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submitted by John Sourrys on 16.04.2013

The Sourrys family

At this stage 3 children were born. Maria and George ultimately had 7 children.

We all grew up in the outback, developing the resilience of "bush kids".

From left, Manuel, my mother Maria (nee Castrisos), was "but a girl", Stella, my father, George, & John, (me).

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Neos Kosmos, Melbourne on 15.04.2013

WWII veteran turns 100

Happy Birthday Les!

Leslie Manning as a young Digger in 1940 and today

Neos Kosmos 15 Apr 2013
MICHAEL SWEET

On April 19, Mr Leslie Manning, one of the few remaining veterans who fought in the Battle of Crete, celebrates his one hundredth birthday.
Born and raised in Richmond, the son of a Flinders Lane rag trader, Les joined the Victorian 2/7th Battalion in October 1939 and left Port Melbourne for the Middle East in April 1940. A year later he was in Greece.

After the Allied evacuation of the mainland in April 1941, Les and his fellow Diggers found themselves in Crete just before the German invasion.

The 2/7th were held back as reinforcements during the first days of the battle, but on May 27 1941 the battalion took part in what became known as the charge at 42nd Street, when Australian and Maori troops forced back an elite division of Austrian mountain troops, buying time for the Allies to make it to the evacuation beaches on the south coast.
Les, pinned down by mortar fire at the 42nd Street action near Souda Bay, made it to Sfakia days later, but like thousands of other troops, was left behind.

After the Allied surrender he evaded capture briefly before becoming a prisoner of war. Shipped eventually to Stalag 13 in Bavaria, he spent the rest of the war in Germany.

On his return to Australia Les worked for the state savings bank on Melbourne's Collins Street as a security guard. A father of four, he celebrated his sixtieth wedding anniversary with his wife Alma at their Wantirna home in January.

John Nikolakakis, president of the Pancretan Association of Melbourne told Neos Kosmos that the duty and sacrifice shown by Les and his fellow Diggers should and would never be forgotten.
"I have met many Crete campaign veterans, and I feel so honoured to know Les and his family," said Mr Nikolakakis.
"Les is one of our oldest living veterans and it's amazing how he recollects so much of his time in Crete.

"It's important for us as second and third generation Greeks living in Australia to acknowledge, remember and spend as much time with these people as possible, to hear their stories and respect their struggles to try and protect our island 70 years ago.

"Happy Birthday Les. God bless you."

Neos Kosmos adds its warmest congratulations to Les on achieving 100 years not out.

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Kytherian Newsletter Sydney on 12.04.2013

In loving memory of Saphira Caravousanos

First President of the Kytherian Ladies Auxiliary
Sydney, NSW, Australia

This interesting account of the life of Mrs Caravousanos, was written by her son Andrew, and with his permission we share it with all our members.

On Sunday 24th December 1924, the weather in Carthage Missouri USA was well below zero and considered “the worst winter’s day in the city’s history”. There were no Sunday papers to forecast hopeful improvement so its citizens gathered in churches praying for relief. Yet for Andrew & Stella ( Stamatoula) Khlentzos, warmth was abundant with the birth of their first daughter Saphira (their second child within a calendar year). Andrew was so thrilled that a daughter was born so that he could name her ‘Zafiro’ after his beloved mother in Logothetianika, Kythera, Greece.

With his brothers Andrew Khlentzos, a skilled candy maker, had established candy stores in Wichita and Missouri. Saphira was proud that the site of one of the stores is now part of the baseball diamond of the St Louis Cardinals.

In 1929 , Andrew and Stella ( pregnant with her fifth child) with their then four children ( Michael, Saphira, Helen and Peter) decided to flee the crippling depression of USA and joined Stella’s brothers, Nick and Dave , in Lithgow NSW Australia.

After Mary their third daughter was born in June, Andrew became a partner in the Paragon Café in Hay NSw with Mr Logothetis. The depression spread and Logothetis disappeared leaving Saphira’s father with no money as well as the debts of the business. It was the start of extreme hardship for the family which would last for over ten years. Andrew and Stella lost all their savings and were forced to leave Hay after their sixth child Billy was born in 1932.
The family moved to Sydney, with Stella trying desperately to raise her six children whilst Andrew washed floors and made candy. The two eldest children, Michael and Saphira, went to cricket and football matches at Moore Park selling their father’s homemade candy for 2 pence a stick. The sticks were thick solid candy 2 inches long and came in greaseproof paper wrapping in either strawberry or peppermint flavour.

Moves were many and sadly Andrew died in 1935 of stomach cancer leaving Stella with 6 children, the eldest being 11. There was no food in the house and they had to wait for their Uncle Nick and Aunty Aspa to bring them a loaf of bread to eat. So difficult was their plight that their uncle had to take them in for all to survive. A gesture emphasised by the fact the Uncle Nick was the sole wage earner of the family.

Saphira attended Sydney Girls High School and was a brilliant mathematician. An excellent student also blessed with a mature soprano singing voice, Saphira was forced to leave school and work in her uncle’s business in Lithgow at the age of 14. Saphira was treated harshly by her Uncle Dave’s wife, Aunty Ella and was forced to work in the shop in appalling conditions, without even a heater in heavy winters. A promise to educate her further was never kept. She felt cheated and when she had her own children she provided them all with equal opportunities and encouraged in their education.

Eventually Saphira moved back home and worked in a clothing factory until Charles Caravousanos met her and wanted to marry her. World War II brought more hardship with the conscription of her eldest brother Michael into the Air Force and posting in Papua New Guinea.

On the February 1943 Charles married Saphira at the Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church, Surry Hills.

They worked side by side in their business known as the Piccadilly” Café next door to the Capital Theatre. However she was known to disappear next door on occasions to watch her favourite movie stars appearing in a movie during a matinee. Many Greeks in the Australian Army treated the “Piccadilly” as their home away from home. Saphira’s hard-working and dignified manner generated great respect from them.

In May 1944 their first son John was born followed by the birth of their second son Andrew in November 1945. Saphira and Charlie (as many called him now) bought a house in Botany Street Kingsford also sold the “Piccadilly” in 1946.

They then purchased a delicatessen business in Taylor Square but the whispers of a railway station being built involving the actual sight bought concern to Saphira whose past had been proven difficult and they sold it to Nick Potiris.

In 1948 saw the leasing of the Athenian Restaurant in Castlereagh Street Sydney from peter Conomos and eventually purchased by Charles and Saphira in the 1950’s. In November 1950 their daughter Tina was born. The purchase of their new home in Willoughby followed in 1951. Their second daughter Marianne was born in May 1952.

The Athenian Restaurant became a landmark in Sydney in the 1950’s and 1960’s. Its reputation amongst members of the print media and multi-cultural migrants was second to none for its large meals for little money. No other restaurant offered a free loaf of bread with every meal, a pitcher of water and wine by the glass at an affordable price. With its success came Saphira’s selfless task of helping new arrivals from Greece with their job applications, interpreting needs for medical and legal matters and their naturalisation. It was never an issue for Saphira to accompany a young expectant mother or an elderly Greek to interpret for them when visiting a doctor.

She and Charles both loved to party as well as dine out with family, koumbari and friends alike. Latin Quarter, Chequers, The Couchman, La Taverna and the Chevron Silver Spade Room were to name a few, some of their favourite spots.

Her tireless effort in joining and visibly supporting organisations such as the Lyceum and the Young matrons was with purpose and direction. Saphira supported Charlie’s financing (together with Mina Psaltis) of the hire of the Paddington Town Hall to hold dances for the Kytherians who were struggling to create a new life in a new land.

Between them, Charles and Saphira had 48 godchildren. Saphira’s ritual was to open a special bank account at the end of January each year and then 2 weeks prior to Christmas withdraw the amount saved to purchase each one a Christmas present. Saphira not only gave a gift to her Godchild but also to their siblings. Her generosity was renowned.

With the purchase of the Athenian Club, a floor below the restaurant, Saphira became a skilled poker player, much to the awe of her male counterparts!

On the 4th December 1960 Saphira fulfilled a dream that many believed was impossible. Together with Charles, she took her four children on an overseas trip of a lifetime. The sea voyages and the travelling through over 10 countries was first class in every sense of the word, completed with a first class voyage home on the maiden voyage of the ‘Canberra’. Her children to this day cherish the memories of this overseas travel.

Saphira became the first President of the Kytherian Brotherhood Ladies Auxiliary. Through numerous generous gestures of both Saphira and Charlie, and the efforts of many parishioners, St Michael’s Church in Holterman St Crows Nest was built. Saphira made it her quest to be the owner of the initial church key and her generous donation made that a reality. Her love of this church and her deep-seeded religious beliefs were part of her everyday life.

After the sale of both the Athenian Restaurant and Club, Charles and Saphira opened an Athenian Take-Away Coffee Lounge near the Sydney Opera House. However it was sold quite soon after as Charlie’s health was suffering. The 1970’s brought the marriages of her children John, Marianne and Tina. From 1978 until 1991, 7 grandchildren (Charles, Simeon, Angelique, Shani, David, Charles and Michael) were born bringing them great joy.

After periods of overseas and interstate travelling, Saphira and Charles purchased a house in St Ives in 1978. Unfortunately the occasion was marred by Charlie’s sudden stroke the same year prior to them moving out of Willoughby. However in her typical strong manner Saphira was steadfast in her faith and hope that all would be fine. Sadly on 2nd July 1985 Charles died. Saphira never really recovered from her loss.

For the next 28 years Saphira filled her life with her family. Her Zest for life knew no boundaries. Her delight was to travel with children and grandchildren alike, always in style. She celebrated the achievements of her grandchildren which brought her great pride and happiness.

In later years she suffered a horrific accident in a shopping centre when the faulty automatic doors closed suddenly causing serious life-threating injuries. The recovery was slow but her fight and spirit enormous. The marriage of her granddaughter, Shani, to Tony brought her great joy with the crowning glory being the birth of her great-grandson Chase John . Saphira never stopped bragging about this ‘blessed gift’ . The respect for her can easily be measured by the wonderful outpouring of prayers and services held for Saphira during her illness. Saphira was astounded at these enormous acts of love for her. Prayer sessions were held at mosques, synagogues, Hindu and Buddhist temples, shrines, cathedrals and churches all over the world. She was certainly a lady of presence and style who touched the hearts of many, old and young alike.

Her greatest wish was to have all her family around her in those final days. God granted her wish. She will be sorely missed and in our hearts forever.

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Kytherian Newsletter Sydney on 12.04.2013

Mrs Saphira Caravousanos

First President of the Kytherian Ladies Auxiliary
Sydney, NSW, Australia

This interesting account of the life of Mrs Caravousanos, was written by her son Andrew, and with his permission we share it with all our members.

On Sunday 24th December 1924, the weather in Carthage Missouri USA was well below zero and considered “the worst winter’s day in the city’s history”. There were no Sunday papers to forecast hopeful improvement so its citizens gathered in churches praying for relief. Yet for Andrew & Stella ( Stamatoula) Khlentzos, warmth was abundant with the birth of their first daughter Saphira(their second child within a calendar year). Andrew was so thrilled that a daughter was born so that he could name her ‘Zafiro’ after his beloved mother in Logothetianika, Kythera, Greece.

With his brothers Andrew Khlentzos, a skilled candy maker, had established candy stores in Wichita and Missouri. Saphira was proud that the site of one of the stores is now part of the baseball diamond of the St Louis Cardinals.

In 1929 , Andrew and Stella ( pregnant with her fifth child) with their then four children ( Michael, Saphira, Helen and Peter) decided to flee the crippling depression of USA and joined Stella’s brothers, Nick and Dave , in Lithgow NSW Australia.

After Mary their third daughter was born in June, Andrew became a partner in the Paragon Café in Hay NSw with Mr Logothetis. The depression spread and Logothetis disappeared leaving Saphira’s father with no money as well as the debts of the business. It was the start of extreme hardship for the family which would last for over ten years. Andrew and Stella lost all their savings and were forced to leave Hay after their sixth child Billy was born in 1932.
The family moved to Sydney, with Stella trying desperately to raise her six children whilst Andrew washed floors and made candy. The two eldest children, Michael and Saphira, went to cricket and football matches at Moore Park selling their father’s homemade candy for 2 pence a stick. The sticks were thick solid candy 2 inches long and came in greaseproof paper wrapping in either strawberry or peppermint flavour.

Moves were many and sadly Andrew died in 1935 of stomach cancer leaving Stella with 6 children, the eldest being 11. There was no food in the house and they had to wait for their Uncle Nick and Aunty Aspa to bring them a loaf of bread to eat. So difficult was their plight that their uncle had to take them in for all to survive. A gesture emphasised by the fact the Uncle Nick was the sole wage earner of the family.

Saphira attended Sydney Girls High School and was a brilliant mathematician. An excellent student also blessed with a mature soprano singing voice, Saphira was forced to leave school and work in her uncle’s business in Lithgow at the age of 14. Saphira was treated harshly by her Uncle Dave’s wife, Aunty Ella and was forced to work in the shop in appalling conditions, without even a heater in heavy winters. A promise to educate her further was never kept. She felt cheated and when she had her own children she provided them all with equal opportunities and encouraged in their education.

Eventually Saphira moved back home and worked in a clothing factory until Charles Caravousanos met her and wanted to marry her. World War II brought more hardship with the conscription of her eldest brother Michael into the Air Force and posting in Papua New Guinea.

On the February 1943 Charles married Saphira at the Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church, Surry Hills.

They worked side by side in their business known as the Piccadilly” Café next door to the Capital Theatre. However she was known to disappear next door on occasions to watch her favourite movie stars appearing in a movie during a matinee. Many Greeks in the Australian Army treated the “Piccadilly” as their home away from home. Saphira’s hard-working and dignified manner generated great respect from them.

In May 1944 their first son John was born followed by the birth of their second son Andrew in November 1945. Saphira and Charlie (as many called him now) bought a house in Botany Street Kingsford also sold the “Piccadilly” in 1946.

They then purchased a delicatessen business in Taylor Square but the whispers of a railway station being built involving the actual sight bought concern to Saphira whose past had been proven difficult and they sold it to Nick Potiris.

In 1948 saw the leasing of the Athenian Restaurant in Castlereagh Street Sydney from peter Conomos and eventually purchased by Charles and Saphira in the 1950’s. In November 1950 their daughter Tina was born. The purchase of their new home in Willoughby followed in 1951. Their second daughter Marianne was born in May 1952.

The Athenian Restaurant became a landmark in Sydney in the 1950’s and 1960’s. Its reputation amongst members of the print media and multi-cultural migrants was second to none for its large meals for little money. No other restaurant offered a free loaf of bread with every meal, a pitcher of water and wine by the glass at an affordable price. With its success came Saphira’s selfless task of helping new arrivals from Greece with their job applications, interpreting needs for medical and legal matters and their naturalisation. It was never an issue for Saphira to accompany a young expectant mother or an elderly Greek to interpret for them when visiting a doctor.

She and Charles both loved to party as well as dine out with family, koumbari and friends alike. Latin Quarter, Chequers, The Couchman, La Taverna and the Chevron Silver Spade Room were to name a few, some of their favourite spots.

Her tireless effort in joining and visibly supporting organisations such as the Lyceum and the Young matrons was with purpose and direction. Saphira supported Charlie’s financing (together with Mina Psaltis) of the hire of the Paddington Town Hall to hold dances for the Kytherians who were struggling to create a new life in a new land.

Between them, Charles and Saphira had 48 godchildren. Saphira’s ritual was to open a special bank account at the end of January each year and then 2 weeks prior to Christmas withdraw the amount saved to purchase each one a Christmas present. Saphira not only gave a gift to her Godchild but also to their siblings. Her generosity was renowned.

With the purchase of the Athenian Club, a floor below the restaurant, Saphira became a skilled poker player, much to the awe of her male counterparts!

On the 4th December 1960 Saphira fulfilled a dream that many believed was impossible. Together with Charles, she took her four children on an overseas trip of a lifetime. The sea voyages and the travelling through over 10 countries was first class in every sense of the word, completed with a first class voyage home on the maiden voyage of the ‘Canberra’. Her children to this day cherish the memories of this overseas travel.

Saphira became the first President of the Kytherian Brotherhood Ladies Auxiliary. Through numerous generous gestures of both Saphira and Charlie, and the efforts of many parishioners, St Michael’s Church in Holterman St Crows Nest was built. Saphira made it her quest to be the owner of the initial church key and her generous donation made that a reality. Her love of this church and her deep-seeded religious beliefs were part of her everyday life.

After the sale of both the Athenian Restaurant and Club, Charles and Saphira opened an Athenian Take-Away Coffee Lounge near the Sydney Opera House. However it was sold quite soon after as Charlie’s health was suffering. The 1970’s brought the marriages of her children John, Marianne and Tina. From 1978 until 1991, 7 grandchildren (Charles, Simeon, Angelique, Shani, David, Charles and Michael) were born bringing them great joy.

After periods of overseas and interstate travelling, Saphira and Charles purchased a house in St Ives in 1978. Unfortunately the occasion was marred by Charlie’s sudden stroke the same year prior to them moving out of Willoughby. However in her typical strong manner Saphira was steadfast in her faith and hope that all would be fine. Sadly on 2nd July 1985 Charles died. Saphira never really recovered from her loss.

For the next 28 years Saphira filled her life with her family. Her Zest for life knew no boundaries. Her delight was to travel with children and grandchildren alike, always in style. She celebrated the achievements of her grandchildren which brought her great pride and happiness.

In later years she suffered a horrific accident in a shopping centre when the faulty automatic doors closed suddenly causing serious life-threating injuries. The recovery was slow but her fight and spirit enormous. The marriage of her granddaughter, Shani, to Tony brought her great joy with the crowning glory being the birth of her great-grandson Chase John . Saphira never stopped bragging about this ‘blessed gift’ . The respect for her can easily be measured by the wonderful outpouring of prayers and services held for Saphira during her illness. Saphira was astounded at these enormous acts of love for her. Prayer sessions were held at mosques, synagogues, Hindu and Buddhist temples, shrines, cathedrals and churches all over the world. She was certainly a lady of presence and style who touched the hearts of many, old and young alike.

Her greatest wish was to have all her family around her in those final days. God granted her wish. She will be sorely missed and in our hearts forever.

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Barbara Zantiotis on 06.04.2013

Stephen & Anna Zantiotis 1968

My parents at a wedding in 1968.
My dad's parent's were Peter Steve Zantiotis from Agia Anastasia and Ekaterini (Katina) Moulos from Logothetianika.
My mum's parents were Peter Con Anastasopoulos from Perlegianika and Barbara Kominos.
My dad was born in Weston in 1928 and my mum was born in Perlegianika in 1938. She arrived in Australia in 1956.

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by John Sourrys on 06.04.2013

George Sourrys. Photo from the Nundah Village Advertising brochure.

My son, George Sourrys works as a model.

The photo above is a page from the Nundah Village advertsing brochure.

Download the entire brochure here:

CircaNundahBrochure.pdf

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by James Victor Prineas on 05.04.2013

Takis Efstathiou. Art Collector.

Τακης Ευσαθιου

Συλλεκτης Εργων Τεχνης

Download the full article, (in Greek) as a .pdf here:

Hearn Takis Efsathiou Art Collector.pdf

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Barbara Zantiotis on 24.01.2014

Kyrani (Anna) Anastasopoulos 1956

My mother was born on April 15, 1938 in Perlegianika.
Her parents were Peter Con Anastaspoulos and Barbara Komninou. Peter's parents were Con and Eleni and Barbara's parents were Denis and Kyrani (Castrisios).
In 1956, when Kyrani was 18, she left Kythera to begin a new life in Australia where her two brothers, Con and Denis, were already living having arrived a few years earlier.
This photo was taken on a trip to Wollongong.

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Barbara Zantiotis on 18.05.2014

George Steve Zantiotis 1950

George was the son of Steve and Eugenia from Agia Anastasia. George was born in 1911 and arrived in Australia in 1937. George and my paternal grandfather, Peter, were brothers.
George married Katina Protopsaltis and had three children, Steve, Peter and Jenny.

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Barbara Zantiotis on 01.04.2013

Stefanos Moulos

Stefanos Moulos was from Logothetianika. He arrived in Australia with his wife, Stavroula Kalopedis and their daughter Ekaterini (Katina) sometime in the 1920s.
Katina married Peter Steve Zantiotis in 1926. They had three children, Steve, Stephen (my dad) and Arthur.
The date when this photo was taken is unknown.

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Barbara Zantiotis on 24.01.2014

Baby Stephen Zantiotis

My dad, Stephen Zantiotis, was born in Weston (near Singleton) on March 10, 1928. I'm guessing this was taken about 1929 - 1930. Stephen's parents were Peter Steve Zantiotis from Agia Anastasia and Ekaterini (Katina) Moulos from Logothetianika.

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Barbara Zantiotis on 24.01.2014

Zantiotis wedding 1956

This was taken on November 19, 1956 on the occasion of the wedding of Stephen Zantiotis to Anna (Kyrani) Anastasopoulos - my parents.
My dad is on the left followed by his parents, Ekaterini (Moulos) and Peter then his brother Arthur.
The wedding was held at Agia Triada in Sydney.

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Barbara Zantiotis on 26.05.2015

Ernie & Stephen

Anastasios (Ernie) Steve Zantiotis and his nephew (my dad) Stephen Peter Zantiotis in the early 1950s.
Ernie was born in Kythera in 1908 and arrived in Australia in 1924. He passed away in Casino aged 90 in 1998. Ernie's wife, Mavis (Tapper), still lives in Casino.
Stephen was born in the NSW country town of Weston on 10/03/1928. His father, Peter Steve Zantiotis (Ernie's brother) was born in Kythera in 1898 and arrived in Australia in 1914.
My dad recently celebrated his 85th birhtday!

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Barbara Zantiotis on 25.03.2013

Little Stephen Zantiotis

My dad, Stephen Peter Zantiotis, playing his beloved violin about 1936 to 1938. My dad turned 85 on March 10, 2013 and still plays in an orchestra!

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Barbara Zantiotis on 09.03.2013

Anna & Mary 1964

My mother, Anna Zantiotis (Kyrani Anastasopoulos) and her forever friend, Mary Sofios (Patrikiou) on 16 August 1964. Anna and Mary went to school together in Kythera and are the best of friends to this day.

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Lafcadio Hearn Files on 12.02.2013

Masaaki Noda, with Greek marathon runner Maria Polyzou

Masaaki has donated a famous sculpture to the city of Marathon, to commemorate the 2,500 year anniversary of the Battle of Marathon.

Massaki and Maria, were underneath the Acropolis, admiring Maria's book on the subject of her efforts to run a series of Marathon's 3 years prior.

The book is called Spirit and Body.

In August 2010 Maria Polyzou successfully completed “The Battle of Marathon”

Two and a half millennia after The Battle of Marathon; an event widely acknowledged to have ensured the democratic legacy of Western culture, a Greek distance runner aspired to represent the legendary messenger Pheidippides.

Greek women’s marathon record holder Maria Polyzou had announced her intention to run the 520 kilometres (325 miles) from Athens to Sparta and back to Marathon virtually nonstop within six days, to mark the battle’s 2,500th year anniversary.

As a result she set off from the Acropolis July 26th and reached Sparta on July 29th, before running back to The Tomb of Marathon. This required her to run the equivalent of a double marathon every day for a week, with minimal rest.

“This is a special year for the sport and I want to be a part of our history…To put it simply, the marathon is part of my soul. You can’t undertake something like this if you do not believe in the whole idea of the marathon” Polyzou stated.

The marathon celebrates the run of soldier Pheidippides from the battlefield near Marathon to Athens in 490 BC. Pheidippides was carrying the news of a Greek victory over the Persians and is said to have collapsed and died at the completion of his efforts. But the original legend whose first report was 600 years after the battle, was that the messenger first went to Sparta to ask for help but was rebuffed due to the fact that the Spartans were in the middle of a religious festival. He then ran back to Marathon before going to Athens to announce the Greek victory following the successful efforts of 10,000 Athenian soldiers and 1,000 Plataeans who repelled King Darius’ invading army of Persia.

Polyzou was well prepared to spread the marathon spirit. At 42 she had been running marathons for 23 years. She is also the director of The Museum of Marathon and Vice President of Greece’s athletic federation SEGAS.

Having fulfilled her goal, she was welcomed by General Secretary of the Ministry for Culture Panos Bitsakses.

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Lafcadio Hearn Files on 11.02.2013

Masaaki Noda, Yakis Efsathiou, and Spyros Zagaris

At the Spirit of Hermes sculpture, Marathon Greece.

Spyros Zagaris is a former mayor of Marathon.

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Lafcadio Hearn Files on 05.02.2013

Takis Efstathiou and Masaaki Noda

At the Spirit of Hermes statue, in Marathon Greece, created by Masaaki.

Based in New York, Masaaki is one of the world's great sculptors.

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by DAILY TELEGRAPH on 03.02.2013

Rabbitohs chairman Nick Pappas awarded medal in Australia Day honours

Daily Telegraph, January 25, 2013

by: Staff Writer

Picture: Brett Costello Source: NewsLocal. South Sydney Rabbitohs chairman Nick Pappas is a man heavily involved in his culture and passions

Nick Pappas is a Castellorizian, but also a strong Philokytherian.

South Sydney Rabbitohs chairman Nick Pappas has been recognised for his contribution to league, the arts and the Greek-Australian community in the Australia Day honours.

For his impressive service to rugby league, the arts and the Greek-Australian community, he will be honoured with a Member of the Order medal.

Before his current role Mr Pappas was the club's lawyer and played a major part in the legal battle to reinstate the club to the NRL from its exclusion after the 1999 season.

"Playing a role in the club's reinstatement was definitely one of the high points in my legal career," he said.

"Serving as the chairman during the club's reawakening to the point the club is now - a frontrunner in the competition - is a privilege to be a part of."

Mr Pappas lives in Rose Bay, but spent 28 years living across the road from Maroubra Beach.

"I still feel very strongly about the area," he said. "Even now with the Rabbitohs, the club is deeply embedded in Maroubra and surrounding suburbs."

Mr Pappas is also secretary of the Greek Orthodox Archdiocesan Council and Trustee of the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of Australia Consolidated Trust of Australia.

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Neos Kosmos, Melbourne on 02.02.2013

Australia Day Honours recognise Hellenic achievement

Greek Australians honoured for service

Neos Kosmos

30 Jan 2013

MICHAEL SWEET

Eleven Greek and Cypriot Australians will receive Australia Day 2013 awards, marking outstanding service to their fellow citizens in Australia and internationally.

The honoured recipients are Mr Nicholas Begakis AM, Mr George Papadopoulos, Dr Nicholas Pappas, Reverend Father George Carpis, Mr George Lazaris, Dr George Peponis, Mr Panayiotes Yiannoudes, Professor Helen Zorbas, Gillian Nikakis OAM, Father Diogenis Patsouris OAM, and Major Paul Bellas.

The eleven awards reflect a diversity of practice within the Greek Australian community - from business and community leadership to international trade; from achievement in medicine to the development of public policy; from services to sport and cultural life, to matters of faith and the Greek Orthodox Church. All celebrate outstanding contributions to improving the lives of others.

In total, 571 Australians are receiving Australia Day awards in the general division of the Order of Australia.

Governor-General, Her Excellency Quentin Bryce AC CVO - who approved the 2013 Honours List - said that the awards "heighten our respect for one another, and they encourage Australians to think about the responsibilities of citizenship in our democracy.

"Awards in the Australian honours system represent the highest level of recognition accorded by our nation for outstanding achievement and service. The Honours announced today recognise community values and celebrate what is important and unifying in Australian life," said Ms Bryce.

Air Chief Marshal Angus Houston AC AFC (Ret'd), Chair of the Council of the Order, said the diversity of service across all fields of endeavour was recognised in the Australia Day Honours List.

"These awards are public recognition of people who provide outstanding community service and whose achievements enhance national identity.
"By their actions they demonstrate the qualities of positive role models. The recipients are not only worthy of respect but encourage emulation. These awards also recognise the 'quiet achievers' in our midst. They are people who serve the community, but do not seek accolades," Air Chief Marshal Houston said.

"The Order of Australia relies entirely upon community initiative for submission of nominations. It is important that the honours system continues to uphold the national ethos of valuing diversity and recognising the contributions made by citizens to Australian cultural and social life, regardless of background," he said.

Mr Nicholas Begakis told Neos Kosmos that he was "surprised and humbled" by his award.

"Given my Greek heritage, the sort of values my parents instilled in me, were those of community service - that one gets involved and puts one's hand up. That was natural," said the Adelaide-based business leader.

Speaking from Canberra, Reverend Father George Carpis - parish priest of St Nicholas' Greek Orthodox Community between 1962 and 2011 - said that he wished to dedicate his award to his wife and the many people in the ACT that he had worked with over 50 years.

Quiet-achiever George Lazaris, former President of the Cyprus Community of New South Wales and famous in Sydney's Maroubra suburb for helping others over more than 40 years, said that the award was totally unexpected.

"It's great to hear this news. I don't know who nominated me, I have my suspicions, but I don't know for sure. I never expected anything back."
Mr Panayiotes Yiannoudes - who has been honoured for his work in Greek and Cypriot community organisations - said that whilst he felt honoured to be given an Australia Day award, he neither sought nor expected accolades for his work in helping others.

"You must give to the maximum of your efforts, we live in a society where we must not expect just to receive but to give as well," said Mr Yiannoudes.

Cancer specialist Professor Helen Zorbas receives an award for her distinguished service to public health. Professor Zorbas told Neos Kosmos that she felt, "extremely honoured and privileged" to be included in the 2013 Honours List.

"This is the ultimate recognition for any Australian to receive, recognising a contribution to the fabric of the country in some way. To be counted amongst those people is very humbling," said the Sydney-based professor.