kythera family kythera family
  

Diaspora Weddings and Proxenia

Photos > Diaspora Weddings and Proxenia

Showing 21 - 40 from 76 entries
Show: sorted by:

Photos > Diaspora Weddings and Proxenia

submitted by Vasilia Uhrweiss (nee Margetis) on 06.10.2011

Marriage of Bretos Margetis to Theodora Lianos, 1925

Back row, (left to right);

Evangelia Coroneos (slightly lower), Sam Coroneos, (unknown?), Jim Margetis (brother to groom), Anthony Lianos (brother to bride), (unknown but called" Buboula"), Menas Lianos, Peter Bernard.

Middle row, (left to right)

Theo Georgopoulos (small child), Panagotisa ("Bonnie") Georgopoulos, (unknown), Bretos Margetis ,Groom, Theodora Lianos Bride, George Lianos, father, Argapi Lianos, mother, Emanuel Lianos, brother to bride, Theodore Lianos, also brother to the bride.

Front Row, Left, (left to right):

Andrew Coroneos, Vassili Georgopoulos, George Georgopoulos on lap, (unknown), Socrates Lianos, seated on floor.

Front Row, Right, (left to right):

Aspacia Lianos, sister to the bride, Coralia Lianos, sister to the bride, Diana Lianos, sister to the bride, Constantine Lianos, brother to the bride. Diana and Constantine seated at the very front.

Studio portrait of Bretos Margetis and Theodora Lianos

Bretos Margetis and Theodora Lianos outside Agia Triatha, Sydney

Studio portrait of Theodora Lianos on her wedding day

Studio portrait of Theodora Lianos on her wedding day, with mirror image

Photos > Diaspora Weddings and Proxenia

submitted by Vasilia Uhrweiss (nee Margetis) on 06.10.2011

Wedding of Nicholas Sophios to Aspacia Lianos c, 1927

Back row, (left to right):

Theodore Lianos, Vi Bernard. Peter Bernard, Anthony Lianos, Jack
Theodore, Menas Lianos,( unknown? but called "Buboulus"), Emanuel Lianos

Middle row, (left to right):

Socrates Lianos, Bretos Margetis, Maria (sister to groom?) (unknown), Groom, Nicholas Sophios, Bride, Aspacia Lianos, Coralie Lianos, Agarpi Lianos, (nee Comino), & George Lianos, (parents of the bride).

Seated (left):

George Margetis, Theodora Margetis (nee Lianos), Vasilia Margetis (Seated on Mother's knee), Diana Lianos, Constantine Lianos, (seated on floor).

Seated (right):

Lovey Aroney, George Aroney, Stella Aroney, Kosma Aroney, (seated on floor). Lovey, George & Kosma are the children of Stella, and Jack Theodore.

Photos > Diaspora Weddings and Proxenia

submitted by Kytherian Art World on 29.09.2011

Wedding party of Emmanuel Cavacos and Pauline Pradelle 2

Wedding Party In this view, looking from the other end of the table, the bride and groom are seated in the center on the right Oct 2 1915 Paris.

Emmanuel Andrew Cavacos was born in Potamos, Kythera, on February 10th, 1885. He emigrated to the United States of America, when he was sixteen years old, and settled in Baltimore, in the suburb of Hampden, where his brother Constantine was living. Another brother Theodore also chose to live in Baltimore. (Theodore was married to fellow Kytherian Pothiti Chlentzos). In Baltimore he formed a close friendship with Charles Fitzpatrick, with whom he communicated for many years. Photographs and Arts Programs which Cavacos sent to Fitzpatrick form the basis for this (preliminary) biographical sketch.

Having displayed a decided artistic aptitude, he was sent to the Maryland Institute to study painting. He devoted four years to this pursuit, whilst at the same time experimenting with sculptural modeling. Ephraim Keyser, the veteran Baltimore sculptor, who for many years was Director of the Rinehart School of Sculpture at the Maryland Institute, was so impressed with the quality of his clay sketches that he advised him to give up painting and devote himself exclusively to sculpture.

Cavacos took this advise, and he made such rapid progress as a student of Ephraim Keyser, that in 1911 he was awarded the Rinehart Scholarship, which enabled him to go to the Beaux Arts School in Paris. In Paris he was known as Emmanuel Andre, Andre being the French version of his middle name, Andrew.

In 1913, one of his works, Aspiration received an Honorable Mention at the Salon des Artistes Francais. The next year his Thinker attracted great attention at the Paris Salon. The first of this “Thinkers” is housed at the Enoch Pratt Free Library, and the second at the Peabody Institute in Baltimore.

In Paris, On October 2nd, 1915, Cavacos married Pauline Pradelle. Pauline was a professional pianist. She practiced her art in the studio where Emmanuel executed his sculptures.

His work made him a well known figure in the art colony of Paris, and he was commissioned to do the portraits of a number of notable citizens, including Mlle. Mistinguett, a prominent actress; Bucot, and Marcelle Ragnon. In 1925 he received a silver medal for a fountain at the International Exhibition of Decorative Arts in Paris. As a tribute to his ability, in 1927, the French Government bestowed upon him the decoration, Officier de l’Acadamie.
In subsequent years he exhibited annually in the Salon, and also at the Salon des Humoristes de Paris, where his dancing figures were highly praised.
His work is in a number of important collections, including that of Queen Marie of Rumania, who purchased one of his marble figures, Grief.

Cavacos’ sculpture has been praised for its variety, able craftsmanship, and for the sense of rhythm it conveys. The French critics emphasized its inherently poetic qualities.

In 1930 Cavacos returned to the United States for the first time in eighteen years. His work was exhibited at the Baltimore Museum of Art in March of that year. His work was also shown in New York, and later in the year at Homeland. A group of 17 of his sculptures were also placed on display in the National Sculpture Society Exhibition in San Francisco. In May, 1930, he and his wife returned to Paris.

Information about Cavacos post 1930 is difficult to obtain. Hopefully someone can shed more light on his life, in particular the period from 1931 – 1976.

We do know that when members of his family died, Cavacos undertook to create a beautiful monument, and to send it to be erected in the Greek section of a Cemetery in Baltimore, where it still stands today.

It seems that his interest in sculpture continued until well into his old age. When granddaughters of Charles Fitzpatrick (his Baltimore friend) visited him in Paris in 1969, they were photographed with him in his art studio. Many sculptures are visible in the room.

Emmanuel Cavacos died in 1976, aged 91.

Background to the biographical sketch, above

Information about Emmanuel Cavacos is not very extensive. Thankfully, Emmanuel seems to have established a friendship with a Baltimore resident called Charles Fitzpatrick. After Cavacos moved permanently to France he continued to correspond with him. Mike Fitzpatrick (aka Piedmont Fossil), Charles Fitzpatrick’s grandson takes up the story. “Cavacos sent photographs of his studio and his sculptures and even an invitation to his wedding in October 1915. Considering that the wedding took place across the Atlantic and the great time and expense it would require to go there -- not to mention that fact that by then France was deep into World War I -- my grandfather was unable to attend. In 1930 Cavacos made a return visit to the United States for a couple of exhibitions, one in his old hometown of Baltimore and one in New York. I don’t know how successful his exhibitions were considering they took place during the first year of the Great Depression, but today his sculptures, if they can be found at all, seem to sell for between several hundred and several thousand dollars each. In the late 1960s my two sisters traveled to Europe and, at the request of my grandfather, they stopped by to visit (the by that time elderly) Mr. Cavacos at his Paris home”.

Thankfully Mike Fitzpatrick has posted the Cavacos photographs from that time on flickr

http://www.flickr.com/photos/piedmont_fossil/sets/72157594585161747/

“Most of the photos in this set were sent to my grandfather by Emmanuel Cavacos soon after he moved to Paris. Almost all of them are inscribed on the reverse in the artist’s own handwriting.”

Cindy Anderson, is a fiancee of Pete Capsanes, who is the grandson of Theodore Andrew Cavacos, brother to Emmanuel and Constantine. These are all Baltimore Cavacos Kytherians. Cindy wrote to KAW:
"We just had Pete's family here and were talking about Emmanual Andrew Cavacos which is Pete's Great Great Uncle and the sculptor who ended up migrating from Greece, to Maryland back to Paris where he died. We have many of his sculpted pieces in the family".

Photos > Diaspora Weddings and Proxenia

submitted by Kytherian Art World on 29.09.2011

Wedding party of Emmanuel Cavacos and Pauline Pradelle

The bride (Pauline Pradelle) and groom (Emmanuel Cavacos) are seated second and third from left Oct 2 1915 Paris

Emmanuel Andrew Cavacos was born in Potamos, Kythera, on February 10th, 1885. He emigrated to the United States of America, when he was sixteen years old, and settled in Baltimore, in the suburb of Hampden, where his brother Constantine was living. Another brother Theodore also chose to live in Baltimore. (Theodore was married to fellow Kytherian Pothiti Chlentzos). In Baltimore he formed a close friendship with Charles Fitzpatrick, with whom he communicated for many years. Photographs and Arts Programs which Cavacos sent to Fitzpatrick form the basis for this (preliminary) biographical sketch.

Having displayed a decided artistic aptitude, he was sent to the Maryland Institute to study painting. He devoted four years to this pursuit, whilst at the same time experimenting with sculptural modeling. Ephraim Keyser, the veteran Baltimore sculptor, who for many years was Director of the Rinehart School of Sculpture at the Maryland Institute, was so impressed with the quality of his clay sketches that he advised him to give up painting and devote himself exclusively to sculpture.

Cavacos took this advise, and he made such rapid progress as a student of Ephraim Keyser, that in 1911 he was awarded the Rinehart Scholarship, which enabled him to go to the Beaux Arts School in Paris. In Paris he was known as Emmanuel Andre, Andre being the French version of his middle name, Andrew.

In 1913, one of his works, Aspiration received an Honorable Mention at the Salon des Artistes Francais. The next year his Thinker attracted great attention at the Paris Salon. The first of this “Thinkers” is housed at the Enoch Pratt Free Library, and the second at the Peabody Institute in Baltimore.

In Paris, On October 2nd, 1915, Cavacos married Pauline Pradelle. Pauline was a professional pianist. She practiced her art in the studio where Emmanuel executed his sculptures.

His work made him a well known figure in the art colony of Paris, and he was commissioned to do the portraits of a number of notable citizens, including Mlle. Mistinguett, a prominent actress; Bucot, and Marcelle Ragnon. In 1925 he received a silver medal for a fountain at the International Exhibition of Decorative Arts in Paris. As a tribute to his ability, in 1927, the French Government bestowed upon him the decoration, Officier de l’Acadamie.
In subsequent years he exhibited annually in the Salon, and also at the Salon des Humoristes de Paris, where his dancing figures were highly praised.
His work is in a number of important collections, including that of Queen Marie of Rumania, who purchased one of his marble figures, Grief.

Cavacos’ sculpture has been praised for its variety, able craftsmanship, and for the sense of rhythm it conveys. The French critics emphasized its inherently poetic qualities.

In 1930 Cavacos returned to the United States for the first time in eighteen years. His work was exhibited at the Baltimore Museum of Art in March of that year. His work was also shown in New York, and later in the year at Homeland. A group of 17 of his sculptures were also placed on display in the National Sculpture Society Exhibition in San Francisco. In May, 1930, he and his wife returned to Paris.

Information about Cavacos post 1930 is difficult to obtain. Hopefully someone can shed more light on his life, in particular the period from 1931 – 1976.

We do know that when members of his family died, Cavacos undertook to create a beautiful monument, and to send it to be erected in the Greek section of a Cemetery in Baltimore, where it still stands today.

It seems that his interest in sculpture continued until well into his old age. When granddaughters of Charles Fitzpatrick (his Baltimore friend) visited him in Paris in 1969, they were photographed with him in his art studio. Many sculptures are visible in the room.

Emmanuel Cavacos died in 1976, aged 91.

Background to the biographical sketch, above

Information about Emmanuel Cavacos is not very extensive. Thankfully, Emmanuel seems to have established a friendship with a Baltimore resident called Charles Fitzpatrick. After Cavacos moved permanently to France he continued to correspond with him. Mike Fitzpatrick (aka Piedmont Fossil), Charles Fitzpatrick’s grandson takes up the story. “Cavacos sent photographs of his studio and his sculptures and even an invitation to his wedding in October 1915. Considering that the wedding took place across the Atlantic and the great time and expense it would require to go there -- not to mention that fact that by then France was deep into World War I -- my grandfather was unable to attend. In 1930 Cavacos made a return visit to the United States for a couple of exhibitions, one in his old hometown of Baltimore and one in New York. I don’t know how successful his exhibitions were considering they took place during the first year of the Great Depression, but today his sculptures, if they can be found at all, seem to sell for between several hundred and several thousand dollars each. In the late 1960s my two sisters traveled to Europe and, at the request of my grandfather, they stopped by to visit (the by that time elderly) Mr. Cavacos at his Paris home”.

Thankfully Mike Fitzpatrick has posted the Cavacos photographs from that time on flickr

http://www.flickr.com/photos/piedmont_fossil/sets/72157594585161747/

“Most of the photos in this set were sent to my grandfather by Emmanuel Cavacos soon after he moved to Paris. Almost all of them are inscribed on the reverse in the artist’s own handwriting.”

Cindy Anderson, is a fiancee of Pete Capsanes, who is the grandson of Theodore Andrew Cavacos, brother to Emmanuel and Constantine. These are all Baltimore Cavacos Kytherians. Cindy wrote to KAW:
"We just had Pete's family here and were talking about Emmanual Andrew Cavacos which is Pete's Great Great Uncle and the sculptor who ended up migrating from Greece, to Maryland back to Paris where he died. We have many of his sculpted pieces in the family".

Photos > Diaspora Weddings and Proxenia

submitted by Vasilia Uhrweiss (nee Margetis) on 06.10.2011

Bretos Margetis and Theodora Lianos outside Agia Triatha

...Church Bourke St Sydney.1925.

Wedding of Bretos Margetis & Theodora Lianos

Bretos was born on 24 Nov1889, landed in Australia on 5 Dec1903 per ‘Orizaba.’

Arrivals Australia, 1903

He features in the book Life in Australia, on page 201.

Download a .pdf of page 201, here:

LIA_English_p201.pdf

His name is spelt Vretos in Life in Australia but I have always spelt it Bretos.

Studio portrait of Bretos Margetis and Theodora Lianos

Wedding party photograph, Wedding of Bretos Margetis and Theodora Lianos

Studio portrait of Theodora Lianos on her wedding day

Studio portrait of Theodora Lianos on her wedding day, with mirror image

Photos > Diaspora Weddings and Proxenia

submitted by Vasilia Uhrweiss (nee Margetis) on 06.10.2011

Wedding of Bretos Margetis & Theodora Lianos

Married in 1925 at the Agia Triatha Church Bourke St Sydney.

Bretos was born on 24 Nov 1889, landed in Australia on 5 Dec 1903 per ‘Orizaba.’

He features in the book Life in Australia, on page 201.

Download a .pdf of page 201, here:

LIA_English_p201.pdf

His name is spelt Vretos in Life in Australia but I have always spelt it Bretos.

View a second marriage photograph:

Bretos Margetis and Theodora Lianos outside Agia Triatha, Sydney


Bretos was born on 24 Nov 1889, He landed in Australia on 5 Dec 1903 per ‘Orizaba.’

Arrivals Australia, 1903

Wedding photographs

Bretos Margetis and Theodora Lianos outside Agia Triatha, Sydney

Wedding party photograph, Wedding of Bretos Margetis and Theodora Lianos

Studio portrait of Theodora Lianos on her wedding day

Studio portrait of Theodora Lianos on her wedding day, with mirror image

Photos > Diaspora Weddings and Proxenia

submitted by John Andrews on 17.01.2011

Marriage of Arthur Gerakiteys to Kalliopi Mavromatis

Front row, left - seated and standing, left to right:

Metaxia Semitecolos.
Tony Semitecolos (small boy on knee)
Zina Semiecolos (small girl standing on chair)
Stella Veneris (bridesmaid)
Peter Veneris (small boy seated)
Jimmy Gerakiteys (small boy standing)

Front row, right - seated and standing, left to right:

Martha Tjanavaras (bridesdmaid)
...........(?) Veneris (small girl standing)
Elena Christianos
Kiriakoula(?) Veneris

Middle row, right - standing, left to right:

Spiros Semitecolos (standing directly behind Metaxia and Zina Semitecolos)
........... Moulos(?)
Arthur Gerakiteys (groom)
Kaliopi Mavromatis (bride)
Manoli Mavromatis
Chrissy Mavromatis
........................(?)
...........(?) Veneris

Back row, right - standing, left to right:

Harry Gerakiteys
Peter Gerakiteys
Chrisoula .............(?) (Niece of Manoli Mavromatis)
Kiriakos ............... (?) (husband of Chrisoula)
Manolis Gerakiteys
Harry Vangis
Benny Gerakiteys
...............(?) Veneris
Nicholas Gerakiteys

Photos > Diaspora Weddings and Proxenia

submitted by Vikki Vrettos Fraioli on 21.03.2010

Stamatoula Mavromatis Chlentzos March 14, 2010, age 103

Stamatoula Mavromatis was born in Christoforianika in 1906. She married Angelo Panagiotis Chlentzos in 1931. Shortly after, Stamatoula left her home in Kythera and immigrated with her husband to the USA where she lives today.
In the photo above, she is sitting on the couch at the home of her daughter, Teddi Zes, in Hayward, California, USA where she lives.
On her lap is her wedding dress, stefana, and silver case that held her koufeta.

Photos > Diaspora Weddings and Proxenia

submitted by Toni Risson on 31.10.2007

Vassiliki's Story

Daughters of Aphrodite: Cafe Brides

Chapter5, Aphrodite and the Mixed Grill.

Kytherian-born, George Kentrotis, left Fratsia in 1925, when he was 21. He returned from Australia at the age of 53 to find a wife. Vasiliki was a beautiful 25-year-old from Fratsia. She had an aunt who used to tell people’s fortunes by tipping the dregs of their coffee cups out onto a saucer. Vasi recalls that when she was a teenager, her aunt ‘read’ her cup and told her that she would one day marry an old man and travel far across the water. Her aunt was right. George and Vasi were married in Greece on the 13th of October, 1957, and she sailed with him for Australia.

Vasi remembers everyone’s surprise at her agreeing to marry such ‘an old man’. So why did young women like Vasi leave their families, their country, their language, and their culture to travel to the other side of the world and marry old’ men they had never met? The answer lies in a lesser-known aspect of chain migration, the upside of the Australian Greek café phenomenon, which is dealt with at length in Chapter Twelve. Because so many men had migrated to Australia or America, there was a devastating lack of men in Kytherian villages like Fratsia. Even if men were available, there was no one to provide the bride’s dowry. According to several respondents, Greek sons were responsible for setting their sisters up in houses as a kind of dowry before they themselves could marry — the groom simply arrived with a suitcase and moved in. Villages depleted of both sons and prospective grooms therefore left a generation of women who faced the prospect of never marrying or having families. Kythera, the birthplace of the goddess of love, had become a place of abandoned houses and childless women. Vasi says she was very happy to marry George because he was rich by Kytherian standards; she would have her own house and be able to help her family.
Like many Greek women her age, Vasi had little schooling. She was only eight when WWII began and she did not go to school from then on because the teachers were in the army and the schools were closed. In days filled with bombing and other dangers, Vasi’s job was looking after elderly people, sometimes hiding them in the woods from German soldiers. The pounding of distant guns was sometimes heard on Kythera as the Germans bombed passing ships. The people were very poor. They waited. Eventually shoes and clothing and huge tins of jam washed toward the shores of Kythera and the people would scoop them out of the sea. One day they noticed increased activity around the docks. The Germans were leaving. The next day Australian and English troops parachuted onto the island and all of Kythera celebrated. After the war, however, many people left because they could not face the prospect of being invaded again. Vasi never learned to read or write, but when her three children were old enough to go to school, she acquired enough English to handle money and serve in the Regal Café with George. Unfortunately, after the business closed down, she had little contact with people and lost much of her English. George died when Vasi was only 49, which exacerbated her language difficulties, as does the fact that some of her grandchildren speak no Greek.

During the time that Vasi and George had the Regal, Vasi’s work did not end at the door of the café. She kept a large ‘chook house’ in the backyard of their inner-city home and killed and dressed 15 chickens at a time for the café, where they were served with roast vegetables. Fortunately, George’s bride was also a keen cook, because some weekends George would invite 30 people home for a meal. The row of tables would stretch from the enclosed rear verandah outside Vasi’s kitchen, through the archway, across the dining room and into the sitting room to end near the front door of their old Queenslander. As one Ipswich resident recalls: “Georgie was a kind little man — always nice to people and nice to kids.” He was a great host and Vasi is a great cook. Vasi also remembers making wine from the grapes they grew in the backyard of their home by treading them in a vat underneath the house. Her backyard is still a patchwork of well-tended vegetable beds that produce spinach and tomatoes for her table, although the drought has reduced their capacity. Her lemon tree is indispensable, but the olive tree near the fence still refuses to bear any fruit.

TO ORDER a copy of Aphrodite and the Mixed Grill:

Phone: (07) 3281 1525 or

0439 664 291

Enquiries:

Contact Toni Risson by email here

Or, send, name, address and cheque/money order to

Toni Risson
130 Woodend Road
Woodend, 4305.

$49.50 (incl. GST)

Plus $11 (Postage and handling).


Composite Front-Back Cover as a .pdf

Aphrodite coverV1.pdf

Photos > Diaspora Weddings and Proxenia

submitted by James Gavriles on 28.10.2007

Uncle Ted Gavrilys and wife Mary Koukoulis wedding photo

My Father's Brother ,Theodore Demetrios Gavrilys. and his wife Mary Koucoulis wedding picture.
1919

Photos > Diaspora Weddings and Proxenia

submitted by Peter Panaretos on 22.12.2007

Wedding in New York

C.Cassis wedding

Photos > Diaspora Weddings and Proxenia

submitted by Tasso John Conomos on 22.10.2006

Wedding of Anne Conomos & George Achilles Condas of San Francisco

August 17, 1958

Photos > Diaspora Weddings and Proxenia

submitted by Robyn Florance on 15.10.2006

Menios Kassos and Stamatina (Matina) Belas.

Menios Kassos married Stamatina Matina Belas at St Lukes Church Berry on Sunday 23rd July, 1950. Paul Calopedis of the Nowra Cafe was the best man, while Nick Calopedis was groomsman. The bride, who was given away by her uncle, Speros Belas of the Berry Cafe, wore a gown of silver lame, with tight fitting bodice, made by her aunt Maritsa Belas.

Over 250 guests attended the wedding, and the reception was held in The Berry School of Arts, where Paul Calopedis acted as MC.


You can discover more about the lives of the Greeks and Kytherians in Nowra (NSW) and Districts by reading the book - A Touch of Greece in Junction Street. Greek Cafe Owners of Nowra.

To order a copy of the book, contact

Robyn Florance

Shoalhaven Historical Society

Phone: 44293564 (BH)


<b>Email Robyn Florance</b>

<b>Email President of SHS, Lynne Allen</b>

Shoalhaven Historical Society Inc.,
PO Box 301
Nowra, NSW. 2541.

02 44460297

Price: $17.50 including postage & handling, within Australia.


To view and/or download .pdf reports about the book launch event from the South Coast Register, Nowra.

Article; Historical Happenings with Alan Clark, Wednesday, August 23, 2006, page 17, Greek Presence in Junction Street.

alan1.pdf

Article; A Great Greek Story. By Alan Clark. Photograph by Dayle Latham. Wednesday, August 23, 2006, page 17.

alan2.pdf

Photos > Diaspora Weddings and Proxenia

submitted by Vikki Vrettos Fraioli on 12.11.2006

Panagiotis Chlentzos wedding records of 1826 and 1841

These are the wedding records of Panayiotis Chlentzos (1799 - ?) discovered and translated by Telemachos Combes.

Left:
1826 January 28
Wedding of Panagiotis Chlentzos son of Nicolas Chlentzos -in first marriage - with the daughter of Costantis Paspalas named Athinia and coumbaros was Manolis Marietis and Fotini wife of Jan(nis) Aronis

Nikiforos Ieromonachos Christoforos
(certifies)

Athinia Paspalas died 19-9-1840. Panagiotis remarried in 1841

Right:
1841 January 26 - old calendar
Wedding of Panagiotis Chlentzos, son of the late Nicolas with Kerana daughter of the late Panagiotis Zaglanikiss - in second marriage- witnesses were ------(?) Georgopoulos son of Dimitri, Dimitrios Galacatos son of the late Theodore and Lambrini wife of Jani Zaglankiki son of the late Theodore.


Telemachos Combes has accounted for virtually all individuals bearing the family name Chlentzos in the transitional period 1750-1850. During this period the name Chlentzos gradually replaced the original name of Christoforos.

See an account of Telemachos' work here:

Genealogy of the Family Name Chlentzos

Genealogy of the Family Name Christoforos from the Island of Kythera

See also:

The Genealogy of the Greek family name Combis

Photos > Diaspora Weddings and Proxenia

submitted by James Gavriles on 10.07.2006

Wedding of Theodore P . and Voula Gavrilis

Wedding of my Cousin Theodore P. Gavrilis and wife Voula. Not sure of her maiden name?
Theodore ,was the son Of Peter D. Gavrilis,Brother to my Father Nicholas.
He recently passed away. He is survived by his wife and 3 sons, Peter, Aggyis, and Andreas. Also 3 Brothers in Australia. James, Con, and Nicholas.

Photos > Diaspora Weddings and Proxenia

submitted by James Gavriles on 10.07.2006

Theodore and Mary Gavrilis wedding

Wedding of my Uncle Theodore D.Gavrilis to his wife Mary Koukoulis in Coffeyville Kansas 1919. Coffeyville is a small town and has no Greek church. However this traveling Greek orthodox priest performed the wedding there. He also abscounded with the gifts of gold presents given to the bride and groom. quite a scoundrel.
Many people in this photo that I don't ,know, but included are my Father Nicholas Gavrilis, His older brother John Gavrilis, Theodore Georgopoulos. Manolis Georgopoulos. Mr. and Mrs Koukoulis. The bride's Grandmother Mrs Logothetis. bride's sisters. Paul and Nicholas Galakatos. Wedding was in Coffeyvile, Kansas USA

Photos > Diaspora Weddings and Proxenia

submitted by Vikki Vrettos Fraioli on 13.08.2014

Wedding of Vrettos Alfieris and Marigo Cordato (Theodorakakis)

This is a photo of the wedding of Vrettos Alfieris (1890-1974) to
Marigo Cordato (Theodorakakis).
They married in Dubbo, Australia on August 4, 1922.

Back row standing from left to right:

Anthony Cordato (Theodorakakis), brother of the bride
Jim Cordato (Theodorakakis), brother of the bride
Evangelos Chlentzos (Balos), koumbaro
Stavros Stellio, brother-in-law of the bride
unknown woman
and Kirakos Cordato (Theodorakakis), brother of the bride.

Front row from left to right:

Anthi Cordato (nee Minoucos), wife of Anthony
Fr. Dimitris Marinakis
Vrettos Alfieris & Marigo Theodorakakis
Spiridoula Alfieris (nee Argiris) (1855-1927), mother of the groom
Emmanuel Alfieris, brother of the groom,
and unknown woman

Seated child in the sailor suit is Manual Cordato, son of Anthi and Anthony

 

Other child unknown

Help identifying others in the photograph would be appreciated.

See also:

Vrettos Alfieris at Agios Theodoros

Vrettos & Marigo Alfieris with Stavroula Gouveri in Potamos

Kythera Connections

Photos > Diaspora Weddings and Proxenia

submitted by Vikki Vrettos Fraioli on 02.05.2006

Wedding of Stamatoula Mavromati and Angelo Chlentzos 1931

Angleo Chlenztos immigrated to the USA as a young man. He returned to Kythera to find a bride in 1931. He met Stamatoula in October 1931. Following a brief engagement, Angelo Panayiotis Chlentzos (1895-1982) married Stamatoula Coulentianos Mavromati (1906- ) on December 28, 1931. They were married at the church of Agios Vasilis in Christoforianika by Stamatoula's grandfather Fr. Dionisios Coulentianos. A few months after they married, they moved to Oakland, California.
Stamatoula will celetbrate her 100th birthday on November 1, 2006.

Photos > Diaspora Weddings and Proxenia

submitted by Denis A Conomos on 07.01.2006

Wedding of Peter Elisseos and Marianthi Psomas in Biloela in 1938.

L. to r.: John Psomas, Unknown, Peter Elisseos (groom), Jim Valassi (at rear), Lady at rear Unknown, Marianthi Elisseos (bride), Lady at rear Unknown, Despina Diakospiridon, Antigone Psomas, Zaharoula Loula, Philippas Loula (at rear), Maria Vasiliadou.

From Chapter 13 of Denis A Conomos's, The Greeks in Quensland, entitled, Proxenia, Weddings and Familes.

To download Chapter 13, of Denis A Conomos's The Greeks in Queensland

Chpt13GIQ.pdf

To purchase a copy of The Greeks in Queensland