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Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

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Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by M Negas on 27.07.2015

Moulos (Malos) Ormiston - Redland Bay - Australia 1948-1950

Paul Malos & family on their strawberry farm at Ormiston.

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by M Negas on 21.06.2015

Moulos (Malos) Ormiston - Redland Bay - Australia 1948-1950

Paul & Smarago Malos and 2 helpers on their strawberry farm at Ormiston.
Paul Malos arrived in Australia with his eldest son Steve in 1934 and then brought out the rest of his family in 1939 & 1947.

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Sydney Morning Herald on 12.05.2015

George Poulos with his daughter, Aphrodite, and son, Nik, outside his milk bar in 2014.

"It gave him something to do — to get up in the morning and do things." Photo: Wolter Peeters

Farewell to George Poulos, the man who made milkshakes in Summer Hill for 63 years

Sydney Morning Herald

Date May 11, 2015

Stephanie Wood


He was a soldier and a hero. His family called him "the General". He made milkshakes in Summer Hill for 63 years and not once did he turn up for work in anything other than a long-sleeved shirt and tie.

On Tuesday last week, George Poulos opened The Rio, his famous old milk bar in Smith Street as usual. At 92, Mr Poulos was frail. He may have spent more of the day sitting on his sofa bed behind the shop than at the counter, where he displayed a Greek flag and a photograph of himself as a young soldier. Perhaps he watched a video — he liked John Wayne movies, especially Rio Bravo, and I Love Lucy and M*A*S*H. Perhaps he made someone a milkshake. Perhaps he didn't. Most only came to gawk — at the vintage shop, its retro signage and the old man and his scant range of confectionery. Few spent money.


George Poulos with his family behind the counter of The Rio in its golden years. From left, Stavroula, Nik, Aphrodite, George holding Margaret and George's father, Philip. "We used to open until 11 o'clock waiting for the picture show to come out," says Nik Poulos.

Perhaps Mr Poulos closed early: he hadn't been well lately, according to his son. But earlier in the month he'd begged to get out of hospital. "He needed to go back and open his business," says Nik Poulos, who arrived at The Rio on Wednesday afternoon to discover it was locked up. He jumped over a back fence and broke in to discover his father had died some time after he had closed the day before.

The business was his whole life, says Nik Poulos. "He'd be open until 10 o'clock at night sometimes just for one person to come in and get one drink. It just kept him alive; he didn't make any money from it."

It was not always so: once, George Poulos called The Rio "the goldmine". Through the '50s, '60s and '70s, the milk bar had a symbiotic relationship with the old Summer Hill movie theatre.


George behind The Rio counter. Once, the shop was a goldmine and people queued out the door for milkshakes.

"We used to open until 11 o'clock waiting for the picture show to come out," says Nik Poulos, who grew up working behind the counter. "They were three deep there waiting for milkshakes. We had the old-fashioned seats there. We had people like Johnny O'Keefe and Lionel Long (come in)… I was the f-- Fonz before the Fonz was even thought of. The best milkshakes in the whole of New South Wales were made by my Dad."

George Poulos sailed into Sydney in 1952 on the Cyrenia, a former troop carrier converted into a migrant vessel. He'd come from the family village, Parori, in Northern Greece. He'd fought in World War II and the Greek Civil War and, according to his son, was a hero. "He looked like Rambo; he saved our whole town during the Civil War when the Communists tried to take over."

In Sydney, George quickly went into business with his uncle, Chris, and his father Philip, who'd already been in Australia for more than a decade cutting cane in Queensland. George soon enough sent for his wife, Stavroula, son Nik and daughter Aphrodite. Another child, Margaret, was born nine months after the family was reunited.


War hero: George Poulos as a Greek soldier.

He fiercely protected his girls. "(He) still lived like if he was in Greece," says Nik Poulos. After Stavroula died in 1998, a female in-law would send him letters at Christmas. He refused to open them because she was a married woman. "That's how old-fashioned my Dad was."

He was also independent and determined. While he was alive, the shop would remain open. "It gave him something to do — to get up in the morning and do things," says Nik Poulos, who in later years would come from his home on the Central Coast to visit his father and take him to the local supermarket to replenish the little stock he had sold. "He literally worked until the last day."

The shop though, was always more than simply a job. "It offered him a sense of presence in a new land because those in the local community knew him," says Macquarie University historian and curator, Leonard Janiszewski, who, with his colleague Effy Alexakis, interviewed Poulos for their project "In Their Own Image: Greek-Australians". "He remained with the shop, the things that he knew; he knew that he was a recognisable character within his urban scene. George said, 'people know me around here, I've been here so long'."

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Hellenic War History on 09.05.2015

Maria Hill presented with an award by the Greek Ambassador Charalambos Dafaranos and his wife Eva

Maria was invited to give a talk in Canberra on 29 April 2015, at the opening for the art exhibition called "Lemnos - the Greek dimension in the Anzac Centenary."

Maria made historical reference to Lemnos and its contribution to the Allied War effort during World War I.

The 'Lemnos' presentation was organised as part of the events for the Centenary of the Australian and New Zealand Expeditionary Corps, in the presence of diplomatic corps representatives, local media, Australian Foreign Ministry officials and Greek Diaspora members.

The exhibition, curated by Eva Dafaranos, included the works of 14 artists from various Australian states, such as New South Wales, Victoria, Perth and the Australian Capital Territory. “The ANZAC Centenary is a historic milestone for two countries that I hold dear, Australia and New Zealand, so there is no doubt that I felt the need to commemorate in an artistic way the Greek connection to this landmark anniversary,” said the curator.

The Greek Australian artists participating in the exhibition were: Karen Barbouttis, Nick Bonovas, Stephen Caldis, Olga Cironis, George Comino, Alexandra Danalis, Eva T. Dafaranos, Stella Karydiotou, Dean Manning, Peter Michalandos, George Raftopoulos, Ros Psakis, George Zindilis and Athena Xenakis.

The exhibition was presented at the Greek Embassy in Canberra (115 Empire Circuit, Yarralumla) and it remained open to the public on Saturday and Sunday, May 2 and 3 from 11 am to 4 pm. Admission was free.

At the event the Ambassador presented Maria Hill - a military historian - with an award for her outstanding contribution to Hellenism.

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Sydney Morning Herald on 30.04.2015

Charlize Theron with director George Miller. Photo Jasin Boland Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc

On the set of Mad Max: Fury Road with director George Miller

Sydney Morning Herald

April 25, 2015

Garry Maddox


The badlands of the latest Mad Max movie have never looked more forbidding. But for director George Miller, it’s a happy homecoming.

Mad Max: George Miller's enduring anti-hero
Thirty years on, the iconic Mad Max franchise has been reimagined by its original creator.The result is an explosive, 'very Australian' modern action movie. George Miller talks to Garry Maddox.

Inside a cavernous sound stage in sweltering heat, a surreal scene is taking place. A band of skinny, shirtless men wearing filthy shorts and bandannas are clambering onto two giant steel turbines. On a command, they begin to pedal. The job of these sorry souls, called Treadmill Rats, is to operate a platform that brings battle vehicles and warriors up to a mountaintop citadel then back down to a desert wasteland.

Milling around nearby are a group of bald youths, also shirtless and wearing combat pants. They are daubed in white paint and marked with a menacing skull tattoo. Called the War Pups, they answer to a masked warlord known as Immortan Joe, who styles himself as a cult leader in the post-apocalyptic future.

While the Treadmill Rats pedal, the War Pups lounge around waiting for their scene. A make-up artist touches up the white paint on one. Another has found a spot in the sun to study a school book.

Watching the action intently on a monitor is George Miller, the acclaimed director who is about to finally finish filming Mad Max: Fury Road at Sydney's Fox Studios.

The former doctor made his name with Mad Max in 1979, then followed up in 1981 with Mad Max 2 (known as The Road Warrior in the US) and Mad Max: Beyond Thunderdome in 1985. While he has had many other successes, including the Oscar-winning Happy Feet, the trilogy about a damaged cop roaming the lawless Australian wasteland remains a cinema landmark.

Tom Hardy fires up as Mad Max

Photo: Jasin Boland/Warner Bros. Entertainment

Still one of the most profitable films ever made, the first instalment launched an unknown Mel Gibson to stardom as Max Rockatansky and influenced countless celluloid versions of the post-apocalyptic future. Out of Miller's vivid imagination came such memorable characters as Toecutter, Goose, the Feral Kid, the Gyro Captain, Master Blaster and Aunt Entity, as well as an inspired range of futuristic vehicles.

And there, on the platform the Treadmill Rats have been lowering, is one of the icons of the series – Max's Interceptor, the black V8 muscle car he drove at turbo-charged speed in his battered leather jacket with a cattle dog by his side. Despite the heat, Miller is also wearing a black leather jacket as he directs one of the last of 135 gruelling days on the movie.

"I liked being hot from when I was making the first Mad Max," he says, joking that it might be an attempt to raise his metabolism, or just an idiosyncratic security blanket on set.

Charlize Theron muscles in as Furiosa

Photo: Jasin Boland/Warner Bros. Entertainment

Miller describes Fury Road as a "wild and operatic" chase movie that is neither a reboot, prequel nor sequel. "It's revisiting the world," he says. "For me, it's revisiting old friends."

Pursued by Immortan Joe's marauding hordes, a one-armed female warrior named Imperator Furiosa, played by Charlize Theron, drives a giant tanker carrying a precious cargo – his five young wives – through the wasteland. Along the way, she gets help from Max, played this time by Tom Hardy.

In its 114 minutes, Fury Road features no less than 300 stunts, all performed for real on set rather than simulated in a studio with digital effects. "Old school", Miller calls it. There are enough crashes, jumps, tumbles and explosions for producer Doug Mitchell to describe the movie as "Mad Max 2 on steroids".

Future shock: It took only minutes for George Miller to be inspired to make Fury Road It took 12 years to bring it to the big screen

Photo: Tim Bauer

As epic as that sounds, the movie's production has been even more so. Over 12 years, Miller has had to persevere during three major delays, with three actors down to play Max – including Heath Ledger until his tragic death – a switch of continents, three different Hollywood studios and enough financial challenges to sink just about any other movie.

And with up to 10 cameras shooting the action, Fury Road has been assembled from a huge 480 hours of footage. Back in the sound stage, it's time for a shot that has two War Pups reacting to Max's arrival off screen. They are joined by one of Immortan Joe's sons, Corpus Colossus (Quentin Kenihan), in a harness seat.

"Can we ask Jamie to just drop his head a little
bit," Miller says calmly into a microphone. "Crouch down. Not too far forward, Riley. And we're in action. The vehicles arrive. We're watching Max."

Around the corner, production designer Colin Gibson prepares for another shot. Up a ladder, he is painting a slogan on the wall of what looks like a cave: "There's a new world coming … she's already on her way."

This is the mountaintop vault where Immortan Joe keeps The Wives, played by a glamorous group of actresses and models: Rosie Huntington-Whiteley, Abbey Lee Kershaw, Courtney Eaton, Zoe Kravitz and Riley Keough.

Gibson describes the cave as a combined harem, library, crèche and museum for all the flotsam and jetsam of history. "In a world of horror, this is an attempt to keep all the other bits of civilisation you don't worry about anywhere else," he says. "There's music, art, literature, plants."

A short walk away on the busy lot – Angelina Jolie is directing Unbroken and Russell Crowe is shooting The Water Diviner on other sound stages – Mitchell and Gibson show off more
of the dystopian world. Their team
has built 150 metres of tunnels, where Max is held prisoner and treated as a blood donor.

In another corner stands the truck that Furiosa pilots across the desert. Called the War Rig – one of three built for the movie – it looks like a battered dusty petrol tanker with chunks of two other vehicles welded on top, spiked wheels and a fuel-pod trailer.

"For George, this was Stagecoach, this was John Ford," says Gibson in a reference to the classic John Wayne western that takes place on the move. "There may be 10 million stunts happening out there but this is the stage for the drama. The beating heart."

Upstairs in the elegant Metro Theatre in Potts Point, three kilometres away, is an office with a rich history that dates back to some of the famous miniseries Kennedy Miller made in the 1980s. It was the prime minister's office in The Dismissal, a ship's bar in Bodyline, and a prison in The Cowra Breakout. Now it's Mad Max Central. George Miller's office.

With only weeks until Fury Road opens worldwide on May 14, the director is still flat out finishing all the different versions required for a Hollywood blockbuster: subtitled, dubbed, IMAX and various sound and 3D formats.

Beneath three whirring ceiling fans, signs of the movie are everywhere. There are large black models of the War Rig and another vehicle called the Doof Wagon, which urges warriors into battle in the movie with musician Iota playing a flame-throwing guitar. Elsewhere, some of the ornate steering wheels worshipped by War Boys, grown-up War Pups, hang on a wall, and a pile of movie posters are waiting to be approved.

For much of the production, the office was lined with 3500 storyboard panels that outline what happens shot by shot in Fury Road. "That's how we conceived the film," says Miller.

A genial figure behind glasses, the 70-year-old has long been one of the country's finest filmmakers, telling serious, thoughtful stories in a variety of genres.

Since forming Kennedy Miller with the late Byron Kennedy in the 1970s, George Miller has directed and mostly produced The Dismissal, The Witches of Eastwick, Lorenzo's Oil, Babe: Pig in the City, two Happy Feet films and the Mad Max trilogy. He also produced Babe (which he co-wrote), Bodyline, Vietnam, The Year My Voice Broke, Dead Calm and Bangkok Hilton. And he's done it all while living in Sydney rather than moving full-time to Los Angeles.

The four-time Oscar nominee – he was a winner for Happy Feet – traces his intense imaginative life back to a childhood based around play, without television, as one of four sons of Kytherian Greek immigrant parents in the Queensland town of Chinchilla.

After studying medicine at the University of NSW with his twin brother John, then working at St Vincent's Hospital in Sydney, Miller was already making short films when he met Kennedy at a University of Melbourne film workshop.

He worked as a locum while they shot Mad Max around Melbourne, with the story influenced by seeing the damage caused by the country's car culture: the "death by autocide" in rural Queensland, and then dealing with the trauma as an emergency doctor.

"Ever since I was a kid, I've basically lived the imaginative life," Miller says. "I'm pretty hard-wired for that now. So these characters you've come up with, they live like imaginary characters in your head."

One of these characters, Max Rockatansky, unexpectedly jumped back to life as Miller crossed a street in Los Angeles in 1998. "Halfway across, this idea popped into my head," he says. "I thought, 'Oh my, that's a Mad Max movie.' By the time I got to the other side of the road, I said, 'There's no way I'm going to go anywhere near that because I've already done three.'

"Two years after that, I was on a plane flying across the Pacific during the night – from Los Angeles to Sydney – and the whole movie played in my head. It was in a rough form and it was very misty but the scenes played.

"By the time I landed, I told everyone, 'I think we're going to make another Mad Max movie.' "

Influenced by a love of silent movies and Alfred Hitchcock's theory about making films so people in other countries do not need to read subtitles, Miller conceived Fury Road as a helter-skelter action movie told largely through visuals rather than words.

After the apocalypse, there are no books, internet or TV, and language has become purely functional. So Max speaks just 41 lines and Furiosa less than 100. "There's very specific language in Fury Road but people don't do it recreationally and they don't think aloud because they're in extremis," Miller says. "They don't have time to think aloud."

The director and his team devised a new dark age. "All the worst-case scenarios we see in the news come to pass all at once. Economic collapse, power-grid collapse, oil wars, water wars and things we just didn't see coming. There's wholesale organ failure of all the things that glue us together. You jump 45 years into the future. All the coastal cities so far as we know have been razed. Great gangs have marauded like locusts across the land. In the centre of a continent like Australia, there's a new dominance hierarchy, where all the resources are controlled."

Immortan Joe controls artesian water from his citadel and trades with other warlords who run Gas Town, which has the fuel, and the Bullet Farm, which has the weapons.

With computer systems wiped out, the wasteland is filled with whatever can be cobbled together from a more robust technological era. "Everything is found objects," says Miller. Everything on screen, including the wardrobe, weapons, vehicles, dialogue and the way the actors behave, was created from these found objects. Two other rules governed what takes place in the movie. "Just because it's after the apocalypse, it doesn't mean people can't make beautiful things. We see that in early man. The palaeolithics did all that wonderful rock art. In refugee camps in the most impoverished parts of the world, they can make beautiful things. And just because it's the wasteland, it doesn't mean people lose their sense of humour. There's a certain rambunctiousness to the world and the story."

As he talks, editor Margaret Sixel – Miller's partner – arrives in the office. When he praises her "massive brain", she jokes that "together we make the complete person".

He chimes in: "If you can imagine the world's biggest Rubik's Cube, that's what Margie had to deal with."

She chips back: "It takes you three months to view all the material, just watching, before you can do anything – it's the bloody digital cameras they can stick everywhere. Then everyone leaves and the poor editor is left in the cutting room. 'See you later, guys. There's 400 hours. Good luck.' "

The movie has a rapid-cutting style that reflects Miller's view that audiences can process information much quicker than years ago. While Mad Max 2 was made up of 1200 shots, Fury Road has more than twice that many at 2750. "Film language – this relatively new language – has evolved that much in 30 years," says Miller.

What keeps him making movies is the same intense curiosity that once drew him to medicine, a fascination with the power of stories and a passion for new filmmaking technology. "It took us 10 years to get the technology to make Babe talk," he says. "The Happy Feet movies came from seeing motion capture and developing it when [cinematographer] Andrew Lesnie came from Lord of the Rings and showed me the first Gollum motion capture."

Doug Mitchell, who joined what is now called Kennedy Miller Mitchell after Mad Max 2 and took over as producer when Byron Kennedy was killed in a helicopter crash in 1983, says the good doctor's genial nature is deceptive. "You've got to be tough," Mitchell says. "George is very gentle and very humorous and very affable but behind that he's a very capable, strong man. You can't lead a company into a filmmaking venture like this without that."

Back when John Howard was still prime minister, Miller planned to shoot Fury Road in and around Broken Hill in western NSW, with Mel Gibson returning as Max. But shortly before filming in 2003, production stalled due to the looming Iraq War, the rising US dollar, insurance issues and problems with the star's deal.

When the movie was eventually revived – with Miller making two Happy Feet movies in the interim – filming was delayed again when heavy rain caused the desert around Broken Hill to bloom in 2009. And it was delayed again when the desert was still too green in 2010 for a start the following year.

After the first delay, Gibson was no longer young enough (and becoming too controversial) to play the role. Miller wanted to replace him with Heath Ledger until his sudden death in 2008. So the role went to Tom Hardy, best known for Inception and The Dark Knight Rises. "In casting sessions, Tom Hardy walked through the door and I just got the same intense vibe that I got when Mel Gibson first walked through the door," Miller says. They both have "an animal-like charisma".

While Beyond Thunderdome was made with Warner Bros, Miller's unhappy experience trying to make the sci-fi movie Contact with the studio meant Fury Road would be made with Universal Pictures, which had great success with Babe. But after the movie stalled for the first time, it went to 20th Century Fox because of its deal with Gibson. When he dropped out, Warner Bros, with a new executive team, took over the movie.

Without Broken Hill, the filmmakers considered deserts in China and Chile but decided to shoot in Namibia in southern Africa, which had a variety of landscapes, a population that spoke English and enough accommodation for a crew that ranged from 1200 to 1700 during the shoot, plus a cast of 55. But it was prohibitively expensive to ship more than 200 vehicles and all those people across the world. "By the time we got to Namibia, the cost and the additional expense of getting there required us to cut back on what we were going to shoot," Mitchell says. They also found themselves fielding flak from Hollywood executives, who were fearful about what else could go wrong so far from home.

While Miller and his crew wanted to shoot for 150 days, the extra costs meant cutting back to 100 days in the Namibian desert and another 20 days in a South African studio. "The sacrifice was to cut off the start and the end of the film," Mitchell says. "George wisely agreed that was the way to go because at least we could get all the action in the desert, which was what we needed – the essence of the film. We'd find somehow, later on, a way to cope with the problem."

Two units went out to shoot moving vehicles every day – one with Miller directing, the other with stunt co-ordinator and second-unit director Guy Norris at the helm. Along the way, they abandoned plans to shoot the movie in 3D because it was taking too much time, deciding to convert the movie in post-production.

They persevered, making safety a priority as they shot from June to December 2012. From their base in the town of Swakopmund, they had to move a giant tent city six times to shoot in locations that allowed more rugged terrain, canyons and bogs.

Heat was not the only challenge. At times it was so cold the Wives wore overcoats and carried hot water bottles between takes. "I must confess I got massively stressed for a period out there in Africa, where I'd be on the phone at four in the morning to the States," Mitchell says. "There was a lot of noise going on through the film."

Former model Megan Gale, who plays a rifle-toting warrior named Valkyrie, describes the shoot as "completely surreal". "It was just wild," she says. "There were hundreds of guys in character. My first impression
was – everyone says it – it's mad, it's mental, it's just this crazy world that's just full of people who are desperate to survive and are ruthless. It was just a trip to see it on day one."

Gale was so thrilled to be involved that she took on the stunts she could handle safely, including one that involved rolling out of the way of pursuing vehicles after a motorbike crash. "I just had to trust that they would all drive and hit their mark and miss me," she says. "I had to just roll to the left, to the right, to the left, to the right over rocks. That was pretty exhilarating."

Gale says they shot the scene several times for different camera angles and that the expert stunt crew did exactly what they had to do each time. Even working in extreme conditions, Miller still made himself available to discuss dialogue and costumes to help her with the role.

"It was a gruelling shoot," she says. "I came in quite a few months after they'd been there and he was just collected and calm. I never saw him lose his cool, even logistically a lot of things were happening. There's always something that can go wrong, whether it's a car that breaks down or someone's sick or a stunt is not quite working, and he was just so calm."

Miller says shooting stunts "where if it went wrong, it could go horribly wrong" plus the heat, dust and long days in remote locations, were exhausting. "Every day for 120 days was doing heavy-duty action. It was the relentless quality of it that really took its toll."

Security was also an issue, especially with so many actors and the families of crew members who had joined the shoot. A former SAS soldier, John Iles, headed a security team and moonlighted as a warrior named Ace in the movie. "There were a number of burglaries and he was first there," Mitchell says. "John billeted himself near where the Wives were, so if
anything happened, I had an emergency hotline to him to get down and help."

Mitchell takes great pride in completing Fury Road without anyone sustaining serious injuries during filming. "Without patting ourselves on the back, we got through an extensive war in terms of the potential carnage with real vehicles going at speed – massive vehicles – not just one behind the other but in a convoy attacking each other."

If Fury Road is a hit, it will not be the last audiences see of Mad Max. While working on the movie, Miller and co-writer Nico Lathouris came up with two other stories. One was due to be made as a Japanese-style anime but, with a full script written, has been held back as a live-action movie. The other story has been written as a 200-page novella. There are also plans for a Mad Max live-action arena spectacular with producer-director David Atkins.

Clearly as resilient as he is driven, Miller seems calm about what's at stake. A movie made with a budget of $US150 million to $US200 million – and possibly costing more than $US240 million, including government subsidies – will open on the same weekend in every major cinema territory bar Japan and China.

"Our test screenings have gone well," says Miller. "I'm very cautiously hoping for the best but that's not to say that all this effort won't be for naught."

Miller plans some family time – he and Sixel have two sons aged 19 and 14 and he has a 27-year-old daughter, Augusta, with former wife Sandy Gore – but clearly wants to turn more of those ideas that leap to mind crossing roads into movies. "I often say that if I end up in a nursing home staring into the distance, I'll be playing some movie in my head," he says.

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Sydney Morning Herald on 30.04.2015

Future shock: It took only minutes for George Miller to be inspired to make Fury Road It took 12 years to bring it to the big screen. Photo Tim Bauer

On the set of Mad Max: Fury Road with director George Miller

Sydney Morning Herald

April 25, 2015

Garry Maddox


The badlands of the latest Mad Max movie have never looked more forbidding. But for director George Miller, it’s a happy homecoming.

Mad Max: George Miller's enduring anti-hero
Thirty years on, the iconic Mad Max franchise has been reimagined by its original creator.The result is an explosive, 'very Australian' modern action movie. George Miller talks to Garry Maddox.

Inside a cavernous sound stage in sweltering heat, a surreal scene is taking place. A band of skinny, shirtless men wearing filthy shorts and bandannas are clambering onto two giant steel turbines. On a command, they begin to pedal. The job of these sorry souls, called Treadmill Rats, is to operate a platform that brings battle vehicles and warriors up to a mountaintop citadel then back down to a desert wasteland.

Milling around nearby are a group of bald youths, also shirtless and wearing combat pants. They are daubed in white paint and marked with a menacing skull tattoo. Called the War Pups, they answer to a masked warlord known as Immortan Joe, who styles himself as a cult leader in the post-apocalyptic future.

Charlize Theron with director George Miller.
Charlize Theron with director George Miller. Photo: Jasin Boland/Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc

While the Treadmill Rats pedal, the War Pups lounge around waiting for their scene. A make-up artist touches up the white paint on one. Another has found a spot in the sun to study a school book.

Watching the action intently on a monitor is George Miller, the acclaimed director who is about to finally finish filming Mad Max: Fury Road at Sydney's Fox Studios.

The former doctor made his name with Mad Max in 1979, then followed up in 1981 with Mad Max 2 (known as The Road Warrior in the US) and Mad Max: Beyond Thunderdome in 1985. While he has had many other successes, including the Oscar-winning Happy Feet, the trilogy about a damaged cop roaming the lawless Australian wasteland remains a cinema landmark.

Tom Hardy fires up as Mad Max.
Tom Hardy fires up as Mad Max. Photo: Jasin Boland/Warner Bros. Entertainment

Still one of the most profitable films ever made, the first instalment launched an unknown Mel Gibson to stardom as Max Rockatansky and influenced countless celluloid versions of the post-apocalyptic future. Out of Miller's vivid imagination came such memorable characters as Toecutter, Goose, the Feral Kid, the Gyro Captain, Master Blaster and Aunt Entity, as well as an inspired range of futuristic vehicles.

And there, on the platform the Treadmill Rats have been lowering, is one of the icons of the series – Max's Interceptor, the black V8 muscle car he drove at turbo-charged speed in his battered leather jacket with a cattle dog by his side. Despite the heat, Miller is also wearing a black leather jacket as he directs one of the last of 135 gruelling days on the movie.

"I liked being hot from when I was making the first Mad Max," he says, joking that it might be an attempt to raise his metabolism, or just an idiosyncratic security blanket on set.

Charlize Theron muscles in as Furiosa.
Charlize Theron muscles in as Furiosa. Photo: Jasin Boland/Warner Bros. Entertainment

Miller describes Fury Road as a "wild and operatic" chase movie that is neither a reboot, prequel nor sequel. "It's revisiting the world," he says. "For me, it's revisiting old friends."

Pursued by Immortan Joe's marauding hordes, a one-armed female warrior named Imperator Furiosa, played by Charlize Theron, drives a giant tanker carrying a precious cargo – his five young wives – through the wasteland. Along the way, she gets help from Max, played this time by Tom Hardy.

In its 114 minutes, Fury Road features no less than 300 stunts, all performed for real on set rather than simulated in a studio with digital effects. "Old school", Miller calls it. There are enough crashes, jumps, tumbles and explosions for producer Doug Mitchell to describe the movie as "Mad Max 2 on steroids".

Future shock: It took only minutes for George Miller to be inspired to make Fury Road. It took 12 years to bring it to the big screen. Photo: Tim Bauer

As epic as that sounds, the movie's production has been even more so. Over 12 years, Miller has had to persevere during three major delays, with three actors down to play Max – including Heath Ledger until his tragic death – a switch of continents, three different Hollywood studios and enough financial challenges to sink just about any other movie.

And with up to 10 cameras shooting the action, Fury Road has been assembled from a huge 480 hours of footage. Back in the sound stage, it's time for a shot that has two War Pups reacting to Max's arrival off screen. They are joined by one of Immortan Joe's sons, Corpus Colossus (Quentin Kenihan), in a harness seat.

"Can we ask Jamie to just drop his head a little
bit," Miller says calmly into a microphone. "Crouch down. Not too far forward, Riley. And we're in action. The vehicles arrive. We're watching Max."

Around the corner, production designer Colin Gibson prepares for another shot. Up a ladder, he is painting a slogan on the wall of what looks like a cave: "There's a new world coming … she's already on her way."

This is the mountaintop vault where Immortan Joe keeps The Wives, played by a glamorous group of actresses and models: Rosie Huntington-Whiteley, Abbey Lee Kershaw, Courtney Eaton, Zoe Kravitz and Riley Keough.

Gibson describes the cave as a combined harem, library, crèche and museum for all the flotsam and jetsam of history. "In a world of horror, this is an attempt to keep all the other bits of civilisation you don't worry about anywhere else," he says. "There's music, art, literature, plants."

A short walk away on the busy lot – Angelina Jolie is directing Unbroken and Russell Crowe is shooting The Water Diviner on other sound stages – Mitchell and Gibson show off more
of the dystopian world. Their team
has built 150 metres of tunnels, where Max is held prisoner and treated as a blood donor.

In another corner stands the truck that Furiosa pilots across the desert. Called the War Rig – one of three built for the movie – it looks like a battered dusty petrol tanker with chunks of two other vehicles welded on top, spiked wheels and a fuel-pod trailer.

"For George, this was Stagecoach, this was John Ford," says Gibson in a reference to the classic John Wayne western that takes place on the move. "There may be 10 million stunts happening out there but this is the stage for the drama. The beating heart."

Upstairs in the elegant Metro Theatre in Potts Point, three kilometres away, is an office with a rich history that dates back to some of the famous miniseries Kennedy Miller made in the 1980s. It was the prime minister's office in The Dismissal, a ship's bar in Bodyline, and a prison in The Cowra Breakout. Now it's Mad Max Central. George Miller's office.

With only weeks until Fury Road opens worldwide on May 14, the director is still flat out finishing all the different versions required for a Hollywood blockbuster: subtitled, dubbed, IMAX and various sound and 3D formats.

Beneath three whirring ceiling fans, signs of the movie are everywhere. There are large black models of the War Rig and another vehicle called the Doof Wagon, which urges warriors into battle in the movie with musician Iota playing a flame-throwing guitar. Elsewhere, some of the ornate steering wheels worshipped by War Boys, grown-up War Pups, hang on a wall, and a pile of movie posters are waiting to be approved.

For much of the production, the office was lined with 3500 storyboard panels that outline what happens shot by shot in Fury Road. "That's how we conceived the film," says Miller.

A genial figure behind glasses, the 70-year-old has long been one of the country's finest filmmakers, telling serious, thoughtful stories in a variety of genres.

Since forming Kennedy Miller with the late Byron Kennedy in the 1970s, George Miller has directed and mostly produced The Dismissal, The Witches of Eastwick, Lorenzo's Oil, Babe: Pig in the City, two Happy Feet films and the Mad Max trilogy. He also produced Babe (which he co-wrote), Bodyline, Vietnam, The Year My Voice Broke, Dead Calm and Bangkok Hilton. And he's done it all while living in Sydney rather than moving full-time to Los Angeles.

The four-time Oscar nominee – he was a winner for Happy Feet – traces his intense imaginative life back to a childhood based around play, without television, as one of four sons of Kytherian Greek immigrant parents in the Queensland town of Chinchilla.

After studying medicine at the University of NSW with his twin brother John, then working at St Vincent's Hospital in Sydney, Miller was already making short films when he met Kennedy at a University of Melbourne film workshop.

He worked as a locum while they shot Mad Max around Melbourne, with the story influenced by seeing the damage caused by the country's car culture: the "death by autocide" in rural Queensland, and then dealing with the trauma as an emergency doctor.

"Ever since I was a kid, I've basically lived the imaginative life," Miller says. "I'm pretty hard-wired for that now. So these characters you've come up with, they live like imaginary characters in your head."

One of these characters, Max Rockatansky, unexpectedly jumped back to life as Miller crossed a street in Los Angeles in 1998. "Halfway across, this idea popped into my head," he says. "I thought, 'Oh my, that's a Mad Max movie.' By the time I got to the other side of the road, I said, 'There's no way I'm going to go anywhere near that because I've already done three.'

"Two years after that, I was on a plane flying across the Pacific during the night – from Los Angeles to Sydney – and the whole movie played in my head. It was in a rough form and it was very misty but the scenes played.

"By the time I landed, I told everyone, 'I think we're going to make another Mad Max movie.' "

Influenced by a love of silent movies and Alfred Hitchcock's theory about making films so people in other countries do not need to read subtitles, Miller conceived Fury Road as a helter-skelter action movie told largely through visuals rather than words.

After the apocalypse, there are no books, internet or TV, and language has become purely functional. So Max speaks just 41 lines and Furiosa less than 100. "There's very specific language in Fury Road but people don't do it recreationally and they don't think aloud because they're in extremis," Miller says. "They don't have time to think aloud."

The director and his team devised a new dark age. "All the worst-case scenarios we see in the news come to pass all at once. Economic collapse, power-grid collapse, oil wars, water wars and things we just didn't see coming. There's wholesale organ failure of all the things that glue us together. You jump 45 years into the future. All the coastal cities so far as we know have been razed. Great gangs have marauded like locusts across the land. In the centre of a continent like Australia, there's a new dominance hierarchy, where all the resources are controlled."

Immortan Joe controls artesian water from his citadel and trades with other warlords who run Gas Town, which has the fuel, and the Bullet Farm, which has the weapons.

With computer systems wiped out, the wasteland is filled with whatever can be cobbled together from a more robust technological era. "Everything is found objects," says Miller. Everything on screen, including the wardrobe, weapons, vehicles, dialogue and the way the actors behave, was created from these found objects. Two other rules governed what takes place in the movie. "Just because it's after the apocalypse, it doesn't mean people can't make beautiful things. We see that in early man. The palaeolithics did all that wonderful rock art. In refugee camps in the most impoverished parts of the world, they can make beautiful things. And just because it's the wasteland, it doesn't mean people lose their sense of humour. There's a certain rambunctiousness to the world and the story."

As he talks, editor Margaret Sixel – Miller's partner – arrives in the office. When he praises her "massive brain", she jokes that "together we make the complete person".

He chimes in: "If you can imagine the world's biggest Rubik's Cube, that's what Margie had to deal with."

She chips back: "It takes you three months to view all the material, just watching, before you can do anything – it's the bloody digital cameras they can stick everywhere. Then everyone leaves and the poor editor is left in the cutting room. 'See you later, guys. There's 400 hours. Good luck.' "

The movie has a rapid-cutting style that reflects Miller's view that audiences can process information much quicker than years ago. While Mad Max 2 was made up of 1200 shots, Fury Road has more than twice that many at 2750. "Film language – this relatively new language – has evolved that much in 30 years," says Miller.

What keeps him making movies is the same intense curiosity that once drew him to medicine, a fascination with the power of stories and a passion for new filmmaking technology. "It took us 10 years to get the technology to make Babe talk," he says. "The Happy Feet movies came from seeing motion capture and developing it when [cinematographer] Andrew Lesnie came from Lord of the Rings and showed me the first Gollum motion capture."

Doug Mitchell, who joined what is now called Kennedy Miller Mitchell after Mad Max 2 and took over as producer when Byron Kennedy was killed in a helicopter crash in 1983, says the good doctor's genial nature is deceptive. "You've got to be tough," Mitchell says. "George is very gentle and very humorous and very affable but behind that he's a very capable, strong man. You can't lead a company into a filmmaking venture like this without that."

Back when John Howard was still prime minister, Miller planned to shoot Fury Road in and around Broken Hill in western NSW, with Mel Gibson returning as Max. But shortly before filming in 2003, production stalled due to the looming Iraq War, the rising US dollar, insurance issues and problems with the star's deal.

When the movie was eventually revived – with Miller making two Happy Feet movies in the interim – filming was delayed again when heavy rain caused the desert around Broken Hill to bloom in 2009. And it was delayed again when the desert was still too green in 2010 for a start the following year.

After the first delay, Gibson was no longer young enough (and becoming too controversial) to play the role. Miller wanted to replace him with Heath Ledger until his sudden death in 2008. So the role went to Tom Hardy, best known for Inception and The Dark Knight Rises. "In casting sessions, Tom Hardy walked through the door and I just got the same intense vibe that I got when Mel Gibson first walked through the door," Miller says. They both have "an animal-like charisma".

While Beyond Thunderdome was made with Warner Bros, Miller's unhappy experience trying to make the sci-fi movie Contact with the studio meant Fury Road would be made with Universal Pictures, which had great success with Babe. But after the movie stalled for the first time, it went to 20th Century Fox because of its deal with Gibson. When he dropped out, Warner Bros, with a new executive team, took over the movie.

Without Broken Hill, the filmmakers considered deserts in China and Chile but decided to shoot in Namibia in southern Africa, which had a variety of landscapes, a population that spoke English and enough accommodation for a crew that ranged from 1200 to 1700 during the shoot, plus a cast of 55. But it was prohibitively expensive to ship more than 200 vehicles and all those people across the world. "By the time we got to Namibia, the cost and the additional expense of getting there required us to cut back on what we were going to shoot," Mitchell says. They also found themselves fielding flak from Hollywood executives, who were fearful about what else could go wrong so far from home.

While Miller and his crew wanted to shoot for 150 days, the extra costs meant cutting back to 100 days in the Namibian desert and another 20 days in a South African studio. "The sacrifice was to cut off the start and the end of the film," Mitchell says. "George wisely agreed that was the way to go because at least we could get all the action in the desert, which was what we needed – the essence of the film. We'd find somehow, later on, a way to cope with the problem."

Two units went out to shoot moving vehicles every day – one with Miller directing, the other with stunt co-ordinator and second-unit director Guy Norris at the helm. Along the way, they abandoned plans to shoot the movie in 3D because it was taking too much time, deciding to convert the movie in post-production.

They persevered, making safety a priority as they shot from June to December 2012. From their base in the town of Swakopmund, they had to move a giant tent city six times to shoot in locations that allowed more rugged terrain, canyons and bogs.

Heat was not the only challenge. At times it was so cold the Wives wore overcoats and carried hot water bottles between takes. "I must confess I got massively stressed for a period out there in Africa, where I'd be on the phone at four in the morning to the States," Mitchell says. "There was a lot of noise going on through the film."

Former model Megan Gale, who plays a rifle-toting warrior named Valkyrie, describes the shoot as "completely surreal". "It was just wild," she says. "There were hundreds of guys in character. My first impression
was – everyone says it – it's mad, it's mental, it's just this crazy world that's just full of people who are desperate to survive and are ruthless. It was just a trip to see it on day one."

Gale was so thrilled to be involved that she took on the stunts she could handle safely, including one that involved rolling out of the way of pursuing vehicles after a motorbike crash. "I just had to trust that they would all drive and hit their mark and miss me," she says. "I had to just roll to the left, to the right, to the left, to the right over rocks. That was pretty exhilarating."

Gale says they shot the scene several times for different camera angles and that the expert stunt crew did exactly what they had to do each time. Even working in extreme conditions, Miller still made himself available to discuss dialogue and costumes to help her with the role.

"It was a gruelling shoot," she says. "I came in quite a few months after they'd been there and he was just collected and calm. I never saw him lose his cool, even logistically a lot of things were happening. There's always something that can go wrong, whether it's a car that breaks down or someone's sick or a stunt is not quite working, and he was just so calm."

Miller says shooting stunts "where if it went wrong, it could go horribly wrong" plus the heat, dust and long days in remote locations, were exhausting. "Every day for 120 days was doing heavy-duty action. It was the relentless quality of it that really took its toll."

Security was also an issue, especially with so many actors and the families of crew members who had joined the shoot. A former SAS soldier, John Iles, headed a security team and moonlighted as a warrior named Ace in the movie. "There were a number of burglaries and he was first there," Mitchell says. "John billeted himself near where the Wives were, so if
anything happened, I had an emergency hotline to him to get down and help."

Mitchell takes great pride in completing Fury Road without anyone sustaining serious injuries during filming. "Without patting ourselves on the back, we got through an extensive war in terms of the potential carnage with real vehicles going at speed – massive vehicles – not just one behind the other but in a convoy attacking each other."

If Fury Road is a hit, it will not be the last audiences see of Mad Max. While working on the movie, Miller and co-writer Nico Lathouris came up with two other stories. One was due to be made as a Japanese-style anime but, with a full script written, has been held back as a live-action movie. The other story has been written as a 200-page novella. There are also plans for a Mad Max live-action arena spectacular with producer-director David Atkins.

Clearly as resilient as he is driven, Miller seems calm about what's at stake. A movie made with a budget of $US150 million to $US200 million – and possibly costing more than $US240 million, including government subsidies – will open on the same weekend in every major cinema territory bar Japan and China.

"Our test screenings have gone well," says Miller. "I'm very cautiously hoping for the best but that's not to say that all this effort won't be for naught."

Miller plans some family time – he and Sixel have two sons aged 19 and 14 and he has a 27-year-old daughter, Augusta, with former wife Sandy Gore – but clearly wants to turn more of those ideas that leap to mind crossing roads into movies. "I often say that if I end up in a nursing home staring into the distance, I'll be playing some movie in my head," he says.

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Barbara Zantiotis on 24.04.2015

Zantiotis family & their Irish friends

My father Stephen, an avid photographer in his younger years, took this photo at Bulli Tops in about 1949. He also processed and developed it.
Left to right - His mother Katina (Moulos/Mallos), Mr & Mrs Jordan, his father Peter and his brother Arthur (Archie).
My grandmother was from Logothetianika and my grandfather was from Agia Anastasia. My dad and his brother were born in Australia.

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Kytherian Art World on 01.05.2015

Alexia Psaltis

Art Student gets subsumed

By HELEN GREGORY

Newcastle Herald

February 10th, 2015

Reproduced with permission of The Newcastle Herald ©Copyright 2015
.

Alexia is the daughter of Peter and Sheri Psaltis, who live in Newcastle, and granddaughter of the late George Psaltis and Alexandra Psaltis (nee, Feros), of Gilgandra, and later Earlwood.

ALEXIA Psaltis’ hair-raising expeditions squeezing through fences to photograph abandoned industrial sites have paid off, culminating in an eye-catching piece selected to hang in the Art Gallery of NSW.

The 2014 dux of Hunter School of the Performing Arts is the woman behind Subsumed, which has been selected for Artexpress, a showcase of the best works of art completed by NSW students as part of last year’s Higher School Certificate.

Of the 219 works selected for exhibitions in galleries across the state, only 37 have been selected for inclusion in the exclusive Art Gallery of NSW exhibit.

‘‘When I heard, I was jumping around in excitement, it was the best feeling,’’ Ms Psaltis said.

‘‘Out of all of my HSC achievements, that’s the one that really stood out to me.’’

Ms Psaltis’ work explores the paradox of Newcastle’s heavy industry sitting alongside its pristine coast.

It comprises six surrealistic portraits of female figures, representing Mother Nature, being consumed by industrial structures, objects and landscapes that convey destruction and invasion.

Each portrait includes layers of hundreds of photos she captured from both active and abandoned industrial sites including Kooragang Island, Cockatoo Island and around Hexham and Maitland.

‘‘I visited quite a few deserted and unused machinery yards where there was equipment that had rusted and been left to rot,’’ she said.

‘‘It was a bit scary going into the abandoned sites, but I just squeezed through holes in fences.

‘‘The portraits represent how physical, spiritual and psychological identity is threatened by industrialisation, which removes individual human inspiration and imagination.

‘‘We now face a future of surreal, stunted landscapes.’’

Ms Psaltis also completed major works in English Extension II, Music and Society and Culture and was named on the All-round Achievers list for receiving marks in the highest band possible for 10 or more units.

She began her combined law and arts degree at the University of Newcastle in February 2015.

Artexpress at the Art Gallery of NSW will open to the public from Thursday.

The remaining works selected for Artexpress will be on display in venues across the state throughout the remainder of the year.

The exhibition will come to Maitland Regional Art Gallery between September 11 and November 1.

Rationale of the artwork

Alexia Psaltis
Hunter School of the Performing Arts

SUBSUMED

Photomeita
Prints to Breathing Colour Velvet paper

Subsumed is a series of portraits representing the threat to physical, spiritual and psychological identity from rampant industrialisation. The portraits identify how the dominance of industry removes individual human inspiration and imagination. We face a future of surreal, stunted landscapes populated by impaired humanity, symbolised by the replacement of human physicality with machinery. I photographed all the images of industrial structures, objects and landscapes that convey destruction and invasion. I layered these eclectic images with the human portraits to represent the unchecked, pervasive presence of industrial processes in our lives. We are consumed by industry and its detritus.

What is ArtExpress?

ARTEXPRESS is an annual exhibition of artworks created by students from government and non-government schools for the Higher School Certificate Examination in Visual Arts. The works demonstrate exceptional quality across a broad range of subject matter, approaches, styles and media including painting, photography, drawing, printmaking, sculpture, documented forms, textiles and fibre, ceramics, digital animation, film and video, and collections of works.

ARTEXPRESS represents the high standards and diversity achieved by Year 12 Visual Arts students in New South Wales schools.

The continued excellence of the annual ARTEXPRESS exhibition is the outcome of a rigorous Visual Arts curriculum that builds on study from Kindergarten through to Year 12.

Visual Arts is part of the core curriculum in primary school and junior high school and a popular elective for the Higher School Certificate examination.

Student assessment in Visual Arts for the Higher School Certificate is based on submission of a Body of Work plus a written examination. Each students develops their submission through a process, recorded in a Visual Arts Process Diary, which reflects the problem-solving approach of the practising artist.

Equally important especially at senior level, is critical study and art history which plays a crucial role in informing the artworks produced by students.

The works chosen for ARTEXPRESS are a representative selection from over 12,000 examination submissions and reflect not only the talent of the individual students, but also the strength of the curriculum and excellence of Visual Arts teaching in New South Wales schools.

ARTEXPRESS is shown at 9 metropolitan and regional venues in NSW.

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Kytherian Biographies Project on 07.03.2015

Jimmie Corones at the wheel of his first car in Wills Street, Charleville

A photo taken about characters of the Queensland western regions - with their cars and trucks as they competed with the well-established coaches buggies and sulkies.

The photograph shows a youthful Jimmie Corones at the wheel of his first car in Wills Street, Charleville. It may not have been the first car in town, but by the look on his face he was surely proud of it. He is parked in front of a large billboard sign which was part of Herriman's Garage (where the National Bank building is today). The vehicle was complete with pneumatic horn and white wall balloon tyres.

The phote was taken about 1915, when Jimmie was 20 years old. He went on to become a prominent business man in Quilpie, owning many hotels including the Imperial. He passed away in 1966 at the age of 71, and is buried in the Quilpie Cemetery.

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Good Weekend Magazine on 06.03.2015

Two of Us. Kristina Oldson & Peter Preneas

Good Weekend

February 28, 2015

Photograph: Kristina Olsson with her brother, Peter Preneas, in Sydney.
Photo: Janie Barrett

By SUSAN WYNDHAM

Website designer Peter Preneas, 66, was a baby when he was snatched by his father as his pregnant mother boarded a train in Cairns in 1950; they were finally reunited in Brisbane in 1985, when he was 35. His half-sister, author Kristina Olsson, 58, tells their story in the 2013 memoir Boy, Lost.

Kristina:
The day Peter arrived in Brisbane, my mother called us all and said, "Can you come over? There's someone I'd like you to meet." We all turned up and none of us was surprised about who it was.

We were all protective of our mother that night. Peter's then-wife, Kim, was with him and their little girl, Tamara. The whole family was there: [my half-sister] Sharon and her son John, me and my then husband and two children, my two younger brothers, and my father and my mother. So it was easy to diffuse some of the emotion.

We didn't know the story, we just knew he had been taken from her. Seeing Peter and Sharon sitting together, it was indisputable that they were siblings. I liked him straight off. I recognised my mother in him - her eyes and her smile - and it was safe.

Around 2006, six years after mum died, he applied for his records from DOCS. He was shocked. He called and said, "Krissy, you're the writer in the family, why don't you write about this?" He thought it'd be interesting to put something together about the polio he suffered as a boy and all those people who thought they had recovered but were now getting post-polio syndrome. Later I rang him and said, "Polio is a big part of your life but I don't think it's what affected you most; it was being stolen from your mother's arms." He didn't want to do that, but finally he came back and said okay.

We'd been casual friends until then but we had to spend a lot of time together. It was incredibly emotional. When I'm in Sydney I stay with him in Newtown; he's turned over one of his rooms to me. He says all the time, "Don't do that Krissy, you don't want to do that." He would have been a wonderful big brother to have. We're all much bigger human beings because he's the person he is.

Peter is incorrigible in many ways, but he has an extraordinarily big heart; he's incredibly generous. There's a survival mechanism in him. Polio does that to you but living on the streets, the terrible abuse at the hands of his father and as a ward of the state; he's still the little boy who had to get off at the right station, had to sleep under the right bush, had to pick the right people and sometimes didn't. I think he trusts me now, and the rest of his family, but there's still that wariness about parts of the world.

The first thing people ask me is, "How's Peter now?" I say he's wonderful, and the thing that amazes me is that he's come through as this decent human being.

Peter:
I first started looking for my mother and her family when I was six. I started running away from my father's home; he would catch me, I'd run away the next day. I can remember being at Central Station asking people if they knew how I could find my mother. If I hadn't found Mum, I'd be bitter, I'd be a different person. I probably felt sorry for myself for not having had that nurturing but I have no resentment towards my mother's later children, because all they have ever given me is love.

I like having little brothers and sisters. They naturally love me and accept me 100 per cent for all the stupid things I've done along the way that should have put them off. All I told them was the fun stuff.

I told them I used to renovate massage parlours and did a bit of travelling; the stuff you could brag about. I didn't tell about the dark stuff because I was ashamed of it.

When I was eight or nine, I was molested by some guy opposite Maitland Public School. And when I was 11, I was picked up in North Sydney and a man had five charges laid against him of sexual molesting. I didn't tell Krissy about this for the book. I was hungry on the streets; I didn't know what was going on.

I'd have liked to be around when Krissy was younger and going out with boys so I could belt 'em up. I missed out on all that. She mightn't have got married quite so quickly; I'd have warned her about 'em.

But she's got two beautiful children, so she would never regret her marriage.

Krissy is eccentric. Ring her and her message says: "I don't normally take calls so ring me back." She has a passion for writing - and can't she write! I said to her one day, "You don't make any money out of this writing. I can give you some stories." But she's not interested. I could give her a series on [Sydney brothel] A Touch of Class or the underworld.

I think the book took its toll on her. She'd come down to Sydney and we'd walk around Sydney Hospital, where I spent a couple of years. We walked around the Rocks, and I showed her where I used to sleep and a tree I slept inside under a Harbour Bridge pylon. When she was doing the final editing, she rang me up and started bawling her eyes out: "What happened to you Peter, it's all coming to me now." I was having a little cry, too, but she was beside herself because it all came crashing down.

Krissy brought us all closer together by writing the book. We all now know what Mum went through, what I went through, what we all missed out on. I just did a website for the family photos. I'm the custodian of 18 or 20 photo albums, so I'm scanning them and putting them on DVDs and I'll give a copy to all the kids. I'm catching up with what I missed out on.

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Marianne Casimatis on 01.03.2015

Emanuel Casimatis with his grandchildren

Biography of Emanuel Casimatis

To view / download a version of this article in Greek, as a .pdf:

Emanuel Casimatis article.pdf

Born in Pitsinianika, Kythera in April 1919, Emanuel Casimatis was the tenth child of Gerasimos and Anizina Casimatis. He came from a big family of five brothers and six sisters, and the villagers would call the many kids ‘Gerasimakia’. There was a 28-year difference between the eldest and youngest of the ‘Gerasimakia’ children. By the time Emanuel was born some of his brothers had already left for Australia, which meant he had not yet met them. He made it his goal to travel to Australia and become acquainted with his siblings.

Emanuel was a very smart child. He was dux at his school and was offered a future there in Kythera. The high school teacher even came to his house and told his father that he wanted him to continue his studies, offering him all the books for free as an incentive. When his father asked him, he told him that he wanted to migrate to Australia as he had his heart set on joining his brothers in Australia whom he had not yet met.

At the age of 17, Emanuel travelled to Australia on the ‘Orama’ on a 28-day voyage via the Suez Canal and Cocos Islands, eventually reaching Sydney where he had an entourage of people waiting for him, including brothers that he was able to meet for the first time. From here he went to Temora, where the close bond he was able to forge between himself and his brothers was a key factor in their success in Australia. Emanuel once recounted, “We were a very close family, keeping in mind we had 5 brothers living here together, and
in all our lives we never had one single fight”.

When he was 23 he was drafted into the army. He worked for 3 years in an ammunition depot, to load up the trains that went to New Guinea. Though Emanuel didn't like the idea of conscription it turned out to be a good thing as he made many lifelong friends, including many Kytherians and other Greeks. Over the years, he would regularly meet up with 30-40 ex-army buddies every Wednesday at the Hellenic House. Their numbers slowly dwindled until there were only 2 left. Two days before his passing, Emanuel made his regular Wednesday visit to Hellenic House, and this would be his last.

Emanuel was very proud of the business ventures he started with his brothers in Temora (White Horse Café), Young (Monterey Café), Ariah Park, the Chatswood Oasis Milk Bar with friend Peter Coroneos, and then later Crows Nest (Peter Pan Cake Shop). His last venture was the Elite Shoe Salon in Kingsgrove with his wife Matina, which he ran for over 35 years until his retirement in the mid 1980’s.

Emanuel was equally proud of his involvement with the Kytherian Brotherhood, serving as President during a financially tumultuous time. Under his leadership and with a strong team behind him, the fortunes of the Kytherian Brotherhood were turned around, and Kythera House was saved. The Kytherian Brotherhood remained an integral part of his and his family’s life.

Emanuel loved his garden, especially his fig trees. He and Matina would spend many hours administering tender loving care to their numerous flowers, fruit and vegetables. No visitor to his home would leave without some kind of offering from his garden. He would also regularly visit friends and relatives laden with all kinds of goodies.

The story of Emanuel is not complete without mention of his passion for both fishing and playing cards. He enjoyed many memorable fishing trips to the Great Barrier Reef with his friends, and also enjoyed fishing with Matina near his holiday home at Ettalong.

He was a master Prefa and Poker player, with a razor sharp mind right until his last game at Hellenic House a couple of days before his passing. He also enjoyed the game of Tavli.
Rotary was also an important part of Emanuel’s life, and it helped define the philosophies by which he chose to live by. He believed in the saying that “the worth of a man’s life is measured not by the money or property he leaves behind, but rather by the family he leaves behind”.

Emanuel met fellow Kytherian Matina Samios and they were married in 1953, celebrating their 60th Wedding anniversary in 2013. They had 3 children, Anna in 1954, Gerald in 1955 and Stephen in 1958, and later welcomed son in law John Psaltis, and daughters in law Marianne Comino and Virginia Spinoulas to the family with open arms. Seven grandchildren followed, Michael, Matthew, and Christopher Psaltis, Matthew and Jason Casimatis, and Evan and Marissa Casimatis. He was lucky enough to attend the wedding of two grandsons, welcoming their new wives Jennifer and Elise to the family. He was also looking forward to becoming a great grandfather for the first time later this year.

On Christmas Day 2014, sitting at the table surrounded by all of his loving children and grandchildren, Emanuel remarked to his wife Matina, “we started off as just the two of us, and now look at what we have”.

Emanuel will be dearly missed by all.


RETURNED SERVICE LEAGUE (RSL) SERVICE

Emanuel Casimatis

N202233

“Their bodies are buried in peace and their name liveth for evermore”

“The members of the Kingsgrove RSL Sub-Branch and Club offer their sincere condolences to the Casimatis family and their friends on their very sad loss of Emanuel.

Emanuel Casimatis travelled from the small town of Ariah Park which is in the Riverina region near Temora to Paddington in Sydney to enlist in the Citizen Military Force (CMF) for full time duty on the 12th May 1942 at the age of (23) twenty three, obviously he wanted to help his newly adopted country as it was under threat of a Japanese invasion. I was told by Emanuel’s son Steve that two of Emanuel’s brothers Jack and Andrew also enlisted in the Australian Army; Andrew served in the same unit as Emanuel 2 Employment Company.

Emanuel was posted to 2 Australian Labour Company, unfortunately we do not know where this Company was based however official records show they camped at places like Tocumwal and Albury on the New South Wales border as at that time we had different rail gauges so the men worked on the trains loading and unloading military supplies, including foodstuffs and armaments. Emanuel probably would have also found himself working at factories packing and transporting goods, or he could have worked on the wharves loading military equipment which was required at the front line for the Australian troops fighting the Japanese

It was ‘hard yakka’ as they say in Australian terms and though the work lacked the glamour of the front line however its importance to the conduct of the war was very much understood by Emanuel and his mates in the Unit. They knew they were part of the whole nation doing its bit; they were doing their part in the army towards protecting the country and winning the war.

On the 5th October 1942 Emanuel was transferred to 2 Australian Employment Company where he and his mates would have continued in much the same role moving important military supplies. On the 1st March 1943 Emanuel was posted to 6 Australian Advanced Ammunition Depot (AAD) at Lithgow this was a part of the Royal Australian Ordnance Corp (RAOC). This particular Ammunition Depot was of such high strategic importance that besides the many anti aircraft batteries including a few dummy ones there was actually a number of dummy town buildings built to protect the Depot from possible bombing. Once again Emanuel and his mates undertook vital work in the munitions supply chain; it cannot be overstated as to the importance of this Depot to the Australian war effort.

On the 22nd November 1943 Emanuel left Lithgow and having probably spent a very cold and wet winter in Lithgow he would have been very happy to leave, Emanuel was posted back to 2 Employment Company where once again he and his mates undertook the essential laboring tasks , the hard physical labour needed to maintain the war effort and support the Australian military units in their quest to defeat the enemy.

It must be said that Emanuel and the rest of those 15,000 men from, Greece, Italy, and Austria to name a few countries who served with the Australian Army’s (39) thirty nine Labour and Employment Units were very diverse in Nationality and backgrounds, they lived together in tents and huts in crowded proximity and still managed to build up a great camaraderie however it must be said that they were the Forgotten Soldiers of the war as far as the history books are concerned.
Finally after (3) three years of dedicated service to his country on the 16th April 1945 Emanuel was discharged from the Army and he could return to his family and become a civilian and get on with building his successful life in Australia .

Emanuel was indeed a man who selflessly served Australia in its time of great need; Emanuel was awarded the War Medal 1939 – 45, Australian Service Medal 1939 – 45 and the General Service Badge.

“O valiant hearts who to your glory came through dust of conflict and through battle flame, tranquil you lie. Your knightly virtue proved, your memory hallowed in the land you loved”

“The hour has come for rest. This red poppy the traditional emblem of war sacrifice, the symbol of life offered in the service of one’s country and Rosemary for Remembrance links us to our late comrade Emanuel and us who remain. “We place them here in remembrance”

Those persons who wish to lay a Poppy please come forward.
Would you please stand for a few moments silence in memory of Emanuel, this will be followed by the playing of the Last Post; I will then recite the Ode followed by Reveille
“They shall grow not old as we that are left grow old, age shall not weary them nor the years condemn. At the going down of the sun and in the morning, we will remember them. Reveille

“Lest we forget”

Alan R. Barnes
President Kingsgrove RSL Sub Branch
22nd January 2015

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Marianne Casimatis on 27.02.2015

Emanuel Casimatis. A catch from one of the Kytherian fishing trips to the Great Barrier Reef

Biography of Emanuel Casimatis

To view / download a version of this article in Greek, as a .pdf:

Emanuel Casimatis article.pdf

Born in Pitsinianika, Kythera in April 1919, Emanuel Casimatis was the tenth child of Gerasimos and Anizina Casimatis. He came from a big family of five brothers and six sisters, and the villagers would call the many kids ‘Gerasimakia’. There was a 28-year difference between the eldest and youngest of the ‘Gerasimakia’ children. By the time Emanuel was born some of his brothers had already left for Australia, which meant he had not yet met them. He made it his goal to travel to Australia and become acquainted with his siblings.

Emanuel was a very smart child. He was dux at his school and was offered a future there in Kythera. The high school teacher even came to his house and told his father that he wanted him to continue his studies, offering him all the books for free as an incentive. When his father asked him, he told him that he wanted to migrate to Australia as he had his heart set on joining his brothers in Australia whom he had not yet met.

At the age of 17, Emanuel travelled to Australia on the ‘Orama’ on a 28-day voyage via the Suez Canal and Cocos Islands, eventually reaching Sydney where he had an entourage of people waiting for him, including brothers that he was able to meet for the first time. From here he went to Temora, where the close bond he was able to forge between himself and his brothers was a key factor in their success in Australia. Emanuel once recounted, “We were a very close family, keeping in mind we had 5 brothers living here together, and
in all our lives we never had one single fight”.

When he was 23 he was drafted into the army. He worked for 3 years in an ammunition depot, to load up the trains that went to New Guinea. Though Emanuel didn't like the idea of conscription it turned out to be a good thing as he made many lifelong friends, including many Kytherians and other Greeks. Over the years, he would regularly meet up with 30-40 ex-army buddies every Wednesday at the Hellenic House. Their numbers slowly dwindled until there were only 2 left. Two days before his passing, Emanuel made his regular Wednesday visit to Hellenic House, and this would be his last.

Emanuel was very proud of the business ventures he started with his brothers in Temora (White Horse Café), Young (Monterey Café), Ariah Park, the Chatswood Oasis Milk Bar with friend Peter Coroneos, and then later Crows Nest (Peter Pan Cake Shop). His last venture was the Elite Shoe Salon in Kingsgrove with his wife Matina, which he ran for over 35 years until his retirement in the mid 1980’s.

Emanuel was equally proud of his involvement with the Kytherian Brotherhood, serving as President during a financially tumultuous time. Under his leadership and with a strong team behind him, the fortunes of the Kytherian Brotherhood were turned around, and Kythera House was saved. The Kytherian Brotherhood remained an integral part of his and his family’s life.

Emanuel loved his garden, especially his fig trees. He and Matina would spend many hours administering tender loving care to their numerous flowers, fruit and vegetables. No visitor to his home would leave without some kind of offering from his garden. He would also regularly visit friends and relatives laden with all kinds of goodies.

The story of Emanuel is not complete without mention of his passion for both fishing and playing cards. He enjoyed many memorable fishing trips to the Great Barrier Reef with his friends, and also enjoyed fishing with Matina near his holiday home at Ettalong.

He was a master Prefa and Poker player, with a razor sharp mind right until his last game at Hellenic House a couple of days before his passing. He also enjoyed the game of Tavli.
Rotary was also an important part of Emanuel’s life, and it helped define the philosophies by which he chose to live by. He believed in the saying that “the worth of a man’s life is measured not by the money or property he leaves behind, but rather by the family he leaves behind”.

Emanuel met fellow Kytherian Matina Samios and they were married in 1953, celebrating their 60th Wedding anniversary in 2013. They had 3 children, Anna in 1954, Gerald in 1955 and Stephen in 1958, and later welcomed son in law John Psaltis, and daughters in law Marianne Comino and Virginia Spinoulas to the family with open arms. Seven grandchildren followed, Michael, Matthew, and Christopher Psaltis, Matthew and Jason Casimatis, and Evan and Marissa Casimatis. He was lucky enough to attend the wedding of two grandsons, welcoming their new wives Jennifer and Elise to the family. He was also looking forward to becoming a great grandfather for the first time later this year.

On Christmas Day 2014, sitting at the table surrounded by all of his loving children and grandchildren, Emanuel remarked to his wife Matina, “we started off as just the two of us, and now look at what we have”.

Emanuel will be dearly missed by all.


RETURNED SERVICE LEAGUE (RSL) SERVICE

Emanuel Casimatis

N202233

“Their bodies are buried in peace and their name liveth for evermore”

“The members of the Kingsgrove RSL Sub-Branch and Club offer their sincere condolences to the Casimatis family and their friends on their very sad loss of Emanuel.

Emanuel Casimatis travelled from the small town of Ariah Park which is in the Riverina region near Temora to Paddington in Sydney to enlist in the Citizen Military Force (CMF) for full time duty on the 12th May 1942 at the age of (23) twenty three, obviously he wanted to help his newly adopted country as it was under threat of a Japanese invasion. I was told by Emanuel’s son Steve that two of Emanuel’s brothers Jack and Andrew also enlisted in the Australian Army; Andrew served in the same unit as Emanuel 2 Employment Company.

Emanuel was posted to 2 Australian Labour Company, unfortunately we do not know where this Company was based however official records show they camped at places like Tocumwal and Albury on the New South Wales border as at that time we had different rail gauges so the men worked on the trains loading and unloading military supplies, including foodstuffs and armaments. Emanuel probably would have also found himself working at factories packing and transporting goods, or he could have worked on the wharves loading military equipment which was required at the front line for the Australian troops fighting the Japanese

It was ‘hard yakka’ as they say in Australian terms and though the work lacked the glamour of the front line however its importance to the conduct of the war was very much understood by Emanuel and his mates in the Unit. They knew they were part of the whole nation doing its bit; they were doing their part in the army towards protecting the country and winning the war.

On the 5th October 1942 Emanuel was transferred to 2 Australian Employment Company where he and his mates would have continued in much the same role moving important military supplies. On the 1st March 1943 Emanuel was posted to 6 Australian Advanced Ammunition Depot (AAD) at Lithgow this was a part of the Royal Australian Ordnance Corp (RAOC). This particular Ammunition Depot was of such high strategic importance that besides the many anti aircraft batteries including a few dummy ones there was actually a number of dummy town buildings built to protect the Depot from possible bombing. Once again Emanuel and his mates undertook vital work in the munitions supply chain; it cannot be overstated as to the importance of this Depot to the Australian war effort.

On the 22nd November 1943 Emanuel left Lithgow and having probably spent a very cold and wet winter in Lithgow he would have been very happy to leave, Emanuel was posted back to 2 Employment Company where once again he and his mates undertook the essential laboring tasks , the hard physical labour needed to maintain the war effort and support the Australian military units in their quest to defeat the enemy.

It must be said that Emanuel and the rest of those 15,000 men from, Greece, Italy, and Austria to name a few countries who served with the Australian Army’s (39) thirty nine Labour and Employment Units were very diverse in Nationality and backgrounds, they lived together in tents and huts in crowded proximity and still managed to build up a great camaraderie however it must be said that they were the Forgotten Soldiers of the war as far as the history books are concerned.
Finally after (3) three years of dedicated service to his country on the 16th April 1945 Emanuel was discharged from the Army and he could return to his family and become a civilian and get on with building his successful life in Australia .

Emanuel was indeed a man who selflessly served Australia in its time of great need; Emanuel was awarded the War Medal 1939 – 45, Australian Service Medal 1939 – 45 and the General Service Badge.

“O valiant hearts who to your glory came through dust of conflict and through battle flame, tranquil you lie. Your knightly virtue proved, your memory hallowed in the land you loved”

“The hour has come for rest. This red poppy the traditional emblem of war sacrifice, the symbol of life offered in the service of one’s country and Rosemary for Remembrance links us to our late comrade Emanuel and us who remain. “We place them here in remembrance”

Those persons who wish to lay a Poppy please come forward.
Would you please stand for a few moments silence in memory of Emanuel, this will be followed by the playing of the Last Post; I will then recite the Ode followed by Reveille
“They shall grow not old as we that are left grow old, age shall not weary them nor the years condemn. At the going down of the sun and in the morning, we will remember them. Reveille

“Lest we forget”

Alan R. Barnes
President Kingsgrove RSL Sub Branch
22nd January 2015

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Marianne Casimatis on 27.02.2015

Emanuel Casimatis. Sitting on the front doorstep to his house

Biography of Emanuel Casimatis

To view / download a version of this article in Greek, as a .pdf:

Emanuel Casimatis article.pdf

Born in Pitsinianika, Kythera in April 1919, Emanuel Casimatis was the tenth child of Gerasimos and Anizina Casimatis. He came from a big family of five brothers and six sisters, and the villagers would call the many kids ‘Gerasimakia’. There was a 28-year difference between the eldest and youngest of the ‘Gerasimakia’ children. By the time Emanuel was born some of his brothers had already left for Australia, which meant he had not yet met them. He made it his goal to travel to Australia and become acquainted with his siblings.

Emanuel was a very smart child. He was dux at his school and was offered a future there in Kythera. The high school teacher even came to his house and told his father that he wanted him to continue his studies, offering him all the books for free as an incentive. When his father asked him, he told him that he wanted to migrate to Australia as he had his heart set on joining his brothers in Australia whom he had not yet met.

At the age of 17, Emanuel travelled to Australia on the ‘Orama’ on a 28-day voyage via the Suez Canal and Cocos Islands, eventually reaching Sydney where he had an entourage of people waiting for him, including brothers that he was able to meet for the first time. From here he went to Temora, where the close bond he was able to forge between himself and his brothers was a key factor in their success in Australia. Emanuel once recounted, “We were a very close family, keeping in mind we had 5 brothers living here together, and
in all our lives we never had one single fight”.

When he was 23 he was drafted into the army. He worked for 3 years in an ammunition depot, to load up the trains that went to New Guinea. Though Emanuel didn't like the idea of conscription it turned out to be a good thing as he made many lifelong friends, including many Kytherians and other Greeks. Over the years, he would regularly meet up with 30-40 ex-army buddies every Wednesday at the Hellenic House. Their numbers slowly dwindled until there were only 2 left. Two days before his passing, Emanuel made his regular Wednesday visit to Hellenic House, and this would be his last.

Emanuel was very proud of the business ventures he started with his brothers in Temora (White Horse Café), Young (Monterey Café), Ariah Park, the Chatswood Oasis Milk Bar with friend Peter Coroneos, and then later Crows Nest (Peter Pan Cake Shop). His last venture was the Elite Shoe Salon in Kingsgrove with his wife Matina, which he ran for over 35 years until his retirement in the mid 1980’s.

Emanuel was equally proud of his involvement with the Kytherian Brotherhood, serving as President during a financially tumultuous time. Under his leadership and with a strong team behind him, the fortunes of the Kytherian Brotherhood were turned around, and Kythera House was saved. The Kytherian Brotherhood remained an integral part of his and his family’s life.

Emanuel loved his garden, especially his fig trees. He and Matina would spend many hours administering tender loving care to their numerous flowers, fruit and vegetables. No visitor to his home would leave without some kind of offering from his garden. He would also regularly visit friends and relatives laden with all kinds of goodies.

The story of Emanuel is not complete without mention of his passion for both fishing and playing cards. He enjoyed many memorable fishing trips to the Great Barrier Reef with his friends, and also enjoyed fishing with Matina near his holiday home at Ettalong.

He was a master Prefa and Poker player, with a razor sharp mind right until his last game at Hellenic House a couple of days before his passing. He also enjoyed the game of Tavli.
Rotary was also an important part of Emanuel’s life, and it helped define the philosophies by which he chose to live by. He believed in the saying that “the worth of a man’s life is measured not by the money or property he leaves behind, but rather by the family he leaves behind”.

Emanuel met fellow Kytherian Matina Samios and they were married in 1953, celebrating their 60th Wedding anniversary in 2013. They had 3 children, Anna in 1954, Gerald in 1955 and Stephen in 1958, and later welcomed son in law John Psaltis, and daughters in law Marianne Comino and Virginia Spinoulas to the family with open arms. Seven grandchildren followed, Michael, Matthew, and Christopher Psaltis, Matthew and Jason Casimatis, and Evan and Marissa Casimatis. He was lucky enough to attend the wedding of two grandsons, welcoming their new wives Jennifer and Elise to the family. He was also looking forward to becoming a great grandfather for the first time later this year.

On Christmas Day 2014, sitting at the table surrounded by all of his loving children and grandchildren, Emanuel remarked to his wife Matina, “we started off as just the two of us, and now look at what we have”.

Emanuel will be dearly missed by all.


RETURNED SERVICE LEAGUE (RSL) SERVICE

Emanuel Casimatis

N202233

“Their bodies are buried in peace and their name liveth for evermore”

“The members of the Kingsgrove RSL Sub-Branch and Club offer their sincere condolences to the Casimatis family and their friends on their very sad loss of Emanuel.

Emanuel Casimatis travelled from the small town of Ariah Park which is in the Riverina region near Temora to Paddington in Sydney to enlist in the Citizen Military Force (CMF) for full time duty on the 12th May 1942 at the age of (23) twenty three, obviously he wanted to help his newly adopted country as it was under threat of a Japanese invasion. I was told by Emanuel’s son Steve that two of Emanuel’s brothers Jack and Andrew also enlisted in the Australian Army; Andrew served in the same unit as Emanuel 2 Employment Company.

Emanuel was posted to 2 Australian Labour Company, unfortunately we do not know where this Company was based however official records show they camped at places like Tocumwal and Albury on the New South Wales border as at that time we had different rail gauges so the men worked on the trains loading and unloading military supplies, including foodstuffs and armaments. Emanuel probably would have also found himself working at factories packing and transporting goods, or he could have worked on the wharves loading military equipment which was required at the front line for the Australian troops fighting the Japanese

It was ‘hard yakka’ as they say in Australian terms and though the work lacked the glamour of the front line however its importance to the conduct of the war was very much understood by Emanuel and his mates in the Unit. They knew they were part of the whole nation doing its bit; they were doing their part in the army towards protecting the country and winning the war.

On the 5th October 1942 Emanuel was transferred to 2 Australian Employment Company where he and his mates would have continued in much the same role moving important military supplies. On the 1st March 1943 Emanuel was posted to 6 Australian Advanced Ammunition Depot (AAD) at Lithgow this was a part of the Royal Australian Ordnance Corp (RAOC). This particular Ammunition Depot was of such high strategic importance that besides the many anti aircraft batteries including a few dummy ones there was actually a number of dummy town buildings built to protect the Depot from possible bombing. Once again Emanuel and his mates undertook vital work in the munitions supply chain; it cannot be overstated as to the importance of this Depot to the Australian war effort.

On the 22nd November 1943 Emanuel left Lithgow and having probably spent a very cold and wet winter in Lithgow he would have been very happy to leave, Emanuel was posted back to 2 Employment Company where once again he and his mates undertook the essential laboring tasks , the hard physical labour needed to maintain the war effort and support the Australian military units in their quest to defeat the enemy.

It must be said that Emanuel and the rest of those 15,000 men from, Greece, Italy, and Austria to name a few countries who served with the Australian Army’s (39) thirty nine Labour and Employment Units were very diverse in Nationality and backgrounds, they lived together in tents and huts in crowded proximity and still managed to build up a great camaraderie however it must be said that they were the Forgotten Soldiers of the war as far as the history books are concerned.
Finally after (3) three years of dedicated service to his country on the 16th April 1945 Emanuel was discharged from the Army and he could return to his family and become a civilian and get on with building his successful life in Australia .

Emanuel was indeed a man who selflessly served Australia in its time of great need; Emanuel was awarded the War Medal 1939 – 45, Australian Service Medal 1939 – 45 and the General Service Badge.

“O valiant hearts who to your glory came through dust of conflict and through battle flame, tranquil you lie. Your knightly virtue proved, your memory hallowed in the land you loved”

“The hour has come for rest. This red poppy the traditional emblem of war sacrifice, the symbol of life offered in the service of one’s country and Rosemary for Remembrance links us to our late comrade Emanuel and us who remain. “We place them here in remembrance”

Those persons who wish to lay a Poppy please come forward.
Would you please stand for a few moments silence in memory of Emanuel, this will be followed by the playing of the Last Post; I will then recite the Ode followed by Reveille
“They shall grow not old as we that are left grow old, age shall not weary them nor the years condemn. At the going down of the sun and in the morning, we will remember them. Reveille

“Lest we forget”

Alan R. Barnes
President Kingsgrove RSL Sub Branch
22nd January 2015

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Marianne Casimatis on 27.02.2015

Emanuel Casimatis. Master gardener. He loved his figs.

Biography of Emanuel Casimatis

To view / download a version of this article in Greek, as a .pdf:

Emanuel Casimatis article.pdf

Born in Pitsinianika, Kythera in April 1919, Emanuel Casimatis was the tenth child of Gerasimos and Anizina Casimatis. He came from a big family of five brothers and six sisters, and the villagers would call the many kids ‘Gerasimakia’. There was a 28-year difference between the eldest and youngest of the ‘Gerasimakia’ children. By the time Emanuel was born some of his brothers had already left for Australia, which meant he had not yet met them. He made it his goal to travel to Australia and become acquainted with his siblings.

Emanuel was a very smart child. He was dux at his school and was offered a future there in Kythera. The high school teacher even came to his house and told his father that he wanted him to continue his studies, offering him all the books for free as an incentive. When his father asked him, he told him that he wanted to migrate to Australia as he had his heart set on joining his brothers in Australia whom he had not yet met.

At the age of 17, Emanuel travelled to Australia on the ‘Orama’ on a 28-day voyage via the Suez Canal and Cocos Islands, eventually reaching Sydney where he had an entourage of people waiting for him, including brothers that he was able to meet for the first time. From here he went to Temora, where the close bond he was able to forge between himself and his brothers was a key factor in their success in Australia. Emanuel once recounted, “We were a very close family, keeping in mind we had 5 brothers living here together, and
in all our lives we never had one single fight”.

When he was 23 he was drafted into the army. He worked for 3 years in an ammunition depot, to load up the trains that went to New Guinea. Though Emanuel didn't like the idea of conscription it turned out to be a good thing as he made many lifelong friends, including many Kytherians and other Greeks. Over the years, he would regularly meet up with 30-40 ex-army buddies every Wednesday at the Hellenic House. Their numbers slowly dwindled until there were only 2 left. Two days before his passing, Emanuel made his regular Wednesday visit to Hellenic House, and this would be his last.

Emanuel was very proud of the business ventures he started with his brothers in Temora (White Horse Café), Young (Monterey Café), Ariah Park, the Chatswood Oasis Milk Bar with friend Peter Coroneos, and then later Crows Nest (Peter Pan Cake Shop). His last venture was the Elite Shoe Salon in Kingsgrove with his wife Matina, which he ran for over 35 years until his retirement in the mid 1980’s.

Emanuel was equally proud of his involvement with the Kytherian Brotherhood, serving as President during a financially tumultuous time. Under his leadership and with a strong team behind him, the fortunes of the Kytherian Brotherhood were turned around, and Kythera House was saved. The Kytherian Brotherhood remained an integral part of his and his family’s life.

Emanuel loved his garden, especially his fig trees. He and Matina would spend many hours administering tender loving care to their numerous flowers, fruit and vegetables. No visitor to his home would leave without some kind of offering from his garden. He would also regularly visit friends and relatives laden with all kinds of goodies.

The story of Emanuel is not complete without mention of his passion for both fishing and playing cards. He enjoyed many memorable fishing trips to the Great Barrier Reef with his friends, and also enjoyed fishing with Matina near his holiday home at Ettalong.

He was a master Prefa and Poker player, with a razor sharp mind right until his last game at Hellenic House a couple of days before his passing. He also enjoyed the game of Tavli.
Rotary was also an important part of Emanuel’s life, and it helped define the philosophies by which he chose to live by. He believed in the saying that “the worth of a man’s life is measured not by the money or property he leaves behind, but rather by the family he leaves behind”.

Emanuel met fellow Kytherian Matina Samios and they were married in 1953, celebrating their 60th Wedding anniversary in 2013. They had 3 children, Anna in 1954, Gerald in 1955 and Stephen in 1958, and later welcomed son in law John Psaltis, and daughters in law Marianne Comino and Virginia Spinoulas to the family with open arms. Seven grandchildren followed, Michael, Matthew, and Christopher Psaltis, Matthew and Jason Casimatis, and Evan and Marissa Casimatis. He was lucky enough to attend the wedding of two grandsons, welcoming their new wives Jennifer and Elise to the family. He was also looking forward to becoming a great grandfather for the first time later this year.

On Christmas Day 2014, sitting at the table surrounded by all of his loving children and grandchildren, Emanuel remarked to his wife Matina, “we started off as just the two of us, and now look at what we have”.

Emanuel will be dearly missed by all.


RETURNED SERVICE LEAGUE (RSL) SERVICE

Emanuel Casimatis

N202233

“Their bodies are buried in peace and their name liveth for evermore”

“The members of the Kingsgrove RSL Sub-Branch and Club offer their sincere condolences to the Casimatis family and their friends on their very sad loss of Emanuel.

Emanuel Casimatis travelled from the small town of Ariah Park which is in the Riverina region near Temora to Paddington in Sydney to enlist in the Citizen Military Force (CMF) for full time duty on the 12th May 1942 at the age of (23) twenty three, obviously he wanted to help his newly adopted country as it was under threat of a Japanese invasion. I was told by Emanuel’s son Steve that two of Emanuel’s brothers Jack and Andrew also enlisted in the Australian Army; Andrew served in the same unit as Emanuel 2 Employment Company.

Emanuel was posted to 2 Australian Labour Company, unfortunately we do not know where this Company was based however official records show they camped at places like Tocumwal and Albury on the New South Wales border as at that time we had different rail gauges so the men worked on the trains loading and unloading military supplies, including foodstuffs and armaments. Emanuel probably would have also found himself working at factories packing and transporting goods, or he could have worked on the wharves loading military equipment which was required at the front line for the Australian troops fighting the Japanese

It was ‘hard yakka’ as they say in Australian terms and though the work lacked the glamour of the front line however its importance to the conduct of the war was very much understood by Emanuel and his mates in the Unit. They knew they were part of the whole nation doing its bit; they were doing their part in the army towards protecting the country and winning the war.

On the 5th October 1942 Emanuel was transferred to 2 Australian Employment Company where he and his mates would have continued in much the same role moving important military supplies. On the 1st March 1943 Emanuel was posted to 6 Australian Advanced Ammunition Depot (AAD) at Lithgow this was a part of the Royal Australian Ordnance Corp (RAOC). This particular Ammunition Depot was of such high strategic importance that besides the many anti aircraft batteries including a few dummy ones there was actually a number of dummy town buildings built to protect the Depot from possible bombing. Once again Emanuel and his mates undertook vital work in the munitions supply chain; it cannot be overstated as to the importance of this Depot to the Australian war effort.

On the 22nd November 1943 Emanuel left Lithgow and having probably spent a very cold and wet winter in Lithgow he would have been very happy to leave, Emanuel was posted back to 2 Employment Company where once again he and his mates undertook the essential laboring tasks , the hard physical labour needed to maintain the war effort and support the Australian military units in their quest to defeat the enemy.

It must be said that Emanuel and the rest of those 15,000 men from, Greece, Italy, and Austria to name a few countries who served with the Australian Army’s (39) thirty nine Labour and Employment Units were very diverse in Nationality and backgrounds, they lived together in tents and huts in crowded proximity and still managed to build up a great camaraderie however it must be said that they were the Forgotten Soldiers of the war as far as the history books are concerned.
Finally after (3) three years of dedicated service to his country on the 16th April 1945 Emanuel was discharged from the Army and he could return to his family and become a civilian and get on with building his successful life in Australia .

Emanuel was indeed a man who selflessly served Australia in its time of great need; Emanuel was awarded the War Medal 1939 – 45, Australian Service Medal 1939 – 45 and the General Service Badge.

“O valiant hearts who to your glory came through dust of conflict and through battle flame, tranquil you lie. Your knightly virtue proved, your memory hallowed in the land you loved”

“The hour has come for rest. This red poppy the traditional emblem of war sacrifice, the symbol of life offered in the service of one’s country and Rosemary for Remembrance links us to our late comrade Emanuel and us who remain. “We place them here in remembrance”

Those persons who wish to lay a Poppy please come forward.
Would you please stand for a few moments silence in memory of Emanuel, this will be followed by the playing of the Last Post; I will then recite the Ode followed by Reveille
“They shall grow not old as we that are left grow old, age shall not weary them nor the years condemn. At the going down of the sun and in the morning, we will remember them. Reveille

“Lest we forget”

Alan R. Barnes
President Kingsgrove RSL Sub Branch
22nd January 2015

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Marianne Casimatis on 27.02.2015

Emanuel Casimatis with his beloved wife Matina (nee Samios)

Biography of Emanuel Casimatis

To view / download a version of this article in Greek, as a .pdf:

Emanuel Casimatis article.pdf

Born in Pitsinianika, Kythera in April 1919, Emanuel Casimatis was the tenth child of Gerasimos and Anizina Casimatis. He came from a big family of five brothers and six sisters, and the villagers would call the many kids ‘Gerasimakia’. There was a 28-year difference between the eldest and youngest of the ‘Gerasimakia’ children. By the time Emanuel was born some of his brothers had already left for Australia, which meant he had not yet met them. He made it his goal to travel to Australia and become acquainted with his siblings.

Emanuel was a very smart child. He was dux at his school and was offered a future there in Kythera. The high school teacher even came to his house and told his father that he wanted him to continue his studies, offering him all the books for free as an incentive. When his father asked him, he told him that he wanted to migrate to Australia as he had his heart set on joining his brothers in Australia whom he had not yet met.

At the age of 17, Emanuel travelled to Australia on the ‘Orama’ on a 28-day voyage via the Suez Canal and Cocos Islands, eventually reaching Sydney where he had an entourage of people waiting for him, including brothers that he was able to meet for the first time. From here he went to Temora, where the close bond he was able to forge between himself and his brothers was a key factor in their success in Australia. Emanuel once recounted, “We were a very close family, keeping in mind we had 5 brothers living here together, and
in all our lives we never had one single fight”.

When he was 23 he was drafted into the army. He worked for 3 years in an ammunition depot, to load up the trains that went to New Guinea. Though Emanuel didn't like the idea of conscription it turned out to be a good thing as he made many lifelong friends, including many Kytherians and other Greeks. Over the years, he would regularly meet up with 30-40 ex-army buddies every Wednesday at the Hellenic House. Their numbers slowly dwindled until there were only 2 left. Two days before his passing, Emanuel made his regular Wednesday visit to Hellenic House, and this would be his last.

Emanuel was very proud of the business ventures he started with his brothers in Temora (White Horse Café), Young (Monterey Café), Ariah Park, the Chatswood Oasis Milk Bar with friend Peter Coroneos, and then later Crows Nest (Peter Pan Cake Shop). His last venture was the Elite Shoe Salon in Kingsgrove with his wife Matina, which he ran for over 35 years until his retirement in the mid 1980’s.

Emanuel was equally proud of his involvement with the Kytherian Brotherhood, serving as President during a financially tumultuous time. Under his leadership and with a strong team behind him, the fortunes of the Kytherian Brotherhood were turned around, and Kythera House was saved. The Kytherian Brotherhood remained an integral part of his and his family’s life.

Emanuel loved his garden, especially his fig trees. He and Matina would spend many hours administering tender loving care to their numerous flowers, fruit and vegetables. No visitor to his home would leave without some kind of offering from his garden. He would also regularly visit friends and relatives laden with all kinds of goodies.

The story of Emanuel is not complete without mention of his passion for both fishing and playing cards. He enjoyed many memorable fishing trips to the Great Barrier Reef with his friends, and also enjoyed fishing with Matina near his holiday home at Ettalong.

He was a master Prefa and Poker player, with a razor sharp mind right until his last game at Hellenic House a couple of days before his passing. He also enjoyed the game of Tavli.
Rotary was also an important part of Emanuel’s life, and it helped define the philosophies by which he chose to live by. He believed in the saying that “the worth of a man’s life is measured not by the money or property he leaves behind, but rather by the family he leaves behind”.

Emanuel met fellow Kytherian Matina Samios and they were married in 1953, celebrating their 60th Wedding anniversary in 2013. They had 3 children, Anna in 1954, Gerald in 1955 and Stephen in 1958, and later welcomed son in law John Psaltis, and daughters in law Marianne Comino and Virginia Spinoulas to the family with open arms. Seven grandchildren followed, Michael, Matthew, and Christopher Psaltis, Matthew and Jason Casimatis, and Evan and Marissa Casimatis. He was lucky enough to attend the wedding of two grandsons, welcoming their new wives Jennifer and Elise to the family. He was also looking forward to becoming a great grandfather for the first time later this year.

On Christmas Day 2014, sitting at the table surrounded by all of his loving children and grandchildren, Emanuel remarked to his wife Matina, “we started off as just the two of us, and now look at what we have”.

Emanuel will be dearly missed by all.


RETURNED SERVICE LEAGUE (RSL) SERVICE

Emanuel Casimatis

N202233

“Their bodies are buried in peace and their name liveth for evermore”

“The members of the Kingsgrove RSL Sub-Branch and Club offer their sincere condolences to the Casimatis family and their friends on their very sad loss of Emanuel.

Emanuel Casimatis travelled from the small town of Ariah Park which is in the Riverina region near Temora to Paddington in Sydney to enlist in the Citizen Military Force (CMF) for full time duty on the 12th May 1942 at the age of (23) twenty three, obviously he wanted to help his newly adopted country as it was under threat of a Japanese invasion. I was told by Emanuel’s son Steve that two of Emanuel’s brothers Jack and Andrew also enlisted in the Australian Army; Andrew served in the same unit as Emanuel 2 Employment Company.

Emanuel was posted to 2 Australian Labour Company, unfortunately we do not know where this Company was based however official records show they camped at places like Tocumwal and Albury on the New South Wales border as at that time we had different rail gauges so the men worked on the trains loading and unloading military supplies, including foodstuffs and armaments. Emanuel probably would have also found himself working at factories packing and transporting goods, or he could have worked on the wharves loading military equipment which was required at the front line for the Australian troops fighting the Japanese

It was ‘hard yakka’ as they say in Australian terms and though the work lacked the glamour of the front line however its importance to the conduct of the war was very much understood by Emanuel and his mates in the Unit. They knew they were part of the whole nation doing its bit; they were doing their part in the army towards protecting the country and winning the war.

On the 5th October 1942 Emanuel was transferred to 2 Australian Employment Company where he and his mates would have continued in much the same role moving important military supplies. On the 1st March 1943 Emanuel was posted to 6 Australian Advanced Ammunition Depot (AAD) at Lithgow this was a part of the Royal Australian Ordnance Corp (RAOC). This particular Ammunition Depot was of such high strategic importance that besides the many anti aircraft batteries including a few dummy ones there was actually a number of dummy town buildings built to protect the Depot from possible bombing. Once again Emanuel and his mates undertook vital work in the munitions supply chain; it cannot be overstated as to the importance of this Depot to the Australian war effort.

On the 22nd November 1943 Emanuel left Lithgow and having probably spent a very cold and wet winter in Lithgow he would have been very happy to leave, Emanuel was posted back to 2 Employment Company where once again he and his mates undertook the essential laboring tasks , the hard physical labour needed to maintain the war effort and support the Australian military units in their quest to defeat the enemy.

It must be said that Emanuel and the rest of those 15,000 men from, Greece, Italy, and Austria to name a few countries who served with the Australian Army’s (39) thirty nine Labour and Employment Units were very diverse in Nationality and backgrounds, they lived together in tents and huts in crowded proximity and still managed to build up a great camaraderie however it must be said that they were the Forgotten Soldiers of the war as far as the history books are concerned.
Finally after (3) three years of dedicated service to his country on the 16th April 1945 Emanuel was discharged from the Army and he could return to his family and become a civilian and get on with building his successful life in Australia .

Emanuel was indeed a man who selflessly served Australia in its time of great need; Emanuel was awarded the War Medal 1939 – 45, Australian Service Medal 1939 – 45 and the General Service Badge.

“O valiant hearts who to your glory came through dust of conflict and through battle flame, tranquil you lie. Your knightly virtue proved, your memory hallowed in the land you loved”

“The hour has come for rest. This red poppy the traditional emblem of war sacrifice, the symbol of life offered in the service of one’s country and Rosemary for Remembrance links us to our late comrade Emanuel and us who remain. “We place them here in remembrance”

Those persons who wish to lay a Poppy please come forward.
Would you please stand for a few moments silence in memory of Emanuel, this will be followed by the playing of the Last Post; I will then recite the Ode followed by Reveille
“They shall grow not old as we that are left grow old, age shall not weary them nor the years condemn. At the going down of the sun and in the morning, we will remember them. Reveille

“Lest we forget”

Alan R. Barnes
President Kingsgrove RSL Sub Branch
22nd January 2015

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Marianne Casimatis on 27.02.2015

Emanuel Casimatis, in Australian army uniform

Biography of Emanuel Casimatis

To view / download a version of this article in Greek, as a .pdf:

Emanuel Casimatis article.pdf

Born in Pitsinianika, Kythera in April 1919, Emanuel Casimatis was the tenth child of Gerasimos and Anizina Casimatis. He came from a big family of five brothers and six sisters, and the villagers would call the many kids ‘Gerasimakia’. There was a 28-year difference between the eldest and youngest of the ‘Gerasimakia’ children. By the time Emanuel was born some of his brothers had already left for Australia, which meant he had not yet met them. He made it his goal to travel to Australia and become acquainted with his siblings.

Emanuel was a very smart child. He was dux at his school and was offered a future there in Kythera. The high school teacher even came to his house and told his father that he wanted him to continue his studies, offering him all the books for free as an incentive. When his father asked him, he told him that he wanted to migrate to Australia as he had his heart set on joining his brothers in Australia whom he had not yet met.

At the age of 17, Emanuel travelled to Australia on the ‘Orama’ on a 28-day voyage via the Suez Canal and Cocos Islands, eventually reaching Sydney where he had an entourage of people waiting for him, including brothers that he was able to meet for the first time. From here he went to Temora, where the close bond he was able to forge between himself and his brothers was a key factor in their success in Australia. Emanuel once recounted, “We were a very close family, keeping in mind we had 5 brothers living here together, and
in all our lives we never had one single fight”.

When he was 23 he was drafted into the army. He worked for 3 years in an ammunition depot, to load up the trains that went to New Guinea. Though Emanuel didn't like the idea of conscription it turned out to be a good thing as he made many lifelong friends, including many Kytherians and other Greeks. Over the years, he would regularly meet up with 30-40 ex-army buddies every Wednesday at the Hellenic House. Their numbers slowly dwindled until there were only 2 left. Two days before his passing, Emanuel made his regular Wednesday visit to Hellenic House, and this would be his last.

Emanuel was very proud of the business ventures he started with his brothers in Temora (White Horse Café), Young (Monterey Café), Ariah Park, the Chatswood Oasis Milk Bar with friend Peter Coroneos, and then later Crows Nest (Peter Pan Cake Shop). His last venture was the Elite Shoe Salon in Kingsgrove with his wife Matina, which he ran for over 35 years until his retirement in the mid 1980’s.

Emanuel was equally proud of his involvement with the Kytherian Brotherhood, serving as President during a financially tumultuous time. Under his leadership and with a strong team behind him, the fortunes of the Kytherian Brotherhood were turned around, and Kythera House was saved. The Kytherian Brotherhood remained an integral part of his and his family’s life.

Emanuel loved his garden, especially his fig trees. He and Matina would spend many hours administering tender loving care to their numerous flowers, fruit and vegetables. No visitor to his home would leave without some kind of offering from his garden. He would also regularly visit friends and relatives laden with all kinds of goodies.

The story of Emanuel is not complete without mention of his passion for both fishing and playing cards. He enjoyed many memorable fishing trips to the Great Barrier Reef with his friends, and also enjoyed fishing with Matina near his holiday home at Ettalong.

He was a master Prefa and Poker player, with a razor sharp mind right until his last game at Hellenic House a couple of days before his passing. He also enjoyed the game of Tavli.
Rotary was also an important part of Emanuel’s life, and it helped define the philosophies by which he chose to live by. He believed in the saying that “the worth of a man’s life is measured not by the money or property he leaves behind, but rather by the family he leaves behind”.

Emanuel met fellow Kytherian Matina Samios and they were married in 1953, celebrating their 60th Wedding anniversary in 2013. They had 3 children, Anna in 1954, Gerald in 1955 and Stephen in 1958, and later welcomed son in law John Psaltis, and daughters in law Marianne Comino and Virginia Spinoulas to the family with open arms. Seven grandchildren followed, Michael, Matthew, and Christopher Psaltis, Matthew and Jason Casimatis, and Evan and Marissa Casimatis. He was lucky enough to attend the wedding of two grandsons, welcoming their new wives Jennifer and Elise to the family. He was also looking forward to becoming a great grandfather for the first time later this year.

On Christmas Day 2014, sitting at the table surrounded by all of his loving children and grandchildren, Emanuel remarked to his wife Matina, “we started off as just the two of us, and now look at what we have”.

Emanuel will be dearly missed by all.


RETURNED SERVICE LEAGUE (RSL) SERVICE

Emanuel Casimatis

N202233

“Their bodies are buried in peace and their name liveth for evermore”

“The members of the Kingsgrove RSL Sub-Branch and Club offer their sincere condolences to the Casimatis family and their friends on their very sad loss of Emanuel.

Emanuel Casimatis travelled from the small town of Ariah Park which is in the Riverina region near Temora to Paddington in Sydney to enlist in the Citizen Military Force (CMF) for full time duty on the 12th May 1942 at the age of (23) twenty three, obviously he wanted to help his newly adopted country as it was under threat of a Japanese invasion. I was told by Emanuel’s son Steve that two of Emanuel’s brothers Jack and Andrew also enlisted in the Australian Army; Andrew served in the same unit as Emanuel 2 Employment Company.

Emanuel was posted to 2 Australian Labour Company, unfortunately we do not know where this Company was based however official records show they camped at places like Tocumwal and Albury on the New South Wales border as at that time we had different rail gauges so the men worked on the trains loading and unloading military supplies, including foodstuffs and armaments. Emanuel probably would have also found himself working at factories packing and transporting goods, or he could have worked on the wharves loading military equipment which was required at the front line for the Australian troops fighting the Japanese

It was ‘hard yakka’ as they say in Australian terms and though the work lacked the glamour of the front line however its importance to the conduct of the war was very much understood by Emanuel and his mates in the Unit. They knew they were part of the whole nation doing its bit; they were doing their part in the army towards protecting the country and winning the war.

On the 5th October 1942 Emanuel was transferred to 2 Australian Employment Company where he and his mates would have continued in much the same role moving important military supplies. On the 1st March 1943 Emanuel was posted to 6 Australian Advanced Ammunition Depot (AAD) at Lithgow this was a part of the Royal Australian Ordnance Corp (RAOC). This particular Ammunition Depot was of such high strategic importance that besides the many anti aircraft batteries including a few dummy ones there was actually a number of dummy town buildings built to protect the Depot from possible bombing. Once again Emanuel and his mates undertook vital work in the munitions supply chain; it cannot be overstated as to the importance of this Depot to the Australian war effort.

On the 22nd November 1943 Emanuel left Lithgow and having probably spent a very cold and wet winter in Lithgow he would have been very happy to leave, Emanuel was posted back to 2 Employment Company where once again he and his mates undertook the essential laboring tasks , the hard physical labour needed to maintain the war effort and support the Australian military units in their quest to defeat the enemy.

It must be said that Emanuel and the rest of those 15,000 men from, Greece, Italy, and Austria to name a few countries who served with the Australian Army’s (39) thirty nine Labour and Employment Units were very diverse in Nationality and backgrounds, they lived together in tents and huts in crowded proximity and still managed to build up a great camaraderie however it must be said that they were the Forgotten Soldiers of the war as far as the history books are concerned.
Finally after (3) three years of dedicated service to his country on the 16th April 1945 Emanuel was discharged from the Army and he could return to his family and become a civilian and get on with building his successful life in Australia .

Emanuel was indeed a man who selflessly served Australia in its time of great need; Emanuel was awarded the War Medal 1939 – 45, Australian Service Medal 1939 – 45 and the General Service Badge.

“O valiant hearts who to your glory came through dust of conflict and through battle flame, tranquil you lie. Your knightly virtue proved, your memory hallowed in the land you loved”

“The hour has come for rest. This red poppy the traditional emblem of war sacrifice, the symbol of life offered in the service of one’s country and Rosemary for Remembrance links us to our late comrade Emanuel and us who remain. “We place them here in remembrance”

Those persons who wish to lay a Poppy please come forward.
Would you please stand for a few moments silence in memory of Emanuel, this will be followed by the playing of the Last Post; I will then recite the Ode followed by Reveille
“They shall grow not old as we that are left grow old, age shall not weary them nor the years condemn. At the going down of the sun and in the morning, we will remember them. Reveille

“Lest we forget”

Alan R. Barnes
President Kingsgrove RSL Sub Branch
22nd January 2015

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Kytherian Biographies Project on 23.02.2015

Anecdote about Jim Corones mentioned in an anecdote in the Queensland Parliament

Speech by
VAUGHAN JOHNSON
MEMBER FOR GREGORY

Hansard 7 March 1990

Gregory is a vast electorate of approximately 430 000 square kilometres enveloping 12 local authorities that reflect the vast size of the electorate itself. Firstly, I mention my home town of Quilpie, which is almost 1 000 kilometres west of Brisbane and at the end of the great western railway line. It is the gateway to the channel country and home of the famous Quilpie boulder opal, which was made famous largely by the efforts of the late Des Burton, who was a legend in the opal-mining industry in western Queensland.

Quilpie has a population of approximately 740 who are typical of true western people, as is the case with all the people in the Gregory electorate. Quilpie has some famous families. The descendants of pioneers live in the district today, namely the Tully, Watts, Pegler, Hall, Wade, Costello, Richardson, Hansen and D'Hennin families, as well as my good friends the Gibsons.

I must mention three late identities of Quilpie: Jimmy and Harry Corones, who built the hotels there in about 1916 and, last but not least, the late Len McManus, who was the local store-keeper and whose business is carried on today by his daughter and son-in-law. They were true examples of western characters and are a very important part of the town's history.

With due respect to you, Mr Deputy Speaker, I will now relate a story. The Corones family is a legend in the west. No doubt honourable members have heard of them. The late Jimmy Corones is no exception. One day, somebody said to Jimmy, "How many £10 notes are in a 44-gallon drum, Jimmy?" He said, "Ah, I don't know, boy; he's not full yet." That story is a reflection of some of the people who live in the west. The Gregory electorate is full of colourful characters, including many bush larrikins, and much bush folklore. Those characters are all fair dinkum and true blue.

Quilpie boasts many sporting bodies and a bowls club of which the town is proud. I must mention the Catholic convent run by the Sisters of St Joseph, who are to be commended for the courage they have shown and the love they have extended to many children since 1950. I am proud to say that I was a member of that school from 1955 to 1957. In recent times, my children have attended the school. I also mention the Marist Brothers, with whom I finished my education at St Joseph's College at Hunters Hill in Sydney. I am proud to be a past student of that great college. I offer them my thanks.

Photograph: When first arriving as immigrants from Kythira, Greece, Harry Corones bought a cafe in Charleville. Harry and Jim were to become two of Queensland's foremost hoteliers. They were foundation shareholders of the fledgling Qantas airlines. By 1929, the first class Corones Hotel in Charleville by Harry. Many celebrity guests visited the hotel including the Duke and Duchess of Gloucester, Charles Kingsford Smith and Amy Johnston. Jim settled in Quilpie, also in Western Queensland. (Information taken from Corones. V, Harry Corones and Quilpie, 2004)

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Barbara Zantiotis on 18.01.2015

Stephen Zantiotis about 1944

My dad was about 16 years old in this photo. He was born in Weston, NSW in 1928. A few years later, the family moved to Dapto where this photo was taken.
My dad's parents were Peter Zantiotis from Agia Anastasia and Ekaterini Moulos from Logothetianika.

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Barbara Zantiotis on 18.01.2015

Stephen & Arthur Zantiotis about 1932

This photo is of my dad, Stephen and his younger brother Arthur (Archie). My dad was born in Weston, NSW in 1928.
Their parents were Peter Zantiotis and Ekaterini (Katina) Moulos. Peter was from Agia Anastasia and Katina was from Logothetianika.

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Thoroughbred News on 18.11.2014

Contract extension for Peter V'landys

Thoroughbred News

17 NOV 2014 | BY ROB BURNET

The chief executive of Racing NSW Peter V’landys has had his contract extended by a further three years according to a report in smh.com.au on Monday. There was no formal announcement of the decision on the Racing NSW site racingnsw.com.au as at early Monday morning.

The decision comes before the NSW Government announces if it will put legislation through the NSW Parliament before the House rises for the summer break to give NSW tax parity from wagering with Victoria’s government tax takeout.

It also comes before the Government announces the appointment of directors to fill three positions on the Board of Racing NSW.

The NSW Minister for Racing Troy Grant called for nominations for the three positions on October 2nd.

Three of the seven directors of Racing NSW, Alan Brown, Kevin Greene and Tony Hodgson, have terms that expire on December 18th, 2014. All three are eligible to apply for re-appointment.

“This is a great opportunity to ensure we have the best possible board for Racing NSW,” Mr Grant said in a statement at the time.

“Candidates for the Racing NSW board will be recommended based on merit and in accordance with the eligibility and skills-based criteria prescribed in the Thoroughbred Racing Act.

“Terms of up to four years can be recommended to me by the Selection Panel and I would like to see appointments of two, three and four years.

“This will ensure we are staggering the renewal and replacement of members of the board and don’t lose valuable corporate knowledge with multiple positions open at the same time,” said Grant.

The nominations closed on October 31st with the appointments to be announced in mid-December.

This is similar timing to the Government’s expressions of interest from candidates for the three independent directors’ positions, which expire on January 31st, 2015, on the board of the Australian Turf Club Ltd.

Grant said the three positions, currently held by Laurie Macri and John Camilleri, and Mark McInnes’ role which is currently vacant after his resignation earlier this year, would be for a term of up to four years.

The successful applicants are also due to be announced in mid-December.

The smh.com.au also says that Racing NSW is due to release its latest strategic plan this week with the plan to report on how the industry body would allocate the forecast additional $70 million in funds from tax parity should the legislation pass.

The majority of the additional funding would be used in stakes along with grants to country racing, Sydney autumn racing and a quarantine centre.

Peter V'landys, picture Sportpix.com.au