Mrs Stamata.” which was the name of the mother. It took many years to return to the skeletal draft and complete it.

The novel is a collection of experiences that I encountered, fictions that were creations of my cerebral fantasies the perpetually moving mind and my invisible soul.

All the persons that you will encounter in the story were real. Even the beautiful Flora (Madeline) who lived a daringly prodigal life was lucky to meet Milton and experience the immensity and tranquillity of true love. I compromised the tragedy of Alekos and Sofia’s love and gave a happy ending because of the philanthropic action of her boss Leon. Stamata died but she lives on as a ghost at the Greek section of the cemetery at Chatby awaiting the next Resurrection.

Now all of us who were born in Egypt and more particular in the cosmopolitan Alexandria we have dispersed at all corners of this hospitable planet. We travelled to new seas; we flew in skies and lands of places that we have learned in our Geography lessons. Most of us are well established in our new countries and we live carefree existences.

Yet we are grateful that we were born in Egypt.

This is Jim's second book. His first book, My Four Homes was published in both Greek and English.

Jims speech at the My Four Homes Book Launch

Download an interview with Jim Saltis on SBS Radio, Australia, here:

jim-saltis.mp3

This interview refers mainly to Jims previous book, My Four Homes, but also makes reference to Blessings, Curses and Exorcisms.

Author: Jim Saltis

When Published: 2013

Publisher: Jim Saltis

Available: From Jim Saltis or Tina Andrew. 02 9399 9767

Email, Jim Saltis

Book Details

Description: Paperback

Language: GREEK

ISBN: 9780646583938

Dewey Number: A823.4

Ευχές αναθεματισμοί και εξορκισμοί

Παρουσιάστρια: Πόπη Αναστασιάδου-Μαλλιάνου

Ο Δημήτρης Πρωτοψάλτης, γνωστός και ως Jim Saltis στο μυθιστόρημα του Ευχές αναθεματισμοί και εξορκισμοί μας πηγαίνει πίσω στο παρελθόν και μας κάνει να νοσταλγούμε και να ονειρευόμαστε. Μας περιγράφει με έντονα χρώματα μια Αίγυπτο που δεν υπάρχιε πια. Την Αίγυπτο της δεκαετίας του 1930. Βαθύς ψυχολόγος και γνώστης των ηθών της εποχής, μας αναλύει εκτενώς κοινονικά φαινόμενα. Μέσα από την ιστορία της ζωής μιας οικογένειας με επτά παιδιά μας περιγράφει ρεαλιστικά την Αίγυπτο και ιδίως την Αλέξάνδρια εκείνης της εποχής, την αγαπημένη του Αλεξάνδρια, την Αλεξάνδρια στην οποία γεννήθηκε(Βηθλεέμ Μπήκανε στο τράμ για το Μπακός...το εξαιρετικό προσωπικό του και την ακρίβεια του. ) Μια έντονη αίσθηση ιστορικότητας χαρακτηρίζει αυτό το μυθιστόρημα, όπως και το προηγoύμενο μυθιστόρημα του (Τα τέσσερα σπιτια) Στα βιβλία αυτά ο συγγραφέας αναλύει και τεκμηριώνει την πολιτική σήψη που υπάρχει στην δεκαετία του 30. Ο Πρωτοψάλτης είναι κοσμοπολίτης. Στο πίσω εξώφυλλο του βιβλίου του μας λέει; Σήμερα όλοι που γεννηθήκαμε στην μαγευτική πόλη της Αλεξάνδριας και στην Αίγυπτο ζούμε σκορπισμένοι στον φιλόξενο πλανήτη. Ταξιδέψαμε σε καινούργιες θάλασσες και πετάξαμε σε ουρανούς και πατρίδες που μάθαμε από τα βιβλία της Γεωγραφίας.

Το φάσμα των πάσης φύσεως προβληματισμών του είναι ευρύτατο. Αντλεί τα θέματα του από το παρελθόν που έχουν όμως απόλυτη σχέση με τα σημερινά δρώμενα. Εξετάζει όλες τις πτυχές της κοινωνίας με καταπληκτική οξυδέρκεια. Επίσης μας αναφέρει τις διάφορες δυσιδαιμονίες και προκαταλήψεις που υπήρχαν εκείνη την εποχή όπως π.χ. το χύσιμο του λαδιού που το θεωρούσαν μεγάλη γρουσουζιά. Κακός οιωνός όπως έλεγαν. (ΔήμητραΤο Μπουκάλι με το λάδι γλυστρησε από το χέρι της...μα τι φταίει πάλι ο άνθρωπος σκέφθηκε.)Πάνω σ’αυτές τις δυσιδαιμονίες και προκαταλήψεις βασίζεται και ο τίτλος του βιβλίου του Δημήτρη. Ευχές, αναθεματισμοί και εξορκισμοί. και μας μιλά και για τα μάγια που έκαναν για να σταματήσουν ανεπιθήμητους γάμους, η για να εκδικηθούν κάποιον που τους είχε ενοχλήσει η απλώς κάποιον που δεν συμπαθούσαν. Διάφοροι επιτήδιοι εκμετάλευονταν τις προκαταλήψεις αυτές και κέρδιζαν χρήματα από τα ανύποπτα θύματα που πίστευαν σ’αυτά που τους έλεγαν ότι δηλ, τα μάγια θα φέρουν το ποθητό απότέλεσμα. Παρ’ολό που αυτά που περιγράφει ο Πρωτοψάλτης στο βιβλίο του έχουν λάβει χώρα στος αρχές του 20 ου αιώνα το θέμα είναι πολύ επίκαιρο διότι κάθε τόσο βλέπουμε στα μέσα ενημέρωσης παρόμοιες καταστάσεις και στις μέρες μας, όπως τους δύο μάγους που συνέλαβε μερικά χρόνια πρίν, η αστυνομία στα Δυτικά προάστεια του Σύδνευ, που είχαν πελάτες-θύματα με Πανεπιστημιακή μόρφωση.(Κική Είμαι έτοιμη τώρα κυρία...Αμα το φέρεις τότε θα κάνουμε και το επόμενο βήμα.)

Αφίνοντας την φαντασία του ελεύθερη ο Πρωτοψάλτης, ζωντανεύει το παρελθόν κατά τον πιο θελκτικό τρόπο. Ο χρόνος, οι βαθειές εσωτερικές δονήσεις τα πάθη συνθέτουν ένα αρμονικό σύνολο. Με απλά λόγια με πέννα που ρέει, μας παρασέρνει να τον παρακολουθήσουμε με τον πιο αβίαστο τρόπο (Δήμητρα Θυμάμαι καλά τον πολιτικό τους γάμο...η ευτυχία μπήκε στο σπιτικό τους.)

Δεν λείπει το ρεαλιστικό στοιχείο, ενώ οι κοινονικές συνθήκες της εποχής αναλύονται με αξιοπρόσεκτη ακρίβεια. Οι διαγραφές των χαρακτήρων του είναι ακριβείς ενώ οι χώροι και οι περιγραφές των τοπίων αποδίνονται θαυμάσια (Βηθλεέμ,Ομως σκόρπιες σκέψεις χτυπούσαν την πόρτα του μυαλού της...και ο Θεός της είχε χαρίσει 7 παιδιά. .)Ρόζα.Αραπάδες.... της ερωμένης του)
Επίσης ο συγραφέας μας περιγράφει με μαθηματική ακρίβεια τον έρωτα, σαρκικό και πνευματικό σε μια εποχή δύσκολη, υποκριτική, σεμνότυφη, εποχή σεξουαλικής καταπίεσης. Οι ήρωες του, αγαπούν πολύ, στη ζωή τους. Αγαπούν δίχως σεμνοτυφίες και όρια και πολλές φορές περνούν τα σύνορα και σπάνουν τα καλούπια της ηθηκής με ολέθρια αποτελέσματα(.ΡόζαΗΦλώρα γύρισε στο σπίτι της....που αρνήθηκε την οικογένεια της.)

Βαθύς γνώστης της ανθρώπινης φύσης μας περιγράφει με έντονες μελανές πινελιέςτην καθοδική πορεία ατόμων-θυμάτων, που παραδίνονται σε ακραία πάθη και καταστρεπτικές συνήθειες επιρεάζοντας αρνητικά την ζωή τους και τις ζωές προσφυλών τους προσώπων. (Κική Είχε επιθυμήσει να περάσει....από την οικογένεια της.)

Μια άλλη πρωτοτυπία του βιβλίου είναι ότι συχνά παρεμβάλλονται διάφορα σχόλια και φιλοσοφικές παρατηρήσεις. Στος τέλος του βιβλίου υπάρχουν πολλές ωραίες φωτογραφίες κτιρίων και τοπίων εκείνης της εποχής.
Συνοψίζωντας μπορούμε να πούμε ότι το (Ευχές αναθεματισμοί και εξορκισμοί είναι ένα πρωτότυπο, αξιοπρόσεκτο έργο που αξίζει να διαβαστεί.

Συγχαρητήρια λοιπόν στον Δημήτρη Πρωτοψάλτη και του ευχόμαστε να δεί το έργο του διαδεδομένο διαχρονικά και πάντα με ανοδική πορεία.

Πόπη Αναστασιάδη-Μαλλιάνου
Πρόεδρος Ελλήνων Λογοτεχνών
Και
Καλλιτεχνών Αυστραλίας(ΕΕΛΚΑ)

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by Kytherian Association Of Australia on 11.10.2013

Kytherian Association Aged Care Trust Art Union

Tickets only $100

3 Chances in 1000 to win one of these prizes

Tickets Available NOW!

WIN A GREAT CAR

First Prize: Valued at $42,918.00
NEW Toyota RAV4 GXL - AWD 2.5L Petrol
On Road - Drive Away, Including Stamp Duty,
Registration and Compulsory Third Party Insurance
Your Choice of Colour,
Manufactured 2014
All Wheel Drive, 2.5 Litre, Automatic 6 Speed,
Anti-lock Braking System, 7 Air Bags, Stability Control,
Capped Price Service, Blue Tooth, Keyless Entry,
17” Alloy Wheels, Your Choice of Colour
Supplied by:Ferguson & Canterbury Toyota DL20038
104 Forest Road, Hurstville NSW, Ph. 02 9579 5077
744 Canterbury Rd, Belmore NSW, Ph. 02 9750 0011

SECOND PRIZE

An In-Store Purchase Voucher from The Good Guys, Caringbah ((02) 9540 0000)) valued at $2,500.00

THIRD PRIZE

An In-Store Purchase Voucher from The Good Guys, Caringbah ((02) 9540 0000)) valued at $1,500.00

Download a copy of the form,

car_orderform.pdf

fill in your particulars, and post to:


Kytherian Association of Australia
Aged Care Trust Art Union,
PO Box 183, Rockdale NSW 2216

or: Email the Kytherian Association

For more information please contact
George Giaouris 0417 970 500 or
Kathy Samios 0410 491 849


The Art Union will be drawn at a dinner dance at
The Grand Roxy, 128 The Grand Parade, Brighton Le Sands at 10pm on Saturday 15 February 2014.

Winning numbers will be published in the Sydney Morning Herald on 18 Feb. 2014.

Buy a ticket. You will be assisting a great cause!

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by Kytherian World Heritage Fund on 11.10.2013

The Big Fat Greek Book Launch & Fair

You are invited to the launch of many new Greek books, together with other published books in the English and Greek language. With over 30 back titles, this is the biggest Greek book fair ever.

All Welcome. Admittance Free

Of special interest is Kytherian Surnames, a 800 page historical record
of Kytherian families and Kythera From The Air and A Year in Kythera, excellent colour pageant of photos of the Island.

Where:

ST SPYRIDON
CHURCH HALL
KENSINGTON


When:

6.00 – 9.00PM WEDNESDAY

23 OCTOBER 2013


After the book launch all are invited to tea, coffee and refreshments.

HELP US RAISE FUNDS FOR ST SPYRIDON SCHOOL

If you have any books of a Greek nature, published in Greek or English edition, on any subject, you no longer need, then bring them along as a donation and if sold all proceeds to the school.

The Kytherian World Heritage Fund, as sponsor of this evening’s book fair, will also donate a percentage of it’s sales of books to the school.

RSVP: Kathy Samios
(02) 9349 1849
By 20th October


Download a .pdf invitation to the Big Fat Greek Book Launch & Fair, here:

Greek Book Launch Ad SS.pdf

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by Kytherian Book Review on 15.10.2013

Jim Saltis signing copies at the launch of his latest book Ευχές αναθεματισμοί και εξορκισμοί

The English translation is Blessings, Curses and Exorcisms.

The launch was conducted at the Australian Hellenic Educational Progressive Association (AHEPA) Hall, 394 Princes Hwy
Rockdale NSW 2216, from 6:00 pm on Sunday 1st October, 2013.

The launch was hosted by the Association of Greek Writers and Artists Australia ( EELKA ) in collaboration with the Center for Literature and Poetry " Kostis Palamas " AHEPA.

The master of ceremonies for the evening was the Secretary of the Union Litsa Diakovasili. Dsicussion of the book was hosted by the President of the Union, Popi Anastasiadis Mallianou, and excerpts read by : Kiki Betty, Bethlehem Georgelli , Dimitra Milatou and Rosa Gialopouli, Board members of EELKA. Many passages were read from the book, and all acknowledged that the style and flow of Jim's novel was exceptional.

Visitors welcomed the President of AHEPA's Kostis Palamas " Mr. George Lianos.The presentation was attended by the Consul General of Greece Dr Stavros Kyrimis, and many other distinguished members of EELKA & AHEPA.

The launch was attended by a substantial number of people, as can be testified by this photograph.

Jim's friend, Tina Andrew accompanied him. This was appropriate as Tina's father Angelo Christianos was one of the founding members of AHEPA. He attended , one of the first AHEPA meetings held at Scone in 1935. A photograph of the Scone meeting adorns the AHEPA Hall.

Many of Jim and Tina's extended family, attended the launch.

The book is based on Jim Saltis's personal experiences, growing up as he did in a family of 7 children, in the pre-WW2 period in Alexandria, Egypt.

Authors Prefactory Remarks

Alexandria, Egypt, was the city of my birth, nurture and finally my departure in January 1949 without any hatred or wickedness.

I started writing my book Blessings, Curses and Exorcisms back in 1988, after my divorce. I bought a unit at Camspsie and attempted to reorganise my life as a bachelor. My days were grey and the nights were endless. I was craving for same sleep but it refused to intervene and bring some relief to my aching body and a break to my forever active brain. I named the Book “Mrs Stamata.” which was the name of the mother. It took many years to return to the skeletal draft and complete it.

The novel is a collection of experiences that I encountered, fictions that were creations of my cerebral fantasies the perpetually moving mind and my invisible soul.

All the persons that you will encounter in the story were real. Even the beautiful Flora (Madeline) who lived a daringly prodigal life was lucky to meet Milton and experience the immensity and tranquillity of true love. I compromised the tragedy of Alekos and Sofia’s love and gave a happy ending because of the philanthropic action of her boss Leon. Stamata died but she lives on as a ghost at the Greek section of the cemetery at Chatby awaiting the next Resurrection.

Now all of us who were born in Egypt and more particular in the cosmopolitan Alexandria we have dispersed at all corners of this hospitable planet. We travelled to new seas; we flew in skies and lands of places that we have learned in our Geography lessons. Most of us are well established in our new countries and we live carefree existences.

Yet we are grateful that we were born in Egypt.

This is Jim's second book. His first book, My Four Homes was published in both Greek and English.

Jims speech at the My Four Homes Book Launch

Download an interview with Jim Saltis on SBS Radio, Australia, here:

jim-saltis.mp3

This interview refers mainly to Jims previous book, My Four Homes, but also makes reference to Blessings, Curses and Exorcisms.

Author: Jim Saltis

When Published: 2013

Publisher: Jim Saltis

Available: From Jim Saltis or Tina Andrew. 02 9399 9767

Email, Jim Saltis

Book Details

Description: Paperback

Language: GREEK

ISBN: 9780646583938

Dewey Number: A823.4

Ευχές αναθεματισμοί και εξορκισμοί

Παρουσιάστρια: Πόπη Αναστασιάδου-Μαλλιάνου

Ο Δημήτρης Πρωτοψάλτης, γνωστός και ως Jim Saltis στο μυθιστόρημα του Ευχές αναθεματισμοί και εξορκισμοί μας πηγαίνει πίσω στο παρελθόν και μας κάνει να νοσταλγούμε και να ονειρευόμαστε. Μας περιγράφει με έντονα χρώματα μια Αίγυπτο που δεν υπάρχιε πια. Την Αίγυπτο της δεκαετίας του 1930. Βαθύς ψυχολόγος και γνώστης των ηθών της εποχής, μας αναλύει εκτενώς κοινονικά φαινόμενα. Μέσα από την ιστορία της ζωής μιας οικογένειας με επτά παιδιά μας περιγράφει ρεαλιστικά την Αίγυπτο και ιδίως την Αλέξάνδρια εκείνης της εποχής, την αγαπημένη του Αλεξάνδρια, την Αλεξάνδρια στην οποία γεννήθηκε(Βηθλεέμ Μπήκανε στο τράμ για το Μπακός...το εξαιρετικό προσωπικό του και την ακρίβεια του. ) Μια έντονη αίσθηση ιστορικότητας χαρακτηρίζει αυτό το μυθιστόρημα, όπως και το προηγoύμενο μυθιστόρημα του (Τα τέσσερα σπιτια) Στα βιβλία αυτά ο συγγραφέας αναλύει και τεκμηριώνει την πολιτική σήψη που υπάρχει στην δεκαετία του 30. Ο Πρωτοψάλτης είναι κοσμοπολίτης. Στο πίσω εξώφυλλο του βιβλίου του μας λέει; Σήμερα όλοι που γεννηθήκαμε στην μαγευτική πόλη της Αλεξάνδριας και στην Αίγυπτο ζούμε σκορπισμένοι στον φιλόξενο πλανήτη. Ταξιδέψαμε σε καινούργιες θάλασσες και πετάξαμε σε ουρανούς και πατρίδες που μάθαμε από τα βιβλία της Γεωγραφίας.

Το φάσμα των πάσης φύσεως προβληματισμών του είναι ευρύτατο. Αντλεί τα θέματα του από το παρελθόν που έχουν όμως απόλυτη σχέση με τα σημερινά δρώμενα. Εξετάζει όλες τις πτυχές της κοινωνίας με καταπληκτική οξυδέρκεια. Επίσης μας αναφέρει τις διάφορες δυσιδαιμονίες και προκαταλήψεις που υπήρχαν εκείνη την εποχή όπως π.χ. το χύσιμο του λαδιού που το θεωρούσαν μεγάλη γρουσουζιά. Κακός οιωνός όπως έλεγαν. (ΔήμητραΤο Μπουκάλι με το λάδι γλυστρησε από το χέρι της...μα τι φταίει πάλι ο άνθρωπος σκέφθηκε.)Πάνω σ’αυτές τις δυσιδαιμονίες και προκαταλήψεις βασίζεται και ο τίτλος του βιβλίου του Δημήτρη. Ευχές, αναθεματισμοί και εξορκισμοί. και μας μιλά και για τα μάγια που έκαναν για να σταματήσουν ανεπιθήμητους γάμους, η για να εκδικηθούν κάποιον που τους είχε ενοχλήσει η απλώς κάποιον που δεν συμπαθούσαν. Διάφοροι επιτήδιοι εκμετάλευονταν τις προκαταλήψεις αυτές και κέρδιζαν χρήματα από τα ανύποπτα θύματα που πίστευαν σ’αυτά που τους έλεγαν ότι δηλ, τα μάγια θα φέρουν το ποθητό απότέλεσμα. Παρ’ολό που αυτά που περιγράφει ο Πρωτοψάλτης στο βιβλίο του έχουν λάβει χώρα στος αρχές του 20 ου αιώνα το θέμα είναι πολύ επίκαιρο διότι κάθε τόσο βλέπουμε στα μέσα ενημέρωσης παρόμοιες καταστάσεις και στις μέρες μας, όπως τους δύο μάγους που συνέλαβε μερικά χρόνια πρίν, η αστυνομία στα Δυτικά προάστεια του Σύδνευ, που είχαν πελάτες-θύματα με Πανεπιστημιακή μόρφωση.(Κική Είμαι έτοιμη τώρα κυρία...Αμα το φέρεις τότε θα κάνουμε και το επόμενο βήμα.)

Αφίνοντας την φαντασία του ελεύθερη ο Πρωτοψάλτης, ζωντανεύει το παρελθόν κατά τον πιο θελκτικό τρόπο. Ο χρόνος, οι βαθειές εσωτερικές δονήσεις τα πάθη συνθέτουν ένα αρμονικό σύνολο. Με απλά λόγια με πέννα που ρέει, μας παρασέρνει να τον παρακολουθήσουμε με τον πιο αβίαστο τρόπο (Δήμητρα Θυμάμαι καλά τον πολιτικό τους γάμο...η ευτυχία μπήκε στο σπιτικό τους.)

Δεν λείπει το ρεαλιστικό στοιχείο, ενώ οι κοινονικές συνθήκες της εποχής αναλύονται με αξιοπρόσεκτη ακρίβεια. Οι διαγραφές των χαρακτήρων του είναι ακριβείς ενώ οι χώροι και οι περιγραφές των τοπίων αποδίνονται θαυμάσια (Βηθλεέμ,Ομως σκόρπιες σκέψεις χτυπούσαν την πόρτα του μυαλού της...και ο Θεός της είχε χαρίσει 7 παιδιά. .)Ρόζα.Αραπάδες.... της ερωμένης του)
Επίσης ο συγραφέας μας περιγράφει με μαθηματική ακρίβεια τον έρωτα, σαρκικό και πνευματικό σε μια εποχή δύσκολη, υποκριτική, σεμνότυφη, εποχή σεξουαλικής καταπίεσης. Οι ήρωες του, αγαπούν πολύ, στη ζωή τους. Αγαπούν δίχως σεμνοτυφίες και όρια και πολλές φορές περνούν τα σύνορα και σπάνουν τα καλούπια της ηθηκής με ολέθρια αποτελέσματα(.ΡόζαΗΦλώρα γύρισε στο σπίτι της....που αρνήθηκε την οικογένεια της.)

Βαθύς γνώστης της ανθρώπινης φύσης μας περιγράφει με έντονες μελανές πινελιέςτην καθοδική πορεία ατόμων-θυμάτων, που παραδίνονται σε ακραία πάθη και καταστρεπτικές συνήθειες επιρεάζοντας αρνητικά την ζωή τους και τις ζωές προσφυλών τους προσώπων. (Κική Είχε επιθυμήσει να περάσει....από την οικογένεια της.)

Μια άλλη πρωτοτυπία του βιβλίου είναι ότι συχνά παρεμβάλλονται διάφορα σχόλια και φιλοσοφικές παρατηρήσεις. Στος τέλος του βιβλίου υπάρχουν πολλές ωραίες φωτογραφίες κτιρίων και τοπίων εκείνης της εποχής.
Συνοψίζωντας μπορούμε να πούμε ότι το (Ευχές αναθεματισμοί και εξορκισμοί είναι ένα πρωτότυπο, αξιοπρόσεκτο έργο που αξίζει να διαβαστεί.

Συγχαρητήρια λοιπόν στον Δημήτρη Πρωτοψάλτη και του ευχόμαστε να δεί το έργο του διαδεδομένο διαχρονικά και πάντα με ανοδική πορεία.

Πόπη Αναστασιάδη-Μαλλιάνου
Πρόεδρος Ελλήνων Λογοτεχνών
Και
Καλλιτεχνών Αυστραλίας(ΕΕΛΚΑ)

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by Kytherian World Heritage Fund on 07.10.2013

Launch of Jim Saltis's latest book, Ευχες Αναεματισμοι και Eξορκισμοι

The launch was conducted at AHEPA Hall, 394 Princes Hwy
Rockdale NSW 2216, from 6:00 pm on Sunday 1st October, 2013.

The launch was hosted by the Association of Greek Writers and Artists Australia ( EELKA ) in collaboration with the Center for Literature and Poetry " Kostis Palamas " AHEPA.

The master of ceremonies for the evening was the Secretary of the Union Litsa Diakovasili. Dsicussion of the book was hosted by the President of the Union, Popi Anastasiadis Mallianou, and excerpts read by : Kiki Betty, Bethlehem Georgelli , Dimitra Milatou and Rosa Gialopouli, Board members of EELKA. Many passages were read from the book, and all acknowledged that the style and flow of Jim's novel was exceptional.

Visitors welcomed the President of AHEPA's Kostis Palamas " Mr. George Lianos.The presentation was attended by the Consul General of Greece Dr Stavros Kyrimis, and many other distinguished members of EELKA & AHEPA.

The launch was attended by a substantial number of people, as can be testified by the photograph above.

The book is based on Jim Saltis's personal experiences, growing up as he did in a family of 7 children, in the pre-WW2 period in Alexandria, Egypt.

Authors Prefactory Remarks

Alexandria, Egypt, was the city of my birth, nurture and finally my departure in January 1949 without any hatred or wickedness.

I started writing my book Blessings, Curses and Exorcisms back in 1988, after my divorce. I bought a unit at Camspsie and attempted to reorganise my life as a bachelor. My days were grey and the nights were endless. I was craving for same sleep but it refused to intervene and bring some relief to my aching body and a break to my forever active brain. I named the Book “Mrs Stamata.” which was the name of the mother. It took many years to return to the skeletal draft and complete it.

The novel is a collection of experiences that I encountered, fictions that were creations of my cerebral fantasies the perpetually moving mind and my invisible soul.

All the persons that you will encounter in the story were real. Even the beautiful Flora (Madeline) who lived a daringly prodigal life was lucky to meet Milton and experience the immensity and tranquillity of true love. I compromised the tragedy of Alekos and Sofia’s love and gave a happy ending because of the philanthropic action of her boss Leon. Stamata died but she lives on as a ghost at the Greek section of the cemetery at Chatby awaiting the next Resurrection.

Now all of us who were born in Egypt and more particular in the cosmopolitan Alexandria we have dispersed at all corners of this hospitable planet. We travelled to new seas; we flew in skies and lands of places that we have learned in our Geography lessons. Most of us are well established in our new countries and we live carefree existences.

Yet we are grateful that we were born in Egypt.

This is Jim's second book. His first book, My Four Homes was published in both Greek and English.

Jims speech at the My Four Homes Book Launch

Download an interview with Jim Saltis on SBS Radio, Australia, here:

jim-saltis.mp3

This interview refers mainly to Jims previous book, My Four Homes, but also makes reference to Blessings, Curses and Exorcisms.

Ευχες Αναεματισμοι και Eξορκισμοι - Blessings, Curses and Exorcisms

Author: Jim Saltis

When Published: 2013

Publisher: Jim Saltis

Available: From Jim Saltis or Tina Andrew. 02 9399 9767

Email, Jim Saltis

Description: Paperback

Language: GREEK

ISBN: 9780646583938

Dewey Number: A823.4

Ευχές αναθεματισμοί και εξορκισμοί

Παρουσιάστρια: Πόπη Αναστασιάδου-Μαλλιάνου

Ο Δημήτρης Πρωτοψάλτης, γνωστός και ως Jim Saltis στο μυθιστόρημα του Ευχές αναθεματισμοί και εξορκισμοί μας πηγαίνει πίσω στο παρελθόν και μας κάνει να νοσταλγούμε και να ονειρευόμαστε. Μας περιγράφει με έντονα χρώματα μια Αίγυπτο που δεν υπάρχιε πια. Την Αίγυπτο της δεκαετίας του 1930. Βαθύς ψυχολόγος και γνώστης των ηθών της εποχής, μας αναλύει εκτενώς κοινονικά φαινόμενα. Μέσα από την ιστορία της ζωής μιας οικογένειας με επτά παιδιά μας περιγράφει ρεαλιστικά την Αίγυπτο και ιδίως την Αλέξάνδρια εκείνης της εποχής, την αγαπημένη του Αλεξάνδρια, την Αλεξάνδρια στην οποία γεννήθηκε(Βηθλεέμ Μπήκανε στο τράμ για το Μπακός...το εξαιρετικό προσωπικό του και την ακρίβεια του. ) Μια έντονη αίσθηση ιστορικότητας χαρακτηρίζει αυτό το μυθιστόρημα, όπως και το προηγoύμενο μυθιστόρημα του (Τα τέσσερα σπιτια) Στα βιβλία αυτά ο συγγραφέας αναλύει και τεκμηριώνει την πολιτική σήψη που υπάρχει στην δεκαετία του 30. Ο Πρωτοψάλτης είναι κοσμοπολίτης. Στο πίσω εξώφυλλο του βιβλίου του μας λέει; Σήμερα όλοι που γεννηθήκαμε στην μαγευτική πόλη της Αλεξάνδριας και στην Αίγυπτο ζούμε σκορπισμένοι στον φιλόξενο πλανήτη. Ταξιδέψαμε σε καινούργιες θάλασσες και πετάξαμε σε ουρανούς και πατρίδες που μάθαμε από τα βιβλία της Γεωγραφίας.

Το φάσμα των πάσης φύσεως προβληματισμών του είναι ευρύτατο. Αντλεί τα θέματα του από το παρελθόν που έχουν όμως απόλυτη σχέση με τα σημερινά δρώμενα. Εξετάζει όλες τις πτυχές της κοινωνίας με καταπληκτική οξυδέρκεια. Επίσης μας αναφέρει τις διάφορες δυσιδαιμονίες και προκαταλήψεις που υπήρχαν εκείνη την εποχή όπως π.χ. το χύσιμο του λαδιού που το θεωρούσαν μεγάλη γρουσουζιά. Κακός οιωνός όπως έλεγαν. (ΔήμητραΤο Μπουκάλι με το λάδι γλυστρησε από το χέρι της...μα τι φταίει πάλι ο άνθρωπος σκέφθηκε.)Πάνω σ’αυτές τις δυσιδαιμονίες και προκαταλήψεις βασίζεται και ο τίτλος του βιβλίου του Δημήτρη. Ευχές, αναθεματισμοί και εξορκισμοί. και μας μιλά και για τα μάγια που έκαναν για να σταματήσουν ανεπιθήμητους γάμους, η για να εκδικηθούν κάποιον που τους είχε ενοχλήσει η απλώς κάποιον που δεν συμπαθούσαν. Διάφοροι επιτήδιοι εκμετάλευονταν τις προκαταλήψεις αυτές και κέρδιζαν χρήματα από τα ανύποπτα θύματα που πίστευαν σ’αυτά που τους έλεγαν ότι δηλ, τα μάγια θα φέρουν το ποθητό απότέλεσμα. Παρ’ολό που αυτά που περιγράφει ο Πρωτοψάλτης στο βιβλίο του έχουν λάβει χώρα στος αρχές του 20 ου αιώνα το θέμα είναι πολύ επίκαιρο διότι κάθε τόσο βλέπουμε στα μέσα ενημέρωσης παρόμοιες καταστάσεις και στις μέρες μας, όπως τους δύο μάγους που συνέλαβε μερικά χρόνια πρίν, η αστυνομία στα Δυτικά προάστεια του Σύδνευ, που είχαν πελάτες-θύματα με Πανεπιστημιακή μόρφωση.(Κική Είμαι έτοιμη τώρα κυρία...Αμα το φέρεις τότε θα κάνουμε και το επόμενο βήμα.)

Αφίνοντας την φαντασία του ελεύθερη ο Πρωτοψάλτης, ζωντανεύει το παρελθόν κατά τον πιο θελκτικό τρόπο. Ο χρόνος, οι βαθειές εσωτερικές δονήσεις τα πάθη συνθέτουν ένα αρμονικό σύνολο. Με απλά λόγια με πέννα που ρέει, μας παρασέρνει να τον παρακολουθήσουμε με τον πιο αβίαστο τρόπο (Δήμητρα Θυμάμαι καλά τον πολιτικό τους γάμο...η ευτυχία μπήκε στο σπιτικό τους.)

Δεν λείπει το ρεαλιστικό στοιχείο, ενώ οι κοινονικές συνθήκες της εποχής αναλύονται με αξιοπρόσεκτη ακρίβεια. Οι διαγραφές των χαρακτήρων του είναι ακριβείς ενώ οι χώροι και οι περιγραφές των τοπίων αποδίνονται θαυμάσια (Βηθλεέμ,Ομως σκόρπιες σκέψεις χτυπούσαν την πόρτα του μυαλού της...και ο Θεός της είχε χαρίσει 7 παιδιά. .)Ρόζα.Αραπάδες.... της ερωμένης του)
Επίσης ο συγραφέας μας περιγράφει με μαθηματική ακρίβεια τον έρωτα, σαρκικό και πνευματικό σε μια εποχή δύσκολη, υποκριτική, σεμνότυφη, εποχή σεξουαλικής καταπίεσης. Οι ήρωες του, αγαπούν πολύ, στη ζωή τους. Αγαπούν δίχως σεμνοτυφίες και όρια και πολλές φορές περνούν τα σύνορα και σπάνουν τα καλούπια της ηθηκής με ολέθρια αποτελέσματα(.ΡόζαΗΦλώρα γύρισε στο σπίτι της....που αρνήθηκε την οικογένεια της.)

Βαθύς γνώστης της ανθρώπινης φύσης μας περιγράφει με έντονες μελανές πινελιέςτην καθοδική πορεία ατόμων-θυμάτων, που παραδίνονται σε ακραία πάθη και καταστρεπτικές συνήθειες επιρεάζοντας αρνητικά την ζωή τους και τις ζωές προσφυλών τους προσώπων. (Κική Είχε επιθυμήσει να περάσει....από την οικογένεια της.)

Μια άλλη πρωτοτυπία του βιβλίου είναι ότι συχνά παρεμβάλλονται διάφορα σχόλια και φιλοσοφικές παρατηρήσεις. Στος τέλος του βιβλίου υπάρχουν πολλές ωραίες φωτογραφίες κτιρίων και τοπίων εκείνης της εποχής.
Συνοψίζωντας μπορούμε να πούμε ότι το (Ευχές αναθεματισμοί και εξορκισμοί είναι ένα πρωτότυπο, αξιοπρόσεκτο έργο που αξίζει να διαβαστεί.

Συγχαρητήρια λοιπόν στον Δημήτρη Πρωτοψάλτη και του ευχόμαστε να δεί το έργο του διαδεδομένο διαχρονικά και πάντα με ανοδική πορεία.

Πόπη Αναστασιάδη-Μαλλιάνου
Πρόεδρος Ελλήνων Λογοτεχνών
Και
Καλλιτεχνών Αυστραλίας(ΕΕΛΚΑ)

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by Vikki Vrettos Fraioli on 27.06.2013

Kytherian Society of California members welcome Kiriaki Orfanos to SF, USA

KSOCA members Vikki & Tom Fraioli, and Melissa Neofes-Mischak welcome Kiriaki Orfanos from Australia, to San Francisco. While vacationing in the USA, Kiriaki made a quick stop in San Francisco to meet up with the California Kytherians. A wonderful day of filoxenia was enjoyed by all!

June 20, 2013

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by Sydney Morning Herald on 17.06.2013

Enigma's answer to the humble doughnut: Loukoumades. Photo: Brianne Makin

Sydney Morning Herald
May 25, 2013

Sarah McInerney

A Greek favourite is the clincher on a classic menu.

Greece - Castle Hill, Sydney

Enigma attracts a diverse crowd.

Ah, doughnuts, is there any cuisine you haven't infiltrated?

The Greek version, loukoumades, is a weekend-only option at Enigma in Castle Hill. The small, deep-fried balls of dough are served in a sweet honey syrup, topped with sesame seeds and cinnamon. Golden and crispy on the outside and soft inside, they're delicious. It's a generous serve - and pretty hard to stop at just one - so I'd suggest sharing these treats at the end of the meal lest you demolish the whole bowl.

Located in the bustling, restaurant-filled Piazza at Castle Hill Towers, Enigma attracts a diverse crowd on a busy Saturday night. The place is packed, with family groups sitting alongside couples of all ages and tables of friends.

The white decor gives it a fresh, modern feel. There are nautical touches, too, with ropes and metal oars used as decoration. If the name is familiar, it's because co-owner Mark Psaroudis previously ran Enigma at Brighton-le-Sands, now closed.

The menu of the new venture, which opened last August, features many classic Greek dishes, and the cultural influence translates to the drinks list too. There's ouzo, of course, plus Greek wines and a beer. The mezze plate is a popular entree option, with many tables choosing to share it, scooping up delightfully garlicky tzatziki and flavoursome taramosalata with warm, slightly crispy, wood-fired pita bread. There's also a wedge of feta and thick pieces of fried haloumi, plus kalamata olives, freshly made dolmades and fried chorizo slices that ooze meaty oil on the plate (perfect for swiping with that bread). The olives and feta are imported from Greece, as are the sardines. These are a little on the salty side but easily fixed by wrapping the fish in some pita and adding tzatziki.

The spanikopita comes in four triangles, not as a pie. The spinach, feta and black pepper filling is tasty but the ratio of filling to pastry isn't quite right. We're left wanting more filling and less pastry.

Much more successful is the slow-cooked lamb, a house specialty. A wood-fired oven sits between the kitchen and the bar, its metal doors providing a homely, old-style touch to the room. The meat is cooked in here for three hours and when it hits the table, flakes apart with a press of a fork. Another bowl of that lovely tzatziki helps spruce up the vegetables - carrots, cauliflower, zucchini and roasted potato.

There are a few hits and misses on the food front. The Greek salad, for instance, is freshness on a plate but the dressing is barely discernible. And while the attentive and welcoming staff keep things moving all night, they lack knowledge about some of the dishes they bring to the table (though they do follow up with the chef), which is surprising given the prices. The pop classic soundtrack - for example, Boyz II Men - is also a little incongruous with the surrounds.

But this popular restaurant has a smart-looking fit-out, buzzing atmosphere and crowd-pleasing dishes. If you're a doughnut fan, visit on a Friday or Saturday night.

Menu Classic Greek cuisine.

Value A bit pricey. Starters $4-$18, entrees $14-$35, mains $28-$45, salads $14-$15, dessert $10-$18.

Recommended dishes Mezze plate, wood-fired slow roasted lamb, loukoumades.

ENIGMA AT THE PIAZZA

Shop 21, The Piazza, Castle Towers Shopping Centre, 6 Castle Street, Castle Hill,

8850 3330

Open seven days, lunch, 11.30am-3pm, dinner, 5.30pm-late

Licensed

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by Sydney Morning Herald on 17.06.2013

Buzzing: Enigma attracts a diverse crowd.

Sydney Morning Herald
May 25, 2013

Sarah McInerney

A Greek favourite is the clincher on a classic menu.

Another fine mezze

Greece - Castle Hill, Sydney

Ah, doughnuts, is there any cuisine you haven't infiltrated?

The Greek version, loukoumades, is a weekend-only option at Enigma in Castle Hill. The small, deep-fried balls of dough are served in a sweet honey syrup, topped with sesame seeds and cinnamon. Golden and crispy on the outside and soft inside, they're delicious. It's a generous serve - and pretty hard to stop at just one - so I'd suggest sharing these treats at the end of the meal lest you demolish the whole bowl.

Located in the bustling, restaurant-filled Piazza at Castle Hill Towers, Enigma attracts a diverse crowd on a busy Saturday night. The place is packed, with family groups sitting alongside couples of all ages and tables of friends.

Enigma's answer to the humble doughnut: Loukoumades

The white decor gives it a fresh, modern feel. There are nautical touches, too, with ropes and metal oars used as decoration. If the name is familiar, it's because co-owner Mark Psaroudis previously ran Enigma at Brighton-le-Sands, now closed.

The menu of the new venture, which opened last August, features many classic Greek dishes, and the cultural influence translates to the drinks list too. There's ouzo, of course, plus Greek wines and a beer. The mezze plate is a popular entree option, with many tables choosing to share it, scooping up delightfully garlicky tzatziki and flavoursome taramosalata with warm, slightly crispy, wood-fired pita bread. There's also a wedge of feta and thick pieces of fried haloumi, plus kalamata olives, freshly made dolmades and fried chorizo slices that ooze meaty oil on the plate (perfect for swiping with that bread). The olives and feta are imported from Greece, as are the sardines. These are a little on the salty side but easily fixed by wrapping the fish in some pita and adding tzatziki.

The spanikopita comes in four triangles, not as a pie. The spinach, feta and black pepper filling is tasty but the ratio of filling to pastry isn't quite right. We're left wanting more filling and less pastry.

Much more successful is the slow-cooked lamb, a house specialty. A wood-fired oven sits between the kitchen and the bar, its metal doors providing a homely, old-style touch to the room. The meat is cooked in here for three hours and when it hits the table, flakes apart with a press of a fork. Another bowl of that lovely tzatziki helps spruce up the vegetables - carrots, cauliflower, zucchini and roasted potato.

There are a few hits and misses on the food front. The Greek salad, for instance, is freshness on a plate but the dressing is barely discernible. And while the attentive and welcoming staff keep things moving all night, they lack knowledge about some of the dishes they bring to the table (though they do follow up with the chef), which is surprising given the prices. The pop classic soundtrack - for example, Boyz II Men - is also a little incongruous with the surrounds.

But this popular restaurant has a smart-looking fit-out, buzzing atmosphere and crowd-pleasing dishes. If you're a doughnut fan, visit on a Friday or Saturday night.

Menu Classic Greek cuisine.

Value A bit pricey. Starters $4-$18, entrees $14-$35, mains $28-$45, salads $14-$15, dessert $10-$18.

Recommended dishes Mezze plate, wood-fired slow roasted lamb, loukoumades.

ENIGMA AT THE PIAZZA

Shop 21, The Piazza, Castle Towers Shopping Centre, 6 Castle Street, Castle Hill,

8850 3330

Open seven days, lunch, 11.30am-3pm, dinner, 5.30pm-late

Licensed

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by Kytherian Newsletter Sydney on 10.05.2013

Sophia Poulos, ...........................& Ms Jill Faddy, OAM

...(left to right).....at the Karavas Water Project Presentation.

The Presentation was made by:

Timothy E. Gregory (Ohio State University)
Lita Tzortzopoulou-Gregory (Ohio State University)


The presentation was held at the University of Sydney at 7.15pm, Wednesday, March 20th 2013

At the Centre of Classical and Near Eastern Studies Board Room, in the Madsen Building  Level 4,
Room 480 (one storey up and directly behind the building’s main foyer on the Eastern Avenue pedestrian mall).

What follows is George Vardas's Report of the event.

Download a .pdf of George's Report, here:

KARAVAS WATER PROJECT ARTICLE TOTAL.pdf

Download Tim and Lita's summary of their presentation, here:

Download a .pdf version of this article here:

Gregory_karavas_water_kythera_summer_2013.pdf

"Traditional mills belong to the cultural memory of people because they are associated to a still recent past and appeal to the countryside roots of people". (1)

KARAVAS WATER PROJECT EXPLAINED

The watermills of Kythera are traditionally associated with the village of Milopotamos (literally, the village of the watermills). However, to the north of the island, the verdant terraced landscape of Karavas is also rich in water, deep green gorges, free-running springs, walking trails and abandoned stone-built watermills which the Karavas Water Project seeks to explore.

On 20 March 2013 the leaders of this project, Professor Timothy Gregory and his colleague and wife, Lita Tzortzopoulou-Gregory, of Ohio State University gave an enthralling presentation to an audience of more than fifty (including a number of Karavites) at the Centre of Classical and Near Eastern Studies Board Room at Sydney University.
Lita started off by setting the scene for what it would have been like to live in the village of Karavas when the water mills were operating and how the social life often gravitated around those mills and the famous water springs, for which the village was renown, and vividly recalled the abundance of popular folk legends and stories associated with them.
Professor Gregory then proceeded to explain how the Karavas Water Project, by taking an environmental, topographic, archaeological and historical approach, seeks to examine the historical use of water resources in the northern part of Kythera throughout antiquity and up to the modern day.

According to the local historian and writer, Ioannis Cassimatis, the first watermills appeared in Kythera in the late eighteenth century. It is thought they were introduced from Crete where mills were built during the Ottoman and Venetian occupations. Traditionally, the mills, which were either single or two storey buildings, were built in the prevailing architectural style of the village.

Professor Gregory observed that Karavas stands out because of its plentiful springs and deep green gorges that resemble a sub-tropical rainforest in marked contrast to the barren, parched landscape of other parts of Greece. Indeed, the defining marker of Karavas is its watershed that runs in a generally southwest-northeast direction from the heights near Gerakari to the sea at Plateia Ammos.

From 2011 Timothy and his team took to the island small groups of university students as volunteers to help clear overgrown vegetation from the springs and watermills and undertake research on the various water installations, including the channels, cisterns and mills, and their use. They also spoke to local residents and former residents about their memories of the mills and have begun recording those oral histories. The cleared walking trails have also helped enhance Karavas’ reputation as an eco-tourism destination.

By means of a powerpoint presentation, including photographs and drawings of what some of the areas in Karavas now look like, once they have been cleaned of the dense vegetation, Timothy took the audience on a virtual tour of some of the ten watermills in the gorges of Karavas, including the impressive Magganou mill and cistern, and the mills of Paliomylos, Kourvoulis, Portokalia and Keramari and their sophisticated water channels and storage areas. He also mentioned Loutro which may date back to the 18th and 19th centuries (according to travellers’ accounts) and the possibility of its being used for bathing in Roman times.

As the molinologist Stelios Mouzakis has observed:

“The watermills of Kythera … are constructions on a small scale of the anonymous traditional architecture of Kythera. They are impressive in their special characteristics, the harmony of their volumes, their simplicity, their picturesque appearance, the modesty of their local building materials, the solutions they manifest to various constructional difficulties, but mainly by their unpretentious, effortless incorporation into their surroundings.”(2)

Professor Gregory also discussed how the systems of irrigation were used for the perivolia and the communal arrangements made between farmers and mill operators to exploit and share the water. Tim even alluded to a reference to the watermills in Spiro Stathis’ remarkable Kytherian Review published in 1923. In his survey of industry on Kythera in the year 1923, Stathis reported on the number of operating watermills on the island. Apart from Mylopotamos, we learn that there were five functioning watermills in Karavas operated by Panagiotis Coroneos, Haris Vanges, T. Tzortzopoulos, P. Tzortzopoulos and Ioannis Venardos.

Sadly, according to Cassimatis, the last watermill on Kythera ceased to operate in the late 1940s as the advent of power on the island meant that the mills were no longer economical to operate.

Finally, it is noteworthy that Timothy and Lita Gregory have established the impressive Amir Ali research centre, incorporating a library and dormitory, in Karavas to promote further research and greater understanding of the Karavas watershed and the historic, archaeological and cultural traditions and structures associated with water use on the island.

A big thank you goes to Timothy and Lita for their passionate and ongoing interest in Kytherian archaeology, as well as to Wayne Mullen, Executive Director of the Australian Archaeological Institute at Athens, for offering the venue at Sydney University for the lecture.

After the presentation, members of the audience were treated to coffee and biscuits put on by the Kytherian Association together with some exquisite chocolate offerings from Fardoulis Chocolates. It was enough to make anyone thirsty.

(1) J. C. Viegas & J. A. Miranda, “Rehabilitation of traditional mills” in C.A. Brebbia (ed.) Structural Studies, Repairs and Maintenance of Heritage Architecture VIII (2003) p.657

(2) S. Mouzakis, “Watermills of the Greek Islands of Kythera and Antikythera” International Molinology (2004, Vol. 69, no. 2) p. 4

George Vardas

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by Kytherian Newsletter Sydney on 10.05.2013

Maria Londy, Nina Conomos & Kathy Samios

...(left to right).....at the Karavas Water Project Presentation.

The Presentation was made by:

Timothy E. Gregory (Ohio State University)
Lita Tzortzopoulou-Gregory (Ohio State University)


The presentation was held at the University of Sydney at 7.15pm, Wednesday, March 20th 2013

At the Centre of Classical and Near Eastern Studies Board Room, in the Madsen Building  Level 4,
Room 480 (one storey up and directly behind the building’s main foyer on the Eastern Avenue pedestrian mall).

What follows is George Vardas's Report of the event.

Download a .pdf of George's Report, here:

KARAVAS WATER PROJECT ARTICLE TOTAL.pdf

Download Tim and Lita's summary of their presentation, here:

Download a .pdf version of this article here:

Gregory_karavas_water_kythera_summer_2013.pdf

"Traditional mills belong to the cultural memory of people because they are associated to a still recent past and appeal to the countryside roots of people". (1)

KARAVAS WATER PROJECT EXPLAINED

The watermills of Kythera are traditionally associated with the village of Milopotamos (literally, the village of the watermills). However, to the north of the island, the verdant terraced landscape of Karavas is also rich in water, deep green gorges, free-running springs, walking trails and abandoned stone-built watermills which the Karavas Water Project seeks to explore.

On 20 March 2013 the leaders of this project, Professor Timothy Gregory and his colleague and wife, Lita Tzortzopoulou-Gregory, of Ohio State University gave an enthralling presentation to an audience of more than fifty (including a number of Karavites) at the Centre of Classical and Near Eastern Studies Board Room at Sydney University.
Lita started off by setting the scene for what it would have been like to live in the village of Karavas when the water mills were operating and how the social life often gravitated around those mills and the famous water springs, for which the village was renown, and vividly recalled the abundance of popular folk legends and stories associated with them.
Professor Gregory then proceeded to explain how the Karavas Water Project, by taking an environmental, topographic, archaeological and historical approach, seeks to examine the historical use of water resources in the northern part of Kythera throughout antiquity and up to the modern day.

According to the local historian and writer, Ioannis Cassimatis, the first watermills appeared in Kythera in the late eighteenth century. It is thought they were introduced from Crete where mills were built during the Ottoman and Venetian occupations. Traditionally, the mills, which were either single or two storey buildings, were built in the prevailing architectural style of the village.

Professor Gregory observed that Karavas stands out because of its plentiful springs and deep green gorges that resemble a sub-tropical rainforest in marked contrast to the barren, parched landscape of other parts of Greece. Indeed, the defining marker of Karavas is its watershed that runs in a generally southwest-northeast direction from the heights near Gerakari to the sea at Plateia Ammos.

From 2011 Timothy and his team took to the island small groups of university students as volunteers to help clear overgrown vegetation from the springs and watermills and undertake research on the various water installations, including the channels, cisterns and mills, and their use. They also spoke to local residents and former residents about their memories of the mills and have begun recording those oral histories. The cleared walking trails have also helped enhance Karavas’ reputation as an eco-tourism destination.

By means of a powerpoint presentation, including photographs and drawings of what some of the areas in Karavas now look like, once they have been cleaned of the dense vegetation, Timothy took the audience on a virtual tour of some of the ten watermills in the gorges of Karavas, including the impressive Magganou mill and cistern, and the mills of Paliomylos, Kourvoulis, Portokalia and Keramari and their sophisticated water channels and storage areas. He also mentioned Loutro which may date back to the 18th and 19th centuries (according to travellers’ accounts) and the possibility of its being used for bathing in Roman times.

As the molinologist Stelios Mouzakis has observed:

“The watermills of Kythera … are constructions on a small scale of the anonymous traditional architecture of Kythera. They are impressive in their special characteristics, the harmony of their volumes, their simplicity, their picturesque appearance, the modesty of their local building materials, the solutions they manifest to various constructional difficulties, but mainly by their unpretentious, effortless incorporation into their surroundings.”(2)

Professor Gregory also discussed how the systems of irrigation were used for the perivolia and the communal arrangements made between farmers and mill operators to exploit and share the water. Tim even alluded to a reference to the watermills in Spiro Stathis’ remarkable Kytherian Review published in 1923. In his survey of industry on Kythera in the year 1923, Stathis reported on the number of operating watermills on the island. Apart from Mylopotamos, we learn that there were five functioning watermills in Karavas operated by Panagiotis Coroneos, Haris Vanges, T. Tzortzopoulos, P. Tzortzopoulos and Ioannis Venardos.

Sadly, according to Cassimatis, the last watermill on Kythera ceased to operate in the late 1940s as the advent of power on the island meant that the mills were no longer economical to operate.

Finally, it is noteworthy that Timothy and Lita Gregory have established the impressive Amir Ali research centre, incorporating a library and dormitory, in Karavas to promote further research and greater understanding of the Karavas watershed and the historic, archaeological and cultural traditions and structures associated with water use on the island.

A big thank you goes to Timothy and Lita for their passionate and ongoing interest in Kytherian archaeology, as well as to Wayne Mullen, Executive Director of the Australian Archaeological Institute at Athens, for offering the venue at Sydney University for the lecture.

After the presentation, members of the audience were treated to coffee and biscuits put on by the Kytherian Association together with some exquisite chocolate offerings from Fardoulis Chocolates. It was enough to make anyone thirsty.

(1) J. C. Viegas & J. A. Miranda, “Rehabilitation of traditional mills” in C.A. Brebbia (ed.) Structural Studies, Repairs and Maintenance of Heritage Architecture VIII (2003) p.657

(2) S. Mouzakis, “Watermills of the Greek Islands of Kythera and Antikythera” International Molinology (2004, Vol. 69, no. 2) p. 4

George Vardas

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by Kytherian Newsletter Sydney on 11.05.2013

Lily Castrissios, Andrew "Psomas" Coroneo, & ....................

...at the Karavas Water Project Presentation. (Left to right).

The Presentation was made by:

Timothy E. Gregory (Ohio State University)
Lita Tzortzopoulou-Gregory (Ohio State University)


The presentation was held at the University of Sydney at 7.15pm, Wednesday, March 20th 2013

At the Centre of Classical and Near Eastern Studies Board Room, in the Madsen Building  Level 4,
Room 480 (one storey up and directly behind the building’s main foyer on the Eastern Avenue pedestrian mall).

What follows is George Vardas's Report of the event.

Download a .pdf of George's Report, here:

KARAVAS WATER PROJECT ARTICLE TOTAL.pdf

Download Tim and Lita's summary of their presentation, here:

Download a .pdf version of this article here:

Gregory_karavas_water_kythera_summer_2013.pdf

"Traditional mills belong to the cultural memory of people because they are associated to a still recent past and appeal to the countryside roots of people". (1)

KARAVAS WATER PROJECT EXPLAINED

The watermills of Kythera are traditionally associated with the village of Milopotamos (literally, the village of the watermills). However, to the north of the island, the verdant terraced landscape of Karavas is also rich in water, deep green gorges, free-running springs, walking trails and abandoned stone-built watermills which the Karavas Water Project seeks to explore.

On 20 March 2013 the leaders of this project, Professor Timothy Gregory and his colleague and wife, Lita Tzortzopoulou-Gregory, of Ohio State University gave an enthralling presentation to an audience of more than fifty (including a number of Karavites) at the Centre of Classical and Near Eastern Studies Board Room at Sydney University.
Lita started off by setting the scene for what it would have been like to live in the village of Karavas when the water mills were operating and how the social life often gravitated around those mills and the famous water springs, for which the village was renown, and vividly recalled the abundance of popular folk legends and stories associated with them.
Professor Gregory then proceeded to explain how the Karavas Water Project, by taking an environmental, topographic, archaeological and historical approach, seeks to examine the historical use of water resources in the northern part of Kythera throughout antiquity and up to the modern day.

According to the local historian and writer, Ioannis Cassimatis, the first watermills appeared in Kythera in the late eighteenth century. It is thought they were introduced from Crete where mills were built during the Ottoman and Venetian occupations. Traditionally, the mills, which were either single or two storey buildings, were built in the prevailing architectural style of the village.

Professor Gregory observed that Karavas stands out because of its plentiful springs and deep green gorges that resemble a sub-tropical rainforest in marked contrast to the barren, parched landscape of other parts of Greece. Indeed, the defining marker of Karavas is its watershed that runs in a generally southwest-northeast direction from the heights near Gerakari to the sea at Plateia Ammos.

From 2011 Timothy and his team took to the island small groups of university students as volunteers to help clear overgrown vegetation from the springs and watermills and undertake research on the various water installations, including the channels, cisterns and mills, and their use. They also spoke to local residents and former residents about their memories of the mills and have begun recording those oral histories. The cleared walking trails have also helped enhance Karavas’ reputation as an eco-tourism destination.

By means of a powerpoint presentation, including photographs and drawings of what some of the areas in Karavas now look like, once they have been cleaned of the dense vegetation, Timothy took the audience on a virtual tour of some of the ten watermills in the gorges of Karavas, including the impressive Magganou mill and cistern, and the mills of Paliomylos, Kourvoulis, Portokalia and Keramari and their sophisticated water channels and storage areas. He also mentioned Loutro which may date back to the 18th and 19th centuries (according to travellers’ accounts) and the possibility of its being used for bathing in Roman times.

As the molinologist Stelios Mouzakis has observed:

“The watermills of Kythera … are constructions on a small scale of the anonymous traditional architecture of Kythera. They are impressive in their special characteristics, the harmony of their volumes, their simplicity, their picturesque appearance, the modesty of their local building materials, the solutions they manifest to various constructional difficulties, but mainly by their unpretentious, effortless incorporation into their surroundings.”(2)

Professor Gregory also discussed how the systems of irrigation were used for the perivolia and the communal arrangements made between farmers and mill operators to exploit and share the water. Tim even alluded to a reference to the watermills in Spiro Stathis’ remarkable Kytherian Review published in 1923. In his survey of industry on Kythera in the year 1923, Stathis reported on the number of operating watermills on the island. Apart from Mylopotamos, we learn that there were five functioning watermills in Karavas operated by Panagiotis Coroneos, Haris Vanges, T. Tzortzopoulos, P. Tzortzopoulos and Ioannis Venardos.

Sadly, according to Cassimatis, the last watermill on Kythera ceased to operate in the late 1940s as the advent of power on the island meant that the mills were no longer economical to operate.

Finally, it is noteworthy that Timothy and Lita Gregory have established the impressive Amir Ali research centre, incorporating a library and dormitory, in Karavas to promote further research and greater understanding of the Karavas watershed and the historic, archaeological and cultural traditions and structures associated with water use on the island.

A big thank you goes to Timothy and Lita for their passionate and ongoing interest in Kytherian archaeology, as well as to Wayne Mullen, Executive Director of the Australian Archaeological Institute at Athens, for offering the venue at Sydney University for the lecture.

After the presentation, members of the audience were treated to coffee and biscuits put on by the Kytherian Association together with some exquisite chocolate offerings from Fardoulis Chocolates. It was enough to make anyone thirsty.

(1) J. C. Viegas & J. A. Miranda, “Rehabilitation of traditional mills” in C.A. Brebbia (ed.) Structural Studies, Repairs and Maintenance of Heritage Architecture VIII (2003) p.657

(2) S. Mouzakis, “Watermills of the Greek Islands of Kythera and Antikythera” International Molinology (2004, Vol. 69, no. 2) p. 4

George Vardas

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by Kytherian Newsletter Sydney on 10.05.2013

Part of the large crowd that attended Karavas Water Project Presentation

The Presentation was made by:

Timothy E. Gregory (Ohio State University)
Lita Tzortzopoulou-Gregory (Ohio State University)


The presentation was held at the University of Sydney at 7.15pm, Wednesday, March 20th 2013

At the Centre of Classical and Near Eastern Studies Board Room, in the Madsen Building  Level 4,
Room 480 (one storey up and directly behind the building’s main foyer on the Eastern Avenue pedestrian mall).

What follows is George Vardas's Report of the event.

Download a .pdf of George's Report, here:

KARAVAS WATER PROJECT ARTICLE TOTAL.pdf

Download Tim and Lita's summary of their presentation, here:

Download a .pdf version of this article here:

Gregory_karavas_water_kythera_summer_2013.pdf

"Traditional mills belong to the cultural memory of people because they are associated to a still recent past and appeal to the countryside roots of people". (1)

KARAVAS WATER PROJECT EXPLAINED

The watermills of Kythera are traditionally associated with the village of Milopotamos (literally, the village of the watermills). However, to the north of the island, the verdant terraced landscape of Karavas is also rich in water, deep green gorges, free-running springs, walking trails and abandoned stone-built watermills which the Karavas Water Project seeks to explore.

On 20 March 2013 the leaders of this project, Professor Timothy Gregory and his colleague and wife, Lita Tzortzopoulou-Gregory, of Ohio State University gave an enthralling presentation to an audience of more than fifty (including a number of Karavites) at the Centre of Classical and Near Eastern Studies Board Room at Sydney University.
Lita started off by setting the scene for what it would have been like to live in the village of Karavas when the water mills were operating and how the social life often gravitated around those mills and the famous water springs, for which the village was renown, and vividly recalled the abundance of popular folk legends and stories associated with them.
Professor Gregory then proceeded to explain how the Karavas Water Project, by taking an environmental, topographic, archaeological and historical approach, seeks to examine the historical use of water resources in the northern part of Kythera throughout antiquity and up to the modern day.

According to the local historian and writer, Ioannis Cassimatis, the first watermills appeared in Kythera in the late eighteenth century. It is thought they were introduced from Crete where mills were built during the Ottoman and Venetian occupations. Traditionally, the mills, which were either single or two storey buildings, were built in the prevailing architectural style of the village.

Professor Gregory observed that Karavas stands out because of its plentiful springs and deep green gorges that resemble a sub-tropical rainforest in marked contrast to the barren, parched landscape of other parts of Greece. Indeed, the defining marker of Karavas is its watershed that runs in a generally southwest-northeast direction from the heights near Gerakari to the sea at Plateia Ammos.

From 2011 Timothy and his team took to the island small groups of university students as volunteers to help clear overgrown vegetation from the springs and watermills and undertake research on the various water installations, including the channels, cisterns and mills, and their use. They also spoke to local residents and former residents about their memories of the mills and have begun recording those oral histories. The cleared walking trails have also helped enhance Karavas’ reputation as an eco-tourism destination.

By means of a powerpoint presentation, including photographs and drawings of what some of the areas in Karavas now look like, once they have been cleaned of the dense vegetation, Timothy took the audience on a virtual tour of some of the ten watermills in the gorges of Karavas, including the impressive Magganou mill and cistern, and the mills of Paliomylos, Kourvoulis, Portokalia and Keramari and their sophisticated water channels and storage areas. He also mentioned Loutro which may date back to the 18th and 19th centuries (according to travellers’ accounts) and the possibility of its being used for bathing in Roman times.

As the molinologist Stelios Mouzakis has observed:

“The watermills of Kythera … are constructions on a small scale of the anonymous traditional architecture of Kythera. They are impressive in their special characteristics, the harmony of their volumes, their simplicity, their picturesque appearance, the modesty of their local building materials, the solutions they manifest to various constructional difficulties, but mainly by their unpretentious, effortless incorporation into their surroundings.”(2)

Professor Gregory also discussed how the systems of irrigation were used for the perivolia and the communal arrangements made between farmers and mill operators to exploit and share the water. Tim even alluded to a reference to the watermills in Spiro Stathis’ remarkable Kytherian Review published in 1923. In his survey of industry on Kythera in the year 1923, Stathis reported on the number of operating watermills on the island. Apart from Mylopotamos, we learn that there were five functioning watermills in Karavas operated by Panagiotis Coroneos, Haris Vanges, T. Tzortzopoulos, P. Tzortzopoulos and Ioannis Venardos.

Sadly, according to Cassimatis, the last watermill on Kythera ceased to operate in the late 1940s as the advent of power on the island meant that the mills were no longer economical to operate.

Finally, it is noteworthy that Timothy and Lita Gregory have established the impressive Amir Ali research centre, incorporating a library and dormitory, in Karavas to promote further research and greater understanding of the Karavas watershed and the historic, archaeological and cultural traditions and structures associated with water use on the island.

A big thank you goes to Timothy and Lita for their passionate and ongoing interest in Kytherian archaeology, as well as to Wayne Mullen, Executive Director of the Australian Archaeological Institute at Athens, for offering the venue at Sydney University for the lecture.

After the presentation, members of the audience were treated to coffee and biscuits put on by the Kytherian Association together with some exquisite chocolate offerings from Fardoulis Chocolates. It was enough to make anyone thirsty.

(1) J. C. Viegas & J. A. Miranda, “Rehabilitation of traditional mills” in C.A. Brebbia (ed.) Structural Studies, Repairs and Maintenance of Heritage Architecture VIII (2003) p.657

(2) S. Mouzakis, “Watermills of the Greek Islands of Kythera and Antikythera” International Molinology (2004, Vol. 69, no. 2) p. 4

George Vardas

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by Kytherian Newsletter Sydney on 10.05.2013

Photograph of the Kouvoulis Water Mill in Karavas

Kouvoulis is a "parachoukli" of one of the the Tzortzopoulos clans.

Shown at the Karavas Water Prtoject presentation.

The Presentation was made by:

Timothy E. Gregory (Ohio State University)
Lita Tzortzopoulou-Gregory (Ohio State University)


The presentation was held at the University of Sydney at 7.15pm, Wednesday, March 20th 2013

At the Centre of Classical and Near Eastern Studies Board Room, in the Madsen Building  Level 4,
Room 480 (one storey up and directly behind the building’s main foyer on the Eastern Avenue pedestrian mall).

What follows is George Vardas's Report of the event.

Download a .pdf of George's Report, here:

KARAVAS WATER PROJECT ARTICLE TOTAL.pdf

Download Tim and Lita's summary of their presentation, here:

Download a .pdf version of this article here:

Gregory_karavas_water_kythera_summer_2013.pdf

"Traditional mills belong to the cultural memory of people because they are associated to a still recent past and appeal to the countryside roots of people". (1)

KARAVAS WATER PROJECT EXPLAINED

The watermills of Kythera are traditionally associated with the village of Milopotamos (literally, the village of the watermills). However, to the north of the island, the verdant terraced landscape of Karavas is also rich in water, deep green gorges, free-running springs, walking trails and abandoned stone-built watermills which the Karavas Water Project seeks to explore.

On 20 March 2013 the leaders of this project, Professor Timothy Gregory and his colleague and wife, Lita Tzortzopoulou-Gregory, of Ohio State University gave an enthralling presentation to an audience of more than fifty (including a number of Karavites) at the Centre of Classical and Near Eastern Studies Board Room at Sydney University.
Lita started off by setting the scene for what it would have been like to live in the village of Karavas when the water mills were operating and how the social life often gravitated around those mills and the famous water springs, for which the village was renown, and vividly recalled the abundance of popular folk legends and stories associated with them.
Professor Gregory then proceeded to explain how the Karavas Water Project, by taking an environmental, topographic, archaeological and historical approach, seeks to examine the historical use of water resources in the northern part of Kythera throughout antiquity and up to the modern day.

According to the local historian and writer, Ioannis Cassimatis, the first watermills appeared in Kythera in the late eighteenth century. It is thought they were introduced from Crete where mills were built during the Ottoman and Venetian occupations. Traditionally, the mills, which were either single or two storey buildings, were built in the prevailing architectural style of the village.

Professor Gregory observed that Karavas stands out because of its plentiful springs and deep green gorges that resemble a sub-tropical rainforest in marked contrast to the barren, parched landscape of other parts of Greece. Indeed, the defining marker of Karavas is its watershed that runs in a generally southwest-northeast direction from the heights near Gerakari to the sea at Plateia Ammos.

From 2011 Timothy and his team took to the island small groups of university students as volunteers to help clear overgrown vegetation from the springs and watermills and undertake research on the various water installations, including the channels, cisterns and mills, and their use. They also spoke to local residents and former residents about their memories of the mills and have begun recording those oral histories. The cleared walking trails have also helped enhance Karavas’ reputation as an eco-tourism destination.

By means of a powerpoint presentation, including photographs and drawings of what some of the areas in Karavas now look like, once they have been cleaned of the dense vegetation, Timothy took the audience on a virtual tour of some of the ten watermills in the gorges of Karavas, including the impressive Magganou mill and cistern, and the mills of Paliomylos, Kourvoulis, Portokalia and Keramari and their sophisticated water channels and storage areas. He also mentioned Loutro which may date back to the 18th and 19th centuries (according to travellers’ accounts) and the possibility of its being used for bathing in Roman times.

As the molinologist Stelios Mouzakis has observed:

“The watermills of Kythera … are constructions on a small scale of the anonymous traditional architecture of Kythera. They are impressive in their special characteristics, the harmony of their volumes, their simplicity, their picturesque appearance, the modesty of their local building materials, the solutions they manifest to various constructional difficulties, but mainly by their unpretentious, effortless incorporation into their surroundings.”(2)

Professor Gregory also discussed how the systems of irrigation were used for the perivolia and the communal arrangements made between farmers and mill operators to exploit and share the water. Tim even alluded to a reference to the watermills in Spiro Stathis’ remarkable Kytherian Review published in 1923. In his survey of industry on Kythera in the year 1923, Stathis reported on the number of operating watermills on the island. Apart from Mylopotamos, we learn that there were five functioning watermills in Karavas operated by Panagiotis Coroneos, Haris Vanges, T. Tzortzopoulos, P. Tzortzopoulos and Ioannis Venardos.

Sadly, according to Cassimatis, the last watermill on Kythera ceased to operate in the late 1940s as the advent of power on the island meant that the mills were no longer economical to operate.

Finally, it is noteworthy that Timothy and Lita Gregory have established the impressive Amir Ali research centre, incorporating a library and dormitory, in Karavas to promote further research and greater understanding of the Karavas watershed and the historic, archaeological and cultural traditions and structures associated with water use on the island.

A big thank you goes to Timothy and Lita for their passionate and ongoing interest in Kytherian archaeology, as well as to Wayne Mullen, Executive Director of the Australian Archaeological Institute at Athens, for offering the venue at Sydney University for the lecture.

After the presentation, members of the audience were treated to coffee and biscuits put on by the Kytherian Association together with some exquisite chocolate offerings from Fardoulis Chocolates. It was enough to make anyone thirsty.

(1) J. C. Viegas & J. A. Miranda, “Rehabilitation of traditional mills” in C.A. Brebbia (ed.) Structural Studies, Repairs and Maintenance of Heritage Architecture VIII (2003) p.657

(2) S. Mouzakis, “Watermills of the Greek Islands of Kythera and Antikythera” International Molinology (2004, Vol. 69, no. 2) p. 4

George Vardas

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by Kytherian Newsletter Sydney on 10.05.2013

A section of the engrossed audience

at the Karavas Water Project Presentatio,

The Presentation was made by:

Timothy E. Gregory (Ohio State University)
Lita Tzortzopoulou-Gregory (Ohio State University)


The presentation was held at the University of Sydney at 7.15pm, Wednesday, March 20th 2013

At the Centre of Classical and Near Eastern Studies Board Room, in the Madsen Building  Level 4,
Room 480 (one storey up and directly behind the building’s main foyer on the Eastern Avenue pedestrian mall).

What follows is George Vardas's Report of the event.

Download a .pdf of George's Report, here:

KARAVAS WATER PROJECT ARTICLE TOTAL.pdf

Download Tim and Lita's summary of their presentation, here:

Download a .pdf version of this article here:

Gregory_karavas_water_kythera_summer_2013.pdf

"Traditional mills belong to the cultural memory of people because they are associated to a still recent past and appeal to the countryside roots of people". (1)

KARAVAS WATER PROJECT EXPLAINED

The watermills of Kythera are traditionally associated with the village of Milopotamos (literally, the village of the watermills). However, to the north of the island, the verdant terraced landscape of Karavas is also rich in water, deep green gorges, free-running springs, walking trails and abandoned stone-built watermills which the Karavas Water Project seeks to explore.

On 20 March 2013 the leaders of this project, Professor Timothy Gregory and his colleague and wife, Lita Tzortzopoulou-Gregory, of Ohio State University gave an enthralling presentation to an audience of more than fifty (including a number of Karavites) at the Centre of Classical and Near Eastern Studies Board Room at Sydney University.
Lita started off by setting the scene for what it would have been like to live in the village of Karavas when the water mills were operating and how the social life often gravitated around those mills and the famous water springs, for which the village was renown, and vividly recalled the abundance of popular folk legends and stories associated with them.
Professor Gregory then proceeded to explain how the Karavas Water Project, by taking an environmental, topographic, archaeological and historical approach, seeks to examine the historical use of water resources in the northern part of Kythera throughout antiquity and up to the modern day.

According to the local historian and writer, Ioannis Cassimatis, the first watermills appeared in Kythera in the late eighteenth century. It is thought they were introduced from Crete where mills were built during the Ottoman and Venetian occupations. Traditionally, the mills, which were either single or two storey buildings, were built in the prevailing architectural style of the village.

Professor Gregory observed that Karavas stands out because of its plentiful springs and deep green gorges that resemble a sub-tropical rainforest in marked contrast to the barren, parched landscape of other parts of Greece. Indeed, the defining marker of Karavas is its watershed that runs in a generally southwest-northeast direction from the heights near Gerakari to the sea at Plateia Ammos.

From 2011 Timothy and his team took to the island small groups of university students as volunteers to help clear overgrown vegetation from the springs and watermills and undertake research on the various water installations, including the channels, cisterns and mills, and their use. They also spoke to local residents and former residents about their memories of the mills and have begun recording those oral histories. The cleared walking trails have also helped enhance Karavas’ reputation as an eco-tourism destination.

By means of a powerpoint presentation, including photographs and drawings of what some of the areas in Karavas now look like, once they have been cleaned of the dense vegetation, Timothy took the audience on a virtual tour of some of the ten watermills in the gorges of Karavas, including the impressive Magganou mill and cistern, and the mills of Paliomylos, Kourvoulis, Portokalia and Keramari and their sophisticated water channels and storage areas. He also mentioned Loutro which may date back to the 18th and 19th centuries (according to travellers’ accounts) and the possibility of its being used for bathing in Roman times.

As the molinologist Stelios Mouzakis has observed:

“The watermills of Kythera … are constructions on a small scale of the anonymous traditional architecture of Kythera. They are impressive in their special characteristics, the harmony of their volumes, their simplicity, their picturesque appearance, the modesty of their local building materials, the solutions they manifest to various constructional difficulties, but mainly by their unpretentious, effortless incorporation into their surroundings.”(2)

Professor Gregory also discussed how the systems of irrigation were used for the perivolia and the communal arrangements made between farmers and mill operators to exploit and share the water. Tim even alluded to a reference to the watermills in Spiro Stathis’ remarkable Kytherian Review published in 1923. In his survey of industry on Kythera in the year 1923, Stathis reported on the number of operating watermills on the island. Apart from Mylopotamos, we learn that there were five functioning watermills in Karavas operated by Panagiotis Coroneos, Haris Vanges, T. Tzortzopoulos, P. Tzortzopoulos and Ioannis Venardos.

Sadly, according to Cassimatis, the last watermill on Kythera ceased to operate in the late 1940s as the advent of power on the island meant that the mills were no longer economical to operate.

Finally, it is noteworthy that Timothy and Lita Gregory have established the impressive Amir Ali research centre, incorporating a library and dormitory, in Karavas to promote further research and greater understanding of the Karavas watershed and the historic, archaeological and cultural traditions and structures associated with water use on the island.

A big thank you goes to Timothy and Lita for their passionate and ongoing interest in Kytherian archaeology, as well as to Wayne Mullen, Executive Director of the Australian Archaeological Institute at Athens, for offering the venue at Sydney University for the lecture.

After the presentation, members of the audience were treated to coffee and biscuits put on by the Kytherian Association together with some exquisite chocolate offerings from Fardoulis Chocolates. It was enough to make anyone thirsty.

(1) J. C. Viegas & J. A. Miranda, “Rehabilitation of traditional mills” in C.A. Brebbia (ed.) Structural Studies, Repairs and Maintenance of Heritage Architecture VIII (2003) p.657

(2) S. Mouzakis, “Watermills of the Greek Islands of Kythera and Antikythera” International Molinology (2004, Vol. 69, no. 2) p. 4

George Vardas

Photos > Diaspora Social Life

submitted by Kytherian Newsletter Sydney on 10.05.2013

Professor Tim Gregory presenting his talk on the Karavas Water Project

The Presentation was made by:

Timothy E. Gregory (Ohio State University)
Lita Tzortzopoulou-Gregory (Ohio State University)


The presentation was held at the University of Sydney at 7.15pm, Wednesday, March 20th 2013

At the Centre of Classical and Near Eastern Studies Board Room, in the Madsen Building  Level 4,
Room 480 (one storey up and directly behind the building’s main foyer on the Eastern Avenue pedestrian mall).

What follows is George Vardas's Report of the event.

Download a .pdf of George's Report, here:

KARAVAS WATER PROJECT ARTICLE TOTAL.pdf

Download Tim and Lita's summary of their presentation, here:

Download a .pdf version of this article here:

Gregory_karavas_water_kythera_summer_2013.pdf

"Traditional mills belong to the cultural memory of people because they are associated to a still recent past and appeal to the countryside roots of people". (1)

KARAVAS WATER PROJECT EXPLAINED

The watermills of Kythera are traditionally associated with the village of Milopotamos (literally, the village of the watermills). However, to the north of the island, the verdant terraced landscape of Karavas is also rich in water, deep green gorges, free-running springs, walking trails and abandoned stone-built watermills which the Karavas Water Project seeks to explore.

On 20 March 2013 the leaders of this project, Professor Timothy Gregory and his colleague and wife, Lita Tzortzopoulou-Gregory, of Ohio State University gave an enthralling presentation to an audience of more than fifty (including a number of Karavites) at the Centre of Classical and Near Eastern Studies Board Room at Sydney University.
Lita started off by setting the scene for what it would have been like to live in the village of Karavas when the water mills were operating and how the social life often gravitated around those mills and the famous water springs, for which the village was renown, and vividly recalled the abundance of popular folk legends and stories associated with them.
Professor Gregory then proceeded to explain how the Karavas Water Project, by taking an environmental, topographic, archaeological and historical approach, seeks to examine the historical use of water resources in the northern part of Kythera throughout antiquity and up to the modern day.

According to the local historian and writer, Ioannis Cassimatis, the first watermills appeared in Kythera in the late eighteenth century. It is thought they were introduced from Crete where mills were built during the Ottoman and Venetian occupations. Traditionally, the mills, which were either single or two storey buildings, were built in the prevailing architectural style of the village.

Professor Gregory observed that Karavas stands out because of its plentiful springs and deep green gorges that resemble a sub-tropical rainforest in marked contrast to the barren, parched landscape of other parts of Greece. Indeed, the defining marker of Karavas is its watershed that runs in a generally southwest-northeast direction from the heights near Gerakari to the sea at Plateia Ammos.

From 2011 Timothy and his team took to the island small groups of university students as volunteers to help clear overgrown vegetation from the springs and watermills and undertake research on the various water installations, including the channels, cisterns and mills, and their use. They also spoke to local residents and former residents about their memories of the mills and have begun recording those oral histories. The cleared walking trails have also helped enhance Karavas’ reputation as an eco-tourism destination.

By means of a powerpoint presentation, including photographs and drawings of what some of the areas in Karavas now look like, once they have been cleaned of the dense vegetation, Timothy took the audience on a virtual tour of some of the ten watermills in the gorges of Karavas, including the impressive Magganou mill and cistern, and the mills of Paliomylos, Kourvoulis, Portokalia and Keramari and their sophisticated water channels and storage areas. He also mentioned Loutro which may date back to the 18th and 19th centuries (according to travellers’ accounts) and the possibility of its being used for bathing in Roman times.

As the molinologist Stelios Mouzakis has observed:

“The watermills of Kythera … are constructions on a small scale of the anonymous traditional architecture of Kythera. They are impressive in their special characteristics, the harmony of their volumes, their simplicity, their picturesque appearance, the modesty of their local building materials, the solutions they manifest to various constructional difficulties, but mainly by their unpretentious, effortless incorporation into their surroundings.”(2)

Professor Gregory also discussed how the systems of irrigation were used for the perivolia and the communal arrangements made between farmers and mill operators to exploit and share the water. Tim even alluded to a reference to the watermills in Spiro Stathis’ remarkable Kytherian Review published in 1923. In his survey of industry on Kythera in the year 1923, Stathis reported on the number of operating watermills on the island. Apart from Mylopotamos, we learn that there were five functioning watermills in Karavas operated by Panagiotis Coroneos, Haris Vanges, T. Tzortzopoulos, P. Tzortzopoulos and Ioannis Venardos.

Sadly, according to Cassimatis, the last watermill on Kythera ceased to operate in the late 1940s as the advent of power on the island meant that the mills were no longer economical to operate.

Finally, it is noteworthy that Timothy and Lita Gregory have established the impressive Amir Ali research centre, incorporating a library and dormitory, in Karavas to promote further research and greater understanding of the Karavas watershed and the historic, archaeological and cultural traditions and structures associated with water use on the island.

A big thank you goes to Timothy and Lita for their passionate and ongoing interest in Kytherian archaeology, as well as to Wayne Mullen, Executive Director of the Australian Archaeological Institute at Athens, for offering the venue at Sydney University for the lecture.

After the presentation, members of the audience were treated to coffee and biscuits put on by the Kytherian Association together with some exquisite chocolate offerings from Fardoulis Chocolates. It was enough to make anyone thirsty.

(1) J. C. Viegas & J. A. Miranda, “Rehabilitation of traditional mills” in C.A. Brebbia (ed.) Structural Studies, Repairs and Maintenance of Heritage Architecture VIII (2003) p.657

(2) S. Mouzakis, “Watermills of the Greek Islands of Kythera and Antikythera” International Molinology (2004, Vol. 69, no. 2) p. 4

George Vardas