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submitted by Lafcadio Hearn Files on 05.11.2012

Maxwell Stillwell, Bon Koizumi & Takis Efsathiou

Letter from Maxwell Stillwell to Takis Efstathiou

Date: October 25, 2012

Dear Mr. Efstathiou,

This is Maxwell whom you met recently in New Orleans. May I call you Takis?

It was truly a pleasure to meet someone so active in the realm of Hearniana as yourself. I traveled to New Orleans for the sole purpose of the Tulane exhibit. Please allow me to describe myself in a bit more detail than the cramped New Orleanian bus allowed us opportunity for.

I graduated several years ago from Indiana University with a degree in East Asian Studies. My emphasis was Japanese language, though I graduated before I could call myself more than barely conversant. For me, the first time I heard the name Hearn was when my Professor of Japanese History wrote the name on the blackboard at Indiana. Also on the board was written the title Glimpses of Unfamiliar Japan. And upon my looking up the book, I was immediately hooked. For my last semester I chose classes that would allow me to study 19th century American Literature so that I could overlap my interests with my requirements. In the last few years I have worked at various jobs, taking every free moment to continue my Hearn studies.

Recently my collection of Hearn books has grown to about sixty-five, as you read in my notebook on the St. Charles streetcar. That day I was also very impressed with Professor Williamson's energy in procuring electronic Hearn data. However, I was never able to express to you my thanks for your Open Mind of Lafcadio Hearn exhibit. The portrait of Rosa Cassimati was always a missing piece to the visual of Lafcadio's story, and now it feels more complete. I also liked the Mimi-no-Hoichi and Hearn relief pieces.

As for our visits to New Orleans, I am so happy to see that you and the Koizumis have been to Acadian Books on St. Peter, and Librarie Books on Chartes. The proprietors of each of these shops, in my opinion, represent what the French Quarter is all about. The charming lady from Librarie knows much of old New Orleans and I always enjoy talking to her about its history. The learned gentleman from Acadian books can quote from Chita and speaks French wonderfully. By the way, I learned that an Acadian is the term for an expelled French colonist from Canada long ago. They escaped the British and fled south to the area outside of New Orleans. The names origin goes as follows: a Canadian > a Cadian > Acadian (Books) > a Cajuns

My studies of Hearn have made my letters, like his, to become long. Thank you for reading this far. I am as of yet attempting to find my feet in the world of academia and hope soon to pursue postgraduate studies. As you suggested, I would love to help research, write, or edit for you in any capacity which I am capable of. My goal is to squeeze my way into a scholarly journal of some sort. Should you ever need my assistance I will be glad to provide it. Travel safely, and thank you for bringing the Open Mind to Louisiana.

PS

Hearn, indeed, was moved by the sufferings of Native Americans. I recall, from A Winter Journey to Japan, there being a description of natives from Canada. This description is just a short part of the article and paints the sufferings of these people as though they had entirely lost their old way of life and were resorting to the selling of buffalo bones to passengers on the trans-Canadian railroad at its various stops. It is reprinted in Albert Mordell's American Miscellany volume 2.

Sincerely,

Maxwell S.
Clearwater Beach, Florida.

*The sentence - "the portrait of Rosa Cassimati was always a missing piece to the visual of Lafcadio's story, and now it feels more complete" - is bound to pique the interest of every Hearn aficionado.

A photograph or portrait of Rosa Cassimati is the holy grail of Hearn studies.

In this case, the portrait referred to was drawn by Mr. Mitsumasa Anno [安野 光雅 ], and is based upon an oral description from three elderly Kytherians who remembered Rosa's actual appearance from photographs. This information is drawn from Prof. Bon Koizumi's opening lecture for the exhibit.

See a photograph of the Anno portrait

And an enhanced Stillwell version of the Anno portrait

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Sunday Telegraph on 02.11.2012

My mystery rash was a cancer

Baulkham Hills' Patricia Samios can still hug Deanna because she insisted she be checked for breast cancer.

Sunday Telegraph 28th October, 2012

Page 26

ROSIE SQUIRES


Breast cancer sufferer Patricia Samios is lucky to be alive after her GP and oncologist missed numerous chances to diagnose the deadly disease.

After noticing a rash on her left breast in January the 46-year-old visited her doctor a week later when her condition didn't improve.

"The doctor told me I just had an allergy from my washing powder," Ms Samios said.

"But three weeks went by and the rash was still there so I went back and got a referral to a breast surgeon."

A private specialist in Sydney's west told Ms Samios not too worry and gave her the same diagnosis.

Not satisfied, Ms Samios underwent a mammogram. "After seven weeks with this rash, I knew something wasn't right," she said.

"I was pacing at night, I couldn't believe it was from washing power. Everyone kept telling me to stop looking at the internet but I am glad I went with my gut. Finally the results of the mammogram came through and the specialist said, 'oh, you've got breast cancer'. My world stopped."

The specialist suggested a breast reduction to remove the cyst but said chemo­ therapy and radiotherapy would be unnecessary.

But Ms Samios said she wasn't prepared to take any chances and booked an appointment with the head of the Macquarie University Breast Cancer Care Centre, Professor John Boyages.

"It took Professor Boyages five minutes to diagnose my inflammatory breast cancer, which is an advanced cancer that spreads quickly," Ms Samios said.

"The following day I had a scan, and mid-February I underwent surgery and started 18 weeks of chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy every day for five weeks.

"I finished treatment two weeks ago and live to tell the tale."

Like many women suffering the disease Ms Samios said she is certain stress caused her condition.

"I truly believe stress triggered the disease,"she said. "It's given me a new perspective. And the message is, if you feel you need to get a second opinion go with your gut feeling.

"You have to show cancer that you aren't scared of it, you have to say ‘well you fit into my life baby, because I'm not fitting into yours’."

Stress Fear

) Half of Australian women believe their breast cancer was caused by stress.

) Average of 14,000 women and 105 men are diagnosed with the disease each year.

) Doctors remain at odds over causes,saying age, family history and lifestyle play a part.

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Sunday Telegraph on 01.11.2012

My mystery rash was a cancer

Sunday Telegraph 28th October, 2012

Page 26

ROSIE SQUIRES

Breast cancer sufferer Patricia Samios is lucky to be alive after her GP and oncologist missed numerous chances to diagnose the deadly disease.

After noticing a rash on her left breast in January the 46-year-old visited her doctor a week later when her condition didn't improve.

"The doctor told me I just had an allergy from my washing powder," Ms Samios said.

"But three weeks went by and the rash was still there so I went back and got a referral to a breast surgeon."

A private specialist in Sydney's west told Ms Samios not too worry and gave her the same diagnosis.

Not satisfied, Ms Samios underwent a mammogram. "After seven weeks with this rash, I knew something wasn't right," she said.

"I was pacing at night, I couldn't believe it was from washing power. Everyone kept telling me to stop looking at the internet but I am glad I went with my gut. Finally the results of the mammogram came through and the specialist said, 'oh, you've got breast cancer'. My world stopped."

The specialist suggested a breast reduction to remove the cyst but said chemo­ therapy and radiotherapy would be unnecessary.

But Ms Samios said she wasn't prepared to take any chances and booked an appointment with the head of the Macquarie University Breast Cancer Care Centre, Professor John Boyages.

"It took Professor Boyages five minutes to diagnose my inflammatory breast cancer, which is an advanced cancer that spreads quickly," Ms Samios said.

"The following day I had a scan, and mid-February I underwent surgery and started 18 weeks of chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy every day for five weeks.

"I finished treatment two weeks ago and live to tell the tale."

Like many women suffering the disease Ms Samios said she is certain stress caused her condition.

"I truly believe stress triggered the disease,"she said. "It's given me a new perspective. And the message is, if you feel you need to get a second opinion go with your gut feeling.

"You have to show cancer that you aren't scared of it, you have to say ‘well you fit into my life baby, because I'm not fitting into yours’."

Stress Fear

) Half of Australian women believe their breast cancer was caused by stress.

) Average of 14,000 women and 105 men are diagnosed with the disease each year.

) Doctors remain at odds over causes,saying age, family history and lifestyle play a part.

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Lafcadio Hearn Files on 02.11.2012

Takis Efstathiou and Theodora Georgaki, who is in charge of Art exhibits at the Cultural Centre examining new art work donated by Takis.

Takis Efstathiou's new room at the Cultural Centre of Lefkada

Νέα αίθουσα Τάκη Ευσταθίου στο Πνευματικό Κέντρο Δήμου Λευκάδας

Εμπλούτισε τη συλλογή του το Πνευματικό Κέντρο Δήμου Λευκάδας


Πριν λίγο καιρό διαμορφώθηκε μια αίθουσα στο κτήριο του Πνευματικού Κέντρου όπου στεγάστηκαν δέκα έργα του συλλέκτη Τάκη Ευσταθίου. Όταν πληροφορήθηκε ο κος Ευσταθίου για την τιμή που του έγινε από το Πνευματικό Κέντρο, ενθουσιάστηκε τόσο πολύ που κατέφθασε μετά από δύο μέρες με πολλά άλλα έργα για να εμπλουτίσει την αίθουσα που φέρει το όνομά του.

Τα έργα τα παρέλαβαν ο δήμαρχος Κ. Αραβανής, ο αντιπρόεδρος του Πνευματικού Κέντρου Α. Γαζής και η υπεύθυνη αιθουσών εκθέσεων κ. Γεωργάκη Θεοδώρα. Συμφώνησαν δε, ότι το 2014 που θα γίνει έκθεση και ένα μεγάλο συνέδριο στους Δελφούς για τα 110 χρόνια από το θάνατό του Λευκάδιου Χέρν παράλληλα θα εξελίσσεται και εδώ σε μια διαμορφωμένη αίθουσα μια έκθεση εις μνήμην Λευκάδιου Χέρν, την οποία θα εμπλουτίσει o κος Ευσταθίου με περισσότερα έργα.

Ο Τάκης Ευσταθίου είναι συλλέκτης έργων Τέχνης με ιδιαίτερη αγάπη για την Ιαπωνική κουλτούρα και τον Λευκάδιο Χέρν. Πριν δυο χρόνια επέλεξε την γενέτειρα του Λευκάδιου Χέρν, την πόλη μας και με αυτό το κριτήριο χάρισε 10 έργα που φιλοτέχνησαν κυρίως ιάπωνες καλλιτέχνες. Αυτή την στιγμή ο κύριος Ευσταθίου βρίσκεται στην Νέα Ορλεάνη και στην Νέα Υόρκη όπου γίνονται μεγάλες εκθέσεις και συνέδρια για τον Λευκάδιο Χέρν.

Τα έργα που δώρισε αυτήν την φορά είναι πίνακες των μεγάλων Ιαπώνων καλλιτεχνών Σ. Γουάντα και Μασάκι Νόντα. Μεγάλο ενδιαφέρον έχει ένα πουκάμισο ζωγραφισμένο στο χέρι από τον Μασάκι Νόντα. Επίσης, δώρισε στο Πνευματικό Κέντρο δύο μεταξοτυπίες του Στάμου και μια της Χρύσας που ήταν φίλη με τον Στάμο και κάνανε εκθέσεις μαζί. Μεταξοτυπίες από τον μεγάλο Έλληνα γλύπτη Θεόδωρο και μια μεταξοτυπία του Λεκκάκη πολλά βιβλία πολιτισμού και τέχνης των έργων του Λευκάδιου Χέρν, αφίσσες κ.α

Ο Λευκάδιος χέρν γεννημένος στη Λευκάδα από τον Ιρλανδό χειρουργό Τσαρλς Χερν και την Ρόζα Αντωνίου Κασιμάτη από τα Κύθηρα, έχοντας σπουδάσει στο Ντέραμ της Αγγλίας, εργαστεί στις Ηνωμένες Πολιτείες κι έχοντας επιλέξει την Ματσούε της Ιαπωνίας για κατοικία του, έγινε ο ορισμός της προσωπικότητας που γεφυρώνει συμπληρωματικούς πολιτισμούς.

Ο Λευκάδιος αποτελεί λαμπρό παράδειγμα ανθρώπου με ανοικτό μυαλό. Μας διδάσκει ότι δεν υπάρχει μεγαλύτερο κατόρθωμα από την αποδοχή της “ετερότητας’, δεν υπάρχει πλουσιότερος τρόπος ζωής από την αναζήτηση της δημιουργικής αλήθειας, δεν υπάρχει μεγαλύτερη υπευθυνότητα από το να υψώνουμε έναν καθρέφτη απέναντι στην κοινωνία, δεν υπάρχει μεγαλύτερη πρόκληση ή μυστήριο από το να παντρεύουμε τ’ όνειρο με την αλήθεια της ζωής. Με το ανοιχτό του μυαλό ο Λευκάδιος άνοιξε την καρδιά του στην ανθρωπότητα και βρήκε ειρήνη για τον εαυτό του και τον κόσμο.

Πηγή: www.lefkasnews.gr

Takis Efstathiou's new room at the Cultural Center of Lefkada

Enriching the collection of the Cultural Centre of Lefkada


Not long ago I stood in a hall of the Cultural Centre building which housed a number of Hearn exhibits, provided by collector Takis Efstathiou. When informed that the Cultural centre would honour Hearn, Mr. Efstathiou was so impressed that he arrived two days later with many other exhibits, to enrich the hall that bears his name.

The exhibits were received by Mayor, Kostas Aravanis, who is also the Director of the Cultural Centre, as well as Tasos Gazis, Deputy Director of the Cultural Centre, and Art supervisor, Theodora Georgakis. They agreed, that to coincide with the great exhibition and conference to be held in Delphi in 2014 to commemorate 110 years since the death of Lafcadio Hearn - that they would also develop in Lefkada an exhibition hall in memory of Lafcadio Hearn. Takis Efstathiou will provide more exhibits for this exhibition hall.

Takis Efstathiou is an art collectors with a special love for the Japanese culture and for Lafcadio Hearn. Two years ago chose the birthplace of Lafcadio Hearn, our city, to which to donate 10 works painted mostly by Japanese artists. Recently Mr. Efstathios has been in New Orleans and New York, where he facilitated major exhibitions and conferences on Lafcadio Hearn.

The works donated on this occasion are arrays of large Japanese artists including Wanda S. Masaki Nonta. A hand painted shirt by Masaki Nonta generated a great deal of interest. He also donated to the Cultural Centre, a number serigraphs, including one co-created with Stamos. Also serigraphs created by the great Greek sculptor Theo and silkscreen prints of many books, Lekkakos culture, and art works of Lafcadio Hearn, posters etc.

Lafcadio Hearn was born in Lefkada, the son of Irish surgeon Charles Hearn and Rosa Antoniou Kasimati from Kythera, having studied at Durham, England, worked in the United States and chose to make Matsue Japan his home. He helped to define the personality of Japan to the West, thus creating a bridges between the two cultures.

Lafcadio is a shining example of a person with an open mind. It teaches us that there is no greater feat than the acceptance of "otherness", no richer lifestyle than seeking the creative truth, there is no greater responsibility than to erect a mirror to society, there is no greater challenge or mystery than to marry the dream with the reality of life.

With its open mind Lafcadio opened his heart to humanity and found peace for himself and the world

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Lafcadio Hearn Files on 31.10.2012

Νέα αίθουσα Τάκη Ευσταθίου στο Πνευματικό Κέντρο Δήμου Λευκάδας

Takis Efstathiou's new room at the Cultural Centre of Lefkada

Εμπλούτισε τη συλλογή του το Πνευματικό Κέντρο Δήμου Λευκάδας

Πριν λίγο καιρό διαμορφώθηκε μια αίθουσα στο κτήριο του Πνευματικού Κέντρου όπου στεγάστηκαν δέκα έργα του συλλέκτη Τάκη Ευσταθίου. Όταν πληροφορήθηκε ο κος Ευσταθίου για την τιμή που του έγινε από το Πνευματικό Κέντρο, ενθουσιάστηκε τόσο πολύ που κατέφθασε μετά από δύο μέρες με πολλά άλλα έργα για να εμπλουτίσει την αίθουσα που φέρει το όνομά του.

Τα έργα τα παρέλαβαν ο δήμαρχος Κ. Αραβανής, ο αντιπρόεδρος του Πνευματικού Κέντρου Α. Γαζής και η υπεύθυνη αιθουσών εκθέσεων κ. Γεωργάκη Θεοδώρα. Συμφώνησαν δε, ότι το 2014 που θα γίνει έκθεση και ένα μεγάλο συνέδριο στους Δελφούς για τα 110 χρόνια από το θάνατό του Λευκάδιου Χέρν παράλληλα θα εξελίσσεται και εδώ σε μια διαμορφωμένη αίθουσα μια έκθεση εις μνήμην Λευκάδιου Χέρν, την οποία θα εμπλουτίσει o κος Ευσταθίου με περισσότερα έργα.

Ο Τάκης Ευσταθίου είναι συλλέκτης έργων Τέχνης με ιδιαίτερη αγάπη για την Ιαπωνική κουλτούρα και τον Λευκάδιο Χέρν. Πριν δυο χρόνια επέλεξε την γενέτειρα του Λευκάδιου Χέρν, την πόλη μας και με αυτό το κριτήριο χάρισε 10 έργα που φιλοτέχνησαν κυρίως ιάπωνες καλλιτέχνες. Αυτή την στιγμή ο κύριος Ευσταθίου βρίσκεται στην Νέα Ορλεάνη και στην Νέα Υόρκη όπου γίνονται μεγάλες εκθέσεις και συνέδρια για τον Λευκάδιο Χέρν.

Τα έργα που δώρισε αυτήν την φορά είναι πίνακες των μεγάλων Ιαπώνων καλλιτεχνών Σ. Γουάντα και Μασάκι Νόντα. Μεγάλο ενδιαφέρον έχει ένα πουκάμισο ζωγραφισμένο στο χέρι από τον Μασάκι Νόντα. Επίσης, δώρισε στο Πνευματικό Κέντρο δύο μεταξοτυπίες του Στάμου και μια της Χρύσας που ήταν φίλη με τον Στάμο και κάνανε εκθέσεις μαζί. Μεταξοτυπίες από τον μεγάλο Έλληνα γλύπτη Θεόδωρο και μια μεταξοτυπία του Λεκκάκη πολλά βιβλία πολιτισμού και τέχνης των έργων του Λευκάδιου Χέρν, αφίσσες κ.α

Ο Λευκάδιος χέρν γεννημένος στη Λευκάδα από τον Ιρλανδό χειρουργό Τσαρλς Χερν και την Ρόζα Αντωνίου Κασιμάτη από τα Κύθηρα, έχοντας σπουδάσει στο Ντέραμ της Αγγλίας, εργαστεί στις Ηνωμένες Πολιτείες κι έχοντας επιλέξει την Ματσούε της Ιαπωνίας για κατοικία του, έγινε ο ορισμός της προσωπικότητας που γεφυρώνει συμπληρωματικούς πολιτισμούς.

Ο Λευκάδιος αποτελεί λαμπρό παράδειγμα ανθρώπου με ανοικτό μυαλό. Μας διδάσκει ότι δεν υπάρχει μεγαλύτερο κατόρθωμα από την αποδοχή της “ετερότητας’, δεν υπάρχει πλουσιότερος τρόπος ζωής από την αναζήτηση της δημιουργικής αλήθειας, δεν υπάρχει μεγαλύτερη υπευθυνότητα από το να υψώνουμε έναν καθρέφτη απέναντι στην κοινωνία, δεν υπάρχει μεγαλύτερη πρόκληση ή μυστήριο από το να παντρεύουμε τ’ όνειρο με την αλήθεια της ζωής. Με το ανοιχτό του μυαλό ο Λευκάδιος άνοιξε την καρδιά του στην ανθρωπότητα και βρήκε ειρήνη για τον εαυτό του και τον κόσμο.

Πηγή: www.lefkasnews.gr

Takis Efstathiou's new room at the Cultural Center of Lefkada

Enriching the collection of the Cultural Centre of Lefkada

Not long ago I stood in a hall of the Cultural Centre building which housed a number of Hearn exhibits, provided by collector Takis Efstathiou. When informed that the Cultural centre would honour Hearn, Mr. Efstathiou was so impressed that he arrived two days later with many other exhibits, to enrich the hall that bears his name.

The exhibits were received Mayor, Aravanis, Deputy Director of the Cultural Centre, A. Gazis, and showrooms supervisor Georgakis Theodora. They agreed, that to coincide with the great exhibition and conference to be held in Delphi in 2014 to commemorate 110 years since the death of Lafcadio Hearn - that they would also develop in Lefkada an exhibition hall in memory of Lafcadio Hearn. Takis Efstathiou will provide more exhibits for this exhibition hall.

Takis Efstathiou is an art collectors with a special love for the Japanese culture and for Lafcadio Hearn. Two years ago chose the birthplace of Lafcadio Hearn, our city, to which to donate 10 works painted mostly by Japanese artists. Recently Mr. Efstathios has been in New Orleans and New York, where he facilitated major exhibitions and conferences on Lafcadio Hearn.

The works donated on this occasion are arrays of large Japanese artists including Wanda S. Masaki Nonta. A hand painted shirt by Masaki Nonta generated a great deal of interest. He also donated to the Cultural Centre, a number serigraphs, including one co-created with Stamos. Also serigraphs created by the great Greek sculptor Theo and silkscreen prints of many books, Lekkakos culture, and art works of Lafcadio Hearn, posters etc.

Lafcadio Hearn was born in Lefkada, the son of Irish surgeon Charles Hearn and Rosa Antoniou Kasimati from Kythera, having studied at Durham, England, worked in the United States and chose to make Matsue Japan his home. He helped to define the personality of Japan to the West, thus creating a bridges between the two cultures.

Lafcadio is a shining example of a person with an open mind. It teaches us that there is no greater feat than the acceptance of "otherness", no richer lifestyle than seeking the creative truth, there is no greater responsibility than to erect a mirror to society, there is no greater challenge or mystery than to marry the dream with the reality of life.

With its open mind Lafcadio opened his heart to humanity and found peace for himself and the world

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Lafcadio Hearn Files on 01.11.2012

Bon Koizumi and wife Shoko Koizumi examining the exhibits in New Orleans

Photograph taken in the Lafcadio Hearn room and the Hogan Jazz Archive at Tulane. Nicole Shibata noted "the exhibition was a huge hit and it was by far the best one we've had in that gallery space since I've been at Tulane".

The following is an article By Doug MacCash, NOLA.com - on the occasion of the New Orleans exhibition

The Times-Picayune (Newspaper) - Greater New Orleans
on October 19, 2012

Lafcadio Hearn’s great-grandson Bon Koizumi said that he was “moved” by his visit to the Cleveland Avenue apartment his ancestor called home from 1882 to 1887. Hearn was the 19th-century crime journalist turned tongue-in-cheek cultural observer who will remain forever beloved to Crescent City-ites (though perhaps not so revered by residents of his former hometown of Cincinnati) for the evergreen quote:

“Times are not good here (in New Orleans). The city is crumbling into ashes. It has been buried under a lava flood of taxes and frauds and maladministrations so that it has become only a study for archaeologists. Its condition is so bad that when I write about it, as I intend to do soon, nobody will believe I am telling the truth. But it is better to live here in sackcloth and ashes than to own the whole state of Ohio.”

Hearn (1850-1904) was born in Greece, grew up in Ireland, became a professional writer and keen societal observer in the United States, had a brief sojourn in Martinique, then settled in Japan, where he married a woman from a Samurai family and changed his name to Koizumi Yakumois. During the five years he lived in the Cleveland Avenue boarding house, he wrote “La Cuisine Creole,” an early collection of Crescent City recipes that would have been undreamt of in Cincinnati.

In the introduction of the book, Hearn promised readers that “In this compendium will be found many original recipes and other valuable ones heretofore unpublished, notably those of Gombo file, Bouille-abaisse, Courtbouillon, Jambolaya, Salade a la Russe, Bisque of Cray-fish a la Creole, Pusee Café, Café brule, Brulot, together with many confections and delicacies for the sick, including a number of mixed drinks.” The Koizumis said that despite the spread of Creole cooking in the 117 years since the publication of great grandpa's cookbook, there were still no New Orleans-style restaurants in Matsue, Japan, where they live. But, they said, select chefs are able to whip up an occasional jambalaya or gumbo. In fact, the Koizumis said, Creole food was served to guests at their wedding.

Considering the milepost historic importance of “La Cuisine Creole” to a city that has become a world-renowned culinary beacon, shouldn’t the house at 1565 Cleveland be better known?

Lafcadio Hearn’s great-grandson Bon Koizumi visits New Orleans
Lafcadio Hearn’s great-grandson Bon Koizumi visited the Cleveland Ave. apartment in New Orleans, where the 19th-century journalist and author lived between 1882 and 1887, while writing “La Cuisine Creole” and other works that championed Crescent City culture. He spent the last years of his life 1890 to 1904 in Japan, where he married Koizumi Setsu, taking the name Koizumi Yakumois. Hearn is forever beloved in New Orleans (though perhaps not so revered in his former home town of Cincinnati) for the seemingly timeless quote: “Times are not good here. The city is crumbling into ashes. It has been buried under a lava flood of taxes and frauds and maladministrations so that it has become only a study for archaeologists. Its condition is so bad that when I write about it, as I intend to do soon, nobody will believe I am telling the truth. But it is better to live here in sackcloth and ashes than to own the whole state of Ohio.”

A surprise was waiting for Bon Koizumi and wife Shoko Koizumi when they entered the kitchen of the Cleveland Street apartment. Richard Scribner, the owner of great-granddad’s former residence, had thoughtfully prepared a kettle of miso soup for the occasion. After sampling the soy and seaweed broth and having photos taken comparing his profile with a profile photo of his great-grandfather, Bon Koizumi mounted the sturdy winding stairway to the second story. As rain clouds encroached from the horizon, he inspected the wrap-around balcony with its oak-pattern cast iron railing, then entered the spare westward apartment where great-granddad may have lived. The truth is, no one is certain which room was Hearn’s.

There was a plan to visit a second upstairs apartment where Hearn may have lived, but a loud dog and young woman who had freshly emerged from the shower wrapped in a towel made further exploration seem more troublesome for all concerned than it was worth. One felt that somewhere Lafcadio was smiling, charmed by the momentary chaos.

The big brick townhouse where Hearn roomed would fit comfortably into the shady streetscape of, say, Esplanade Avenue at the edge of the French quarter. But in the center of New Orleans’ bustling, treeless hospital district, surrounded by a desert of parking lots and brutish modern architecture, it seems somehow lonely and vulnerable. Heaven only knows how the neo-classical orphan has survived so long amid the wailing sirens and desolation.

The Open Mind of Lafcadio Hearn

What: An exhibition of first editions of Hearn books and Hearn’s art collection.

Where: Tulane University’s Special Collections Gallery, located in Jones Hall, Room 205, 6823 St Charles Ave.

When: Mon-Sat, 10 a.m. to 6; Sun, noon to 6, through Oct. 28.

Admission: Free


Scribner, a Louisiana State University professor of public health, said that old-timers recalled that neighborhood was once the site of several barrooms. As recently as 20 years ago, Scribner said, the one time Hearn residence was a seedy pay-by-the-night flop house frequented by drug abusers and the downtown demimonde. Adding another layer of celebrity to the Cleveland address, Scribner noted that the place had subsequently been purchased and beautifully restored by former Saints star Pat Swilling, who’d entered the contracting trade at the conclusion of his gridiron career. Scribner bought the property 10 years back and managed to place it on the roster of official New Orleans historic landmarks.

Koizumi is a professor of folklore at a community college in Matsue, Japan – Hearn’s last hometown. His great-grandmother, Hearn’s wife Koizumi Setsu, was a renowned story teller, Koizumi said. Is it any wonder that the union of a journalist and storyteller would eventually produce a professor of folklore? Koizumi had come to New Orleans in part to present his views of great-grandfather to Hearn fans at Tulane University, where an exhibit of first editions of Hearn books and Hearn’s art collection is on display. Great-grandpa’s great strength, Koizumi said, was his open-mindedness, and his open mindedness may have had something to do with his view of New Orleans.

“New Orleans is one of my favorite cities in the world,” Koizumi said. “The Creole culture makes people open-minded. So this is the reason I love this city.”

The cloudburst that had rolled across the city during the Koizumi’s visit had passed, leaving behind silver sunlight glittering on the abundant pavement. As the interview began to wind down, Mrs. Koizumi captured the spirit of the moment perfectly. As she glanced up at the high ceiling and the gently spinning ceiling fan she said: “I feel Lafcadio is here with us, because he loved New Orleans and so he wants to come back. Actually, in his life, he never (did). Now he travels with us … this is maybe his second life in a different world.”

Snapshot of Lafcadio's life.

Lafcadio Hearn’s great-grandson Bon Koizumi visited the Cleveland Ave. apartment in New Orleans, where the 19th-century journalist and author lived between 1882 and 1887, while writing “La Cuisine Creole” and other works that championed Crescent City culture. He spent the last years of his life 1890 to 1904 in Japan, where he married Koizumi Setsu, taking the name Koizumi Yakumois. Hearn is forever beloved in New Orleans (though perhaps not so revered in his former home town of Cincinnati) for the seemingly timeless quote: “Times are not good here. The city is crumbling into ashes. It has been buried under a lava flood of taxes and frauds and maladministrations so that it has become only a study for archaeologists. Its condition is so bad that when I write about it, as I intend to do soon, nobody will believe I am telling the truth. But it is better to live here in sackcloth and ashes than to own the whole state of Ohio.”

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Lafcadio Hearn Files on 01.11.2012

Takis Efstathiou viewing books by Lafcadio Hearn at Tulane University

Photograph taken in the Lafcadio Hearn room and the Hogan Jazz Archive at Tulane. Nicole Shibata noted "the exhibition was a huge hit and it was by far the best one we've had in that gallery space since I've been at Tulane".

The following is an article By Doug MacCash, NOLA.com - on the occasion of the New Orleans exhibition

The Times-Picayune (Newspaper) - Greater New Orleans
on October 19, 2012

Lafcadio Hearn’s great-grandson Bon Koizumi said that he was “moved” by his visit to the Cleveland Avenue apartment his ancestor called home from 1882 to 1887. Hearn was the 19th-century crime journalist turned tongue-in-cheek cultural observer who will remain forever beloved to Crescent City-ites (though perhaps not so revered by residents of his former hometown of Cincinnati) for the evergreen quote:

“Times are not good here (in New Orleans). The city is crumbling into ashes. It has been buried under a lava flood of taxes and frauds and maladministrations so that it has become only a study for archaeologists. Its condition is so bad that when I write about it, as I intend to do soon, nobody will believe I am telling the truth. But it is better to live here in sackcloth and ashes than to own the whole state of Ohio.”

Hearn (1850-1904) was born in Greece, grew up in Ireland, became a professional writer and keen societal observer in the United States, had a brief sojourn in Martinique, then settled in Japan, where he married a woman from a Samurai family and changed his name to Koizumi Yakumois. During the five years he lived in the Cleveland Avenue boarding house, he wrote “La Cuisine Creole,” an early collection of Crescent City recipes that would have been undreamt of in Cincinnati.

In the introduction of the book, Hearn promised readers that “In this compendium will be found many original recipes and other valuable ones heretofore unpublished, notably those of Gombo file, Bouille-abaisse, Courtbouillon, Jambolaya, Salade a la Russe, Bisque of Cray-fish a la Creole, Pusee Café, Café brule, Brulot, together with many confections and delicacies for the sick, including a number of mixed drinks.” The Koizumis said that despite the spread of Creole cooking in the 117 years since the publication of great grandpa's cookbook, there were still no New Orleans-style restaurants in Matsue, Japan, where they live. But, they said, select chefs are able to whip up an occasional jambalaya or gumbo. In fact, the Koizumis said, Creole food was served to guests at their wedding.

Considering the milepost historic importance of “La Cuisine Creole” to a city that has become a world-renowned culinary beacon, shouldn’t the house at 1565 Cleveland be better known?

Lafcadio Hearn’s great-grandson Bon Koizumi visits New Orleans
Lafcadio Hearn’s great-grandson Bon Koizumi visited the Cleveland Ave. apartment in New Orleans, where the 19th-century journalist and author lived between 1882 and 1887, while writing “La Cuisine Creole” and other works that championed Crescent City culture. He spent the last years of his life 1890 to 1904 in Japan, where he married Koizumi Setsu, taking the name Koizumi Yakumois. Hearn is forever beloved in New Orleans (though perhaps not so revered in his former home town of Cincinnati) for the seemingly timeless quote: “Times are not good here. The city is crumbling into ashes. It has been buried under a lava flood of taxes and frauds and maladministrations so that it has become only a study for archaeologists. Its condition is so bad that when I write about it, as I intend to do soon, nobody will believe I am telling the truth. But it is better to live here in sackcloth and ashes than to own the whole state of Ohio.”

A surprise was waiting for Bon Koizumi and wife Shoko Koizumi when they entered the kitchen of the Cleveland Street apartment. Richard Scribner, the owner of great-granddad’s former residence, had thoughtfully prepared a kettle of miso soup for the occasion. After sampling the soy and seaweed broth and having photos taken comparing his profile with a profile photo of his great-grandfather, Bon Koizumi mounted the sturdy winding stairway to the second story. As rain clouds encroached from the horizon, he inspected the wrap-around balcony with its oak-pattern cast iron railing, then entered the spare westward apartment where great-granddad may have lived. The truth is, no one is certain which room was Hearn’s.

There was a plan to visit a second upstairs apartment where Hearn may have lived, but a loud dog and young woman who had freshly emerged from the shower wrapped in a towel made further exploration seem more troublesome for all concerned than it was worth. One felt that somewhere Lafcadio was smiling, charmed by the momentary chaos.

The big brick townhouse where Hearn roomed would fit comfortably into the shady streetscape of, say, Esplanade Avenue at the edge of the French quarter. But in the center of New Orleans’ bustling, treeless hospital district, surrounded by a desert of parking lots and brutish modern architecture, it seems somehow lonely and vulnerable. Heaven only knows how the neo-classical orphan has survived so long amid the wailing sirens and desolation.

The Open Mind of Lafcadio Hearn

What: An exhibition of first editions of Hearn books and Hearn’s art collection.

Where: Tulane University’s Special Collections Gallery, located in Jones Hall, Room 205, 6823 St Charles Ave.

When: Mon-Sat, 10 a.m. to 6; Sun, noon to 6, through Oct. 28.

Admission: Free


Scribner, a Louisiana State University professor of public health, said that old-timers recalled that neighborhood was once the site of several barrooms. As recently as 20 years ago, Scribner said, the one time Hearn residence was a seedy pay-by-the-night flop house frequented by drug abusers and the downtown demimonde. Adding another layer of celebrity to the Cleveland address, Scribner noted that the place had subsequently been purchased and beautifully restored by former Saints star Pat Swilling, who’d entered the contracting trade at the conclusion of his gridiron career. Scribner bought the property 10 years back and managed to place it on the roster of official New Orleans historic landmarks.

Koizumi is a professor of folklore at a community college in Matsue, Japan – Hearn’s last hometown. His great-grandmother, Hearn’s wife Koizumi Setsu, was a renowned story teller, Koizumi said. Is it any wonder that the union of a journalist and storyteller would eventually produce a professor of folklore? Koizumi had come to New Orleans in part to present his views of great-grandfather to Hearn fans at Tulane University, where an exhibit of first editions of Hearn books and Hearn’s art collection is on display. Great-grandpa’s great strength, Koizumi said, was his open-mindedness, and his open mindedness may have had something to do with his view of New Orleans.

“New Orleans is one of my favorite cities in the world,” Koizumi said. “The Creole culture makes people open-minded. So this is the reason I love this city.”

The cloudburst that had rolled across the city during the Koizumi’s visit had passed, leaving behind silver sunlight glittering on the abundant pavement. As the interview began to wind down, Mrs. Koizumi captured the spirit of the moment perfectly. As she glanced up at the high ceiling and the gently spinning ceiling fan she said: “I feel Lafcadio is here with us, because he loved New Orleans and so he wants to come back. Actually, in his life, he never (did). Now he travels with us … this is maybe his second life in a different world.”

Snapshot of Lafcadio's life.

Lafcadio Hearn’s great-grandson Bon Koizumi visited the Cleveland Ave. apartment in New Orleans, where the 19th-century journalist and author lived between 1882 and 1887, while writing “La Cuisine Creole” and other works that championed Crescent City culture. He spent the last years of his life 1890 to 1904 in Japan, where he married Koizumi Setsu, taking the name Koizumi Yakumois. Hearn is forever beloved in New Orleans (though perhaps not so revered in his former home town of Cincinnati) for the seemingly timeless quote: “Times are not good here. The city is crumbling into ashes. It has been buried under a lava flood of taxes and frauds and maladministrations so that it has become only a study for archaeologists. Its condition is so bad that when I write about it, as I intend to do soon, nobody will believe I am telling the truth. But it is better to live here in sackcloth and ashes than to own the whole state of Ohio.”

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Lafcadio Hearn Files on 01.11.2012

Takis Efstathiou, Bon Koizumi, and Leon Miller examining photographs in the Hearn collection at Tulane University

Leon Miller, (on the right), is the head of the Louisiana Research Collection at Tulane University.

Photograph taken in the Lafcadio Hearn room and the Hogan Jazz Archive at Tulane. Nicole Shibata noted "the exhibition was a huge hit and it was by far the best one we’ve had in that gallery space since I’ve been at Tulane".

The following is an article By Doug MacCash, NOLA.com - on the occasion of the New Orleans exhibition

The Times-Picayune (Newspaper) - Greater New Orleans
on October 19, 2012

Lafcadio Hearn’s great-grandson Bon Koizumi said that he was “moved” by his visit to the Cleveland Avenue apartment his ancestor called home from 1882 to 1887. Hearn was the 19th-century crime journalist turned tongue-in-cheek cultural observer who will remain forever beloved to Crescent City-ites (though perhaps not so revered by residents of his former hometown of Cincinnati) for the evergreen quote:

“Times are not good here (in New Orleans). The city is crumbling into ashes. It has been buried under a lava flood of taxes and frauds and maladministrations so that it has become only a study for archaeologists. Its condition is so bad that when I write about it, as I intend to do soon, nobody will believe I am telling the truth. But it is better to live here in sackcloth and ashes than to own the whole state of Ohio.”

Hearn (1850-1904) was born in Greece, grew up in Ireland, became a professional writer and keen societal observer in the United States, had a brief sojourn in Martinique, then settled in Japan, where he married a woman from a Samurai family and changed his name to Koizumi Yakumois. During the five years he lived in the Cleveland Avenue boarding house, he wrote “La Cuisine Creole,” an early collection of Crescent City recipes that would have been undreamt of in Cincinnati.

In the introduction of the book, Hearn promised readers that “In this compendium will be found many original recipes and other valuable ones heretofore unpublished, notably those of Gombo file, Bouille-abaisse, Courtbouillon, Jambolaya, Salade a la Russe, Bisque of Cray-fish a la Creole, Pusee Café, Café brule, Brulot, together with many confections and delicacies for the sick, including a number of mixed drinks.” The Koizumis said that despite the spread of Creole cooking in the 117 years since the publication of great grandpa's cookbook, there were still no New Orleans-style restaurants in Matsue, Japan, where they live. But, they said, select chefs are able to whip up an occasional jambalaya or gumbo. In fact, the Koizumis said, Creole food was served to guests at their wedding.

Considering the milepost historic importance of “La Cuisine Creole” to a city that has become a world-renowned culinary beacon, shouldn’t the house at 1565 Cleveland be better known?

Lafcadio Hearn’s great-grandson Bon Koizumi visits New Orleans
Lafcadio Hearn’s great-grandson Bon Koizumi visited the Cleveland Ave. apartment in New Orleans, where the 19th-century journalist and author lived between 1882 and 1887, while writing “La Cuisine Creole” and other works that championed Crescent City culture. He spent the last years of his life 1890 to 1904 in Japan, where he married Koizumi Setsu, taking the name Koizumi Yakumois. Hearn is forever beloved in New Orleans (though perhaps not so revered in his former home town of Cincinnati) for the seemingly timeless quote: “Times are not good here. The city is crumbling into ashes. It has been buried under a lava flood of taxes and frauds and maladministrations so that it has become only a study for archaeologists. Its condition is so bad that when I write about it, as I intend to do soon, nobody will believe I am telling the truth. But it is better to live here in sackcloth and ashes than to own the whole state of Ohio.”

A surprise was waiting for Bon Koizumi and wife Shoko Koizumi when they entered the kitchen of the Cleveland Street apartment. Richard Scribner, the owner of great-granddad’s former residence, had thoughtfully prepared a kettle of miso soup for the occasion. After sampling the soy and seaweed broth and having photos taken comparing his profile with a profile photo of his great-grandfather, Bon Koizumi mounted the sturdy winding stairway to the second story. As rain clouds encroached from the horizon, he inspected the wrap-around balcony with its oak-pattern cast iron railing, then entered the spare westward apartment where great-granddad may have lived. The truth is, no one is certain which room was Hearn’s.

There was a plan to visit a second upstairs apartment where Hearn may have lived, but a loud dog and young woman who had freshly emerged from the shower wrapped in a towel made further exploration seem more troublesome for all concerned than it was worth. One felt that somewhere Lafcadio was smiling, charmed by the momentary chaos.

The big brick townhouse where Hearn roomed would fit comfortably into the shady streetscape of, say, Esplanade Avenue at the edge of the French quarter. But in the center of New Orleans’ bustling, treeless hospital district, surrounded by a desert of parking lots and brutish modern architecture, it seems somehow lonely and vulnerable. Heaven only knows how the neo-classical orphan has survived so long amid the wailing sirens and desolation.

The Open Mind of Lafcadio Hearn

What: An exhibition of first editions of Hearn books and Hearn’s art collection.

Where: Tulane University’s Special Collections Gallery, located in Jones Hall, Room 205, 6823 St Charles Ave.

When: Mon-Sat, 10 a.m. to 6; Sun, noon to 6, through Oct. 28.

Admission: Free


Scribner, a Louisiana State University professor of public health, said that old-timers recalled that neighborhood was once the site of several barrooms. As recently as 20 years ago, Scribner said, the one time Hearn residence was a seedy pay-by-the-night flop house frequented by drug abusers and the downtown demimonde. Adding another layer of celebrity to the Cleveland address, Scribner noted that the place had subsequently been purchased and beautifully restored by former Saints star Pat Swilling, who’d entered the contracting trade at the conclusion of his gridiron career. Scribner bought the property 10 years back and managed to place it on the roster of official New Orleans historic landmarks.

Koizumi is a professor of folklore at a community college in Matsue, Japan – Hearn’s last hometown. His great-grandmother, Hearn’s wife Koizumi Setsu, was a renowned story teller, Koizumi said. Is it any wonder that the union of a journalist and storyteller would eventually produce a professor of folklore? Koizumi had come to New Orleans in part to present his views of great-grandfather to Hearn fans at Tulane University, where an exhibit of first editions of Hearn books and Hearn’s art collection is on display. Great-grandpa’s great strength, Koizumi said, was his open-mindedness, and his open mindedness may have had something to do with his view of New Orleans.

“New Orleans is one of my favorite cities in the world,” Koizumi said. “The Creole culture makes people open-minded. So this is the reason I love this city.”

The cloudburst that had rolled across the city during the Koizumi’s visit had passed, leaving behind silver sunlight glittering on the abundant pavement. As the interview began to wind down, Mrs. Koizumi captured the spirit of the moment perfectly. As she glanced up at the high ceiling and the gently spinning ceiling fan she said: “I feel Lafcadio is here with us, because he loved New Orleans and so he wants to come back. Actually, in his life, he never (did). Now he travels with us … this is maybe his second life in a different world.”

Snapshot of Lafcadio's life.

Lafcadio Hearn’s great-grandson Bon Koizumi visited the Cleveland Ave. apartment in New Orleans, where the 19th-century journalist and author lived between 1882 and 1887, while writing “La Cuisine Creole” and other works that championed Crescent City culture. He spent the last years of his life 1890 to 1904 in Japan, where he married Koizumi Setsu, taking the name Koizumi Yakumois. Hearn is forever beloved in New Orleans (though perhaps not so revered in his former home town of Cincinnati) for the seemingly timeless quote: “Times are not good here. The city is crumbling into ashes. It has been buried under a lava flood of taxes and frauds and maladministrations so that it has become only a study for archaeologists. Its condition is so bad that when I write about it, as I intend to do soon, nobody will believe I am telling the truth. But it is better to live here in sackcloth and ashes than to own the whole state of Ohio.”

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Lafcadio Hearn Files on 01.11.2012

Michael Wood, Shoko Koizumi, Bon Koizumi & Dr. Bruce Raeburn in the Lafcadio Hearn room, Tulane University

Michael Wood, (far left) is professor in the Asian Studies department at Tulane University. On the far right is Dr. Bruce Raeburn, who is the Director of Special Collections at Tulane University. Shoko is Bon's wife.

Photograph taken in the Lafcadio Hearn room and the Hogan Jazz Archive at Tulane. Nicole Shibata noted "the exhibition was a huge hit and it was by far the best one we’ve had in that gallery space since I’ve been at Tulane".

The following is an article By Doug MacCash, NOLA.com - on the occasion of the New Orleans exhibition

The Times-Picayune (Newspaper) - Greater New Orleans
on October 19, 2012

Lafcadio Hearn’s great-grandson Bon Koizumi said that he was “moved” by his visit to the Cleveland Avenue apartment his ancestor called home from 1882 to 1887. Hearn was the 19th-century crime journalist turned tongue-in-cheek cultural observer who will remain forever beloved to Crescent City-ites (though perhaps not so revered by residents of his former hometown of Cincinnati) for the evergreen quote:

“Times are not good here (in New Orleans). The city is crumbling into ashes. It has been buried under a lava flood of taxes and frauds and maladministrations so that it has become only a study for archaeologists. Its condition is so bad that when I write about it, as I intend to do soon, nobody will believe I am telling the truth. But it is better to live here in sackcloth and ashes than to own the whole state of Ohio.”

Hearn (1850-1904) was born in Greece, grew up in Ireland, became a professional writer and keen societal observer in the United States, had a brief sojourn in Martinique, then settled in Japan, where he married a woman from a Samurai family and changed his name to Koizumi Yakumois. During the five years he lived in the Cleveland Avenue boarding house, he wrote “La Cuisine Creole,” an early collection of Crescent City recipes that would have been undreamt of in Cincinnati.

In the introduction of the book, Hearn promised readers that “In this compendium will be found many original recipes and other valuable ones heretofore unpublished, notably those of Gombo file, Bouille-abaisse, Courtbouillon, Jambolaya, Salade a la Russe, Bisque of Cray-fish a la Creole, Pusee Café, Café brule, Brulot, together with many confections and delicacies for the sick, including a number of mixed drinks.” The Koizumis said that despite the spread of Creole cooking in the 117 years since the publication of great grandpa's cookbook, there were still no New Orleans-style restaurants in Matsue, Japan, where they live. But, they said, select chefs are able to whip up an occasional jambalaya or gumbo. In fact, the Koizumis said, Creole food was served to guests at their wedding.

Considering the milepost historic importance of “La Cuisine Creole” to a city that has become a world-renowned culinary beacon, shouldn’t the house at 1565 Cleveland be better known?

Lafcadio Hearn’s great-grandson Bon Koizumi visits New Orleans
Lafcadio Hearn’s great-grandson Bon Koizumi visited the Cleveland Ave. apartment in New Orleans, where the 19th-century journalist and author lived between 1882 and 1887, while writing “La Cuisine Creole” and other works that championed Crescent City culture. He spent the last years of his life 1890 to 1904 in Japan, where he married Koizumi Setsu, taking the name Koizumi Yakumois. Hearn is forever beloved in New Orleans (though perhaps not so revered in his former home town of Cincinnati) for the seemingly timeless quote: “Times are not good here. The city is crumbling into ashes. It has been buried under a lava flood of taxes and frauds and maladministrations so that it has become only a study for archaeologists. Its condition is so bad that when I write about it, as I intend to do soon, nobody will believe I am telling the truth. But it is better to live here in sackcloth and ashes than to own the whole state of Ohio.”

A surprise was waiting for Bon Koizumi and wife Shoko Koizumi when they entered the kitchen of the Cleveland Street apartment. Richard Scribner, the owner of great-granddad’s former residence, had thoughtfully prepared a kettle of miso soup for the occasion. After sampling the soy and seaweed broth and having photos taken comparing his profile with a profile photo of his great-grandfather, Bon Koizumi mounted the sturdy winding stairway to the second story. As rain clouds encroached from the horizon, he inspected the wrap-around balcony with its oak-pattern cast iron railing, then entered the spare westward apartment where great-granddad may have lived. The truth is, no one is certain which room was Hearn’s.

There was a plan to visit a second upstairs apartment where Hearn may have lived, but a loud dog and young woman who had freshly emerged from the shower wrapped in a towel made further exploration seem more troublesome for all concerned than it was worth. One felt that somewhere Lafcadio was smiling, charmed by the momentary chaos.

The big brick townhouse where Hearn roomed would fit comfortably into the shady streetscape of, say, Esplanade Avenue at the edge of the French quarter. But in the center of New Orleans’ bustling, treeless hospital district, surrounded by a desert of parking lots and brutish modern architecture, it seems somehow lonely and vulnerable. Heaven only knows how the neo-classical orphan has survived so long amid the wailing sirens and desolation.

The Open Mind of Lafcadio Hearn

What: An exhibition of first editions of Hearn books and Hearn’s art collection.

Where: Tulane University’s Special Collections Gallery, located in Jones Hall, Room 205, 6823 St Charles Ave.

When: Mon-Sat, 10 a.m. to 6; Sun, noon to 6, through Oct. 28.

Admission: Free


Scribner, a Louisiana State University professor of public health, said that old-timers recalled that neighborhood was once the site of several barrooms. As recently as 20 years ago, Scribner said, the one time Hearn residence was a seedy pay-by-the-night flop house frequented by drug abusers and the downtown demimonde. Adding another layer of celebrity to the Cleveland address, Scribner noted that the place had subsequently been purchased and beautifully restored by former Saints star Pat Swilling, who’d entered the contracting trade at the conclusion of his gridiron career. Scribner bought the property 10 years back and managed to place it on the roster of official New Orleans historic landmarks.

Koizumi is a professor of folklore at a community college in Matsue, Japan – Hearn’s last hometown. His great-grandmother, Hearn’s wife Koizumi Setsu, was a renowned story teller, Koizumi said. Is it any wonder that the union of a journalist and storyteller would eventually produce a professor of folklore? Koizumi had come to New Orleans in part to present his views of great-grandfather to Hearn fans at Tulane University, where an exhibit of first editions of Hearn books and Hearn’s art collection is on display. Great-grandpa’s great strength, Koizumi said, was his open-mindedness, and his open mindedness may have had something to do with his view of New Orleans.

“New Orleans is one of my favorite cities in the world,” Koizumi said. “The Creole culture makes people open-minded. So this is the reason I love this city.”

The cloudburst that had rolled across the city during the Koizumi’s visit had passed, leaving behind silver sunlight glittering on the abundant pavement. As the interview began to wind down, Mrs. Koizumi captured the spirit of the moment perfectly. As she glanced up at the high ceiling and the gently spinning ceiling fan she said: “I feel Lafcadio is here with us, because he loved New Orleans and so he wants to come back. Actually, in his life, he never (did). Now he travels with us … this is maybe his second life in a different world.”

Snapshot of Lafcadio's life.

Lafcadio Hearn’s great-grandson Bon Koizumi visited the Cleveland Ave. apartment in New Orleans, where the 19th-century journalist and author lived between 1882 and 1887, while writing “La Cuisine Creole” and other works that championed Crescent City culture. He spent the last years of his life 1890 to 1904 in Japan, where he married Koizumi Setsu, taking the name Koizumi Yakumois. Hearn is forever beloved in New Orleans (though perhaps not so revered in his former home town of Cincinnati) for the seemingly timeless quote: “Times are not good here. The city is crumbling into ashes. It has been buried under a lava flood of taxes and frauds and maladministrations so that it has become only a study for archaeologists. Its condition is so bad that when I write about it, as I intend to do soon, nobody will believe I am telling the truth. But it is better to live here in sackcloth and ashes than to own the whole state of Ohio.”

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Lafcadio Hearn Files on 26.10.2012

Bon Koizumi poses with a portrait of his great-grandfather, Lafcadio Hearn. (

(Photo by Doug MacCash / The Times-Picayune. )

Lafcadio Hearn's great-grandson Bon Koizumi visits New Orleans author's apartment

By Doug MacCash, NOLA.com
The Times-Picayune (Newspaper_ - Greater New Orleans
on October 19, 2012

Lafcadio Hearn’s great-grandson Bon Koizumi said that he was “moved” by his visit to the Cleveland Avenue apartment his ancestor called home from 1882 to 1887. Hearn was the 19th-century crime journalist turned tongue-in-cheek cultural observer who will remain forever beloved to Crescent City-ites (though perhaps not so revered by residents of his former hometown of Cincinnati) for the evergreen quote:

“Times are not good here (in New Orleans). The city is crumbling into ashes. It has been buried under a lava flood of taxes and frauds and maladministrations so that it has become only a study for archaeologists. Its condition is so bad that when I write about it, as I intend to do soon, nobody will believe I am telling the truth. But it is better to live here in sackcloth and ashes than to own the whole state of Ohio.”

Hearn (1850-1904) was born in Greece, grew up in Ireland, became a professional writer and keen societal observer in the United States, had a brief sojourn in Martinique, then settled in Japan, where he married a woman from a Samurai family and changed his name to Koizumi Yakumois. During the five years he lived in the Cleveland Avenue boarding house, he wrote “La Cuisine Creole,” an early collection of Crescent City recipes that would have been undreamt of in Cincinnati.

In the introduction of the book, Hearn promised readers that “In this compendium will be found many original recipes and other valuable ones heretofore unpublished, notably those of Gombo file, Bouille-abaisse, Courtbouillon, Jambolaya, Salade a la Russe, Bisque of Cray-fish a la Creole, Pusee Café, Café brule, Brulot, together with many confections and delicacies for the sick, including a number of mixed drinks.” The Koizumis said that despite the spread of Creole cooking in the 117 years since the publication of great grandpa's cookbook, there were still no New Orleans-style restaurants in Matsue, Japan, where they live. But, they said, select chefs are able to whip up an occasional jambalaya or gumbo. In fact, the Koizumis said, Creole food was served to guests at their wedding.

Considering the milepost historic importance of “La Cuisine Creole” to a city that has become a world-renowned culinary beacon, shouldn’t the house at 1565 Cleveland be better known?

Lafcadio Hearn’s great-grandson Bon Koizumi visits New Orleans
Lafcadio Hearn’s great-grandson Bon Koizumi visited the Cleveland Ave. apartment in New Orleans, where the 19th-century journalist and author lived between 1882 and 1887, while writing “La Cuisine Creole” and other works that championed Crescent City culture. He spent the last years of his life 1890 to 1904 in Japan, where he married Koizumi Setsu, taking the name Koizumi Yakumois. Hearn is forever beloved in New Orleans (though perhaps not so revered in his former home town of Cincinnati) for the seemingly timeless quote: “Times are not good here. The city is crumbling into ashes. It has been buried under a lava flood of taxes and frauds and maladministrations so that it has become only a study for archaeologists. Its condition is so bad that when I write about it, as I intend to do soon, nobody will believe I am telling the truth. But it is better to live here in sackcloth and ashes than to own the whole state of Ohio.”

A surprise was waiting for Bon Koizumi and wife Shoko Koizumi when they entered the kitchen of the Cleveland Street apartment. Richard Scribner, the owner of great-granddad’s former residence, had thoughtfully prepared a kettle of miso soup for the occasion. After sampling the soy and seaweed broth and having photos taken comparing his profile with a profile photo of his great-grandfather, Bon Koizumi mounted the sturdy winding stairway to the second story. As rain clouds encroached from the horizon, he inspected the wrap-around balcony with its oak-pattern cast iron railing, then entered the spare westward apartment where great-granddad may have lived. The truth is, no one is certain which room was Hearn’s.

There was a plan to visit a second upstairs apartment where Hearn may have lived, but a loud dog and young woman who had freshly emerged from the shower wrapped in a towel made further exploration seem more troublesome for all concerned than it was worth. One felt that somewhere Lafcadio was smiling, charmed by the momentary chaos.

The big brick townhouse where Hearn roomed would fit comfortably into the shady streetscape of, say, Esplanade Avenue at the edge of the French quarter. But in the center of New Orleans’ bustling, treeless hospital district, surrounded by a desert of parking lots and brutish modern architecture, it seems somehow lonely and vulnerable. Heaven only knows how the neo-classical orphan has survived so long amid the wailing sirens and desolation.

The Open Mind of Lafcadio Hearn

What: An exhibition of first editions of Hearn books and Hearn’s art collection.

Where: Tulane University’s Special Collections Gallery, located in Jones Hall, Room 205, 6823 St Charles Ave.

When: Mon-Sat, 10 a.m. to 6; Sun, noon to 6, through Oct. 28.

Admission: Free


Scribner, a Louisiana State University professor of public health, said that old-timers recalled that neighborhood was once the site of several barrooms. As recently as 20 years ago, Scribner said, the one time Hearn residence was a seedy pay-by-the-night flop house frequented by drug abusers and the downtown demimonde. Adding another layer of celebrity to the Cleveland address, Scribner noted that the place had subsequently been purchased and beautifully restored by former Saints star Pat Swilling, who’d entered the contracting trade at the conclusion of his gridiron career. Scribner bought the property 10 years back and managed to place it on the roster of official New Orleans historic landmarks.

Koizumi is a professor of folklore at a community college in Matsue, Japan – Hearn’s last hometown. His great-grandmother, Hearn’s wife Koizumi Setsu, was a renowned story teller, Koizumi said. Is it any wonder that the union of a journalist and storyteller would eventually produce a professor of folklore? Koizumi had come to New Orleans in part to present his views of great-grandfather to Hearn fans at Tulane University, where an exhibit of first editions of Hearn books and Hearn’s art collection is on display. Great-grandpa’s great strength, Koizumi said, was his open-mindedness, and his open mindedness may have had something to do with his view of New Orleans.

“New Orleans is one of my favorite cities in the world,” Koizumi said. “The Creole culture makes people open-minded. So this is the reason I love this city.”

The cloudburst that had rolled across the city during the Koizumi’s visit had passed, leaving behind silver sunlight glittering on the abundant pavement. As the interview began to wind down, Mrs. Koizumi captured the spirit of the moment perfectly. As she glanced up at the high ceiling and the gently spinning ceiling fan she said: “I feel Lafcadio is here with us, because he loved New Orleans and so he wants to come back. Actually, in his life, he never (did). Now he travels with us … this is maybe his second life in a different world.”

Snapshot of Lafcadio's life.

Lafcadio Hearn’s great-grandson Bon Koizumi visited the Cleveland Ave. apartment in New Orleans, where the 19th-century journalist and author lived between 1882 and 1887, while writing “La Cuisine Creole” and other works that championed Crescent City culture. He spent the last years of his life 1890 to 1904 in Japan, where he married Koizumi Setsu, taking the name Koizumi Yakumois. Hearn is forever beloved in New Orleans (though perhaps not so revered in his former home town of Cincinnati) for the seemingly timeless quote: “Times are not good here. The city is crumbling into ashes. It has been buried under a lava flood of taxes and frauds and maladministrations so that it has become only a study for archaeologists. Its condition is so bad that when I write about it, as I intend to do soon, nobody will believe I am telling the truth. But it is better to live here in sackcloth and ashes than to own the whole state of Ohio.”

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Lafcadio Hearn Files on 07.10.2012

Masaaki Noda with Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda

Near the United Nations building, September 25, 2012.

Near the United Nations building, September 25, 2012.

Masaaki Noda is one of Japan's, and the world's, great sculptors.

Masaaki Noda is well know in Greek and Kytherian cultural circles. Amongst others, he has created the sculptures,

- "The Open Mind of Lafcadio Hearn", located on the shore of Lake Shinji, Japan,

- the "Spirit of Mercury" sculpture which is located in the city of Marathon, Greece

- and "Delphi's Mirror", located in Delphi, Greece

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Lafcadio Hearn Files on 03.10.2012

Photograph taken at the Kwaidan exhibition held in Japan

Yet another tribute to Lafcadio Hearn.

The exhibition was reported in an article in Yaizu.

The exhibition was organised by Takis Efstathiou.

Left to right:

Shoko Koizumi

Shin Masuyama, Curator for the Museum at Kalinihta

Katsuhiko Makita

Masaaki Noda

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Lafcadio Hearn Files on 03.10.2012

Article about the Kwaidan exhibition held in Japan

Yet another tribute to Lafcadio Hearn.

As reported in an article in Yaizu.

The exhibition was organised by Takis Efstathiou.

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Lafcadio Hearn Files on 05.10.2012

The Open Mind of Lafcadio Hearn in New Orleans (Book and Art Exhibition)

Sponsored by the HEARN SOCIETY

Download a superb .pdf brochure of the exhibition here:

Lafcadio-Hearn_press_release_2012_english.pdf


展覧会

基本情報

日時
Period
October 18-28, 2012
mon-sat: 10:00am-6:00pm
sun: 12:00pm-6:00pm
会場
Venue
Jones Hall 2F, Jones Gallery (Room 200), Tulane University, New Orleans
料金
Free Entrance
内容

Implementation

Hearn’s Open Mind, in other words his tolerance and cooperative mindset, materializes in many of his writings. In particular, Gombo Zhebès and La Cuisine Creole written during his time in New Orleans, and Two Years in the French West Indies written in the Antilles with the same Creole cultural backdrop. Hearn praised the blended culture of the Creoles, and his open-mindedness regarding the contact and fusion of cultures was a new way of thinking that crosses over to modern post-colonialism.

‘The Open Mind of Lafcadio Hearn in New Orleans’ will display approximately 23 pieces from the 2010 exhibition in Matsue Castle; 2 pieces from The American College of Greece; 3 of his favorite items from the Lafcadio Hearn Memorial Museum in Matsue; 26 of first editions of the books mainly from his time in New Orleans (Rare Book Collection, Special Collections, Howard-Tilton Memorial Library, Tulane University). Pieces by the artists freely expressing Hearn’s life, philosophy, and open-mindedness as interpreted from his works and letters will be displayed along with the artists’ remarks. The beautifully designed covers of Hearn’s original publications create a harmonious display along with Hearn’s memo pad that he used as a journalist in New Orleans, and his favorite pen and inkwell, sharing with the viewer a sense of Hearn’s journalistic and writer’s spirit.

The Open Mind of Lafcadio Hearn

‘The Open Mind of Lafcadio Hearn’ is a project that has been nurtured by Takis Efstathiou (Art Coordinator, Greece) since 1996.

Thanks to his passion and hard work, the world’s first Lafcadio Hearn themed art exhibition was held in The American College of Greece Athens in 2009.

The following year, with 2010 marking the 120th anniversary of Hearn’s arrival in Japan and the 160th anniversary of his birth, the art exhibition called on even more artists and was this time held in the castle and Lafcadio Hearn Memorial Museum of Matsue city.

The collaboration of the 400 year old historical building and the modern art created a unique atmosphere.

On both occasions, a sculpture of the same name as the exhibition, created by New York artist Noda Masaaki, was erected in Athens and in Matsue. In 2011, as one of its international locations, the exhibit was held in New York.

There the art was displayed along with the addition of a display of beautifully bound original publications of Hearn’s works (property of Efstathiou).

The New Orleans exhibit is being held in 2012 in cooperation with Tulane University. Respect for Hearn’s open mind is continually growing, and the exhibition will be held in Toyama Prefecture (Japan), where is located “Lafcadio Hearn Library”, in 2014.

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Lafcadio Hearn Files on 03.10.2012

New Lafacdio Hearn Facebook page

https://www.facebook.com/lafcadiokassimati.hearn

Excellent page featuring all information, exhibitions, events etc surrounding the life and times of Lafcadio Hearn.

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Sydney Morning Herald on 07.09.2012

Tess Mallos

Cook served exotica to adoring millions

Sydney Morning Herald

August 18, 2012

Taste maker … Tess Mallos wrote 16 cookbooks
.

Tess Mallos earned her place on the bookshelves of a generation of home cooks. Just a few years before her death, the food writer admitted she wasn't sure how many of her cookbooks had sold. When pressed, she nonchalantly estimated a worldwide figure about 1½ million to 2 million.

It was a mark of the woman. She wasn't overly obsessed by the exact total, nor did she brag about it. Mallos was more interested in the impact her books had. As the offspring of Greek immigrants, teaching many Australians how to cook ''foreign'' food, she could have held herself up as the poster child of immigration.

Instead, she deflected her importance by pointing out how wonderful it was that Australians were travelling in the 1960s and '70s, opening their minds to new cuisines and packing woks in their return luggage.

Mallos earned an enviable reputation with her cookbooks but, in truth, her work as a pioneering food broadcaster and slavish food historian - pushing everything from the origins of okra to the correct spelling of ''fillo'' pastry - speak more of a wider contribution to the local food industry.

Anastasia Calopades was born on January 25, 1933, in Casino, NSW, to parents from Kythera in Greece. Anastasia didn't roll easily off Australian tongues so, like so many things in her life, she learnt to adapt. Before long it became Ann Tess, later just Tess.

She wanted to study pharmacy but her father didn't believe in higher education for women so when she moved to Sydney, it was to work as a secretary. Mallos didn't grumble about lost opportunity but her intellectual curiosity never left her. Her children recall arriving home as young adults to find their mum "fag in one hand, pen in the other, and a bottomless pot of tea brewing" as she would settle in to discuss the world's problems until the early hours.


She met John Mallos in the unlikely setting of a kitchen tea. They married in 1955 and had three children. They relocated to Delegate, in NSW's southern tablelands, where they ran the Delegate Cafe for five years.

Mallos had grown up at the apron strings of her mother, absorbing the exotica of a family vegetable patch with unlikely stars of their time such as zucchini flowers and eggplant. She also picked up a lot from the home cooks throughout Delegate.

Her ability to morph her acquired knowledge into a practical application showed on her return to Sydney in 1961. Her sister, Ellen, was working in advertising on a pitch for the Rice Marketing Board account. Tess appeared on camera for the project, a role she would later perform with regular cooking segments on Good Morning Australia and other shows.

In the 1960s and '70s her work as a freelance food consultant was flourishing but she still had to convince publishers that Australians were ready for her Greek Cookbook (1976), which went on to notch up 13 editions. It was The Complete Middle East Cookbook (1979), however, that would become her opus. More than 45 editions of the book have been published; it sold all over the world, has been translated into German and Arabic, and is still in print today. Mallos estimated sales of 650,000 for the book.

With 16 cookbooks to her name, when Mallos was inducted into the(Sydney)magazine Food Hall of Fame in 2009, it was at a stage of life when most would be winding down. But she had found a new love: the food of Morocco, which she had turned into a book the year before.

Even as she battled cancer this year, Mallos found time to edit and revise the recipes for The Complete Middle East Cookbook, with a new edition due this Christmas.

Mallos's steel as a food figure, magazine and newspaper columnist and enthusiastic public speaker illustrated yet another side to her cheeky, youthful personality: an unrelenting work ethic.

Tess Mallos is survived by John, children Suzanne, George and Carol, six grandchildren and siblings Ellen and Tony.

Scott Bolles

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Kytherian Biographies Project on 24.07.2012

Paul Theodore

“A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step” – Confucius

This one particular journey started for a young Kytherian boy Paul Theodore when he stepped on board a plane bound for Australia. The world war one twin engine bomber had been converted into a handy passenger plane, and had the capacity to hold approximately nineteen people including pilots.

With nothing but the clothes on his back and a bag a containing precious hand-knitted bed-spread his mother had made, he set off into the unknown, with sixteen complete strangers, four of whom where Greek, and the other, Italian.

The decision to move from Greece was agreed upon by relatives in Australia. After the death of his father, when Paul was only three, and then later, in his teens, the passing of his mother, he no longer had any strong family ties to anyone in Greece.

Australia offered new opportunities, a fresh start, and relatives that were very eager to see him.

So they were off. Young Paul left Greece behind, filled with hope and wondering what the future held for him.

They were welcomed by the sound of gunfire as they flew in to their first stop off point, Lydda. The next thirty-six hours in Jerusalem proved to be interesting. The image of rifles chained to airport guards in case of a sudden unsuspected attack, is one that has remained with him. In a place where such unrest is commonplace, this was not an unusual sight, but it was an alien concept, to the young stranger.

In the next seven days it took to reach Australia, the travelers stopped off twenty-one times. They flew over the Middle East, India, down through Malaysia, and then finally, to Australia. They found themselves confronting many interesting and challenging people and situations. Stories can be told of the Indian crow’s eggs breakfast, a brief encounter with a Malaysian swamp ‘rattler’, and pressed steel runway; but these will be conveyed at another time.

The passenger plane made it! They finally set down in Australia. The now weary and rather dirty young travelers had their first look at the country they would come to call home. The Darwin airport consisted of a tarmac runway, almost a molten liquid in the oppressive heat, a lonely tin shed, and a not so helpful local.

To be perfectly frank the first impressions of our fair Australia were not favorable; in fact young Paul’s first thoughts were that he had arrived in a sort of hell.

The journey continued. The next destination was Sydney, where Paul was to meet his aunty and uncle. Friendly faces greeted him as he came through Sydney customs. Family. After travelling in an ever-changing environment, seeing someone warm and familiar was a great joy and relief.

The Journey was over…..or was it?

Paul Theodore established himself in Australia, by working for his uncle in Crookwell. It was during this time that he learnt English. He asked questions, read Phantom comics and tuned into the daily Biggles episodes on the ‘wireless’. This was how he came to grips with the alien English language.

It was also at this time that he met his future wife, Mary. After a year of courting they were married on the 13th June, 1956, at the Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church, in Surry Hills.

Later he moved to Braidwood and opened the still very prosperous Royal Café. From there he moved to Canberra, were he ran the Blue Moon café. Throughout this time, the couple established a family – with their three daughters, Stella, Andriana, and Christina. Australia was now definitely home.

The journey hasn’t really ended. The transition from Greece to Australia is only part of a larger journey that carries on. Life.

For my Papou, Paul Theodore.

Jasmin Natterer.

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Mosman Daily on 23.06.2012

Jeweller Paul Dracakis has glitter of approval

Mosman Daily, 22 JUNE 2012

BY KATE CRAWFORD

Picture: DAVE SWIFT

Paul Dracakis was awarded an OAM in the Queen's Birthday honours
.

Restrained by the need for secrecy, Mosman jeweller Paul Dracakis fortunately did not get up on his roof and shout about his Queen's Birthday honour.

Mr Dracakis, 72, whose first job in Australia was washing potatoes, says he burst with pride when he received his official letter.

"When I found out, I felt like jumping on the roof and telling the world but I couldn't because you have to keep it secret for a while," he said.

Mr Dracakis has been awarded the Medal of the Order (OAM) of Australiafor his services to the Manly-Warringah community and to business.

It is not surprising that Mr Dracakis is so gratified by the award, particularly in the light of his modest beginnings in Greece where his mother supported her six children by working on farms. The day after he arrived in Australia at the age of 18, Mr Dracakis was working in a fish and chip shop washing potatoes.

Mr Dracakis said he had always loved jewellery and eventually was able to open his first jewellery store in Manly in 1980, later moving to Warringah Mall.

Seven years ago, the family opened a second store at Spit Junction. The two stores are now run by his sons Nick, Peter and Theo.

A resident of Seaforth, he also served as an alderman in Manly Council in the 1980s. "The good people of Manly-Warringah and Mosman gave me everything," he said.

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Vasilia Uhrweiss (nee Margetis) on 21.06.2012

Portrait of my grandmother, Agapi Lianos (nee Comino) c.1900

The Life story of George and Agapi Lianos

The Lianos Comino Odyssey


My Grandparents were Agapi and George Lianos from Kythera,Greece. Papou was born on the 9th June1873 in the village of Liananika to Emmanuel and Relia, farm owners. He was the only son and had four sisters, Irene, Kerani, Marigo and Stavroula. Agapi's birth date was in 1867.

He worked on the farm with his parents and at the age of twenty four married Agapi the seventeen year old daughter of Anthony and Theodora Comino on the 15th February 1897.

My Grandparents Agapi and George Lianos c. 1900

His parents gave them some land with a two room house on it and it was there that their first child Stavroula was born on the 31st July 1898. But conditions were very hard in Kythera so they decided that Papou should go to Australia to try his luck. Also his wife's brothers, Dimitrios, Menas and Nicholas,and her Uncles Zacharias and Ioanis Comino, were already settled in Sydney, which would be a great help to him, he hoped.

He arrived in Pireaus on 16th September 1898 where he arranged his papers and passport and arranged for his passage to Sydney. On the 20th September 1898 he left on an Egyptian Steam boat for Port Said where he stayed for several days. Then on the 28th September 1898 he boarded a new German steamer called the Barbarossa, and set sail for his new life in Australia.

After a lovely and uneventful trip he arrived at Circular Quay Sydney on the 30th of October 1898 and was met by his brothers-in-law and taken to lodgings and instructed in what was to be his life for some time to come. A bad joke was played on him by his brothers-in-law, who had put him in a bug infested room on his first night in Australia, but then gave him a room in one of their homes.

And it was hard. From the 3rd November 1898 he had to get up at 3.a.m. to go to the markets to collect oysters and fish and bring the produce back to the cellar and clean the fish and open the oysters. He then had to go upstairs to scrub the floor, clean the tables and wash the cutlery in preparation for the evening work in the restaurant. Then he had to go back to the cellar to open more oysters. Then it was back to the pantry to wash up the cutlery and dishes from the restaurant after it closed. He went to bed at midnight, and then the routine started again. He had Sundays off but had to clean his room and wash his clothes. Then he dressed up in the best clothes he had and went for a walk in the Domain but he had to be home by 5p.m. to prepare himself for the next day. And so it went on.

My Grandparents Agapi and George Lianos, early in their married life, with Emmanuel and Stavroula

During the next four years he had a series of good and bad experiences in business and family dealings, but he was finally doing well enough to bring his wife and child to join him. In November 1900 they were a united family again. They worked very hard in the latest business they had purchased which was very successful. Their first child to be born in Australia was Emmanuel born on 3rd January 1903. Their next child was Theodora born on 29th January 1905, and on 20th March 1907 another daughter Aspacia was born. He then made the decision to return to Greece and on the16th April 1907 left on the Orient Liner Ormes.

However Theodora became very ill and they had to disembark at Colombo, a decision which saved her life. They stayed there for fifteen days and continued on their journey on the Ortona, and arrived in Pireaus on the 7th June 1907, where they stayed for fifteen days and then travelled to their intended destination Agia Pelagia where they were greeted with great joy by his father and sisters. From there they travelled to their village Liananika and were greeted with great enthusiam by the villagers.

They spent the next few years (3yrs and 10mths to be exact) having a happy time. During this time another son Anthony was born on the 28th January 1908 and Papou built a beautiful home and furnished it with the best furniture which he bought from a shop in Pireaus owned by an in.law J.Venathis. The house was started on the 15th May and completed on the 28th November 1908.

Lianos family home on Kythera, built by my grandfather, George Lianos

Unfortunately he was persuaded by some in-laws to lend them money for their business ventures and then refused to repay him. As he was not receiving the monies due to him from his investments in Australia from his in-laws whom he trusted, he was forced to return to Australia to investigate things. His intention was to return to Greece in a couple of years. So in October 1910, they left Cerigo (as it was called then) and arrived back in Australia on the 7th February 1911, and took over his shop from his brother-in-law Menas Comino and was shocked to see how little money there was for him. However he worked very hard and built the business up and started doing well again . During this time another son Menas, was born on the 1th April 1911 and business was really booming. But he was too trusting of his in-laws and was tricked by them once again and he had many business problems as a result of their actions. About this time another daughter Coralia was born on the 24th April 1913.

At the end of 1912, he intended to sell up everything and return to Greec but once again he was persuaded by his in-laws to do otherwise and made bad decisions which cost him dearly. He opened a lolly shop and milk bar in Elizabeth St. Sydney but again he had bad partners and lost a lot of money. Another son Theodore was born on the 13th December 1914.

Then war had started in Europe in 1914, and business plunged dramatically because the soldiers behaved like larrikins and refused to pay for food and drinks and threatened to smash the windows (which they did once) if he complained. It was a bad time for all shopkeepers. He then went into business at 661 George St,and it was from there that his first daughter Stella married John Aroney in the 1st August 1917, and the wedding reception was held at the George St business and the 100 guests sang and danced till 2.a.m. It was the first genuine Cerigotis wedding held in Australia.

Cosmopolitan Oyster Parlour in Pitt St, owned by the Comino brothers - my grandmothers uncles, c 1900

Business was improving and his landlord then offered to sell him the shop and the one next door but the price was too high and he refused. It was then sold to a Theo Marks and when the current lease expired, his terms for a new lease were excessive and not worth while considering. But he had bills to pay, the wine licence and fittings being a few things to pay. His brother-in-law Menas told him that if he walked away from everything, because the bills were so small no one would chase him for it. But it was bad advice. With his wife and family and new son Socrates born on the 20th January 1918 they left Sydney for Murwillimbah where his daughter Stella and her husband John were in business and John offered him a small shop next door to theirs to open a business. But Theo Marks in Sydney did not walk away from monies owing to him and sent a summons to Murwillumbah. The severe flu epidemic had hit Australia and Papou was ill and unable to go to Sydney to defend the summons so he was declared bankrupt.

But things were no better in Murwillumbah as John Aroney had sold the small shop to help his brother return to Greece, and would not give Papou a larger share of his shop as compensation for the money he had put in renovating the smaller shop. They returned to Sydney and settled in Palmer St. Papou was out of work for five months and only Emanuel was working. He worked in Uncle Mena's and Uncle Nicholas' shop making five to ten gallons of ice cream every morning and serving in the restaurant at night. This helped to pay off the bankruptcy so that his father would not dip into the little money he had left.

Papou then opened a shop in Oxford St and fitted it out but it was not a success and he had to close it. And that was the last of his money. Another daughter Diamantoula was born on the 4th August 1920. Then in October 1921, they decided to go to Gunnedah and bought a broken down shop which he renovated completely as a milk bar. He put in a soda fountain and the business started to build up. It was there that great plans were made for the future and Papou thought he was on his way again at last.

But as the saying goes "Man proposes and God disposes" and so it was with my Grandfather.

Another son Constantine was born on the 4th October 1922. There were eleven children born to Agapi and George Lianos.

My mother with her 10 brothers and sisters

Back row: Aspacia, Menas, Theodora and Stavroula. Seated: Theodore, Diamantoula, Emanuel, Anthony, Socrates, Coralia and Constantine sitting on stool.

My Grandparents Agapi and George Lianos later in life – in 1942

My grandmother died soon after this photograph was taken, at age 62, in July 1942.

My grandfather in 1960, surrounded by his eleven children

8 remaining children of George and Agapi Lianos, 1987, in Uncle Tony's home, in Killarney Heights

Gravesite of the Lianos family, Botany Cemetery, Sydney

Photos > Diaspora Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Vasilia Uhrweiss (nee Margetis) on 20.06.2012

The Lianos sisters. Daughters of George and Agapi Lianos

My mother Theodora was the eldest, and Diana, the youngest in this photograph

Standing: Stella and Coralia. Seated:Theodora, Diana, and Aspacia, and
Diana (christened Diamantoula).

The Life Story of Diana Rudkin (nee, Lianos)

Diana (Diamantoula) Rudkin (nee Lianos), in her prime, 1950

Diana (christened Diamantoula), was born in Sydney on the 4th August 1920,the youngest of five sisters and second youngest of the eleven children of George and Agapi Lianos from Kythera.

As can be seen in the photograph, above, she showed a flair for dressing at an early age and when she grew up went to the East Sydney Technical College to learn dress designing. But she soon found a job in a dress factory instead. It was nothing for her to take a length of material and drape it around herself, pin it into shape with large safety pins and with smart shoes and handbag was ready to go out and party with her friends.

She joined The Metropolitan Younger Set and organised a Ball and Mannequin Parade in aid of the Red Cross Society that was held in the Banquet Hall of the Hotel Australia on the 14th January 1941. Her brother Anthony was the Secretary and her sister Aspacia Sophios, a beautiful singer was on the programme. Diana was one of the mannequins.

Part of the programme of the Metropolitan Younger Set Ball and Mannequin Parade, 1941

Download the 5-pages of the Programme as a .pdf:

Metropolitan_Younger_Set_PROGRAMME_1941s.pdf

Diana continued working in fashion and did charity work with the Metropolitan Younger Set, and was named Miss Australia Legion in the Miss Australia Contest in 1946. Previously in 1945 she had met an American George Rudkin doctor of marine biology, during his leave from Townsville where many Americans were stationed. They corresponded when he returned to America and proposed marriage. She accepted and prepared for a new life in another country. She left Sydney Australia in 1946 and many members of the family went to the boat to see her off.

Diana Lianos (later, Rudkin) leaving for America. 1946

Diana is standing third from the right, next to Papou.

On her arrival in America where she was met by George they immediately travelled to Philadelphia where arrangements were made for their marriage. It was a very small affair at the Registry Office with no family or friends available at such short notice. It was their day and they were very happy.

Diana (Diamantoula) Rudkin (nee Lianos) with husband George Rudkin

And so began her life in America.
Within six months of her arrival she had formed the Australasian Women's Club (originally the Australian Women's Club) and later became the State President of the Pennsylvania branch of the Daughters of the British Empire. It was a new world to the new war brides and many were frightened and anxious. Some suffered real hardship at first and were very disillusioned. The Members, mostly Australian and New Zealand war brides who had settled in well, helped in any way they could financially or with other problems. Over the years most were comfortably settled with their own homes and cars. Now days besides being a social group, the Club still works for various charities in America.

George became a scientist with the Institute for Cancer Research in Philadelphia and soon after their marriage he was invited by the Nobel Institute to further his research at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm. Not to be idle,Diana opened the first International and Modelling School in Sweden. It was more a finishing than a modelling school where the girls were given lessons in hostessing,voice production and wardrobe planning. Diana made sure that the teachers were all experts in their field.

In 1960 she made her first trip home to Australia and spent many happy days catching up with members of her brothers and sisters and their families.

George Lianos surrounded by children and grandchildren, 1950

George in the meantime was is Paris where he was to be the guest speaker at the first international meeting of the Histo-Chemical Society. Before returning to the U.S.they visited Stockholm for the 12th anniversary of the school she founded,which was now under the direction of Count Olderman-Cronstadt. On returning to America she was asked by a travel agency to advise women on wardrobe planning for overseas travel and was offered a job at the agency.

During all these years Diana still managed to have four children,one girl and three boys. On her first trip home to Australia she took the two eldest Liana and Charles with her,and the other two boys Robert and Brian stayed at home with their father.

In 1965 she made another trip to Australia while doing a world trip this time with Robert and Brian.Her father had died suddenly in 1962 and she was unable to reach Australia in time. George continued his research into cancer at the Research Centre in Philadelphia, and Diana opened a small travel agency with a cardboard cut-out of a kangaroo in the window. The children had all completed their educations.Robert and Brian followed their father into research, Liana into finance, and Charles into the high tech field.

Children of George and Diana Rudkin (nee Lianos). Philadelphia. U.S.A

In 1985 George took Sabbatical leave and came to the C.S.I.R.O. in Sydney Australia. Diana came with him and spent time with members of the family remaining after the deaths of sister Stella and brothers Menas and Emanuel. They stayed with Anthony at his home in Killarney Heights,and she insisted that she come and help me at my pharmacy at Waverley. She certainly made her presence felt and fascinated the customers and my staff by her sometimes imperious stage manner (she would have made a great actress) but everyone laughed and loved it.

George and Diana celebrated their Ruby wedding anniversary at Uncle Tony's home and what a night it was. Everyone who was able to came -- aunts,uncles, nieces and nephews many who were married and had their own children.

8 remaining children of George and Agapi Lianos, 1987, in Uncle Tony's home, in Killarney Heights

This photograph taken at the Ruby Anniversary Party, at Uncle Tony's house in 1987.
Standing: Coralia and Diana. Seated: Socrates, Constantine, Anthony, Theodora, Theodore and Aspacia.

One evening George and Diana were invited to a formal dinner given by the C.S.I.R.O, so it was full dress for both of them. Towards the end of their trip a party was held at my mother Theodora's house at Rose Bay, and it was great for all to be together again. But this was to be their last trip to Australia.

Diana (Diamantoula) Rudkin (nee Lianos) with huband George Rudkin later in life,1987

This photograph was taken at the farewell party for Diana at Margetis family home, Rose Bay, Sydney.

In the early part of 1990 George died suddenly. Diana was heartbroken and could not be consoled and she too died suddenly on 6th of September in the same year 1990.

Diana (Diamantoula) Rudkin (nee Lianos) with huband George Rudkin later in life, 1987, in formal dress

The photograph depicts Diana and George Rudkin preparing for a night on the town, 1987.