kythera family kythera family
  

Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

Showing 121 - 140 from 885 entries
Show: sorted by:

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by DAILY TELEGRAPH on 03.02.2013

Rabbitohs chairman Nick Pappas awarded medal in Australia Day honours

Daily Telegraph, January 25, 2013

by: Staff Writer

Picture: Brett Costello Source: NewsLocal. South Sydney Rabbitohs chairman Nick Pappas is a man heavily involved in his culture and passions

Nick Pappas is a Castellorizian, but also a strong Philokytherian.

South Sydney Rabbitohs chairman Nick Pappas has been recognised for his contribution to league, the arts and the Greek-Australian community in the Australia Day honours.

For his impressive service to rugby league, the arts and the Greek-Australian community, he will be honoured with a Member of the Order medal.

Before his current role Mr Pappas was the club's lawyer and played a major part in the legal battle to reinstate the club to the NRL from its exclusion after the 1999 season.

"Playing a role in the club's reinstatement was definitely one of the high points in my legal career," he said.

"Serving as the chairman during the club's reawakening to the point the club is now - a frontrunner in the competition - is a privilege to be a part of."

Mr Pappas lives in Rose Bay, but spent 28 years living across the road from Maroubra Beach.

"I still feel very strongly about the area," he said. "Even now with the Rabbitohs, the club is deeply embedded in Maroubra and surrounding suburbs."

Mr Pappas is also secretary of the Greek Orthodox Archdiocesan Council and Trustee of the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of Australia Consolidated Trust of Australia.

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Neos Kosmos, Melbourne on 02.02.2013

Australia Day Honours recognise Hellenic achievement

Greek Australians honoured for service

Neos Kosmos

30 Jan 2013

MICHAEL SWEET

Eleven Greek and Cypriot Australians will receive Australia Day 2013 awards, marking outstanding service to their fellow citizens in Australia and internationally.

The honoured recipients are Mr Nicholas Begakis AM, Mr George Papadopoulos, Dr Nicholas Pappas, Reverend Father George Carpis, Mr George Lazaris, Dr George Peponis, Mr Panayiotes Yiannoudes, Professor Helen Zorbas, Gillian Nikakis OAM, Father Diogenis Patsouris OAM, and Major Paul Bellas.

The eleven awards reflect a diversity of practice within the Greek Australian community - from business and community leadership to international trade; from achievement in medicine to the development of public policy; from services to sport and cultural life, to matters of faith and the Greek Orthodox Church. All celebrate outstanding contributions to improving the lives of others.

In total, 571 Australians are receiving Australia Day awards in the general division of the Order of Australia.

Governor-General, Her Excellency Quentin Bryce AC CVO - who approved the 2013 Honours List - said that the awards "heighten our respect for one another, and they encourage Australians to think about the responsibilities of citizenship in our democracy.

"Awards in the Australian honours system represent the highest level of recognition accorded by our nation for outstanding achievement and service. The Honours announced today recognise community values and celebrate what is important and unifying in Australian life," said Ms Bryce.

Air Chief Marshal Angus Houston AC AFC (Ret'd), Chair of the Council of the Order, said the diversity of service across all fields of endeavour was recognised in the Australia Day Honours List.

"These awards are public recognition of people who provide outstanding community service and whose achievements enhance national identity.
"By their actions they demonstrate the qualities of positive role models. The recipients are not only worthy of respect but encourage emulation. These awards also recognise the 'quiet achievers' in our midst. They are people who serve the community, but do not seek accolades," Air Chief Marshal Houston said.

"The Order of Australia relies entirely upon community initiative for submission of nominations. It is important that the honours system continues to uphold the national ethos of valuing diversity and recognising the contributions made by citizens to Australian cultural and social life, regardless of background," he said.

Mr Nicholas Begakis told Neos Kosmos that he was "surprised and humbled" by his award.

"Given my Greek heritage, the sort of values my parents instilled in me, were those of community service - that one gets involved and puts one's hand up. That was natural," said the Adelaide-based business leader.

Speaking from Canberra, Reverend Father George Carpis - parish priest of St Nicholas' Greek Orthodox Community between 1962 and 2011 - said that he wished to dedicate his award to his wife and the many people in the ACT that he had worked with over 50 years.

Quiet-achiever George Lazaris, former President of the Cyprus Community of New South Wales and famous in Sydney's Maroubra suburb for helping others over more than 40 years, said that the award was totally unexpected.

"It's great to hear this news. I don't know who nominated me, I have my suspicions, but I don't know for sure. I never expected anything back."
Mr Panayiotes Yiannoudes - who has been honoured for his work in Greek and Cypriot community organisations - said that whilst he felt honoured to be given an Australia Day award, he neither sought nor expected accolades for his work in helping others.

"You must give to the maximum of your efforts, we live in a society where we must not expect just to receive but to give as well," said Mr Yiannoudes.

Cancer specialist Professor Helen Zorbas receives an award for her distinguished service to public health. Professor Zorbas told Neos Kosmos that she felt, "extremely honoured and privileged" to be included in the 2013 Honours List.

"This is the ultimate recognition for any Australian to receive, recognising a contribution to the fabric of the country in some way. To be counted amongst those people is very humbling," said the Sydney-based professor.

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Lafcadio Hearn Files on 27.01.2013

Soko Koizumi with John Kassimatis

Soko is a grand daughter of Lafcadio Hearn. She is visiting Greece at the moment (January, 2013).

John (Yanni), who lives in Athens, and in Livathi, Kythera, has written an excellent life history of Lafcadio Hearn, (in Greek), which Soko is holding in her hands, in this photograph.

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by James Victor Prineas on 20.01.2013

Kytherian Brotherhood of Australia. Committee. 1979

Eleftherios Fatseas, President
Nick Sandeman, Vice President
Con Andronicos, Treasurer
Petros Coroneos
Con Gavrilis
Peter Kalligeros
George Cassimatis
Spiros Frilingos
Nick Samios
Nick S. Samios
Arthur Sklavos
Violet Sandeman

Back Row: Spiros Frilingos, Nick S. Samios, Arthur Sklavos, George Cassimatis, Nick Samios.

Front Row: Petros Coroneos, Violet Sandeman, Eleftherios Fatseas, President, Con Andronicos, Treasurer, Peter Kalligeros.

Absent: Nick Sandeman, Vice President, Con Gavrilis.

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Vasilia Uhrweiss (nee Margetis) on 17.12.2012

Archimandrite Athenagoras Varaklas at the wharf

Archimandrite Athenagoras Varaklas was appointed in 1923, and according to Anastasios Tamis, 'proved to be the most controversial clergyman of the pre-WWII period in Australia'.

See/ download:

Greek Orthodoxy in Australia.pdf

The date may be 1936(?), and the occasion Athenagoras' embarkation for Greece?

Others in the photograph include; left to right: ......Marcello, Bretos Margetis, (second Secretary of the Kytherian Brotherhood of Australia), George Margetis (son of Bretos), ..........Stavrianos, ............Grivas, Archimandrite Athenagoras, Kosmas Cassimatis (first President of the Kytherian Brotherhood of Australia), .............Pattinson (?) florist in Darlinghurst), Agape Lianos (nee, Comino), and George Lianos.

Back, standing: ............Bylos, ................Varvaressos, and (P(?) Marcello.

One person unidentified.

Man on his haunches at front, with child, unidentified.

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Lafcadio Hearn Files on 16.12.2012

From a photograph of Lafcadio Hearn taken in 1889

Λευκάδιος Χερν – Ο ελληνοϊρλανδός συγγραφέας των τριών ηπείρων

Η Ευρώπη τον εγέννησε, η Ασία τον εδημιούργησε ως λογοτέχνη περιωπής και η Αμερική τον ανέδειξε

Της ΦΩΤΕΙΝΗΣ ΤΟΜΑΗ

Levkathitika Nea

ΓΙΟΣ ΙΡΛΑΝΔΟΥ, ενός στρατιωτικού γιατρού που υπηρετούσε στη βρετανική διοίκηση των Επτανήσων, του Charles Ηearn, και Ελληνίδας, της Ρόζας Κασιμάτη, ο ελληνοϊρλανδός συγγραφέας Ρatrick Lafcadio Ηearn γεννήθηκε τον Ιούνιο του 1850 στη Λευκάδα, απ΄ όπου προέρχεται και το ενδιάμεσο όνομα με το οποίο βαπτίστηκε.

Σε ηλικία δύο ετών ακολούθησε μαζί με τη μητέρα του τον πατέρα του που μετατέθηκε πίσω στην Ιρλανδία. Έκτοτε θα ζήσει δυστυχισμένα παιδικά χρόνια, εγκαταλελειμμένος μετά το διαζύγιο των γονέων του στα χέρια μιας ηλικιωμένης θείας του, Ιρλανδής, που τον προόριζε για καθολικό ιερέα. Με ανεπτυγμένο αίσθημα κατωτερότητας λόγω του παρουσιαστικού του, κλειστός και εσωστρεφής χαρακτήρας, θα ζήσει μεταξύ Δουβλίνου και ΗΠΑ, όπου μετανάστευσε στα δεκαεννέα του για να γλιτώσει την ανέχεια και την πείνα ως το 1889, όταν ταξίδεψε για πρώτη φορά στην Ιαπωνία, όπου έμελλε να ζήσει τα τελευταία δεκατέσσερα χρόνια της ζωής του και να δημιουργήσει ουσιαστικά το μεγαλύτερο μέρος του συγγραφικού έργου του, για το οποίο έγινε παγκοσμίως γνωστός.

Σαν να επρόκειτο περί ουράνιας δικαίωσης, το σιωπηλό αγόρι που όπως φαίνεται κανείς από τους δύο γονείς του δεν αγάπησε αλλά και δεν ασχολήθηκε με την ανατροφή του, μειωμένης σωματικής διαπλάσεως και θύμα ατυχήματος από αβλεψία συμμαθητή του που του στέρησε το ένα μάτι, φτωχό που για τον λόγο αυτόν δεν μπόρεσε ποτέ να ολοκληρώσει τις σπουδές του στην Κλασική Φιλολογία, ήταν γραφτό να εισπράξει μετά θάνατον υπερπολλαπλάσια αποδοχή σε σχέση με την αδιαφορία που έτρεφε το περιβάλλον του γι΄ αυτόν.

Η προτομή του Λευκάδιου Χερν (Koizumi Yakumo) στο Πάρκο Παραλίας στη Λευκάδα

Statue of Lafcadio Hearn (Koizumi Yakumo), in the park on the Beach in Lefkada

Ο Λευκάδιος Χερν πέθανε στο Οκούμπο της Ιαπωνίας το 1904. Σχεδόν μαζί με τον θάνατό του έγινε γνωστό το έργο του στην Ελλάδα, όπου το 1910 άρχισαν να δημοσιεύονται σε φιλολογικά περιοδικά και εφημερίδες τα πρώτα αποσπάσματα λογοτεχνικών κειμένων του. Λίγα χρόνια αργότερα, στις 17 Σεπτεμβρίου 1932, η ιαπωνική πρεσβεία στην Αθήνα με ρηματική της διακοίνωση ανακοίνωνε στο ελληνικό ΥΠΕΞ την πρόθεσή της, όπως και του Ελληνοϊαπωνικού Συλλόγου, να εγείρει με δαπάνες της μια αναθηματική στήλη για τον Χερν στην κεντρική πλατεία της Λευκάδας και μια δεύτερη, δαπάναις της Ιαπωνοελληνικής Εταιρείας και του Συνδέσμου Χερν, στο Τόκιο. Στη βάση της στήλης που κατέπεσε στον σεισμό του 1952, αλλ΄ ανηγέρθη εκ νέου το 1984 και το 1987 συμπληρώθηκε με μια προτομή του Χερν, έργο του γλύπτη Σπύρου Κατωπόδη, υπήρχε η επιγραφή:

Plaque commemorating the achievements of Lafcadio Hearn

«Λευκαδίω Χερν (Κοϊζούμι Ιακούμω), μεγάλω συγγραφεί, το των Ιαπώνων αληθές πνεύμα παγκοσμίως και λαμπρώς εμφανίσαντι, σήμα ευγνωμοσύνης ιαπωνικού έθνους, μηνί Οκτωβρίω 1932, έτους 259200 Ιαπωνικής Αυτοκρατορίας».

Lafcadio Hearn (Koizumi Yakumo), a great writer, the true spirit of the Japanese and bright light for interpreting Japan to the world - with the gratitude of the Japanese nation, October 1932, the year 259200 of the Japanese Empire

Με την ίδια ρηματική διακοίνωση η ιαπωνική πλευρά χαρακτήριζε τον Χερν ως τον πρώτο συνεκτικό δεσμό στις σχέσεις των δύο χωρών. Σημειωτέον, το δευτερεύον όνομά του στα ιαπωνικά, Υakumo Κoizumi, έλαβε όταν υιοθετήθηκε από την οικογένεια Κoizumi, λίγο προτού νυμφευθεί την κόρη τους Setsu Κoizumi, προκειμένου να λάβει την ιαπωνική υπηκοότητα. Μαζί της απέκτησε τρεις γιους, τον Κazuo και τον Ιwao που σπούδασαν Φιλολογία και ασχολήθηκαν με την επιμέλεια και έκδοση του έργου του πατέρα τους μεταφράζοντάς το από τα αγγλικά στα ιαπωνικά, τον Κiyoshi, που έγινε γνωστός ζωγράφος, και μια κόρη, τη Suzuko, που έζησε μια μέτρια και ουδέτερη ζωή λόγω σοβαρών προβλημάτων υγείας.

Παραμένει ωστόσο εντυπωσιακό ακόμη και σήμερα το γεγονός ότι οι Ιάπωνες λάτρεψαν έναν συγγραφέα που ελάχιστα γνώριζε τη γλώσσα τους, αλλά έγραφε μόνο στα αγγλικά, και επιπλέον περιέγραφε, λόγω αμυδρής όρασης που διέθετε, όσα συνέβαιναν γύρω του από περιγραφές και αφηγήσεις φίλων και της γυναίκας του. Όπως πολύ χαρακτηριστικά ανέφερε σε πολυσέλιδο κείμενό του στο περιοδικό «Νέα Πορεία» (Αύγουστος – Οκτώβριος 1991), ο έλληνας πρέσβης στο Τόκιο (1990-1993), ε.τ. σήμερα, Κωνσταντίνος Βάσσης, από τους λίγους πραγματικά λόγιους διπλωμάτες καριέρας, «αντιθέτως (σ.σ.: με τον Χερν) υπάρχουν πολλοί ξένοι, ως επί το πλείστον Ευρωπαίοι, οι οποίοι ησχολήθησαν με την Ιαπωνία επιστημονικώς, αφιέρωσαν εις αυτήν όλην την ζωήν των, έγραψαν περί αυτής μεγάλα ιστορικά, λαογραφικά και γλωσσικά έργα. Αυτούς οι Ιάπωνες απλώς τους εξετίμησαν, τους παρεσημοφόρησαν. Στον Χερν όμως ανταπέδωσαν την αγάπη του με διαφόρους τρόπους».

Ως αποτέλεσμα αυτής της αγάπης αρχικά ιδρύθηκε στο Ματσούε, στην πρώτη πόλη όπου ο Χερν δίδαξε αγγλικά σε σχολεία της μέσης εκπαίδευσης και έμεινε 15 μήνες, ο Σύνδεσμος Χερν, με αξιόλογη ως σήμερα δράση, ενεργό μέλος του οποίου είναι ο εγγονός του συγγραφέα, Τoki, ενώ του ιδίου ο γιος και δισεγγονός του Χερν, Βon, είναι σήμερα διευθυντής του Μουσείου Χερν που ιδρύθηκε το 1933 και στεγάστηκε σε κτίριο με ελληνοπρεπή ρυθμό, αλλά επειδή δεν ταίριαζε με το περιβάλλον κατεδαφίστηκε και τη θέση του πήρε άλλο σε ιαπωνικό αρχιτεκτονικό ύφος. Στο Μουσείο Χερν εκτίθενται προσωπικά αντικείμενα του συγγραφέα, σπάνιες εκδόσεις των έργων του, αναμνηστικά εκθέματα κτλ. Στο Ματσούε το 1990 με τη συμπλήρωση 100 ετών από την άφιξη του Χερν στην Ιαπωνία έγινε πανηγυρική τελετή που περιελάμβανε διεθνές συμπόσιο και αποκάλυψη προτομής, που με δαπάνες της ελληνικής κυβέρνησης φιλοτέχνησε ο ίδιος γλύπτης (Σ. Κατωπόδης) ο οποίος τρεις δεκαετίες νωρίτερα είχε κάνει την προτομή για τον Δήμο Λευκάδας. Την ίδια χρονιά ο Δήμος Σιντζούκου (Shinjuku), 50 μέτρα από το ταφικό μνημείο στο Οκούμπου όπου τοποθετήθηκε η σορός του Χερν, αποφάσισε να δημιουργήσει πάρκο εκτάσεως 1.345,50 τ.μ. με εμφανή αρχιτεκτονικά σύνολα, δηλωτικά της ελληνικής καταγωγής του συγγραφέα: ένα είδος αρχαίας αγοράς, σειρά κιόνων, κρήνη, ναΐδριο που να θυμίζει ελληνορθόδοξο ναό (άνευ σταυρού) και χώρο παιδιάς και ανάπαυσης εν μέσω αλσυλλίου, σε περίοπτο χώρο του οποίου σχεδιάστηκε να τοποθετηθεί ψηφιδωτό, απεικονίζον χάρτη της Λευκάδας.

Το λογοτεχνικό έργο του Χερν υπήρξε πολυσχιδές, αν και όχι ενιαίο ποιοτικά. Στην Αμερική, για παράδειγμα, επί μία εικοσαετία το έργο του περιορίστηκε σε άρθρα εφημερίδων της Νέας Ορλεάνης και της Νέας Υόρκης, όπου έζησε, και σε μεταφράσεις γάλλων συγγραφέων. «Ο Χερν οφείλει πολλά στην Αμερική, και το αναγνωρίζει. Αν η Ιαπωνία τον εδημιούργησε ως συγγραφέα περιωπής, η Αμερική τον ανέδειξε. Με την διαφοράν ότι η τελευταία δεν είχε ιδιαίτερο λόγο να τον τιμήση και να φροντίση για την διαιώνιση της μνήμης του» έγραψε στο άρθρο του στο τεύχος της «Νέας Πορείας» ο πρέσβης ε.τ. Κ. Βάσσης. Στην «αμερικανική περίοδο» του συγγραφικού του έργου ανήκουν επίσης δύο μυθιστορήματα (είδος, πάντως, στο οποίο δεν διέπρεψε) και αναπλάσεις θρύλων και παραδόσεων ξένων λαών (εβραίων, Ινδών, Κινέζων και Φινλανδών) τις οποίες εξέδωσε σε δύο τόμους με τίτλους «Σκόρπια φύλλα από Παράξενη Λογοτεχνία» και «Μερικά Κινέζικα Φαντάσματα». Καλύτερο βιβλίο της αμερικανικής περιόδου πάντως θεωρείται το «Δύο χρόνια στις Γαλλικές Ινδίες», με εντυπώσεις από την παραμονή του στη νήσο Μαρτινίκ.

Στην ιαπωνική περίοδο, που είναι και η ουσιαστικότερη, ανήκουν 12 βιβλία, γραμμένα σχεδόν ένα κάθε χρόνο, αφιερωμένα εξ ολοκλήρου στην Ιαπωνία.

Σημαντική ήταν και η αλληλογραφία του που εξέδωσε ο πρωτότοκος γιος του, αλλά και οι πανεπιστημιακές παραδόσεις του που συγκεντρώθηκαν από φοιτητές του σε ογκώδεις τόμους βάσει σημειώσεων που κρατούσαν, δεδομένου ότι ο ίδιος δεν άφησε κείμενα διαλέξεών του, επειδή παρέδιδε μαθήματα αγγλικής λογοτεχνίας και κριτικής αυτοσχεδίως. Ο ίδιος έγραψε επίσης «Ιαπωνικά παραμύθια» για παιδιά.

Ο Οδυσσέας, η «τράτα» και ο μαρμαρωμένος βασιλιάς

ΕΝΔΙΑΦΕΡΟΥΣΑ είναι η ανίχνευση των ελληνικών καταβολών του συγγραφέα μέσα στο έργο του. Αν και δεν γνώριζε ελληνικά, ήταν λάτρης της ιστορίας, των παραδόσεων και των θρύλων της γενέτειράς του. Οι αέναες μετακινήσεις του από χώρα σε χώρα συμβολίζουν τις οδυσσειακές πλευρές του βίου του, ενώ οι αναφορές του σε αρχαίους έλληνες λυρικούς (Ανακρέοντα, Θεόκριτο, Μελέαγρο) είναι πυκνές στα έργα του. Αποσπασματικές ωστόσο ή λανθασμένες είναι οι γνώσεις του για νεότερα θέματα, όπως για τον χορό «τράτα» της περιοχής Μεγάρων ή τον θρύλο του μαρμαρωμένου βασιλιά, τον οποίο θα αναστήση ένας άγγελος όταν απελευθερωθεί η Κωνσταντινούπολη, με τη διαφορά ότι ο Χερν, μη γνωρίζοντας καλά την παράδοση, αντί βασιλιά και αγγέλου, ομιλεί περί ενός μοναχού. Αναμφίβολα ο Χερν ως συγγραφέας μπορεί να μην ανήκει στον πάνθεον των αρίστων της παγκόσμιας λογοτεχνίας, αλλά ως προσωπικότητα, παράγωγο των κληρονομικών καταβολών του και των παιδικών και εφηβικών εμπειριών του, υπήρξε μοναδικός.

http://www.kolivas.de/archives/12090

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by The Age, Melbourne on 14.12.2012

Reg Saunders with wife Dorothy

To Crete with love: a thank-you for bonds forged in war

The Age, Melbourne, December 14, 2012

Annabel Ross

Reporter

Leslie Manning, 99, meets Glenda Hume, the daughter of Aboriginal Digger Reg Saunders

''I'VE GOT a lot of kisses for this man,'' says Glenda Hume, planting another one on Leslie Manning's cheek. Ms Hume is the eldest surviving daughter of Reg Saunders, the first Aboriginal to be commissioned as an officer in the Australian Army.

Mr Manning, 99, served with Mr Saunders in the Battle of Crete in World War II. The two fought in 1941 as members of the Australian 2/7th Battalion, sent to defend Crete from Nazi occupation, and though they only met a couple of times, Mr Manning says: ''He was a very companionable fellow, Reg. Everybody liked him.''

While Mr Saunders, a Gunditjmara man from south-west Victoria, was fortunate enough to be protected from the the Germans by Cretan villagers for 11 months following the battle, Mr Manning unwittingly approached a Nazi boat a week after the conflict and spent the next four years in German concentration camps. Thursday marked the first time Ms Hume has met one of the soldiers who fought with her father in Crete.

Ms Hume and Mr Manning met for lunch at Philhellene Greek restaurant in Moonee Ponds, ahead of a fund-raising concert at Federation Square on Friday night by the Xylouris Ensemble. Headed by celebrated Cretan lute player Yiorgos Xylouris, the ensemble of local and Cretan musicians will pay tribute to the Australian soldiers, such as Mr Saunders and Mr Manning, who fought in Crete in 1941.

''We were very happy to take part and say thank you to the people who were there to fight side by side with us, for freedom,'' says Xylouris.

The owner of Philhellene - whose walls are decorated with pictures of the Anzacs in Crete - and vice-president of the PanCretan Association of Melbourne, John Rerakis, suggested the ensemble play at the event. ''You hear about Gallipoli, but you never hear about this,'' he says. ''It's a story that needs to be told.''

Profits from the concert will go towards building a ''42nd Street'' memorial in Chania, Crete, named after the strip on which the Anzacs, on a rare occasion, forced the Germans to retreat, enabling Commonwealth troops to evacuate from the south coast. The memorial was the brainchild of Ms Hume, who, touched by a visit to Crete in 2010 to meet the family who had protected her father in 1941, decided that something needed to be done to commemorate the bond between the Anzacs and the Cretans.

The site has been left unmarked for more than 70 years. Ms Hume hopes the concert, in which her cousin, Richard Frankland, will also perform, will raise the $20,000 needed to make and ship the bronze memorial plaque.

''When you've got it, you don't lose it,'' she says of the bond forged between her family and the Cretan villagers. ''The family that looked after Dad - their mother - he described her as the bravest woman he'd ever met,'' she says. ''What she did for all those soldiers and the way she risked a lot - he saw in them what he saw in his own family. That's what his own mum would have done and what his Gunditjmara people would have done.''

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by The Age, Melbourne on 14.12.2012

To Crete with love: a thank-you for bonds forged in war

The Age, Melbourne, December 14, 2012

Annabel Ross

Reporter

Leslie Manning, 99, meets Glenda Hume, the daughter of Aboriginal Digger Reg Saunders. The two men fought together in Crete. Photo: Joe Armao


''I'VE GOT a lot of kisses for this man,'' says Glenda Hume, planting another one on Leslie Manning's cheek. Ms Hume is the eldest surviving daughter of Reg Saunders, the first Aboriginal to be commissioned as an officer in the Australian Army.

Mr Manning, 99, served with Mr Saunders in the Battle of Crete in World War II. The two fought in 1941 as members of the Australian 2/7th Battalion, sent to defend Crete from Nazi occupation, and though they only met a couple of times, Mr Manning says: ''He was a very companionable fellow, Reg. Everybody liked him.''

While Mr Saunders, a Gunditjmara man from south-west Victoria, was fortunate enough to be protected from the the Germans by Cretan villagers for 11 months following the battle, Mr Manning unwittingly approached a Nazi boat a week after the conflict and spent the next four years in German concentration camps. Thursday marked the first time Ms Hume has met one of the soldiers who fought with her father in Crete.

Reg Saunders with wife Dorothy

Ms Hume and Mr Manning met for lunch at Philhellene Greek restaurant in Moonee Ponds, ahead of a fund-raising concert at Federation Square on Friday night by the Xylouris Ensemble. Headed by celebrated Cretan lute player Yiorgos Xylouris, the ensemble of local and Cretan musicians will pay tribute to the Australian soldiers, such as Mr Saunders and Mr Manning, who fought in Crete in 1941.

''We were very happy to take part and say thank you to the people who were there to fight side by side with us, for freedom,'' says Xylouris.

The owner of Philhellene - whose walls are decorated with pictures of the Anzacs in Crete - and vice-president of the PanCretan Association of Melbourne, John Rerakis, suggested the ensemble play at the event. ''You hear about Gallipoli, but you never hear about this,'' he says. ''It's a story that needs to be told.''

Profits from the concert will go towards building a ''42nd Street'' memorial in Chania, Crete, named after the strip on which the Anzacs, on a rare occasion, forced the Germans to retreat, enabling Commonwealth troops to evacuate from the south coast. The memorial was the brainchild of Ms Hume, who, touched by a visit to Crete in 2010 to meet the family who had protected her father in 1941, decided that something needed to be done to commemorate the bond between the Anzacs and the Cretans.

The site has been left unmarked for more than 70 years. Ms Hume hopes the concert, in which her cousin, Richard Frankland, will also perform, will raise the $20,000 needed to make and ship the bronze memorial plaque.

''When you've got it, you don't lose it,'' she says of the bond forged between her family and the Cretan villagers. ''The family that looked after Dad - their mother - he described her as the bravest woman he'd ever met,'' she says. ''What she did for all those soldiers and the way she risked a lot - he saw in them what he saw in his own family. That's what his own mum would have done and what his Gunditjmara people would have done.''

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Kytherian Association Of Australia on 20.12.2012

Angelo Notaras holding the Kytherian Medal of Honour

On the 10th December, 2012, at a ceremony at the Athenian Restaurant, Barrack Street, Sydney, attended by family, friends, and members of the Committee of the Kytherian Association of Australia, Angelo Notaras was presented with the Kytherian Medal of Honour.

Kytherian Medal of Honour, Reverse side.

He was also presented with a Certificate of Recognition which read:

Hellenic Republic

Municipality of Kythera

Honorary Award

KYTHERIAN MEDAL OF HONOUR

To

Evangelos Notaras,

in recognition of his achievements for the Greek Orthodox Church

and his social and cultural contribution

to Greek-Australian & Kytherian Culture

both in Australia and in Kythera

Kythera, December 1, 2012,

The Mayor of Kythera

Theodore Koukoulis

The Medal of the Municipality of Kythera
awarded by Professor George Leontsinis,
Municipal Councillor,
Representative of the Municipality of Kythera

Angelo Notaras received the award for the following services:

Services to the Greek Orthodox Church in Australia and the Greek community & Kytherian community in Australia & on Kythera

Services to the Kytherian Association of Australia (established 1922).


Services to the Greek Orthodox Church in Australia and the Greek community & Kytherian community in Australia & on Kythera
.

In 2000 Angelo Notaras was a member of the Millennium Heritage Committee of the Greek Orthodox Church and of the Greek Australian Sports Hall of Fame. The Greek Australian Sports Hall of Fame ensured recognition for Australian athletes of Greek heritage who had represented Australia and had attained prominent positions in Australian sport. The Millennium Heritage Committee formed the Provicare Foundation, a charity established under the auspices of the Greek Orthodox Church to aid disadvantaged persons suffering from alcohol and drug addiction.

Funding for the Provicare Foundation was undertaken on an Australia-wide basis under the direction of Angelo Notaras and Father Steven Scoutas of St Spyridon Church, Kingsford. Angelo Notaras and Father Steven developed a proposal under which Angelo and John manufactured (all at their own cost) moulds to create thousands of hollow plastic batons, fashioned to resemble Greek columns, that were distributed to communities and parishes throughout Australia, to be filled with coin donations. They also coordinated the packaging, transport and delivery of the plastic batons to every single Greek Orthodox parish and community across Australia, as well as monitoring and accounting for the returns after nine months. The initial efforts raised $500,000 and, with subsequent distribution and collection of batons, the final fundraising amount totalled some $700,000. This amount has been used to further the aims of the Provicare Foundation, focusing particularly on the Sydney metropolitan area. The success of these achievements is principally due to the inspiration, financial support and commitment of Angelo Notaras.

Angelo Notaras also participated in further fundraising for the purposes of refurbishing premises provided by the NSW Government at Marine Parade, Brighton-le-Sands; a sum in excess of $100,000 was raised for the Provicare Foundation and the Greek Welfare Centre to provide social services to disadvantaged persons.

As a result of these acts of beneficence, Angelo was awarded the "Cross of St. Andrew", the Greek Orthodox Church's highest award. The medal was presented on 28 November 2003 for “valuable services to the Church and the community”. (A photograph of Angelo Notaras, with wife Mary, taken on the day of presentation, is included with this nomination).
Services to the island of Kythera, Greece, and the Greek-Australian and Kytherian-Australian community.

Kythera is a small island that lies at the tip of the Peloponnese in southern Greece. The large island of Crete is located to the South of Kythera. Since 1854, a majority of the islands’ residents have chosen to migrate to Australia. 3000 Kytherians live on the island. There are 60,000 Kytherians and their descendants’ resident in Australia.

In 2003 James Prineas, a Kytherian-Australian living in Germany, devised the concept of an electronic cultural archive, based on an open access web-site. He proposed that www.kythera-family.net be established, and that instead of being based on the ‘standard’ principle of a ‘central’ web master, monitoring and ordering web content – the kythera-family site should be accessible to all. Kytherians from all around the world were empowered to upload photographs, stories and audio-files, directly onto the site. The concept sounds passé, 10 years ‘down the track’, but at the time, it was revolutionary.

Angelo Notaras recognised immediately that the idea was brilliant. He and John agreed to provide a substantial sum as seed capital to establish the web-site. With his contribution, and his imprimatur, the site became operational very quickly. In the past 10 years the site content has grown to almost 18,000 entries. It is construed as the ‘Encyclopaedia Kytherianika’ in the world, as well as an electronic museum of Kythera. Major encyclopaedias utilise its content. It is used by many universities for educational purposes and has already been the subject of a Master’s and Ph.D thesis. It is the envy of other Greek-Australian, and cultural institutions in Australia, and around the world. (See the original ‘prospectus’ form for the website which accompanies this nomination).
In 2005, Angelo Notaras was instrumental in setting up the Kytherian World Heritage Fund. (A 4-page brochure, summarising the achievements of the KWHF to 2010 is included with this nomination). The main aim of the fund was to preserve the Kytherian heritage for the benefit of Kytherians worldwide.

Kytherian World Heritage Fund

The work of the fund grew out of Angelo Notaras’ initiative, along with brothers John and Mitchell, to personally fund, the publication of former Ambassador to Greece, Hugh Gilchrist’s comprehensive historical research, detailing the relationship between Greeks and Australians. Australians and Greeks, Volume 1 was published in 1992. A large print run of 5000 units was produced.

Angelo Notaras also contributed funds to the second volume, Australians and Greeks, Volume 2 published in 1997. And to the third volume, Australians and Greeks, Volume 3, published in 2004. The three volumes are the definitive history of the Greek presence in Australia.
Since 1992, under Angelo Notaras’ stewardship, the KWHF has gradually evolved into a minor publishing house, with 22 books on its publication list. Over time the KWHF has either published, or been heavily associated with the best three volumes of the history of the Greeks in Australia, as well as the best individual volumes on Greek Life in Australia in 1916, Greeks in Queensland, Greeks in Australian Cafes, Greeks in Australian cinemas, and the Greeks relationship with the Australian military. Excellent individual biographies and life stories of Greek and Kytherian Australians also form part of the publication list. As does a very good Greek cookbook.

Kytherian history is also well represented. The Kytherian World Heritage Fund have produced a general history of Kythera, and specific histories of Kythera under British occupation, the origins of Kytherian Surnames, the history of the town of Potamos, books of vintage photographs taken on Kythera during the early part of the twentieth century, and the best DVD historical and tourist guide for Kythera, ever produced. All are in print, and available.

In 2012, KWHF plans to print four additional books, including Kytherian Surnames, which traces the derivation of every Kytherian surname, and a photographic book, detailing the island of Kythera from the air.

A book list can be downloaded at
/download/KWHFBookPriceList.pdf

Kytherian Photography & Realia. The plate glass negative collection of Panayotis Fatseas – 1,800 valuable prints – which would have been lost to posterity, without the intervention of Angelo Notaras (Sydney), the Kythera Cultural Association, (Potamos, Kythera), under the Directorship of John Stathatos, and the KWHF. Plate glass negatives photographs taken on Kythera from the 1920’s to 1940’s were deteriorating in a storeroom on the island. Angelo Notaras provided computers, scanners, printers, archiving material, and secure storage containers for this important preservation project. This led to a major exhibition at the prestigious Benaki Museum, Athens, in 2008, and to the publication of Panayotis Fatseas. Faces of Kythera, 1920-1938. (2008).
Angelo Notaras has also been involved with a number of Special Projects on the island of Kythera.

Eye Clinic on Kythera. KWHF provided some input into conceiving the idea. It was actioned by Professor Minas Coroneo, Professor of Ophthalmology, University of NSW. Minas mobilised ophthalmologists and optometrists from Europe and Australia, brought sophisticated equipment to the island, and tested the eye sight of many residents, and treated their eyes, en masse.

Medical Equipment containers to Kythera for distribution to the Hospital (Potamos), and Aged Care Facility, (Potamos). Financial and logistical aid in collecting, packing, and shipping beds, with internal moving parts, and equipment to enhance resident and patient mobility on the island. A 20ft container was sent in 2007, and a 40ft container in 2009. This should provide the residents on the island of Kythera with access to wheel chairs and other aids, for years to come.

Library Shelving for Kythera. Logistical and financial support to despatch library shelving, from Alhambra, Los Angeles, USA, to Kythera. (2009). These shelves will form part of the first lending library to be instigated on the island of Kythera. The projects was instigated and superbly managed by Cynthia Cavalenes-Jarvis, California, USA.

Services to the Kytherian Association of Australia (established 1922).

Angelo Notaras joined the Board of the Kytherian Association of Australia in 2005 and has had a profound impact on its activities. He has made a significant contribution in both terms of advice to and mentoring of the younger members of the Board .

Since his appointment to the Board his influence has been widespread and includes the following:
Angelo has encouraged a sharper focus on cultural issues, particularly through www.kythera-family.net and the book publishing arm of the Kytherian World Heritage Fund, with the result that the Association now expends far more funds on important cultural activities than it had done hitherto. As a result, many important works - in both the English and Greek language - have been published and made available for the first time.

With his proven business acumen, Angelo has provided wise counsel at the time the Association’s Board evaluated and purchased a building for investment purposes and for the creation of a substantial cultural resource centre and library in Rockdale known as Kythera House.

Angelo advised the Board on how to best achieve the refurbishment of Kythera House in order to provide a high quality cultural centre, which would be attractive to both members and friends of the Association, in order to promote greater use of the facility and the resources amongst members of the Kytherian and wider Greek-Australian community.

He has encouraged the setting up of record and account systems to increase the Association’s membership base.

Angelo has also determinedly pursued the revised and updating of the Association’s Constitution in order to help meet the needs of a 21st century cultural organisation.

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by The Age, Melbourne on 09.12.2012

In the footsteps of our father

The Age, November 20, 2010

Mike Sweet

Photograph: "I wanted to ring that bell to let him know we're here." GLENDA HUMES, eldest living daughter of Reg Saunders.

Last month, the family of Australia's most celebrated Aboriginal soldier travelled to Greece to walk in his footsteps.

AS THE European winter stretches south, the winds across the Aegean pick up, and flights into Nikos Kazantzakis International Airport in Heraklion may be cancelled. There's no such misfortune for Glenda Humes on this bright, crisp Cretan morning. The eldest living daughter of Reg Saunders, the first indigenous man to be commissioned as an officer in the Australian Army, has arrived in Crete. Alongside her are her grandchildren: Breanna, aged nine, six-year-old Summer, and William, aged four. Glenda's sisters Dorothy and Judith from Queensland are here, too, with husbands Russell and Rod. The hire cars are loaded up and the Saunders family heads west along the highway that skirts the northern coast of the island. The Psiloritis mountains of central Crete soar above us as waves roll in on the deserted beaches below, now empty of summer tourists.

''We planned this trip a year ago,'' says Judith, ''after we'd heard that some of the villagers who looked after dad were still alive. It was a chance to see what he had seen, to get an understanding of what he went through.''

As the journey begins, Glenda reflects on how she first got to know about the Cretan family that hid her father and what it will mean to meet them. ''It was when I read Harry Gordon's biography, written in the early 1960s. Dad didn't talk about his wartime exploits much. Just to be able to look them in the eye and say thank you will be a wonderful thing.''
But first we will retrace Saunders's steps on Crete to the beginning.
We're making for Souda Bay near Chania, where Glenda's father arrived with thousands of other Anzac troops on April 27, 1941. Just two weeks before, Saunders's 2/7th Battalion had gone ashore in Athens, as part of Operation Lustre, the dispatch of British, Australian and New Zealand troops from North Africa sent to defend mainland Greece against Nazi aggression. While the campaign was a noble cause, the plan was doomed from the outset. Overwhelmed by German air power, armaments and force of numbers, Greece was lost.

The 2/7th got as far as Larissa on the central plain before evacuating from Kalamata on April 25. Their destination was Crete - to bolster the defence of the strategically vital island. Bloodied but unbowed, the Anzacs disembarked at Souda Bay to fight one last battle - the Battle of Crete.

We drive on towards Rethymno, past Stavromenos and Perivolia - names synonymous with the story and sacrifices of Australians who fought for Crete in the last 10 desperate days and nights of May 1941. Soon the Lefka Ori, the White Mountains of the western side of the island, appear and the vast natural harbour of Souda Bay reveals itself. It is here that Saunders's story, like that of all the Anzacs who came to Crete, began. And it is here where many of those who fell, remain to this day.
We arrive at the Souda Bay Allied War Cemetery just a few hundred metres from the harbour where the troops first arrived. Among the 1527 graves lie 197 of the 274 Australians killed in the Battle of Crete; 447 graves are those of New Zealanders. Nearby is where Saunders's battalion took up its first position. In what was recognised later as one of many flaws in the deployments made in preparation for the German invasion, the 2/7th, an expert infantry battalion, was positioned at Georgioupolis, near the eastern entrance to Souda Bay. Its task was to defend a section of the north coast from a seaborne attack that never came. When the elite German paratroops appeared in the skies on May 20, Saunders and his fellow Diggers were spectators. In the days that followed, the 2/7th was moved to support a belated and unsuccessful counter-attack, but it would only engage the enemy seven days later, at a location known to the troops as 42nd Street.

Late in the morning of May 27, 1941, the German 141st Mountain Regiment advanced unknowingly towards hundreds of New Zealand and Australian troops dug in. Official records have been unable to confirm whether it was the Diggers of the 2/7th or the 28 Maori Battalion who began the action, but one story - one image - would forever symbolise the events that took place here. A young Maori rose from his position as machinegun fire tore the silver-green leaves off the olive trees. Knees bent, with one hand on hip and a clip of ammunition in the other, the Maori began to lead the ''Ka Mate'' haka. As his ancient war cry rang out, the New Zealanders and Australians charged with long bayonets fixed. It was a brutal affair. The Anzacs had taken a pounding from the air for weeks. What followed was terrifying retribution.

Taken by surprise, the elite Nazi troops fled in disarray, only to be pursued by the charging Anzacs. Saunders was with a patrol that made the initial contact with the enemy. Revealing his innate compassion, he would remember years later the remorse he felt on his first kill. ''I lined him up and I killed him. When I got there I was terribly sorry about it. He was a blond, blue-eyed bloke. His eyes were still open. I rolled him over to have a look at him and I thought 'Jesus, you're about the same age as me.' I wish I could say, 'Come on old fellow, get up and let's get on with the bloody game,' you know … thinking football.''

Minutes later Saunders was part of the charge. ''We were bolting along screeching at the tops of our voices. It was crazy, crazy … the most thrilling few minutes of my life. We stopped being ordinary blokes and became bloodlusted creatures … obsessed with this mad race to slaughter with the bayonet.''

At 42nd Street, about 300 German troops were bayoneted, shot or bludgeoned to death in the olive groves to the west of the lane. The 2/7th's casualties were 10 killed and 28 wounded; 14 of the Maoris were hit. This rout was one of the few occasions in the Battle of Crete when the Germans were forced into retreat.

The country lane that was 42nd Street is today known as Tsikalaria Street. It is an unremarkable road dissecting a nondescript industrial suburb on the outskirts of Chania. Most of the olive groves are long gone, but a few fields of ancient trees survive. Not even the most modest sign, let alone a memorial, has been erected to the victors or vanquished at 42nd Street.

Glenda and the family wander through one of the few remaining groves on the east of the road. Judith's husband bends down. In the soft red earth among the overgrown weeds, he has found something - a battered brass shell-casing from a bullet that has been fired. Has it lain here for 70 years? (On the family's return to Australia, analysis by experts at the Australian War Memorial confirms the casing is from a .303-inch Short Magazine Lee-Enfield, standard issue for the Allied troops on Crete.)
The charge at 42nd Street bought precious time for the Allies as the endgame of the Battle of Crete played out. The same day, the evacuation began in earnest. The the 2/7th was deployed to form a rearguard to protect the thousands of Allied soldiers making their way across the mountains to the south coast.

That afternoon we take the same route, passing through villages connected by lanes still barely wide enough for two cars, which lead to the town of Vrisses, the resting point for the troops before their arduous ascent of the White Mountains. Beyond the mountains lay salvation, evacuation from a fishing village called Hora Sfakia.

The family spends the night in Vamos, a hamlet of gently rolling hills in the Apokoronas district. The next day Glenda would once again pick up her father's trail, to the south coast and the water's edge, where he found the ships had departed, leaving him and his mates behind.

Over four successive nights from May 28, 11,000 British and Commonwealth troops were evacuated from Sfakia to Egypt. The 2/7th was the last to arrive on the final night of the evacuation. Its senior officer, Lieutenant-Colonel Theo Walker, was on the barge that was to ferry the last group of soldiers to the waiting destroyer. When Walker saw his men were unable to board, he stepped off. For Saunders, like the thousands of other soldiers abandoned at the water's edge in Sfakia, there was a choice; surrender or head to the mountains.

Beside the waterfront tavernas at Sfakia, Glenda looks out across the bay her father saw, as he watched the last ship depart into the darkness. ''When he had a choice to surrender or go bush, that was a very easy decision for him to make,'' says Glenda. ''He'd grown up in the bush and would have been able to read the signs, and he would have shared that knowledge.''

The next day thousands did surrender. More than 12,000 Allied troops who fought the Battle of Crete became prisoners of war - 5000 of those were Anzacs.

Saunders was not alone. Hundreds of Allied troops had avoided capture. After moving through the mountains in the weeks that followed the Allied capitulation, Saunders arrived at a village called Labini in the hills south of Rethymno. Of all the hideouts during his time on the run, it was at Labini that he stayed the longest, protected by a woman and her children. Twenty years later he would describe this remarkable matriarch. ''Vasiliki Zacharakis was the bravest woman I've ever seen … classical features and magnificent flashing eyes. She walked straight as a gun barrel and had courage to match. Never saw a woman with so much ruddy strength.''

It takes two hours to drive east along the south coast from Sfakia to Labini. Vasiliki passed away in 1992 but her children, Areti and her elder brother Yiannis, still live in the village. Both formed a close friendship with Saunders and have fond memories of the young Australian soldier they knew as Rengis. A profound appreciation of the kindness and bravery shown by Vasiliki and her children stayed with Reg Saunders for the rest of his life.

''Their courage and generosity never ceased to amaze me. It went beyond being helpful to another human being. Sometimes I used to ask why they were doing it, and the answer boiled down to two reasons: they hated the Germans intensely, and as the Germans looted towns and wiped out whole villages this hatred became more intense. Second, they seemed terribly impressed by the fact that we had come so far to fight a war which concerned them more than our own people.''

Areti and Yiannis are now in their 80s. Areti keeps a simple home in the village; her brother is a shepherd. The reunion of the Saunders and Zacharakis families is to take place at Labini's plateia, the small town square beside the Byzantine church of Panagia. It is the same square where Saunders, hiding in a tree, had witnessed the execution by a German firing squad of two Greeks who had helped the Allies. The people of Crete paid a dreadful price for their resistance. German records put the number of Cretans executed as 3474. A further 1000 civilians were killed in massacres in 1944. The true figures are certainly higher.
When Glenda and the family arrive at the square, Areti and Yiannis, along with their middle-aged children and teenage grandchildren, as well as a throng of other villagers, are already there. Glenda walks purposefully towards Areti with moist eyes. Words are unnecessary. Glenda and Areti embrace. Past and present bleed into one - a quiet, profound expression of thanks across generations, for sacrifice, courage and a kinship born in the storm of war.

Saunders and Vasiliki's daughters walk hand in hand as the celebration moves to Areti's ancient two-room house in the labyrinthine alley ways that make up Labini. Raki, the fiery Cretan alcoholic spirit is offered. Glasses are charged and held high to exclamations of ''Eviva!''. As the party continues, through the interpreter, Glenda discovers more about her father's time in the village. ''We used to take him food and blankets, anything he needed,'' says Areti. ''We taught him Greek. He was like a brother to us.''

As the details of the relationship between Saunders and the Zacharakis family in 1941 are revealed inside the house, outside, 12-year-old Danae Perdikakis, Areti's English-speaking granddaughter, is deep in conversation with Breanna. Danae is keen to know more about the life of a young Gunditjmara girl in Perth. ''Do you use Skype?'' she asks.
A few kilometres away, on a hillside north of the village, is the church of Agios Ioannis Theologos where Breanna's great-grandfather was hidden just outside Labini, in a ruined village called Lofia that was destroyed in Ottoman times. Still accessible only by foot, it was here the Zacharakis family would tend their flocks in the summer. Yiannis leads the way to the isolated church that Saunders shared with two other Diggers - George Burgess of the 2/3rd Battalion and Les ''Dodger'' Vincent of the 2/1st, along with a New Zealander, Arthur Lambert of NZ 18th Battalion.

The tiny chapel altar still holds the icons that looked down on the soldiers as they slept. Yiannis would bring them food each day prepared by his mother. Today his son Stratos has brought a Cretan picnic - loukoumades, the sweet Greek biscuits, and more raki. In the bright sunshine glasses are raised and more ''Evivas!'' exclaimed.

Glenda looks at the old bell in the belfry above with a glint in her eye. ''Let me ring that bell,'' she says excitedly. ''This is the Saunders saying we're in town!'' The rich round tones ring out across the valley; the sound of a precious reconnection made across continents, cultures and time itself.
Vasiliki Zacharakis' last resting place is in Labini's small cemetery.

Glenda and the family have arranged to meet Areti at the graveside. As they approach, Vasiliki's daughter is standing beside her mother's grave, hands clasped. She is talking loudly in Greek, addressing the grave. ''Siko mama - wake up mother. Rengis's children are here. Why do you sleep? Siko mama - mother get up. They have brought you flowers.'' There's a shocking intensity to Areti's invocation - a traditional Cretan way of expressing grief. Glenda consoles her and explains that they have come to thank her mother for what she did for Reg and the other soldiers. Glenda places a sprig of wattle beside the headstone and explains its symbolism. In Greek Orthodox tradition, Dorothy and Judith pass a casket of smoking incense in the sign of the cross above the wide family grave. Tears are shed and wiped. The last ritual of the stay at Labini is complete.

Within weeks of the fall of Crete, the British Special Operations Executive was tasked with assisting the Cretan resistance and organising the evacuation of the hundreds of soldiers who were hiding on the island. Saunders covered a large part of western and central Crete while on the run. The bush skills he had learned in the stringybark country of western Victoria served him well. Away from Labini he was constantly on the move, usually with others in small groups. They would split up and re-form, depending on where one or another felt the best chance of protection and escape lay. Saunders travelled much of the time with Burgess, Lambert and Vincent. They moved on foot, mostly at night. They crossed and recrossed the mountains, lived in caves, scaled the desolate high passes; avoiding roads, they traversed the flat fertile plains taking shelter where they could. Shepherds would bring warnings of German patrols, news of a safe house in the next village, and occasionally, knowledge of gatherings of troops waiting above a beach, where in the dead of night an evacuation was due. Together they came close to getting away in January 1942, but the operation was cancelled because of rough seas. Soon after, Arthur Lambert was captured.

Saunders finally left Crete four months later. From official records of operations in May 1942, the location for the evacuation that took Saunders off Crete, along with Burgess and Vincent and at least 30 other men, was due south of Heraklion, below the village of Krotos.
IT IS still a wild isolated place, accessible even today only with difficulty. We arrive at the beach late in the afternoon. The sun, low on the horizon, casts a rich yellow light and long shadows as the children play by the water's edge. Their great-grandfather's Cretan odyssey ended here.
''We've come full circle,'' says Glenda quietly, looking out to sea. ''I was always close to my father, but I feel closer to him now than I've been for a very long time.''

Summer and William throw stones into the waves that curl and break at their feet. Breanna peers out to the horizon, protecting her eyes against the setting sun. ''I've seen my grandchildren grow on this trip,'' says Glenda. ''To them, before we came here, my dad was just a picture on the wall, a painting in the War Memorial.''

Coaxed into sharing the emotions experienced, Glenda brings to mind the ringing of the church bell. ''I wanted to ring that bell to let him know we're here,'' she says defiantly. ''I wanted him to know that his children and grandchildren are here, and we'll yell it out to the hills and valleys of Labini. And we did.''

Dorothy says she has felt joy and sorrow on this journey. ''What this journey has shown me, is that in times of need, ordinary people can do extraordinary things.''

Already Glenda is thinking about the next chapter in the story. ''Our granddaughters have connected and that's really important. We know each other now and we won't let go of that. I always knew they were kind people. But you don't really know that stuff until you come here and you see it and you're part of it. They just enfold you in their arms and keep you close. We're coming back,'' she says emphatically.

The connection created in wartime between Vassaliki Zacharakis, her children and Reg Saunders has lasted nearly 70 years. As the events of what occurred at Labini those years ago near the end of living memory, in 2010 their children have woven new strands to that eternal bond. Vasiliki and Reg are gone but their legacy remains, forever a reaffirmation of the power of unyielding courage and kinship.

Mike Sweet is a journalist and documentary film maker.

Research sources:

The Embarrassing Australian: The story of an Aboriginal warrior , Lansdowne Press 1962, courtesy of the author, Harry Gordon;

From Greece to Crete - Before and After, by Arthur Lambert. 2001; Greece, Crete and Syria, Gavin Long.

Additional interview extracts courtesy Australian War Memorial.

Historical adviser: Dr Peter Ewer; translation: Sophia Troullinou.

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Kytherian Religious Consciousness on 05.12.2012

Professor Minas Coroneo was awarded the Gold Cross of St Andrew

by Archbishop Stylianos on his name day, Monday November 26th, 2012. Very few of the St Andrews Crosses have ever been awarded. Only 4 of the Gold St Andrew Cross have been awarded.

The Cross is presented for valuable services to the Church and the community. The Cross was presented along with a certificate, signed by His Eminence, with the wording “Honorary Award / The Gold Cross of St Andrew is hereby presented to Minas Coroneo ”.

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Neos Kosmos, Melbourne on 25.04.2013

Australia's new consulate general for Greece Haralabmos Darafanos, meets with Quentin Bryce at Government House in Canberra.

L-R: Mrs Darafanos; Quentin Bryce; with Haralambos Darafanos.

Warm welcome for Darafanos

Neos Kosmos, 3 Dec 2012


Australia's new Ambassador for Greece Haralabmos Darafanos, met with Quentin Bryce at Government House in Canberra.

Mr Darafanos' wife also attended the event, as did the Counsellors of the Embassy Loukas Tsokos, Evi Siaplaoura and Constantine Koutsopoulos.

After the presentation of credentials, the new Ambassador of Greece had a twenty minute private meeting with the Governor General in the presence of officials of the Australian Government and DFAT

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by The Japan Times on 21.11.2012

A Journey inside the mind of Lafcadio Hearn

The Japan Times

Friday, Nov. 5, 2010

By LISA GAY and FINTAN MONAGHAN

Special to The Japan Times


Photograph: "Relief Portrait of Koizumi Yakumo" by Minoru Kurasawa.

One hundred and twenty years ago, Greek-Irish writer Lafcadio Hearn first arrived in Japan; in Matsue, a provincial backwater in Shimane Prefecture, he became Koizumi Yakumo — his adopted Japanese name. Enamored with the city's ancient and enduring culture, he married into a local samurai family: No wonder, then, that it was in Matsue that Hearn wrote his famous "Glimpses of Unfamiliar Japan." This month, the city is celebrating its most famous (adopted) son with an art exhibition.

Entitled "The Open Mind of Lafcadio Hearn," the show is Matsue's version of a 2009 exhibition at the American College of Greece, which was nearly 15 years in the making. The idea first came to Greek art dealer Takis Efstathiou and Japanese artist Masaaki Noda back in 1996 when the pair traveled from Paris to the small Greek island of Lefkada (Hearn's birthplace and namesake). After visiting Hearn's childhood home and talking with locals who remembered old stories about his family, they decided to ask the college to sponsor a statue to commemorate Hearn.

"At the time, there was no door for foreign artists to get into Greece," recalls Noda.

Years later, as Noda's profile in the art world strengthened, he finally got the greenlight to create the sculpture "Open Mind of Lafcadio Hearn." The finished piece is a tangle of metallic wings twisting toward the sky: One points Westward, the other East. In the middle is empty space — but viewed from the right angle, it forms a heart. "I came up with the name," jokes Efstathiou, "but Noda brought the heart."

While the original idea was a single sculpture, it blossomed into an entire exhibition of works celebrating Lafcadio Hearn's multicultural mindset. It was the success of the Greek show that laid the groundwork for the current exhibition in Matsue, complete with a sister statue, also by Noda, standing on the shores of Lake Shinji.

The main venue for the exhibition was, until Nov. 3, the striking Matsue Castle (from tomorrow til Nov. 14 the show will move to Karakoro Art Studio and the Lafcadio Hearn Memorial Museum). Looming over Lake Shinji from its hilltop perch, the castle was evocatively described by Hearn as a "vast, iron-grey dragon." But trying to book the ancient keep for the show wasn't easy.

"Everyone was against it at the start," recalls Shoko Koizumi, head of the Koizumi Yakumo Society. "But eventually, with persistence and the right contacts, we were able to get permission."

A diversity of themes were at play among the thick, wooden beams of the castle: Hearn as man, traveller, storyteller, symbol of multiculturalism, and even figure of myth and legend. Masatoshi Izumi's abstract "Kokoro," for example, is a smooth, gently curving stonework that seemingly represents the source of all living things.

Others take a more direct approach: Debra Bowden and Christos P. Garoufalis base their portraits on famous images of Hearn, while Seiho Wada depicts Jozan Inari shrine, one of Hearn's favorite places. Ynez Johnston paints a delightful picture of Hearn the exotic traveler, while Zoe Savina draws inspiration from Greek myth. Her poem, "To the Plum Trees — The Other Odysseus Dedicated to Lafcadio Hearn," is written in Hearn's three tongues, Japanese, English and Greek, and displayed on a striking azure wall-hanging of clouds and butterflies.

Other artists look to Hearn's stories. "I read 'Kwaidan,' which I couldn't put down," reveals Irish artist Stacia Blake, "and I especially loved 'The Dead Secret.' " The story concludes with a monk discovering a letter containing "O-Sono's secret," a mystery not revealed to the reader. Blake's abstract piece depicts what she imagines the secret to be.

Another engaging work is Aris Stoidis' "Death Giving Life, Rebirth." Taking a cue from "The Story of Kogi the Priest," Stoidis presents a giant, transparent paper fish. When illuminated, an outline of a human skeleton becomes visible, representing Hearn's rebirth in Japan.

But the most stirring works explore Hearn the orphan looking for a home. From Mitsumasa Anno, we have a portrait of Hearn's mother, based on recollections by Lefkada residents. This is particularly poignant as Hearn is said to have wanted a portrait of his mother so badly that he'd have given a fortune to have it. Along similar lines is a work by Vassiliki Koskiniotou suggestive of Hearn's search for a mother-figure and ultimately finding it in his wife Setsu.

A number of contributors to the original Greek show have returned for the Matsue exhibition, including Alexandros Maganiotis. "It's a digital collage," Maganiotis said of his piece. "Even though it's new in technique, it's old in the way it looks." Resembling a yellowing parchment, the piece depicts a double image of Hearn. One is dressed in western garb, its mirror image in kimono. "I think he was looking for a place that felt like home because he was dislocated to start with. . . . I think he found a home in Japan."

The end of Hearn's romance with Japan is a well-kept secret only obliquely referred to in this show. Hearn arrived in a time of great turmoil. Japan had just won the Sino-Japanese war and was rapidly Westernizing. Old traditions were under threat. Writing to his friend Basil Chamberlain in 1893, Hearn lamented that the "the world of electricity, steam, mathematics, is blank and cold and void." The exhibition chooses to touch on the diversity and contradiction within Hearn's thoughts with this quote: "To the child, the world is blue and green; to the old man, grey — both are right."

"The Open Mind of Lafcadio Hearn" takes place in Matsue City, Shimane Prefecture.

The show runs at Karakoro Art Studio and the Lafcadio Hearn Memorial Museum Nov. 6-14th.

For more information, visit yakumokai.org/2349

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Lafcadio Hearn Files on 21.11.2012

Katerina Thomas & Shuji Kawakawa

Viewing exhibits in the LLafcadio Hearn Collection, the American College, in Athens, Greece.

http://www.acg.edu

6 Gravias Street GR-153 42 Aghia Paraskevi Athens, Greece

Phone: +30 210 600 9800

Center of Post-Lyceum Education

The American College of Greece-Deree College, a non-profit Center of Post Lyceum Education, admits students of any race, color and national or ethnic origin and does not discriminate in its programs.

Katerina Thomas is Academic Vice President Ad Interim and Dean of the College.

Shuji Kawakawa is Secretary General of the Japan-Greece Society
Tokyo, Japan.

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Lafcadio Hearn Files on 21.11.2012

Katerina Thomas & Shuji Kawakawa

At the American College, in Athens, Greece.

http://www.acg.edu

6 Gravias Street GR-153 42 Aghia Paraskevi Athens, Greece

Phone: +30 210 600 9800

Center of Post-Lyceum Education

The American College of Greece-Deree College, a non-profit Center of Post Lyceum Education, admits students of any race, color and national or ethnic origin and does not discriminate in its programs.

Katerina Thomas is Academic Vice President Ad Interim and Dean of the College.

Shuji Kawakawa is Secretary General of the Japan-Greece Society
Tokyo, Japan.

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Lafcadio Hearn Files on 10.11.2012

Masaaki Noda with prime minister Yoshihiko Noda.

In the Economic Report Magazine, Japan.

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Kytherian Adventures on 08.11.2012

Crossing the Ice wins 3 awards at the Banff Mountain Film Festival 2012

Photograph: Greg Quail of Quail Television (producer) and Jonesy (producer/director). Image courtesy of The Banff Centre.

We are absolutely stoked (and humbled) to announce that our documentary Crossing the Ice has won 3 awards at the Banff Mountain Film Festival 2012; the Adventure & Exploration category, the People’s Choice and the GRAND PRIZE!!

The Banff Mountain Film Festival is the most prestigious global outdoor film festival in the world. We have grown up being inspired and blown away by past films that have won the festival and have always had a distant dream that we could one day just enter a film in this festival. To win, is the realisation of a dream beyond our imagination. In 2010, our documentary 62 Days at Sea was a category winner.

Capturing our 89 day journey in Antarctica on film was one of our major personal goals when we were down south. We passionately love sharing our expeditions with the public. With no film crew, limited time (every moment we were filming and not hauling was reducing our chances of success in Antarctica) and filming in the cold was an absolute mission to say the least! Some days we really questioned whether it was worth but now we reflect on the footage and are super proud of what we shot.

A massive thank you to all involved in putting the documentary together. Although we’d like to thank everybody involved, we’d like to make special mention to Greg Quail: for believing in us, Dougie for pulling the story out of the footage… and of course Aleks Gamme for not only sharing his footage for our doco, but for being such an integral part of the story. Thank you.

What a great end to 2012!

Cas and Jonesy

http://casandjonesy.com.au/

Cas, of course, is Kytherian, James Castrission

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Kytherian Social News on 05.11.2012

Nicholas Peter Careedy (Karydis)

In Loving memory of Nicholas Peter Careedy (Karydis)

1-3-1912 to 14-10-2012

Nicholas Peter Careedy, the fourth child and only son of Peter and Marietta Careedy, was born in Mylopotams, Kythera on the 1st of March 1912. After completing high school in Kythera he remained in his village until he left for military service. He spent the first six months of service in the recruiting office of the 31st regiment in Athens and then in the office of the Military Academy. When he was discharged from the army, Nick completed a bee-keeping course, establishing his own business in Mylopotams; however the economic state of the 1930s forced him to migrate to Australia.

Nick arrived in Toowoomba on the 10th of January 1937 and worked in his brother-in-law, Harry Andronicos’ café. He became involved with the Greek Community’s Kytherian Association in Toowoomba and served on the committee for eight years. He was also on the organising committee of the Greek War Relief Fund.

When Japan bombed Darwin in February 1942, although still a Greek national, Nick enlisted in the Royal Australian Air-Force. He served for 3 ½ years in the security division and saw active service in Darwin and New Guinea. After he received his discharge he went to Goondiwindi for 12 months and then to Toowoomba where with Harry Andronicos opened a drapery business.

From 1946 he was a member of the RSL, eventually forming a Hellenic Sub-Branch. He became the foundation President and served for thirteen years. He was also given life membership in 2001 and a certificate of merit for his service. In 1951, he moved to Brisbane where he opened a frock salon in the city, became treasurer of the Greek Red Cross and a member of the Greek community.

In 1954, he joined AHEPA where he served as National Supreme President and was honoured with Life Membership in 2004.

Nick received the ‘Multicultural Services Award’ from the Premier of Queensland in 1997. Three years later, he was honoured with the Order of Australia medal at Government House for his charity work.

This year Nick was honoured with Life Membership to the Greek community.

Although experiencing much in his life, his proudest moments were marrying Nina Kalafatas in 1963, the birth of their much loved only child Marietta, who with her husband Paul, have been blessed with two beautiful children Connie and Nicholas.

In 2003, Nick, Nina, Paul, Marietta, Connie and Nicholas all journeyed to Greece for 5 weeks where Nick proudly got to show his family his homeland. They even stayed in the house where he was born. This meant so much to him.

In 2007, with the assistance of Doctor Peter Marendy, $20, 000 was raised to build the War Memorial at Agia Paraskevi in Taigum, Queensland, officially unveiled on Remembrance Day. The olive tree, symbolising peace, was lovingly planted and tended by Nick. As it continues to grow, it is a reminder of Nick’s dedication to those who served in wars.

Nick was a fortunate man, living a long, happy life, which many of us got to celebrate earlier this year at his 100th birthday. Living to the grand old age of 100, Nick tended daily to his garden, loved to travel, and enjoyed fishing and lawn bowls.

Nick was also a religious man who enjoyed attending church on a regular basis. He and Nina would try to travel to Greece as often as possible to visit his relatives and friends in Kythera.

Nick led a full and happy life and is now resting in God’s care, watching over us. We will always be grateful to have had the opportunity for Nick to have been part of our lives. Nick will be greatly missed by all his family and friends. He was laid to rest on Friday 19 October 2012 at Agia Paraskevi, Taigum, Australia.

Extract from the eulogy recited by Steven Mallos, Brisbane.

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Lafcadio Hearn Files on 05.11.2012

Mitsumasa Anno's portrait of Rosa Cassimati drawn from reminiscences and 'enhanced' by Maxwell Stillwell

In the letter written by Maxwell Stillwell to Takis Efstathiou below - the sentence - "the portrait of Rosa Cassimati was always a missing piece to the visual of Lafcadio's story, and now it feels more complete" - was bound to pique the interest of every Hearn aficionado.

A photograph or portrait of Rosa Cassimati is the holy grail of Hearn studies.

In this case, the portrait referred to was drawn by Mr. Mitsumasa Anno [安野 光雅 ], and is based upon an oral description from three elderly Kytherians who remembered Rosa's actual appearance from photographs. This information is drawn from Prof. Bon Koizumi's opening lecture for the exhibit.

The enhanced Stillwell version is depicted above.

A photograph of the Anno portrait is depicted elsewhere in this Vintage Portraits section.9

Letter from Maxwell Stillwell to Takis Efstathiou

Date: October 25, 2012

Dear Mr. Efstathiou,

This is Maxwell whom you met recently in New Orleans. May I call you Takis?

It was truly a pleasure to meet someone so active in the realm of Hearniana as yourself. I traveled to New Orleans for the sole purpose of the Tulane exhibit. Please allow me to describe myself in a bit more detail than the cramped New Orleanian bus allowed us opportunity for.

I graduated several years ago from Indiana University with a degree in East Asian Studies. My emphasis was Japanese language, though I graduated before I could call myself more than barely conversant. For me, the first time I heard the name Hearn was when my Professor of Japanese History wrote the name on the blackboard at Indiana. Also on the board was written the title Glimpses of Unfamiliar Japan. And upon my looking up the book, I was immediately hooked. For my last semester I chose classes that would allow me to study 19th century American Literature so that I could overlap my interests with my requirements. In the last few years I have worked at various jobs, taking every free moment to continue my Hearn studies.

Recently my collection of Hearn books has grown to about sixty-five, as you read in my notebook on the St. Charles streetcar. That day I was also very impressed with Professor Williamson's energy in procuring electronic Hearn data. However, I was never able to express to you my thanks for your Open Mind of Lafcadio Hearn exhibit. The portrait of Rosa Cassimati was always a missing piece to the visual of Lafcadio's story, and now it feels more complete. I also liked the Mimi-no-Hoichi and Hearn relief pieces.

As for our visits to New Orleans, I am so happy to see that you and the Koizumis have been to Acadian Books on St. Peter, and Librarie Books on Chartes. The proprietors of each of these shops, in my opinion, represent what the French Quarter is all about. The charming lady from Librarie knows much of old New Orleans and I always enjoy talking to her about its history. The learned gentleman from Acadian books can quote from Chita and speaks French wonderfully. By the way, I learned that an Acadian is the term for an expelled French colonist from Canada long ago. They escaped the British and fled south to the area outside of New Orleans. The names origin goes as follows: a Canadian > a Cadian > Acadian (Books) > a Cajuns

My studies of Hearn have made my letters, like his, to become long. Thank you for reading this far. I am as of yet attempting to find my feet in the world of academia and hope soon to pursue postgraduate studies. As you suggested, I would love to help research, write, or edit for you in any capacity which I am capable of. My goal is to squeeze my way into a scholarly journal of some sort. Should you ever need my assistance I will be glad to provide it. Travel safely, and thank you for bringing the Open Mind to Louisiana.

PS

Hearn, indeed, was moved by the sufferings of Native Americans. I recall, from A Winter Journey to Japan, there being a description of natives from Canada. This description is just a short part of the article and paints the sufferings of these people as though they had entirely lost their old way of life and were resorting to the selling of buffalo bones to passengers on the trans-Canadian railroad at its various stops. It is reprinted in Albert Mordell's American Miscellany volume 2.

Sincerely,

Maxwell S.
Clearwater Beach, Florida.

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Lafcadio Hearn Files on 05.11.2012

Mitsumasa Anno's portrait of Rosa Cassimati drawn from reminiscences

In the letter written by Maxwell Stillwell to Takis Efstathiou below - the sentence - "the portrait of Rosa Cassimati was always a missing piece to the visual of Lafcadio's story, and now it feels more complete" - was bound to pique the interest of every Hearn aficionado.

A photograph or portrait of Rosa Cassimati is the holy grail of Hearn studies.

In this case, the portrait referred to was drawn by Mr. Mitsumasa Anno [安野 光雅 ], and is based upon an oral description from three elderly Kytherians who remembered Rosa's actual appearance from photographs. This information is drawn from Prof. Bon Koizumi's opening lecture for the exhibit.

A photograph of this Anno portrait is depicted above.

An enhanced Stillwell version of the Anno portrait is also included in this Vintage Portraits section.

Letter from Maxwell Stillwell to Takis Efstathiou

Date: October 25, 2012

Dear Mr. Efstathiou,

This is Maxwell whom you met recently in New Orleans. May I call you Takis?

It was truly a pleasure to meet someone so active in the realm of Hearniana as yourself. I traveled to New Orleans for the sole purpose of the Tulane exhibit. Please allow me to describe myself in a bit more detail than the cramped New Orleanian bus allowed us opportunity for.

I graduated several years ago from Indiana University with a degree in East Asian Studies. My emphasis was Japanese language, though I graduated before I could call myself more than barely conversant. For me, the first time I heard the name Hearn was when my Professor of Japanese History wrote the name on the blackboard at Indiana. Also on the board was written the title Glimpses of Unfamiliar Japan. And upon my looking up the book, I was immediately hooked. For my last semester I chose classes that would allow me to study 19th century American Literature so that I could overlap my interests with my requirements. In the last few years I have worked at various jobs, taking every free moment to continue my Hearn studies.

Recently my collection of Hearn books has grown to about sixty-five, as you read in my notebook on the St. Charles streetcar. That day I was also very impressed with Professor Williamson's energy in procuring electronic Hearn data. However, I was never able to express to you my thanks for your Open Mind of Lafcadio Hearn exhibit. The portrait of Rosa Cassimati was always a missing piece to the visual of Lafcadio's story, and now it feels more complete. I also liked the Mimi-no-Hoichi and Hearn relief pieces.

As for our visits to New Orleans, I am so happy to see that you and the Koizumis have been to Acadian Books on St. Peter, and Librarie Books on Chartes. The proprietors of each of these shops, in my opinion, represent what the French Quarter is all about. The charming lady from Librarie knows much of old New Orleans and I always enjoy talking to her about its history. The learned gentleman from Acadian books can quote from Chita and speaks French wonderfully. By the way, I learned that an Acadian is the term for an expelled French colonist from Canada long ago. They escaped the British and fled south to the area outside of New Orleans. The names origin goes as follows: a Canadian > a Cadian > Acadian (Books) > a Cajuns

My studies of Hearn have made my letters, like his, to become long. Thank you for reading this far. I am as of yet attempting to find my feet in the world of academia and hope soon to pursue postgraduate studies. As you suggested, I would love to help research, write, or edit for you in any capacity which I am capable of. My goal is to squeeze my way into a scholarly journal of some sort. Should you ever need my assistance I will be glad to provide it. Travel safely, and thank you for bringing the Open Mind to Louisiana.

PS

Hearn, indeed, was moved by the sufferings of Native Americans. I recall, from A Winter Journey to Japan, there being a description of natives from Canada. This description is just a short part of the article and paints the sufferings of these people as though they had entirely lost their old way of life and were resorting to the selling of buffalo bones to passengers on the trans-Canadian railroad at its various stops. It is reprinted in Albert Mordell's American Miscellany volume 2.

Sincerely,

Maxwell S.
Clearwater Beach, Florida.