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submitted by Hellenic Museums & Galleries on 26.01.2012

Aphrodite and the Gods of Love at Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Thursday, November 3rd, 2011
Exhibit Openings, Exhibits, Featured, Uncategorized

From, Artscope, New Englands Culture Magazine

Statuette of Aphrodite emerging from the sea, Greek or Roman, Eastern Mediterranean, Hellenistic or Imperial Period, first century BC or first century

Other sculptures and paintings:

Head of Aphrodite (Bartlett Head), about 330-300 BC

"Sleeping Hermaphrodite" Roman, Imperial Period, 1st century B.C. Marble

"Votive Relief with Aphrodite and devotees" Greek, Late Classical period, 4th century B.C.

The Judgment of Paris – Itallic, Etruscan, Hellenistic Period, late 3rd – 2nd century B.C.

By Rosemary Chandler

BOSTON — At the entrance of the exhibition, the marble head of Aphrodite floats in the air, as the black metal bar that secures it to its pedestal disappears against the dark wall behind it. Separated from its body centuries earlier, this is all that remains of the once life-sized statue of the beguiling Greek goddess of love and beauty. Her pensive, almond-shaped eyes gaze outwards at her spectators as they enter the latest Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, exhibition, “Aphrodite and the Gods of Love,” and her full lips turn slightly upwards in a mysterious smirk. It is an inexplicable expression akin to the infamous smile of the “Mona Lisa.” Yet unlike da Vinci’s femme fatale, Aphrodite holds no secrets, bearing all before her spectators in the impressive collection of nudes that follows.

The show is a collection of 160 pieces drawn largely from the MFA’s permanent collection, a testament to the institution’s impressive holdings of Greek and Roman artwork. Frequent visitors to the MFA will not be disappointed by this compilation of familiar works, as the pieces have been taken from their original locations in the Greek and Roman gallery and arranged in a masterful narrative that breathes new life into them. It is the first museum exhibition devoted solely to Aphrodite and her realm, and it celebrates her transition from an unknowable, ethereal being into an anthropomorphic divinity who “has taken human shape through [the work of] the artist,” to use the words of Christine Kondoleon, MFA Boston’s senior curator of Greek and Roman art.

The collection of life-sized nude sculptures in the center of the exhibition shows the way in which artists placed an increasing emphasis on the human nature of Aphrodite over time. In earlier works, Aphrodite is depicted wearing flowing robes, which allude to her human body but do not fully disclose it, preserving some of the mysterious nature of her divine character. In the mid-4th century BC, however, Aphrodite was represented completely in the nude for the first time. This was a watershed moment in art history: she was the first female nude in Western art, and she became the standard upon which later masters — Titian, Ingres, and Renoir, to name just a few — based their own representations of the idealized female form upon. Her depiction in the buff also represents a further breakdown of the barrier between Aphrodite’s human nature and her divine one.

The exhibition continues to make evident Aphrodite’s human characteristics through an exploration of her complex and oftentimes contradictory mythology. Her role as the goddess of love and marriage is demonstrated in such works as “The Judgment of Paris,” a rare fresco piece on loan from the Museo Archeologico Nazinoale di Napoli. The piece depicts Paris, the Prince of Troy, selecting Aphrodite as the most beautiful of all the goddesses, for which Aphrodite rewards him with marriage to the most beautiful woman in the world, Helen.

Yet the exhibition also highlights Aphrodite’s reputation as a notorious adulterous that engaged in many illicit love affairs while married to Hephaestus, the god of the forge. This aspect of her character is explored in a section devoted to her children, both legitimate and illegitimate, including Eros, the winged god of desire better known by his Roman name, Cupid. A number of objects depict him in the very human acts of a naughty boy, such as the “Mirror of Aphrodite and Eros,” which shows a dynamic image of him bent over his mother’s knee while she spanks him — a very human moment indeed.

Despite this exploration of the earthly qualities of Aphrodite and the other gods of love, the exhibition shows that the ancient people of Greece and Rome worshiped these divinities very seriously, and looked to them for guidance and protection in matters of love, lust, and marriage. Their importance to their followers is evident by the sheer number and diversity of objects featuring their likeness. Through the depth and breadth of this exploration of Aphrodite and her realm, it is possible to touch the ancient world, however briefly, before exiting the exhibition and returning to the busy streets of modern Boston.

(“Aphrodite and the Gods of Love” continues through February 20, 2012 at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, 465 Huntington Avenue, Boston. Call (617) 267-9300.)

Photos > Kytherian Art

submitted by Hellenic Museums & Galleries on 27.03.2012

Goddess of Love and Beauty Takes Centre Stage

MFA show first ever devoted to Aphrodite

01.11.2012 By John O’Rourke

Sleeping Hermaphrodite, Roman, Imperial Period, first century BC, Palazzo Massimo alle Terme, Museo Nazionale Romano, Rome. Photo courtesy of Museum of Fine Arts, Boston


The Sleeping Hermaphrodite is one of the noted items in the Museum of Fine Arts current show, Aphrodite and the Gods of Love. Photograph courtesy of Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
Valentine’s Day may be more than a month away, but a new exhibition at the Museum of Fine Arts is already celebrating the goddess of love and desire, Aphrodite.

Head of Aphrodite (Bartlett Head), about 330-300 BC

Aphrodite and the Gods of Love is billed as “the first ever exhibition dedicated entirely to the goddess” who was known as Aphrodite to the ancient Greeks and Venus to the ancient Romans. Drawing on more than 150 objects culled from its own impressive collection of Greek and Roman classical antiquities, most notably, Head of Aphrodite (Bartlett Head), from 330-300 BC, the MFA show also features 13 pieces on loan, most from Rome and Naples and most never before on view in the United States.

This entertaining exhibition reveals Aphrodite in all of her many guises: wife, mother, seducer, patroness of brides, seafarers, and warriors. As the objects reveal, the goddess was not only beautiful and highly sexual, but calculating and powerful, making her a fascinating subject for modern audiences.

Through sculpture, jewelry, bathing vessels, and other objects, the viewer is shown Aphrodite’s pivotal role in Western art for more than 2,500 years, as well as the ways that representations of her have changed throughout antiquity. In fact, the history of the female nude in Western art began with a fourth-century rendering of Aphrodite by an Athenian sculptor named Praxiteles. Prior to that, only males had been portrayed in the nude. And while Praxiteles’ sculpture has never been found, it inspired numerous other sculptors and helped to define the concept of beauty throughout the Greek and Roman world.

Statuette of Aphrodite emerging from the sea,Greek or Roman, Eastern Mediterranean, Hellenistic or Imperial Period, first century BC or first century AD. Photograph courtesy of Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Aphrodite, the daughter of Zeus and the earth mother goddess Dione, is said to have emerged from a seashell off the coast of Cyprus, already a beautiful grown woman. Myth has it that her birth occurred after the Titan Kronos, the father of Zeus, castrated his father, the sky god Ouranos, and threw his genitals into the sea. Waves turned them into a foam from which Aphrodite was formed.

The show includes several of the goddesses who predate Aphrodite. Small terra-cotta figurines, some dating back to 6000 BC, portray early divinities from the Near East, Egypt, and Cyprus who, according to the show’s curators, would later become Aphrodite.

Two of the more narrative works in the exhibition depict Aphrodite’s critical role in one of the key events in Greek mythology, the Trojan War. A fresco from Pompeii, titled The Judgment of Paris – Itallic, Etruscan, Hellenistic Period, late 3rd – 2nd century B.C., on loan from the Museo Archeologico Nazionale, shows Zeus asking the Trojan prince Paris to choose the most beautiful of three goddesses—Hera, Athena, and Aphrodite. Paris selected Aphrodite after she rewarded him with Helen, the wife of Menelaos, king of Sparta, setting off the 10-year war memorialized in Homer’s Iliad. The Trojan War is also the subject of Drinking cup with the departure and recovery of Helen (Greek, about 490-480 BC), an object from the MFA’s collection.

The towering sculpture Aphrodite of Capua portrays Aphrodite as a goddess of military victory. The statue, created sometime between AD 117 and 138 and discovered near Naples in 1750 (yet another loan from the Museo Archeologico Nazionale), was worshiped by Romans.

The MFA show makes clear that Aphrodite was anything but monogamous. Married to Hephaistus, the god of metalsmiths, she was better known for her affairs with Ares, the god of war, Hermes, messenger of the gods, and Dionysus, the god of wine, as well as with such mortals as Adonis and Anchises, with whom she conceived Aeneas, father of the Romans. Many of the objects in the exhibition concern her offspring, most notably Eros, the winged god of desire, also known as Cupid, and Hermaphrodite, the androgynous child she conceived with Hermes. The stunning marble sculpture titled Sleeping Hermaphrodite, dating from the Imperial Period, second century AD, is something of a tease and offers a paradox. Approaching the reclining figure from behind, one sees only the curve of a female back and the suggestion of a woman’s breast. But walk around to the front and the figure is endowed with male genitals.

"Votive Relief with Aphrodite and devotees" Greek, Late Classical period, 4th century B.C.

Women in ancient Greece sought to emulate the beauty of Aphrodite, and paid homage to her because of her influence over love and marriage. Men worshiped her because it was believed she oversaw male potency and war. The MFA show captures the enormous influence she held over virtually every aspect of society in ancient Greece and Rome.

Aphrodite and the Gods of Love is organized under the auspices of the president of the Italian Republic, in celebration of the 150th anniversary of the unification of Italy. After its run at the MFA, the show will travel to the J. Paul Getty Museum, in Malibu, Calif., the San Antonio Museum of Art, and the Philbrook Museum of Art, in Tulsa, Okla.

Aphrodite and the Gods of Love runs through February 20 at the Museum of Fine Arts, 465 Huntington Ave., Boston. Phone: 617-267-9300. Hours: Monday and Tuesday, 10 a.m. to 4:45 p.m., Wednesday to Friday, 10 a.m. to 9:45 p.m., Saturday and Sunday, 10 a.m. to 4:45 p.m. Admission is free for BU students with a valid college ID, $22 for adults, $20 for seniors and students, and free to children 17 and under. Wednesday nights after 4 p.m., admission is by voluntary contribution. By public transportation, take the MBTA Green Line E trolley to the Museum of Fine Arts stop or any Orange Line outbound train to the Ruggles stop. You can also take the #39 bus from Copley Square to the Museum of Fine Arts stop.

“Aphrodite and the Gods of Love” is organized by the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, in association with the J. Paul Getty Museum. When the exhibit closes at the MFA on February 20, it will make its way to the Getty Villa in Malibu, California where it will be in view from March 28 to July 9. After that it will go to be displayed in New Mexico at the San Antonio Museum of Art from September 15, 2012 to February 17, 2013 and then at the Philbrook Museum of Art in Tulsa, OK from March 10 to May 26, 2013.

Photos > Kytherian Art

submitted by Hellenic Museums & Galleries on 26.01.2012

Head of Aphrodite,

Details:

Greek, made in Athens
Late Classical period, about 330 BC
Marble, from Paros
H. 28.8 cm, w. 18.1 cm, d. 24.8 cm
Francis Bartlett Donation of 1900 03.743

Other sculptures and paintings:

Statuette of Aphrodite emerging from the sea,Greek or Roman, Eastern Mediterranean, Hellenistic or Imperial Period, first century BC or first century AD.

"Sleeping Hermaphrodite" Roman, Imperial Period, 1st century B.C. Marble

"Votive Relief with Aphrodite and devotees" Greek, Late Classical period, 4th century B.C.

The Judgment of Paris – Itallic, Etruscan, Hellenistic Period, late 3rd – 2nd century B.C.

Venus, of Greek mythology, is known as the goddess of love and beauty. The Roman name "Venus" is an especially familiar name to us in the modern world, both as the planet Venus—the morning and the evening star—and as a term describing beautiful women.

Originally, Venus was worshipped as the goddess of love and beauty by the ancient Greeks and Romans. At the same time, her figure was repeatedly used as the model for paintings, sculptures and artifacts as the quintessential symbol of love and beauty, serving as the motivating force behind the creation of art masterpieces. Even after the Renaissance period and to this very day, Venus continues to be a source of inspiration for art. Love and beauty, with which this goddess is entrusted, are both indispensable to our lives, and this explains why her presence has never ceased to captivate us throughout the ages. In this exhibition, 135 pieces of art from ancient times to the present, owned by the Museum of Fine Arts Boston, Massachusetts, will take the viewers on a 5,000 year odyssey through the myths and religious faiths venerating Venus, thus revealing the true image of this goddess.

Photos > Kytherian Art

submitted by Hellenic Museums & Galleries on 26.01.2012

Aphrodite and the Gods of Love. Boston, USA. Exhibition.

Other sculptures and paintings:

Head of Aphrodite (Bartlett Head), about 330-300 BC

Statuette of Aphrodite emerging from the sea,Greek or Roman, Eastern Mediterranean, Hellenistic or Imperial Period, first century BC or first century AD.

"Sleeping Hermaphrodite" Roman, Imperial Period, 1st century B.C. Marble

"Votive Relief with Aphrodite and devotees" Greek, Late Classical period, 4th century B.C.

The Judgment of Paris – Itallic, Etruscan, Hellenistic Period, late 3rd – 2nd century B.C.

The object of beauty

Love, desire and yearning sizzle through the hallways of the Boston Museum of Fine Arts this winter where the “Aphrodite and the Gods of Love” exhibition pays homage to the fiery and furious goddess of love.

The display of 170 Greek and Roman works of art, including thirteen significant loans—nine from Italian museums—will take visitors on a five-thousand-year trek from the deity’s birth from the foamy waters of Kythera.

Aphrodite and the Gods of Love

October 26, 2011-February 20

• Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
465 Huntington Avenue,
Boston, MA,

tel.: 617 267 9300

Saturday-Tuesday 10 a.m.-4:45 p.m., Wednesday-Friday 10 a.m.-9:45 p.m.;

admission $20 (adults), senior discount applies; free for MFA members and visitors under 18 years of age.

Photos > Kytherian Art

submitted by Kytherian Art World on 30.09.2011

Emmanuel Cavacos, at about age 84 in his studio

standing before a large recumbent sculpture of Aphrodite.

Emmanuel Andrew Cavacos
was born in Potamos, Kythera, on February 10th, 1885. He emigrated to the United States of America, when he was sixteen years old, and settled in Baltimore, in the suburb of Hampden, where his brother Constantine was living. Another brother Theodore also chose to live in Baltimore. (Theodore was married to fellow Kytherian Pothiti Chlentzos). In Baltimore he formed a close friendship with Charles Fitzpatrick, with whom he communicated for many years. Photographs and Arts Programs which Cavacos sent to Fitzpatrick form the basis for this (preliminary) biographical sketch.

Having displayed a decided artistic aptitude, he was sent to the Maryland Institute to study painting. He devoted four years to this pursuit, whilst at the same time experimenting with sculptural modeling. Ephraim Keyser, the veteran Baltimore sculptor, who for many years was Director of the Rinehart School of Sculpture at the Maryland Institute, was so impressed with the quality of his clay sketches that he advised him to give up painting and devote himself exclusively to sculpture.

Cavacos took this advise, and he made such rapid progress as a student of Ephraim Keyser, that in 1911 he was awarded the Rinehart Scholarship, which enabled him to go to the Beaux Arts School in Paris. In Paris he was known as Emmanuel Andre, Andre being the French version of his middle name, Andrew.

In 1913, one of his works, Aspiration received an Honorable Mention at the Salon des Artistes Francais. The next year his Thinker attracted great attention at the Paris Salon. The first of this “Thinkers” is housed at the Enoch Pratt Free Library, and the second at the Peabody Institute in Baltimore.

In Paris, On October 2nd, 1915, Cavacos married Pauline Pradelle. Pauline was a professional pianist. She practiced her art in the studio where Emmanuel executed his sculptures.

His work made him a well known figure in the art colony of Paris, and he was commissioned to do the portraits of a number of notable citizens, including Mlle. Mistinguett, a prominent actress; Bucot, and Marcelle Ragnon. In 1925 he received a silver medal for a fountain at the International Exhibition of Decorative Arts in Paris. As a tribute to his ability, in 1927, the French Government bestowed upon him the decoration, Officier de l’Acadamie.
In subsequent years he exhibited annually in the Salon, and also at the Salon des Humoristes de Paris, where his dancing figures were highly praised.
His work is in a number of important collections, including that of Queen Marie of Rumania, who purchased one of his marble figures, Grief.

Cavacos’ sculpture has been praised for its variety, able craftsmanship, and for the sense of rhythm it conveys. The French critics emphasized its inherently poetic qualities.

In 1930 Cavacos returned to the United States for the first time in eighteen years. His work was exhibited at the Baltimore Museum of Art in March of that year. His work was also shown in New York, and later in the year at Homeland. A group of 17 of his sculptures were also placed on display in the National Sculpture Society Exhibition in San Francisco. In May, 1930, he and his wife returned to Paris.

Information about Cavacos post 1930 is difficult to obtain. Hopefully someone can shed more light on his life, in particular the period from 1931 – 1976.

We do know that when members of his family died, Cavacos undertook to create a beautiful monument, and to send it to be erected in the Greek section of a Cemetery in Baltimore, where it still stands today.

It seems that his interest in sculpture continued until well into his old age. When granddaughters of Charles Fitzpatrick (his Baltimore friend) visited him in Paris in 1969, they were photographed with him in his art studio. Many sculptures are visible in the room.

Emmanuel Cavacos died in 1976, aged 91.

Background to the biographical sketch, above

Information about Emmanuel Cavacos is not very extensive. Thankfully, Emmanuel seems to have established a friendship with a Baltimore resident called Charles Fitzpatrick. After Cavacos moved permanently to France he continued to correspond with him. Mike Fitzpatrick (aka Piedmont Fossil), Charles Fitzpatrick’s grandson takes up the story. “Cavacos sent photographs of his studio and his sculptures and even an invitation to his wedding in October 1915. Considering that the wedding took place across the Atlantic and the great time and expense it would require to go there -- not to mention that fact that by then France was deep into World War I -- my grandfather was unable to attend. In 1930 Cavacos made a return visit to the United States for a couple of exhibitions, one in his old hometown of Baltimore and one in New York. I don’t know how successful his exhibitions were considering they took place during the first year of the Great Depression, but today his sculptures, if they can be found at all, seem to sell for between several hundred and several thousand dollars each. In the late 1960s my two sisters traveled to Europe and, at the request of my grandfather, they stopped by to visit (the by that time elderly) Mr. Cavacos at his Paris home”.

Thankfully Mike Fitzpatrick has posted the Cavacos photographs from that time on flickr

http://www.flickr.com/photos/piedmont_fossil/sets/72157594585161747/

“Most of the photos in this set were sent to my grandfather by Emmanuel Cavacos soon after he moved to Paris. Almost all of them are inscribed on the reverse in the artist’s own handwriting.”

Cindy Anderson, is a fiancee of Pete Capsanes, who is the grandson of Theodore Andrew Cavacos, brother to Emmanuel and Constantine. These are all Baltimore Cavacos Kytherians. Cindy wrote to KAW:
"We just had Pete's family here and were talking about Emmanual Andrew Cavacos which is Pete's Great Great Uncle and the sculptor who ended up migrating from Greece, to Maryland back to Paris where he died. We have many of his sculpted pieces in the family".

Photos > Kytherian Art

submitted by Kytherian Art World on 30.09.2011

Emmanuel Cavacos' sculpture Danseuse (Ballerina) 1915 as seen from above

Emmanuel Andrew Cavacos was born in Potamos, Kythera, on February 10th, 1885. He emigrated to the United States of America, when he was sixteen years old, and settled in Baltimore, in the suburb of Hampden, where his brother Constantine was living. Another brother Theodore also chose to live in Baltimore. (Theodore was married to fellow Kytherian Pothiti Chlentzos). In Baltimore he formed a close friendship with Charles Fitzpatrick, with whom he communicated for many years. Photographs and Arts Programs which Cavacos sent to Fitzpatrick form the basis for this (preliminary) biographical sketch.

Having displayed a decided artistic aptitude, he was sent to the Maryland Institute to study painting. He devoted four years to this pursuit, whilst at the same time experimenting with sculptural modeling. Ephraim Keyser, the veteran Baltimore sculptor, who for many years was Director of the Rinehart School of Sculpture at the Maryland Institute, was so impressed with the quality of his clay sketches that he advised him to give up painting and devote himself exclusively to sculpture.

Cavacos took this advise, and he made such rapid progress as a student of Ephraim Keyser, that in 1911 he was awarded the Rinehart Scholarship, which enabled him to go to the Beaux Arts School in Paris. In Paris he was known as Emmanuel Andre, Andre being the French version of his middle name, Andrew.

In 1913, one of his works, Aspiration received an Honorable Mention at the Salon des Artistes Francais. The next year his Thinker attracted great attention at the Paris Salon. The first of this “Thinkers” is housed at the Enoch Pratt Free Library, and the second at the Peabody Institute in Baltimore.

In Paris, On October 2nd, 1915, Cavacos married Pauline Pradelle.
Pauline was a professional pianist. She practiced her art in the studio where Emmanuel executed his sculptures.

His work made him a well known figure in the art colony of Paris, and he was commissioned to do the portraits of a number of notable citizens, including Mlle. Mistinguett, a prominent actress; Bucot, and Marcelle Ragnon. In 1925 he received a silver medal for a fountain at the International Exhibition of Decorative Arts in Paris. As a tribute to his ability, in 1927, the French Government bestowed upon him the decoration, Officier de l’Acadamie.
In subsequent years he exhibited annually in the Salon, and also at the Salon des Humoristes de Paris, where his dancing figures were highly praised. His work is in a number of important collections, including that of Queen Marie of Rumania, who purchased one of his marble figures, Grief.

Cavacos’ sculpture has been praised for its variety, able craftsmanship, and for the sense of rhythm it conveys. The French critics emphasized its inherently poetic qualities.

In 1930 Cavacos returned to the United States for the first time in eighteen years. His work was exhibited at the Baltimore Museum of Art in March of that year. His work was also shown in New York, and later in the year at Homeland. A group of 17 of his sculptures were also placed on display in the National Sculpture Society Exhibition in San Francisco. In May, 1930, he and his wife returned to Paris.

Information about Cavacos post 1930 is difficult to obtain. Hopefully someone can shed more light on his life, in particular the period from 1931 – 1976.

We do know that when members of his family died, Cavacos undertook to create a beautiful monument, and to send it to be erected in the Greek section of a Cemetery in Baltimore, where it still stands today.

It seems that his interest in sculpture continued until well into his old age. When granddaughters of Charles Fitzpatrick (his Baltimore friend) visited him in Paris in 1969, they were photographed with him in his art studio. Many sculptures are visible in the room.

Emmanuel Cavacos died in 1976, aged 91.

Background to the biographical sketch, above

Information about Emmanuel Cavacos is not very extensive. Thankfully, Emmanuel seems to have established a friendship with a Baltimore resident called Charles Fitzpatrick. After Cavacos moved permanently to France he continued to correspond with him. Mike Fitzpatrick (aka Piedmont Fossil), Charles Fitzpatrick’s grandson takes up the story. “Cavacos sent photographs of his studio and his sculptures and even an invitation to his wedding in October 1915. Considering that the wedding took place across the Atlantic and the great time and expense it would require to go there -- not to mention that fact that by then France was deep into World War I -- my grandfather was unable to attend. In 1930 Cavacos made a return visit to the United States for a couple of exhibitions, one in his old hometown of Baltimore and one in New York. I don’t know how successful his exhibitions were considering they took place during the first year of the Great Depression, but today his sculptures, if they can be found at all, seem to sell for between several hundred and several thousand dollars each. In the late 1960s my two sisters traveled to Europe and, at the request of my grandfather, they stopped by to visit (the by that time elderly) Mr. Cavacos at his Paris home”.

Thankfully Mike Fitzpatrick has posted the Cavacos photographs from that time on flickr

http://www.flickr.com/photos/piedmont_fossil/sets/72157594585161747/

“Most of the photos in this set were sent to my grandfather by Emmanuel Cavacos soon after he moved to Paris. Almost all of them are inscribed on the reverse in the artist’s own handwriting.”

Cindy Anderson, is a fiancee of Pete Capsanes, who is the grandson of Theodore Andrew Cavacos, brother to Emmanuel and Constantine. These are all Baltimore Cavacos Kytherians. Cindy wrote to KAW:
"We just had Pete's family here and were talking about Emmanual Andrew Cavacos which is Pete's Great Great Uncle and the sculptor who ended up migrating from Greece, to Maryland back to Paris where he died. We have many of his sculpted pieces in the family".

Photos > Kytherian Art

submitted by Kytherian Art World on 29.09.2011

Emmanuel Cavacos Signature at the base of sculpture, 1915

Emmanuel Andrew Cavacos was born in Potamos, Kythera, on February 10th, 1885. He emigrated to the United States of America, when he was sixteen years old, and settled in Baltimore, in the suburb of Hampden, where his brother Constantine was living. Another brother Theodore also chose to live in Baltimore. (Theodore was married to fellow Kytherian Pothiti Chlentzos). In Baltimore he formed a close friendship with Charles Fitzpatrick, with whom he communicated for many years. Photographs and Arts Programs which Cavacos sent to Fitzpatrick form the basis for this (preliminary) biographical sketch.

Having displayed a decided artistic aptitude, he was sent to the Maryland Institute to study painting. He devoted four years to this pursuit, whilst at the same time experimenting with sculptural modeling. Ephraim Keyser, the veteran Baltimore sculptor, who for many years was Director of the Rinehart School of Sculpture at the Maryland Institute, was so impressed with the quality of his clay sketches that he advised him to give up painting and devote himself exclusively to sculpture.

Cavacos took this advise, and he made such rapid progress as a student of Ephraim Keyser, that in 1911 he was awarded the Rinehart Scholarship, which enabled him to go to the Beaux Arts School in Paris. In Paris he was known as Emmanuel Andre, Andre being the French version of his middle name, Andrew.

In 1913, one of his works, Aspiration received an Honorable Mention at the Salon des Artistes Francais. The next year his Thinker attracted great attention at the Paris Salon. The first of this “Thinkers” is housed at the Enoch Pratt Free Library, and the second at the Peabody Institute in Baltimore.

In Paris, On October 2nd, 1915, Cavacos married Pauline Pradelle. Pauline was a professional pianist. She practiced her art in the studio where Emmanuel executed his sculptures.

His work made him a well known figure in the art colony of Paris, and he was commissioned to do the portraits of a number of notable citizens, including Mlle. Mistinguett, a prominent actress; Bucot, and Marcelle Ragnon. In 1925 he received a silver medal for a fountain at the International Exhibition of Decorative Arts in Paris. As a tribute to his ability, in 1927, the French Government bestowed upon him the decoration, Officier de l’Acadamie.
In subsequent years he exhibited annually in the Salon, and also at the Salon des Humoristes de Paris, where his dancing figures were highly praised.
His work is in a number of important collections, including that of Queen Marie of Rumania, who purchased one of his marble figures, Grief.

Cavacos’ sculpture has been praised for its variety, able craftsmanship, and for the sense of rhythm it conveys. The French critics emphasized its inherently poetic qualities.

In 1930 Cavacos returned to the United States for the first time in eighteen years. His work was exhibited at the Baltimore Museum of Art in March of that year. His work was also shown in New York, and later in the year at Homeland. A group of 17 of his sculptures were also placed on display in the National Sculpture Society Exhibition in San Francisco. In May, 1930, he and his wife returned to Paris.

Information about Cavacos post 1930 is difficult to obtain. Hopefully someone can shed more light on his life, in particular the period from 1931 – 1976.

We do know that when members of his family died, Cavacos undertook to create a beautiful monument, and to send it to be erected in the Greek section of a Cemetery in Baltimore, where it still stands today.

It seems that his interest in sculpture continued until well into his old age. When granddaughters of Charles Fitzpatrick (his Baltimore friend) visited him in Paris in 1969, they were photographed with him in his art studio. Many sculptures are visible in the room.

Emmanuel Cavacos died in 1976, aged 91.

Background to the biographical sketch, above

Information about Emmanuel Cavacos is not very extensive. Thankfully, Emmanuel seems to have established a friendship with a Baltimore resident called Charles Fitzpatrick. After Cavacos moved permanently to France he continued to correspond with him. Mike Fitzpatrick (aka Piedmont Fossil), Charles Fitzpatrick’s grandson takes up the story. “Cavacos sent photographs of his studio and his sculptures and even an invitation to his wedding in October 1915. Considering that the wedding took place across the Atlantic and the great time and expense it would require to go there -- not to mention that fact that by then France was deep into World War I -- my grandfather was unable to attend. In 1930 Cavacos made a return visit to the United States for a couple of exhibitions, one in his old hometown of Baltimore and one in New York. I don’t know how successful his exhibitions were considering they took place during the first year of the Great Depression, but today his sculptures, if they can be found at all, seem to sell for between several hundred and several thousand dollars each. In the late 1960s my two sisters traveled to Europe and, at the request of my grandfather, they stopped by to visit (the by that time elderly) Mr. Cavacos at his Paris home”.

Thankfully Mike Fitzpatrick has posted the Cavacos photographs from that time on flickr

http://www.flickr.com/photos/piedmont_fossil/sets/72157594585161747/

“Most of the photos in this set were sent to my grandfather by Emmanuel Cavacos soon after he moved to Paris. Almost all of them are inscribed on the reverse in the artist’s own handwriting.”

Cindy Anderson, is a fiancee of Pete Capsanes, who is the grandson of Theodore Andrew Cavacos, brother to Emmanuel and Constantine. These are all Baltimore Cavacos Kytherians. Cindy wrote to KAW:
"We just had Pete's family here and were talking about Emmanual Andrew Cavacos which is Pete's Great Great Uncle and the sculptor who ended up migrating from Greece, to Maryland back to Paris where he died. We have many of his sculpted pieces in the family".

Photos > Kytherian Art

submitted by Kytherian Art World on 29.09.2011

Three sculptures by Emmanuel Cavacos

The artworks are identifed as,

'The Kiss' dancing
'Whirlwind' bronze
'Springtime' bronze

Autographed photograph To dear Chas. Fitzpatrick, Em. Cavacos, March 1930

Emmanuel Andrew Cavacos
was born in Potamos, Kythera, on February 10th, 1885. He emigrated to the United States of America, when he was sixteen years old, and settled in Baltimore, in the suburb of Hampden, where his brother Constantine was living. Another brother Theodore also chose to live in Baltimore. (Theodore was married to fellow Kytherian Pothiti Chlentzos). In Baltimore he formed a close friendship with Charles Fitzpatrick, with whom he communicated for many years. Photographs and Arts Programs which Cavacos sent to Fitzpatrick form the basis for this (preliminary) biographical sketch.

Having displayed a decided artistic aptitude, he was sent to the Maryland Institute to study painting. He devoted four years to this pursuit, whilst at the same time experimenting with sculptural modeling. Ephraim Keyser, the veteran Baltimore sculptor, who for many years was Director of the Rinehart School of Sculpture at the Maryland Institute, was so impressed with the quality of his clay sketches that he advised him to give up painting and devote himself exclusively to sculpture.

Cavacos took this advise, and he made such rapid progress as a student of Ephraim Keyser, that in 1911 he was awarded the Rinehart Scholarship, which enabled him to go to the Beaux Arts School in Paris. In Paris he was known as Emmanuel Andre, Andre being the French version of his middle name, Andrew.

In 1913, one of his works, Aspiration received an Honorable Mention at the Salon des Artistes Francais. The next year his Thinker attracted great attention at the Paris Salon. The first of this “Thinkers” is housed at the Enoch Pratt Free Library, and the second at the Peabody Institute in Baltimore.

In Paris, On October 2nd, 1915, Cavacos married Pauline Pradelle. Pauline was a professional pianist. She practiced her art in the studio where Emmanuel executed his sculptures.

His work made him a well known figure in the art colony of Paris, and he was commissioned to do the portraits of a number of notable citizens, including Mlle. Mistinguett, a prominent actress; Bucot, and Marcelle Ragnon. In 1925 he received a silver medal for a fountain at the International Exhibition of Decorative Arts in Paris. As a tribute to his ability, in 1927, the French Government bestowed upon him the decoration, Officier de l’Acadamie.
In subsequent years he exhibited annually in the Salon, and also at the Salon des Humoristes de Paris, where his dancing figures were highly praised.
His work is in a number of important collections, including that of Queen Marie of Rumania, who purchased one of his marble figures, Grief.

Cavacos’ sculpture has been praised for its variety, able craftsmanship, and for the sense of rhythm it conveys. The French critics emphasized its inherently poetic qualities.

In 1930 Cavacos returned to the United States for the first time in eighteen years. His work was exhibited at the Baltimore Museum of Art in March of that year. His work was also shown in New York, and later in the year at Homeland. A group of 17 of his sculptures were also placed on display in the National Sculpture Society Exhibition in San Francisco. In May, 1930, he and his wife returned to Paris.

Information about Cavacos post 1930 is difficult to obtain. Hopefully someone can shed more light on his life, in particular the period from 1931 – 1976.

We do know that when members of his family died, Cavacos undertook to create a beautiful monument, and to send it to be erected in the Greek section of a Cemetery in Baltimore, where it still stands today.

It seems that his interest in sculpture continued until well into his old age. When granddaughters of Charles Fitzpatrick (his Baltimore friend) visited him in Paris in 1969, they were photographed with him in his art studio. Many sculptures are visible in the room.

Emmanuel Cavacos died in 1976, aged 91.

Background to the biographical sketch, above

Information about Emmanuel Cavacos is not very extensive. Thankfully, Emmanuel seems to have established a friendship with a Baltimore resident called Charles Fitzpatrick. After Cavacos moved permanently to France he continued to correspond with him. Mike Fitzpatrick (aka Piedmont Fossil), Charles Fitzpatrick’s grandson takes up the story. “Cavacos sent photographs of his studio and his sculptures and even an invitation to his wedding in October 1915. Considering that the wedding took place across the Atlantic and the great time and expense it would require to go there -- not to mention that fact that by then France was deep into World War I -- my grandfather was unable to attend. In 1930 Cavacos made a return visit to the United States for a couple of exhibitions, one in his old hometown of Baltimore and one in New York. I don’t know how successful his exhibitions were considering they took place during the first year of the Great Depression, but today his sculptures, if they can be found at all, seem to sell for between several hundred and several thousand dollars each. In the late 1960s my two sisters traveled to Europe and, at the request of my grandfather, they stopped by to visit (the by that time elderly) Mr. Cavacos at his Paris home”.

Thankfully Mike Fitzpatrick has posted the Cavacos photographs from that time on flickr

http://www.flickr.com/photos/piedmont_fossil/sets/72157594585161747/

“Most of the photos in this set were sent to my grandfather by Emmanuel Cavacos soon after he moved to Paris. Almost all of them are inscribed on the reverse in the artist’s own handwriting.”

Cindy Anderson, is a fiancee of Pete Capsanes, who is the grandson of Theodore Andrew Cavacos, brother to Emmanuel and Constantine. These are all Baltimore Cavacos Kytherians. Cindy wrote to KAW:
"We just had Pete's family here and were talking about Emmanual Andrew Cavacos which is Pete's Great Great Uncle and the sculptor who ended up migrating from Greece, to Maryland back to Paris where he died. We have many of his sculpted pieces in the family".

Photos > Kytherian Art

submitted by Kytherian Art World on 29.09.2011

Nude female bronze by Emmanuel Cavacos

Emmanuel Andrew Cavacos was born in Potamos, Kythera, on February 10th, 1885. He emigrated to the United States of America, when he was sixteen years old, and settled in Baltimore, in the suburb of Hampden, where his brother Constantine was living. Another brother Theodore also chose to live in Baltimore. (Theodore was married to fellow Kytherian Pothiti Chlentzos). In Baltimore he formed a close friendship with Charles Fitzpatrick, with whom he communicated for many years. Photographs and Arts Programs which Cavacos sent to Fitzpatrick form the basis for this (preliminary) biographical sketch.

Having displayed a decided artistic aptitude, he was sent to the Maryland Institute to study painting. He devoted four years to this pursuit, whilst at the same time experimenting with sculptural modeling. Ephraim Keyser, the veteran Baltimore sculptor, who for many years was Director of the Rinehart School of Sculpture at the Maryland Institute, was so impressed with the quality of his clay sketches that he advised him to give up painting and devote himself exclusively to sculpture.

Cavacos took this advise, and he made such rapid progress as a student of Ephraim Keyser, that in 1911 he was awarded the Rinehart Scholarship, which enabled him to go to the Beaux Arts School in Paris. In Paris he was known as Emmanuel Andre, Andre being the French version of his middle name, Andrew.

In 1913, one of his works, Aspiration received an Honorable Mention at the Salon des Artistes Francais. The next year his Thinker attracted great attention at the Paris Salon. The first of this “Thinkers” is housed at the Enoch Pratt Free Library, and the second at the Peabody Institute in Baltimore.

In Paris, On October 2nd, 1915, Cavacos married Pauline Pradelle. Pauline was a professional pianist. She practiced her art in the studio where Emmanuel executed his sculptures.

His work made him a well known figure in the art colony of Paris, and he was commissioned to do the portraits of a number of notable citizens, including Mlle. Mistinguett, a prominent actress; Bucot, and Marcelle Ragnon. In 1925 he received a silver medal for a fountain at the International Exhibition of Decorative Arts in Paris. As a tribute to his ability, in 1927, the French Government bestowed upon him the decoration, Officier de l’Acadamie.
In subsequent years he exhibited annually in the Salon, and also at the Salon des Humoristes de Paris, where his dancing figures were highly praised.
His work is in a number of important collections, including that of Queen Marie of Rumania, who purchased one of his marble figures, Grief.

Cavacos’ sculpture has been praised for its variety, able craftsmanship, and for the sense of rhythm it conveys. The French critics emphasized its inherently poetic qualities.

In 1930 Cavacos returned to the United States for the first time in eighteen years. His work was exhibited at the Baltimore Museum of Art in March of that year. His work was also shown in New York, and later in the year at Homeland. A group of 17 of his sculptures were also placed on display in the National Sculpture Society Exhibition in San Francisco. In May, 1930, he and his wife returned to Paris.

Information about Cavacos post 1930 is difficult to obtain. Hopefully someone can shed more light on his life, in particular the period from 1931 – 1976.

We do know that when members of his family died, Cavacos undertook to create a beautiful monument, and to send it to be erected in the Greek section of a Cemetery in Baltimore, where it still stands today.

It seems that his interest in sculpture continued until well into his old age. When granddaughters of Charles Fitzpatrick (his Baltimore friend) visited him in Paris in 1969, they were photographed with him in his art studio. Many sculptures are visible in the room.

Emmanuel Cavacos died in 1976, aged 91.

Background to the biographical sketch, above

Information about Emmanuel Cavacos is not very extensive. Thankfully, Emmanuel seems to have established a friendship with a Baltimore resident called Charles Fitzpatrick. After Cavacos moved permanently to France he continued to correspond with him. Mike Fitzpatrick (aka Piedmont Fossil), Charles Fitzpatrick’s grandson takes up the story. “Cavacos sent photographs of his studio and his sculptures and even an invitation to his wedding in October 1915. Considering that the wedding took place across the Atlantic and the great time and expense it would require to go there -- not to mention that fact that by then France was deep into World War I -- my grandfather was unable to attend. In 1930 Cavacos made a return visit to the United States for a couple of exhibitions, one in his old hometown of Baltimore and one in New York. I don’t know how successful his exhibitions were considering they took place during the first year of the Great Depression, but today his sculptures, if they can be found at all, seem to sell for between several hundred and several thousand dollars each. In the late 1960s my two sisters traveled to Europe and, at the request of my grandfather, they stopped by to visit (the by that time elderly) Mr. Cavacos at his Paris home”.

Thankfully Mike Fitzpatrick has posted the Cavacos photographs from that time on flickr

http://www.flickr.com/photos/piedmont_fossil/sets/72157594585161747/

“Most of the photos in this set were sent to my grandfather by Emmanuel Cavacos soon after he moved to Paris. Almost all of them are inscribed on the reverse in the artist’s own handwriting.”

Cindy Anderson, is a fiancee of Pete Capsanes, who is the grandson of Theodore Andrew Cavacos, brother to Emmanuel and Constantine. These are all Baltimore Cavacos Kytherians. Cindy wrote to KAW:
"We just had Pete's family here and were talking about Emmanual Andrew Cavacos which is Pete's Great Great Uncle and the sculptor who ended up migrating from Greece, to Maryland back to Paris where he died. We have many of his sculpted pieces in the family".

Photos > Kytherian Art

submitted by Kytherian Art World on 29.09.2011

The Thinker, 1914 by Emmanuel Cavacos. The clay model in his studio 1915

Emmanuel Andrew Cavacos was born in Potamos, Kythera, on February 10th, 1885. He emigrated to the United States of America, when he was sixteen years old, and settled in Baltimore, in the suburb of Hampden, where his brother Constantine was living. Another brother Theodore also chose to live in Baltimore. (Theodore was married to fellow Kytherian Pothiti Chlentzos). In Baltimore he formed a close friendship with Charles Fitzpatrick, with whom he communicated for many years. Photographs and Arts Programs which Cavacos sent to Fitzpatrick form the basis for this (preliminary) biographical sketch.

Having displayed a decided artistic aptitude, he was sent to the Maryland Institute to study painting. He devoted four years to this pursuit, whilst at the same time experimenting with sculptural modeling. Ephraim Keyser, the veteran Baltimore sculptor, who for many years was Director of the Rinehart School of Sculpture at the Maryland Institute, was so impressed with the quality of his clay sketches that he advised him to give up painting and devote himself exclusively to sculpture.

Cavacos took this advise, and he made such rapid progress as a student of Ephraim Keyser, that in 1911 he was awarded the Rinehart Scholarship, which enabled him to go to the Beaux Arts School in Paris. In Paris he was known as Emmanuel Andre, Andre being the French version of his middle name, Andrew.

In 1913, one of his works, Aspiration received an Honorable Mention at the Salon des Artistes Francais. The next year his Thinker attracted great attention at the Paris Salon. The first of this “Thinkers” is housed at the Enoch Pratt Free Library, and the second at the Peabody Institute in Baltimore.

In Paris, On October 2nd, 1915, Cavacos married Pauline Pradelle. Pauline was a professional pianist. She practiced her art in the studio where Emmanuel executed his sculptures.

His work made him a well known figure in the art colony of Paris, and he was commissioned to do the portraits of a number of notable citizens, including Mlle. Mistinguett, a prominent actress; Bucot, and Marcelle Ragnon. In 1925 he received a silver medal for a fountain at the International Exhibition of Decorative Arts in Paris. As a tribute to his ability, in 1927, the French Government bestowed upon him the decoration, Officier de l’Acadamie.
In subsequent years he exhibited annually in the Salon, and also at the Salon des Humoristes de Paris, where his dancing figures were highly praised.
His work is in a number of important collections, including that of Queen Marie of Rumania, who purchased one of his marble figures, Grief.

Cavacos’ sculpture has been praised for its variety, able craftsmanship, and for the sense of rhythm it conveys. The French critics emphasized its inherently poetic qualities.

In 1930 Cavacos returned to the United States for the first time in eighteen years. His work was exhibited at the Baltimore Museum of Art in March of that year. His work was also shown in New York, and later in the year at Homeland. A group of 17 of his sculptures were also placed on display in the National Sculpture Society Exhibition in San Francisco. In May, 1930, he and his wife returned to Paris.

Information about Cavacos post 1930 is difficult to obtain. Hopefully someone can shed more light on his life, in particular the period from 1931 – 1976.

We do know that when members of his family died, Cavacos undertook to create a beautiful monument, and to send it to be erected in the Greek section of a Cemetery in Baltimore, where it still stands today.

It seems that his interest in sculpture continued until well into his old age. When granddaughters of Charles Fitzpatrick (his Baltimore friend) visited him in Paris in 1969, they were photographed with him in his art studio. Many sculptures are visible in the room.

Emmanuel Cavacos died in 1976, aged 91.

Background to the biographical sketch, above

Information about Emmanuel Cavacos is not very extensive. Thankfully, Emmanuel seems to have established a friendship with a Baltimore resident called Charles Fitzpatrick. After Cavacos moved permanently to France he continued to correspond with him. Mike Fitzpatrick (aka Piedmont Fossil), Charles Fitzpatrick’s grandson takes up the story. “Cavacos sent photographs of his studio and his sculptures and even an invitation to his wedding in October 1915. Considering that the wedding took place across the Atlantic and the great time and expense it would require to go there -- not to mention that fact that by then France was deep into World War I -- my grandfather was unable to attend. In 1930 Cavacos made a return visit to the United States for a couple of exhibitions, one in his old hometown of Baltimore and one in New York. I don’t know how successful his exhibitions were considering they took place during the first year of the Great Depression, but today his sculptures, if they can be found at all, seem to sell for between several hundred and several thousand dollars each. In the late 1960s my two sisters traveled to Europe and, at the request of my grandfather, they stopped by to visit (the by that time elderly) Mr. Cavacos at his Paris home”.

Thankfully Mike Fitzpatrick has posted the Cavacos photographs from that time on flickr

http://www.flickr.com/photos/piedmont_fossil/sets/72157594585161747/

“Most of the photos in this set were sent to my grandfather by Emmanuel Cavacos soon after he moved to Paris. Almost all of them are inscribed on the reverse in the artist’s own handwriting.”

Cindy Anderson, is a fiancee of Pete Capsanes, who is the grandson of Theodore Andrew Cavacos, brother to Emmanuel and Constantine. These are all Baltimore Cavacos Kytherians. Cindy wrote to KAW:
"We just had Pete's family here and were talking about Emmanual Andrew Cavacos which is Pete's Great Great Uncle and the sculptor who ended up migrating from Greece, to Maryland back to Paris where he died. We have many of his sculpted pieces in the family".

Photos > Kytherian Art

submitted by Kytherian Art World on 29.09.2011

Nude female bronze by Emmanuel Cavacos

Emmanuel Andrew Cavacos was born in Potamos, Kythera, on February 10th, 1885. He emigrated to the United States of America, when he was sixteen years old, and settled in Baltimore, in the suburb of Hampden, where his brother Constantine was living. Another brother Theodore also chose to live in Baltimore. (Theodore was married to fellow Kytherian Pothiti Chlentzos). In Baltimore he formed a close friendship with Charles Fitzpatrick, with whom he communicated for many years. Photographs and Arts Programs which Cavacos sent to Fitzpatrick form the basis for this (preliminary) biographical sketch.

Having displayed a decided artistic aptitude, he was sent to the Maryland Institute to study painting. He devoted four years to this pursuit, whilst at the same time experimenting with sculptural modeling. Ephraim Keyser, the veteran Baltimore sculptor, who for many years was Director of the Rinehart School of Sculpture at the Maryland Institute, was so impressed with the quality of his clay sketches that he advised him to give up painting and devote himself exclusively to sculpture.

Cavacos took this advise, and he made such rapid progress as a student of Ephraim Keyser, that in 1911 he was awarded the Rinehart Scholarship, which enabled him to go to the Beaux Arts School in Paris. In Paris he was known as Emmanuel Andre, Andre being the French version of his middle name, Andrew.

In 1913, one of his works, Aspiration received an Honorable Mention at the Salon des Artistes Francais. The next year his Thinker attracted great attention at the Paris Salon. The first of this “Thinkers” is housed at the Enoch Pratt Free Library, and the second at the Peabody Institute in Baltimore.

In Paris, On October 2nd, 1915, Cavacos married Pauline Pradelle. Pauline was a professional pianist. She practiced her art in the studio where Emmanuel executed his sculptures.

His work made him a well known figure in the art colony of Paris, and he was commissioned to do the portraits of a number of notable citizens, including Mlle. Mistinguett, a prominent actress; Bucot, and Marcelle Ragnon. In 1925 he received a silver medal for a fountain at the International Exhibition of Decorative Arts in Paris. As a tribute to his ability, in 1927, the French Government bestowed upon him the decoration, Officier de l’Acadamie.
In subsequent years he exhibited annually in the Salon, and also at the Salon des Humoristes de Paris, where his dancing figures were highly praised.
His work is in a number of important collections, including that of Queen Marie of Rumania, who purchased one of his marble figures, Grief.

Cavacos’ sculpture has been praised for its variety, able craftsmanship, and for the sense of rhythm it conveys. The French critics emphasized its inherently poetic qualities.

In 1930 Cavacos returned to the United States for the first time in eighteen years. His work was exhibited at the Baltimore Museum of Art in March of that year. His work was also shown in New York, and later in the year at Homeland. A group of 17 of his sculptures were also placed on display in the National Sculpture Society Exhibition in San Francisco. In May, 1930, he and his wife returned to Paris.

Information about Cavacos post 1930 is difficult to obtain. Hopefully someone can shed more light on his life, in particular the period from 1931 – 1976.

We do know that when members of his family died, Cavacos undertook to create a beautiful monument, and to send it to be erected in the Greek section of a Cemetery in Baltimore, where it still stands today.

It seems that his interest in sculpture continued until well into his old age. When granddaughters of Charles Fitzpatrick (his Baltimore friend) visited him in Paris in 1969, they were photographed with him in his art studio. Many sculptures are visible in the room.

Emmanuel Cavacos died in 1976, aged 91.

Background to the biographical sketch, above

Information about Emmanuel Cavacos is not very extensive. Thankfully, Emmanuel seems to have established a friendship with a Baltimore resident called Charles Fitzpatrick. After Cavacos moved permanently to France he continued to correspond with him. Mike Fitzpatrick (aka Piedmont Fossil), Charles Fitzpatrick’s grandson takes up the story. “Cavacos sent photographs of his studio and his sculptures and even an invitation to his wedding in October 1915. Considering that the wedding took place across the Atlantic and the great time and expense it would require to go there -- not to mention that fact that by then France was deep into World War I -- my grandfather was unable to attend. In 1930 Cavacos made a return visit to the United States for a couple of exhibitions, one in his old hometown of Baltimore and one in New York. I don’t know how successful his exhibitions were considering they took place during the first year of the Great Depression, but today his sculptures, if they can be found at all, seem to sell for between several hundred and several thousand dollars each. In the late 1960s my two sisters traveled to Europe and, at the request of my grandfather, they stopped by to visit (the by that time elderly) Mr. Cavacos at his Paris home”.

Thankfully Mike Fitzpatrick has posted the Cavacos photographs from that time on flickr

http://www.flickr.com/photos/piedmont_fossil/sets/72157594585161747/

“Most of the photos in this set were sent to my grandfather by Emmanuel Cavacos soon after he moved to Paris. Almost all of them are inscribed on the reverse in the artist’s own handwriting.”

Cindy Anderson, is a fiancee of Pete Capsanes, who is the grandson of Theodore Andrew Cavacos, brother to Emmanuel and Constantine. These are all Baltimore Cavacos Kytherians. Cindy wrote to KAW:
"We just had Pete's family here and were talking about Emmanual Andrew Cavacos which is Pete's Great Great Uncle and the sculptor who ended up migrating from Greece, to Maryland back to Paris where he died. We have many of his sculpted pieces in the family".

Photos > Kytherian Art

submitted by Kytherian Art World on 29.09.2011

Head of Bacchante Paris 7 10 1913. Sculpture by Emmanuel Cavacos

Emmanuel Andrew Cavacos was born in Potamos, Kythera, on February 10th, 1885. He emigrated to the United States of America, when he was sixteen years old, and settled in Baltimore, in the suburb of Hampden, where his brother Constantine was living. Another brother Theodore also chose to live in Baltimore. (Theodore was married to fellow Kytherian Pothiti Chlentzos). In Baltimore he formed a close friendship with Charles Fitzpatrick, with whom he communicated for many years. Photographs and Arts Programs which Cavacos sent to Fitzpatrick form the basis for this (preliminary) biographical sketch.

Having displayed a decided artistic aptitude, he was sent to the Maryland Institute to study painting. He devoted four years to this pursuit, whilst at the same time experimenting with sculptural modeling. Ephraim Keyser, the veteran Baltimore sculptor, who for many years was Director of the Rinehart School of Sculpture at the Maryland Institute, was so impressed with the quality of his clay sketches that he advised him to give up painting and devote himself exclusively to sculpture.

Cavacos took this advise, and he made such rapid progress as a student of Ephraim Keyser, that in 1911 he was awarded the Rinehart Scholarship, which enabled him to go to the Beaux Arts School in Paris. In Paris he was known as Emmanuel Andre, Andre being the French version of his middle name, Andrew.

In 1913, one of his works, Aspiration received an Honorable Mention at the Salon des Artistes Francais. The next year his Thinker attracted great attention at the Paris Salon. The first of this “Thinkers” is housed at the Enoch Pratt Free Library, and the second at the Peabody Institute in Baltimore.

In Paris, On October 2nd, 1915, Cavacos married Pauline Pradelle. Pauline was a professional pianist. She practiced her art in the studio where Emmanuel executed his sculptures.

His work made him a well known figure in the art colony of Paris, and he was commissioned to do the portraits of a number of notable citizens, including Mlle. Mistinguett, a prominent actress; Bucot, and Marcelle Ragnon. In 1925 he received a silver medal for a fountain at the International Exhibition of Decorative Arts in Paris. As a tribute to his ability, in 1927, the French Government bestowed upon him the decoration, Officier de l’Acadamie.
In subsequent years he exhibited annually in the Salon, and also at the Salon des Humoristes de Paris, where his dancing figures were highly praised.
His work is in a number of important collections, including that of Queen Marie of Rumania, who purchased one of his marble figures, Grief.

Cavacos’ sculpture has been praised for its variety, able craftsmanship, and for the sense of rhythm it conveys. The French critics emphasized its inherently poetic qualities.

In 1930 Cavacos returned to the United States for the first time in eighteen years. His work was exhibited at the Baltimore Museum of Art in March of that year. His work was also shown in New York, and later in the year at Homeland. A group of 17 of his sculptures were also placed on display in the National Sculpture Society Exhibition in San Francisco. In May, 1930, he and his wife returned to Paris.

Information about Cavacos post 1930 is difficult to obtain. Hopefully someone can shed more light on his life, in particular the period from 1931 – 1976.

We do know that when members of his family died, Cavacos undertook to create a beautiful monument, and to send it to be erected in the Greek section of a Cemetery in Baltimore, where it still stands today.

It seems that his interest in sculpture continued until well into his old age. When granddaughters of Charles Fitzpatrick (his Baltimore friend) visited him in Paris in 1969, they were photographed with him in his art studio. Many sculptures are visible in the room.

Emmanuel Cavacos died in 1976, aged 91.

Background to the biographical sketch, above

Information about Emmanuel Cavacos is not very extensive. Thankfully, Emmanuel seems to have established a friendship with a Baltimore resident called Charles Fitzpatrick. After Cavacos moved permanently to France he continued to correspond with him. Mike Fitzpatrick (aka Piedmont Fossil), Charles Fitzpatrick’s grandson takes up the story. “Cavacos sent photographs of his studio and his sculptures and even an invitation to his wedding in October 1915. Considering that the wedding took place across the Atlantic and the great time and expense it would require to go there -- not to mention that fact that by then France was deep into World War I -- my grandfather was unable to attend. In 1930 Cavacos made a return visit to the United States for a couple of exhibitions, one in his old hometown of Baltimore and one in New York. I don’t know how successful his exhibitions were considering they took place during the first year of the Great Depression, but today his sculptures, if they can be found at all, seem to sell for between several hundred and several thousand dollars each. In the late 1960s my two sisters traveled to Europe and, at the request of my grandfather, they stopped by to visit (the by that time elderly) Mr. Cavacos at his Paris home”.

Thankfully Mike Fitzpatrick has posted the Cavacos photographs from that time on flickr

http://www.flickr.com/photos/piedmont_fossil/sets/72157594585161747/

“Most of the photos in this set were sent to my grandfather by Emmanuel Cavacos soon after he moved to Paris. Almost all of them are inscribed on the reverse in the artist’s own handwriting.”

Cindy Anderson, is a fiancee of Pete Capsanes, who is the grandson of Theodore Andrew Cavacos, brother to Emmanuel and Constantine. These are all Baltimore Cavacos Kytherians. Cindy wrote to KAW:
"We just had Pete's family here and were talking about Emmanual Andrew Cavacos which is Pete's Great Great Uncle and the sculptor who ended up migrating from Greece, to Maryland back to Paris where he died. We have many of his sculpted pieces in the family".

Photos > Kytherian Art

submitted by Kytherian Art World on 29.09.2011

1915. Art Studio of Emmanuel Cavacos, Paris.

Emmanuel Andrew Cavacos was born in Potamos, Kythera, on February 10th, 1885. He emigrated to the United States of America, when he was sixteen years old, and settled in Baltimore, in the suburb of Hampden, where his brother Constantine was living. Another brother Theodore also chose to live in Baltimore. (Theodore was married to fellow Kytherian Pothiti Chlentzos). In Baltimore he formed a close friendship with Charles Fitzpatrick, with whom he communicated for many years. Photographs and Arts Programs which Cavacos sent to Fitzpatrick form the basis for this (preliminary) biographical sketch.

Having displayed a decided artistic aptitude, he was sent to the Maryland Institute to study painting. He devoted four years to this pursuit, whilst at the same time experimenting with sculptural modeling. Ephraim Keyser, the veteran Baltimore sculptor, who for many years was Director of the Rinehart School of Sculpture at the Maryland Institute, was so impressed with the quality of his clay sketches that he advised him to give up painting and devote himself exclusively to sculpture.

Cavacos took this advise, and he made such rapid progress as a student of Ephraim Keyser, that in 1911 he was awarded the Rinehart Scholarship, which enabled him to go to the Beaux Arts School in Paris. In Paris he was known as Emmanuel Andre, Andre being the French version of his middle name, Andrew.

In 1913, one of his works, Aspiration received an Honorable Mention at the Salon des Artistes Francais. The next year his Thinker attracted great attention at the Paris Salon. The first of this “Thinkers” is housed at the Enoch Pratt Free Library, and the second at the Peabody Institute in Baltimore.

In Paris, On October 2nd, 1915, Cavacos married Pauline Pradelle. Pauline was a professional pianist. She practiced her art in the studio where Emmanuel executed his sculptures.

His work made him a well known figure in the art colony of Paris, and he was commissioned to do the portraits of a number of notable citizens, including Mlle. Mistinguett, a prominent actress; Bucot, and Marcelle Ragnon. In 1925 he received a silver medal for a fountain at the International Exhibition of Decorative Arts in Paris. As a tribute to his ability, in 1927, the French Government bestowed upon him the decoration, Officier de l’Acadamie.
In subsequent years he exhibited annually in the Salon, and also at the Salon des Humoristes de Paris, where his dancing figures were highly praised.
His work is in a number of important collections, including that of Queen Marie of Rumania, who purchased one of his marble figures, Grief.

Cavacos’ sculpture has been praised for its variety, able craftsmanship, and for the sense of rhythm it conveys. The French critics emphasized its inherently poetic qualities.

In 1930 Cavacos returned to the United States for the first time in eighteen years. His work was exhibited at the Baltimore Museum of Art in March of that year. His work was also shown in New York, and later in the year at Homeland. A group of 17 of his sculptures were also placed on display in the National Sculpture Society Exhibition in San Francisco. In May, 1930, he and his wife returned to Paris.

Information about Cavacos post 1930 is difficult to obtain. Hopefully someone can shed more light on his life, in particular the period from 1931 – 1976.

We do know that when members of his family died, Cavacos undertook to create a beautiful monument, and to send it to be erected in the Greek section of a Cemetery in Baltimore, where it still stands today.

It seems that his interest in sculpture continued until well into his old age. When granddaughters of Charles Fitzpatrick (his Baltimore friend) visited him in Paris in 1969, they were photographed with him in his art studio. Many sculptures are visible in the room.

Emmanuel Cavacos died in 1976, aged 91.

Background to the biographical sketch, above

Information about Emmanuel Cavacos is not very extensive. Thankfully, Emmanuel seems to have established a friendship with a Baltimore resident called Charles Fitzpatrick. After Cavacos moved permanently to France he continued to correspond with him. Mike Fitzpatrick (aka Piedmont Fossil), Charles Fitzpatrick’s grandson takes up the story. “Cavacos sent photographs of his studio and his sculptures and even an invitation to his wedding in October 1915. Considering that the wedding took place across the Atlantic and the great time and expense it would require to go there -- not to mention that fact that by then France was deep into World War I -- my grandfather was unable to attend. In 1930 Cavacos made a return visit to the United States for a couple of exhibitions, one in his old hometown of Baltimore and one in New York. I don’t know how successful his exhibitions were considering they took place during the first year of the Great Depression, but today his sculptures, if they can be found at all, seem to sell for between several hundred and several thousand dollars each. In the late 1960s my two sisters traveled to Europe and, at the request of my grandfather, they stopped by to visit (the by that time elderly) Mr. Cavacos at his Paris home”.

Thankfully Mike Fitzpatrick has posted the Cavacos photographs from that time on flickr

http://www.flickr.com/photos/piedmont_fossil/sets/72157594585161747/

“Most of the photos in this set were sent to my grandfather by Emmanuel Cavacos soon after he moved to Paris. Almost all of them are inscribed on the reverse in the artist’s own handwriting.”

Cindy Anderson, is a fiancee of Pete Capsanes, who is the grandson of Theodore Andrew Cavacos, brother to Emmanuel and Constantine. These are all Baltimore Cavacos Kytherians. Cindy wrote to KAW:
"We just had Pete's family here and were talking about Emmanual Andrew Cavacos which is Pete's Great Great Uncle and the sculptor who ended up migrating from Greece, to Maryland back to Paris where he died. We have many of his sculpted pieces in the family".

Photos > Kytherian Art

submitted by Kytherian Art World on 29.09.2011

Aspiration Paris 7 10 1913. Sculpture by Emmanuel Cavacos

The woman in the background may be his then fiance, later wife, Pauline Pradelle.

Emmanuel Andrew Cavacos was born in Potamos, Kythera, on February 10th, 1885. He emigrated to the United States of America, when he was sixteen years old, and settled in Baltimore, in the suburb of Hampden, where his brother Constantine was living. Another brother Theodore also chose to live in Baltimore. (Theodore was married to fellow Kytherian Pothiti Chlentzos). In Baltimore he formed a close friendship with Charles Fitzpatrick, with whom he communicated for many years. Photographs and Arts Programs which Cavacos sent to Fitzpatrick form the basis for this (preliminary) biographical sketch.

Having displayed a decided artistic aptitude, he was sent to the Maryland Institute to study painting. He devoted four years to this pursuit, whilst at the same time experimenting with sculptural modeling. Ephraim Keyser, the veteran Baltimore sculptor, who for many years was Director of the Rinehart School of Sculpture at the Maryland Institute, was so impressed with the quality of his clay sketches that he advised him to give up painting and devote himself exclusively to sculpture.

Cavacos took this advise, and he made such rapid progress as a student of Ephraim Keyser, that in 1911 he was awarded the Rinehart Scholarship, which enabled him to go to the Beaux Arts School in Paris. In Paris he was known as Emmanuel Andre, Andre being the French version of his middle name, Andrew.

In 1913, one of his works, Aspiration received an Honorable Mention at the Salon des Artistes Francais. The next year his Thinker attracted great attention at the Paris Salon. The first of this “Thinkers” is housed at the Enoch Pratt Free Library, and the second at the Peabody Institute in Baltimore.

In Paris, On October 2nd, 1915, Cavacos married Pauline Pradelle. Pauline was a professional pianist. She practiced her art in the studio where Emmanuel executed his sculptures.

His work made him a well known figure in the art colony of Paris, and he was commissioned to do the portraits of a number of notable citizens, including Mlle. Mistinguett, a prominent actress; Bucot, and Marcelle Ragnon. In 1925 he received a silver medal for a fountain at the International Exhibition of Decorative Arts in Paris. As a tribute to his ability, in 1927, the French Government bestowed upon him the decoration, Officier de l’Acadamie.
In subsequent years he exhibited annually in the Salon, and also at the Salon des Humoristes de Paris, where his dancing figures were highly praised.
His work is in a number of important collections, including that of Queen Marie of Rumania, who purchased one of his marble figures, Grief.

Cavacos’ sculpture has been praised for its variety, able craftsmanship, and for the sense of rhythm it conveys. The French critics emphasized its inherently poetic qualities.

In 1930 Cavacos returned to the United States for the first time in eighteen years. His work was exhibited at the Baltimore Museum of Art in March of that year. His work was also shown in New York, and later in the year at Homeland. A group of 17 of his sculptures were also placed on display in the National Sculpture Society Exhibition in San Francisco. In May, 1930, he and his wife returned to Paris.

Information about Cavacos post 1930 is difficult to obtain. Hopefully someone can shed more light on his life, in particular the period from 1931 – 1976.

We do know that when members of his family died, Cavacos undertook to create a beautiful monument, and to send it to be erected in the Greek section of a Cemetery in Baltimore, where it still stands today.

It seems that his interest in sculpture continued until well into his old age. When granddaughters of Charles Fitzpatrick (his Baltimore friend) visited him in Paris in 1969, they were photographed with him in his art studio. Many sculptures are visible in the room.

Emmanuel Cavacos died in 1976, aged 91.

Background to the biographical sketch, above

Information about Emmanuel Cavacos is not very extensive. Thankfully, Emmanuel seems to have established a friendship with a Baltimore resident called Charles Fitzpatrick. After Cavacos moved permanently to France he continued to correspond with him. Mike Fitzpatrick (aka Piedmont Fossil), Charles Fitzpatrick’s grandson takes up the story. “Cavacos sent photographs of his studio and his sculptures and even an invitation to his wedding in October 1915. Considering that the wedding took place across the Atlantic and the great time and expense it would require to go there -- not to mention that fact that by then France was deep into World War I -- my grandfather was unable to attend. In 1930 Cavacos made a return visit to the United States for a couple of exhibitions, one in his old hometown of Baltimore and one in New York. I don’t know how successful his exhibitions were considering they took place during the first year of the Great Depression, but today his sculptures, if they can be found at all, seem to sell for between several hundred and several thousand dollars each. In the late 1960s my two sisters traveled to Europe and, at the request of my grandfather, they stopped by to visit (the by that time elderly) Mr. Cavacos at his Paris home”.

Thankfully Mike Fitzpatrick has posted the Cavacos photographs from that time on flickr

http://www.flickr.com/photos/piedmont_fossil/sets/72157594585161747/

“Most of the photos in this set were sent to my grandfather by Emmanuel Cavacos soon after he moved to Paris. Almost all of them are inscribed on the reverse in the artist’s own handwriting.”

Cindy Anderson, is a fiancee of Pete Capsanes, who is the grandson of Theodore Andrew Cavacos, brother to Emmanuel and Constantine. These are all Baltimore Cavacos Kytherians. Cindy wrote to KAW:
"We just had Pete's family here and were talking about Emmanual Andrew Cavacos which is Pete's Great Great Uncle and the sculptor who ended up migrating from Greece, to Maryland back to Paris where he died. We have many of his sculpted pieces in the family".

Photos > Kytherian Art

submitted by Kytherian Art World on 29.09.2011

Danseuse (Ballerina) 1915, sculpture by Emmanuel Cavacos

Emmanuel Andrew Cavacos was born in Potamos, Kythera, on February 10th, 1885. He emigrated to the United States of America, when he was sixteen years old, and settled in Baltimore, in the suburb of Hampden, where his brother Constantine was living. Another brother Theodore also chose to live in Baltimore. (Theodore was married to fellow Kytherian Pothiti Chlentzos). In Baltimore he formed a close friendship with Charles Fitzpatrick, with whom he communicated for many years. Photographs and Arts Programs which Cavacos sent to Fitzpatrick form the basis for this (preliminary) biographical sketch.

Having displayed a decided artistic aptitude, he was sent to the Maryland Institute to study painting. He devoted four years to this pursuit, whilst at the same time experimenting with sculptural modeling. Ephraim Keyser, the veteran Baltimore sculptor, who for many years was Director of the Rinehart School of Sculpture at the Maryland Institute, was so impressed with the quality of his clay sketches that he advised him to give up painting and devote himself exclusively to sculpture.

Cavacos took this advise, and he made such rapid progress as a student of Ephraim Keyser, that in 1911 he was awarded the Rinehart Scholarship, which enabled him to go to the Beaux Arts School in Paris. In Paris he was known as Emmanuel Andre, Andre being the French version of his middle name, Andrew.

In 1913, one of his works, Aspiration received an Honorable Mention at the Salon des Artistes Francais. The next year his Thinker attracted great attention at the Paris Salon. The first of this “Thinkers” is housed at the Enoch Pratt Free Library, and the second at the Peabody Institute in Baltimore.

In Paris, On October 2nd, 1915, Cavacos married Pauline Pradelle.
Pauline was a professional pianist. She practiced her art in the studio where Emmanuel executed his sculptures.

His work made him a well known figure in the art colony of Paris, and he was commissioned to do the portraits of a number of notable citizens, including Mlle. Mistinguett, a prominent actress; Bucot, and Marcelle Ragnon. In 1925 he received a silver medal for a fountain at the International Exhibition of Decorative Arts in Paris. As a tribute to his ability, in 1927, the French Government bestowed upon him the decoration, Officier de l’Acadamie.
In subsequent years he exhibited annually in the Salon, and also at the Salon des Humoristes de Paris, where his dancing figures were highly praised. His work is in a number of important collections, including that of Queen Marie of Rumania, who purchased one of his marble figures, Grief.

Cavacos’ sculpture has been praised for its variety, able craftsmanship, and for the sense of rhythm it conveys. The French critics emphasized its inherently poetic qualities.

In 1930 Cavacos returned to the United States for the first time in eighteen years. His work was exhibited at the Baltimore Museum of Art in March of that year. His work was also shown in New York, and later in the year at Homeland. A group of 17 of his sculptures were also placed on display in the National Sculpture Society Exhibition in San Francisco. In May, 1930, he and his wife returned to Paris.

Information about Cavacos post 1930 is difficult to obtain. Hopefully someone can shed more light on his life, in particular the period from 1931 – 1976.

We do know that when members of his family died, Cavacos undertook to create a beautiful monument, and to send it to be erected in the Greek section of a Cemetery in Baltimore, where it still stands today.

It seems that his interest in sculpture continued until well into his old age. When granddaughters of Charles Fitzpatrick (his Baltimore friend) visited him in Paris in 1969, they were photographed with him in his art studio. Many sculptures are visible in the room.

Emmanuel Cavacos died in 1976, aged 91.

Background to the biographical sketch, above

Information about Emmanuel Cavacos is not very extensive. Thankfully, Emmanuel seems to have established a friendship with a Baltimore resident called Charles Fitzpatrick. After Cavacos moved permanently to France he continued to correspond with him. Mike Fitzpatrick (aka Piedmont Fossil), Charles Fitzpatrick’s grandson takes up the story. “Cavacos sent photographs of his studio and his sculptures and even an invitation to his wedding in October 1915. Considering that the wedding took place across the Atlantic and the great time and expense it would require to go there -- not to mention that fact that by then France was deep into World War I -- my grandfather was unable to attend. In 1930 Cavacos made a return visit to the United States for a couple of exhibitions, one in his old hometown of Baltimore and one in New York. I don’t know how successful his exhibitions were considering they took place during the first year of the Great Depression, but today his sculptures, if they can be found at all, seem to sell for between several hundred and several thousand dollars each. In the late 1960s my two sisters traveled to Europe and, at the request of my grandfather, they stopped by to visit (the by that time elderly) Mr. Cavacos at his Paris home”.

Thankfully Mike Fitzpatrick has posted the Cavacos photographs from that time on flickr

http://www.flickr.com/photos/piedmont_fossil/sets/72157594585161747/

“Most of the photos in this set were sent to my grandfather by Emmanuel Cavacos soon after he moved to Paris. Almost all of them are inscribed on the reverse in the artist’s own handwriting.”

Cindy Anderson, is a fiancee of Pete Capsanes, who is the grandson of Theodore Andrew Cavacos, brother to Emmanuel and Constantine. These are all Baltimore Cavacos Kytherians. Cindy wrote to KAW:
"We just had Pete's family here and were talking about Emmanual Andrew Cavacos which is Pete's Great Great Uncle and the sculptor who ended up migrating from Greece, to Maryland back to Paris where he died. We have many of his sculpted pieces in the family".

Photos > Kytherian Art

submitted by Kytherian Art World on 29.09.2011

The Thinker, 1914, by Emmanuel Andrew Cavacos

Emmanuel Andrew Cavacos was born in Potamos, Kythera, on February 10th, 1885. He emigrated to the United States of America, when he was sixteen years old, and settled in Baltimore, in the suburb of Hampden, where his brother Constantine was living. Another brother Theodore also chose to live in Baltimore. (Theodore was married to fellow Kytherian Pothiti Chlentzos). In Baltimore he formed a close friendship with Charles Fitzpatrick, with whom he communicated for many years. Photographs and Arts Programs which Cavacos sent to Fitzpatrick form the basis for this (preliminary) biographical sketch.

Having displayed a decided artistic aptitude, he was sent to the Maryland Institute to study painting. He devoted four years to this pursuit, whilst at the same time experimenting with sculptural modeling. Ephraim Keyser, the veteran Baltimore sculptor, who for many years was Director of the Rinehart School of Sculpture at the Maryland Institute, was so impressed with the quality of his clay sketches that he advised him to give up painting and devote himself exclusively to sculpture.

Cavacos took this advise, and he made such rapid progress as a student of Ephraim Keyser, that in 1911 he was awarded the Rinehart Scholarship, which enabled him to go to the Beaux Arts School in Paris. In Paris he was known as Emmanuel Andre, Andre being the French version of his middle name, Andrew.

In 1913, one of his works, Aspiration received an Honorable Mention at the Salon des Artistes Francais. The next year his Thinker attracted great attention at the Paris Salon. The first of this “Thinkers” is housed at the Enoch Pratt Free Library, and the second at the Peabody Institute in Baltimore.

In Paris, On October 2nd, 1915, Cavacos married Pauline Pradelle. Pauline was a professional pianist. She practiced her art in the studio where Emmanuel executed his sculptures.

His work made him a well known figure in the art colony of Paris, and he was commissioned to do the portraits of a number of notable citizens, including Mlle. Mistinguett, a prominent actress; Bucot, and Marcelle Ragnon. In 1925 he received a silver medal for a fountain at the International Exhibition of Decorative Arts in Paris. As a tribute to his ability, in 1927, the French Government bestowed upon him the decoration, Officier de l’Acadamie.
In subsequent years he exhibited annually in the Salon, and also at the Salon des Humoristes de Paris, where his dancing figures were highly praised.
His work is in a number of important collections, including that of Queen Marie of Rumania, who purchased one of his marble figures, Grief.

Cavacos’ sculpture has been praised for its variety, able craftsmanship, and for the sense of rhythm it conveys. The French critics emphasized its inherently poetic qualities.

In 1930 Cavacos returned to the United States for the first time in eighteen years. His work was exhibited at the Baltimore Museum of Art in March of that year. His work was also shown in New York, and later in the year at Homeland. A group of 17 of his sculptures were also placed on display in the National Sculpture Society Exhibition in San Francisco. In May, 1930, he and his wife returned to Paris.

Information about Cavacos post 1930 is difficult to obtain. Hopefully someone can shed more light on his life, in particular the period from 1931 – 1976.

We do know that when members of his family died, Cavacos undertook to create a beautiful monument, and to send it to be erected in the Greek section of a Cemetery in Baltimore, where it still stands today.

It seems that his interest in sculpture continued until well into his old age. When granddaughters of Charles Fitzpatrick (his Baltimore friend) visited him in Paris in 1969, they were photographed with him in his art studio. Many sculptures are visible in the room.

Emmanuel Cavacos died in 1976, aged 91.

Background to the biographical sketch, above

Information about Emmanuel Cavacos is not very extensive. Thankfully, Emmanuel seems to have established a friendship with a Baltimore resident called Charles Fitzpatrick. After Cavacos moved permanently to France he continued to correspond with him. Mike Fitzpatrick (aka Piedmont Fossil), Charles Fitzpatrick’s grandson takes up the story. “Cavacos sent photographs of his studio and his sculptures and even an invitation to his wedding in October 1915. Considering that the wedding took place across the Atlantic and the great time and expense it would require to go there -- not to mention that fact that by then France was deep into World War I -- my grandfather was unable to attend. In 1930 Cavacos made a return visit to the United States for a couple of exhibitions, one in his old hometown of Baltimore and one in New York. I don’t know how successful his exhibitions were considering they took place during the first year of the Great Depression, but today his sculptures, if they can be found at all, seem to sell for between several hundred and several thousand dollars each. In the late 1960s my two sisters traveled to Europe and, at the request of my grandfather, they stopped by to visit (the by that time elderly) Mr. Cavacos at his Paris home”.

Thankfully Mike Fitzpatrick has posted the Cavacos photographs from that time on flickr

http://www.flickr.com/photos/piedmont_fossil/sets/72157594585161747/

“Most of the photos in this set were sent to my grandfather by Emmanuel Cavacos soon after he moved to Paris. Almost all of them are inscribed on the reverse in the artist’s own handwriting.”

Cindy Anderson, is a fiancee of Pete Capsanes, who is the grandson of Theodore Andrew Cavacos, brother to Emmanuel and Constantine. These are all Baltimore Cavacos Kytherians. Cindy wrote to KAW:
"We just had Pete's family here and were talking about Emmanual Andrew Cavacos which is Pete's Great Great Uncle and the sculptor who ended up migrating from Greece, to Maryland back to Paris where he died. We have many of his sculpted pieces in the family".

Photos > Kytherian Art

submitted by Kytherian Art World on 29.09.2011

Aspiration, sculpture by Emmanuel Andrew Cavacos

Emmanuel Andrew Cavacos was born in Potamos, Kythera, on February 10th, 1885. He emigrated to the United States of America, when he was sixteen years old, and settled in Baltimore, in the suburb of Hampden, where his brother Constantine was living. Another brother Theodore also chose to live in Baltimore. (Theodore was married to fellow Kytherian Pothiti Chlentzos). In Baltimore he formed a close friendship with Charles Fitzpatrick, with whom he communicated for many years. Photographs and Arts Programs which Cavacos sent to Fitzpatrick form the basis for this (preliminary) biographical sketch.

Having displayed a decided artistic aptitude, he was sent to the Maryland Institute to study painting. He devoted four years to this pursuit, whilst at the same time experimenting with sculptural modeling. Ephraim Keyser, the veteran Baltimore sculptor, who for many years was Director of the Rinehart School of Sculpture at the Maryland Institute, was so impressed with the quality of his clay sketches that he advised him to give up painting and devote himself exclusively to sculpture.

Cavacos took this advise, and he made such rapid progress as a student of Ephraim Keyser, that in 1911 he was awarded the Rinehart Scholarship, which enabled him to go to the Beaux Arts School in Paris. In Paris he was known as Emmanuel Andre, Andre being the French version of his middle name, Andrew. In 1913, one of his works, Aspiration received an Honorable Mention at the Salon des Artistes Francais. The next year his Thinker attracted great attention at the Paris Salon. The first of this “Thinkers” is housed at the Enoch Pratt Free Library, and the second at the Peabody Institute in Baltimore.

In Paris, On October 2nd, 1915, Cavacos married Pauline Pradelle. Pauline was a professional pianist. She practiced her art in the studio where Emmanuel executed his sculptures.

His work made him a well known figure in the art colony of Paris, and he was commissioned to do the portraits of a number of notable citizens, including Mlle. Mistinguett, a prominent actress; Bucot, and Marcelle Ragnon. In 1925 he received a silver medal for a fountain at the International Exhibition of Decorative Arts in Paris. As a tribute to his ability, in 1927, the French Government bestowed upon him the decoration, Officier de l’Acadamie.
In subsequent years he exhibited annually in the Salon, and also at the Salon des Humoristes de Paris, where his dancing figures were highly praised.
His work is in a number of important collections, including that of Queen Marie of Rumania, who purchased one of his marble figures, Grief.

Cavacos’ sculpture has been praised for its variety, able craftsmanship, and for the sense of rhythm it conveys. The French critics emphasized its inherently poetic qualities.

In 1930 Cavacos returned to the United States for the first time in eighteen years. His work was exhibited at the Baltimore Museum of Art in March of that year. His work was also shown in New York, and later in the year at Homeland. A group of 17 of his sculptures were also placed on display in the National Sculpture Society Exhibition in San Francisco. In May, 1930, he and his wife returned to Paris.

Information about Cavacos post 1930 is difficult to obtain. Hopefully someone can shed more light on his life, in particular the period from 1931 – 1976.

We do know that when members of his family died, Cavacos undertook to create a beautiful monument, and to send it to be erected in the Greek section of a Cemetery in Baltimore, where it still stands today.

It seems that his interest in sculpture continued until well into his old age. When granddaughters of Charles Fitzpatrick (his Baltimore friend) visited him in Paris in 1969, they were photographed with him in his art studio. Many sculptures are visible in the room.

Emmanuel Cavacos died in 1976, aged 91.

Background to the biographical sketch, above

Information about Emmanuel Cavacos is not very extensive. Thankfully, Emmanuel seems to have established a friendship with a Baltimore resident called Charles Fitzpatrick. After Cavacos moved permanently to France he continued to correspond with him. Mike Fitzpatrick (aka Piedmont Fossil), Charles Fitzpatrick’s grandson takes up the story. “Cavacos sent photographs of his studio and his sculptures and even an invitation to his wedding in October 1915. Considering that the wedding took place across the Atlantic and the great time and expense it would require to go there -- not to mention that fact that by then France was deep into World War I -- my grandfather was unable to attend. In 1930 Cavacos made a return visit to the United States for a couple of exhibitions, one in his old hometown of Baltimore and one in New York. I don’t know how successful his exhibitions were considering they took place during the first year of the Great Depression, but today his sculptures, if they can be found at all, seem to sell for between several hundred and several thousand dollars each. In the late 1960s my two sisters traveled to Europe and, at the request of my grandfather, they stopped by to visit (the by that time elderly) Mr. Cavacos at his Paris home”.

Thankfully Mike Fitzpatrick has posted the Cavacos photographs from that time on flickr

http://www.flickr.com/photos/piedmont_fossil/sets/72157594585161747/

“Most of the photos in this set were sent to my grandfather by Emmanuel Cavacos soon after he moved to Paris. Almost all of them are inscribed on the reverse in the artist’s own handwriting.”

Cindy Anderson, is a fiancee of Pete Capsanes, who is the grandson of Theodore Andrew Cavacos, brother to Emmanuel and Constantine. These are all Baltimore Cavacos Kytherians. Cindy wrote to KAW:
"We just had Pete's family here and were talking about Emmanual Andrew Cavacos which is Pete's Great Great Uncle and the sculptor who ended up migrating from Greece, to Maryland back to Paris where he died. We have many of his sculpted pieces in the family".

Photos > Kytherian Art

submitted by Kytherian Cultural Exchange on 10.09.2011

Writer Lafcadio Hearn Never Forgot His Greek Heritage or Culture

From suite 101.com

• May 29, 2011

• Kathy Warnes

Photograph: Lafcadio Hearn 18x12x11" Cast Bronze (Ed. of 9)
The Kenny Gallery



Lafcadio Hearn lost his mother as a child and led an erratic writer's life, but he finally found his roots in a combination of Japanese and Greek culture.

"It has been wisely observed by the greatest of modern thinkers that mankind has progressed more rapidly in every other respect than in morality." - Lafcadio Hearn

Lafcadio Hearn, a unique figure in international literature, began his life in Greece and spent the rest of his career becoming a citizen of the world, a bridge between East and West, and a devotee of Greek and Japanese culture.

The Irish Soldier and Greek Noblewoman Fall In Love

Sergeant Major Charles Bush Hearn of County Offaly, Ireland, came from an old and genteel Dublin, Ireland family, and was surgeon of the 45th Nottingham Infantry Regiment stationed near Dublin. One day his regiment was ordered to the town of Lefkada on one of the Greek Ionian islands, during the British occupation of the islands. Lefkada is an island shrouded in myth, including the tradition that a love-distraught Sappho threw herself into the sea from Lefkada’s white rocks. Other myths suggest that the palace of Odysseus, the hero of Homer’s Odyssey, was located west of Nidri on the south coast of Lefkada. At a deep, mystic level, Lafcadio's temperament reflected the mysticism of his birthplace.

Sergeant Major Hearn had only been in Greece a short time when he met Rosa Antoniou Kassimati, a Greek noblewoman through the Kytheran lineage of her father Anthony Kassimati. Rosa’s parents were dead and she lived with her seven brothers, all notorious for their contempt and hatred for foreigners.

A charming Irishman, Sergeant Major Hearn soon melted Rosa Kassimati’s heart and they met secretly for several weeks before her brothers became suspicious. When they discovered their sister’s meetings with the Irish soldier, her brothers warned him never to see their sister again or they would kill him. Rosa’s brothers also threatened her with death if she saw the Irish officer again.
Undaunted, the lovers continued to meet until a goatherd accidentally revealed the location of their rendezvous to Rosa’s brothers. The seven brothers ambushed Sergeant Major Hearn on a lonely road and stabbed him multiple times, leaving him for dead. When they told their sister Rosa what they had done, her intense grief touched even their ferocious hearts.

The Lovers Are Reunited

Then one day the goatherd came to Rosa with astonishing news. He told Rosa that Sergeant Major Hearn had survived the stabbing and he had sent her a message. The Sergeant Major told Rosa to meet him at Lefkada in two weeks. where they would marry. Still believing that Sergeant Major Hearn was dead, the brothers agreed to allow their sister to visit a cousin in Lefkada. The lovers were married and had been gone several days before her brothers discovered their deception.

For nearly two years, Sergeant Major Hearn’s regiment remained at Lefkada, and he and Rosa made a happy home there. Lafcadio was born in Lefkada on June 27, 1850, and he was baptized in the Greek Orthodox Church. Some sources say that his parents gave him the middle name of Lefkada. Other sources say that his parents gave him the baptismal name of Patricio Lafcadio Hearn.

The Hearns Travel to Ireland and Divorce

Sergeant Major Hearn’s regiment was ordered back to Dublin when Lafcadio was two years old, and the people of Dublin welcomed Lafcadio, his brother and his beautiful mother with warmth and curiosity. Charles Hearn’s two unmarried sisters welcomed them all and took them into heart and home. For years after Charles Hearn returned to his old home, he remained deeply in love with his beautiful Greek wife.

Then, according to a story in The Chicago Times Herald, Charles Hearn’s feelings began to change. He became impatient with Rosa’s unique dress and Greek prejudices and superstitions. Finally, he asked her for a divorce. Charles Hearn had reconnected with the woman he had been in love with before he went to Greece. Her father had opposed his original suit, but now her father was dead and the woman still loved him. He decided that his love for the Greek noblewoman had only been an episode.

Grief-stricken at first, Rosa, drew upon her innate courage and resourcefulness. She hurried to divorce Charles Hearn more quickly than he could divorce her. His two aunts rallied around Rosa and her sons instead of Charles, disinherited their nephew, and made his sons their heirs.

The aunts retained a lawyer for Rosa, a Greek scholar, who was also rich, handsome, single, and only forty years old. Rosa won her divorce, the sympathy of most of Dublin society, and the love of her lawyer.

She married him under his terms which were that she leave her two children with their aunts and leave Great Britain forever. She accepted his terms and her two sons never heard from her again. Immediately after the divorce was granted, Charles Hearn went to India with his regiment. He married his old love in India and they lived there many years.

Lafcadio Hearn and His Brother Live With The Aunts

Deserted by both parents, Lafcadio and his brother became the center of their old aunts’ lives. The aunts sent them to the best schools and brought them up in luxurious circumstances. Lafcadio showed early signs of exceptional writing talent, and the aunts, who were Roman Catholics, decided to give him a Catholic education. In1865, at just fifteen years old, he studied at the Ushaw Roman Catholic College in Durham, England. During his teens, he lost the vision in his left eye as the result of a playground accident. Later the aunts sent him to a monastery school in France, where he acquired an extensive knowledge of French and a profound enough disgust of the clerical profession to become an agnostic.

While Lafcadio lived in France, he received some devastating news from the two aunts. They had made some unfortunate investments and lost their fortune, but mercifully they did not live long enough to experience dire poverty. Lafcadio left France, determined to seek his fortune in America.

Lafcadio Immigrates to America and Settles in Cincinnati

In 1869, when he was 19, Lafcadio booked steerage passage on a ship bound for America. Arriving in New York he sought work as a newspaper reporter. He knew hunger and slept in empty packing cases and in the doorways of buildings. Finally he got work on a New York paper and eventually he moved to Cincinnati.

With the help of his friend the English printer and communalist Henry Watkin, Lafcadio managed to eke out a living as a newspaper reporter. His writing talent helped him quickly rise through the newspaper ranks and he worked as a reporter for the Cincinnati Daily Enquirer from 1872 to 1875, becoming known for his lurid accounts of local murders. He developed a reputation as the Enquirer’s foremost sensational journalist and he won fame as the author of sensitive, unconventional accounts of various ethic and minority groups. The American Civil War had not ended racism in white society and Hearn’s bitter experiences would eventually estrange him from the United States.

Lafcadio married a black woman, Alethea Foley, an illegal act at the time. When word of his marriage spread, the Cincinnati Enquirer fired him and he went to work for the rival Cincinnati Commercial. In 1877, Lafcadio divorced his wife and went to New Orleans to write his observations about the city in a column he called “Gateway to the Tropics.”

Lafcadio Hearn Spends Ten Years in New Orleans

In New Orleans, Lafcadio first wrote for the Daily City Item and then the Times Democrat, focusing on the Creole population and its distinctive cuisine, the French Opera, and Louisiana Voodoo. His stories in national publications including Harper’s Weekly and Scribner’s Magazine helped shape the image and reputation of New Orleans as a colorful multi-cultural city that resembled Europe and the Caribbean more than America.

In Harper’s Weekly in 1883, Lafcadio published the first written article about Filipinos in the United States, the Tagalags. He visited one of their villages in Saint Malo, southeast of Lake Bourgne in Saint Bernard Parish to interview people for his story.

In 1887, Harper’s Magazine sent Lafcadio to the West Indies as a correspondent. He spent two years in Martinique and in 1890 produced two books: Two Years in the French West Indies, and Youma, The Story of a West Indian Slave. He was also a major translator of the short stories of Guy de Maupassant.

Lafcadio Hearn Travels to Japan As a Newspaper Correspondent

In 1890, Lafcadio went to Japan with a newspaper correspondent’s commission which soon ended, but he became the editor of the Kobe Chronicle. Here he discovered the ideal combination of his Greek and Japanese roots and his greatest inspiration in Japan. Through Professor Basil Hall Chamberlain of Tokyo Imperial University, Lafcadio obtained a teaching position in Matsue, a western Japanese town on the coast of the Sea of Japan. During his fifteen month stay in Matsue he married Koizumi Setsu, the daughter of a local samurai family. He also became a naturalized Japanese citizen, adopting the name Koizumi Yakumo.

During the remaining years of his life, Lafcadio taught journalism and English literature at several Japanese schools, including Tokoyo Imperial University. In the late Nineteenth Century, the Western world considered Japan mysterious and unknown and the depth, originality, sincerity, and charm of Lafcadio’s writing about Japan did much to explain the enigma of Japan and the enigma of Lafcadio Hearn himself.

Lafcadio Hearn Is an Important Writer and a Cultural Bridge

Lafcadio Hearn influenced the establishing of diplomatic relations between Greece and Japan in 1899. Although he never again saw his mother after 1854, he continued to feel love and longing for her and he took great pride in his Greek identity. He believed that Greek and Japanese culture had common features in its paganism and animism and he visualized Greece as Utopia.

On September 26, 1904, when he was a professor at Waseda University, Lafcadio Hearn died of a heart attack at the age of 54. He is buried at the Zoshigava Cemetery in Toshima, Tokyo. His legacy is continued in his writing, and in plays and exhibitions featuring his work. The Lafcadio Hearn Memorial Museum and his house are still popular tourist attractions in Matsue, Japan, and the American College of Greece in Athens sponsors an exhibition honoring him.

Sources

• Benfey, Christopher, ed. Lafcadio Hearn: American Writings. Library of America. “Some Chinese Ghosts. “Chita” : Two Years in the French West Indies.” “Youma.” “Selected Journalism and Letter.” 2009.
• Bisland, Elizabeth. The Life and Letters of Lafcadio Hearn, Vol. I. New York: Houghton Mifflin and Conmpany, 1906.
• Bisland, Elizabeth. The Life and Letters of Lafcadio Hearn, Vol. II. New York: Houghton Mifflin and Company, 1906.
• Bronner, Milton. editor. Letters from the Raven: Being the Correspondence of Lafcadio Hearn with Henry Watkin, 1907.
• Cott, Jonathan. Wandering Ghost: the Odyssey of Lafcadio Hearn, 1991.
• Hearn, Lafcadio. Kokoro: Hints and Echoes of Japanese Inner Life. 1896
• Hearn, Lafcadio. Kwaidan: Stories and Studies of Strange Things. 1903
• Starr, S. Frederick, editor. Inventing New Orleans: Writings of Lafcadio Hearn. University Press of Mississippi, 2001.

Photos > Kytherian Art

submitted by Kytherian Cultural Exchange on 10.09.2011

A journey inside the mind of Lafcadio Hearn

The Japan Times

Friday, Nov. 5, 2010

By LISA GAY and FINTAN MONAGHAN

Photograph: Japan hearts Hearn - Masaaki Noda's sculpture "The Open Mind of Lafcadio Hearn" on the shore of Lake Shinji in Matsue, Shimame Prefecture.

One hundred and twenty years ago, Greek-Irish writer Lafcadio Hearn first arrived in Japan; in Matsue, a provincial backwater in Shimane Prefecture, he became Koizumi Yakumo — his adopted Japanese name. Enamored with the city's ancient and enduring culture, he married into a local samurai family: No wonder, then, that it was in Matsue that Hearn wrote his famous "Glimpses of Unfamiliar Japan." This month, the city is celebrating its most famous (adopted) son with an art exhibition.

Entitled "The Open Mind of Lafcadio Hearn," the show is Matsue's version of a 2009 exhibition at the American College of Greece, which was nearly 15 years in the making. The idea first came to Greek art dealer Takis Efstathiou and Japanese artist Masaaki Noda back in 1996 when the pair traveled from Paris to the small Greek island of Lefkada (Hearn's birthplace and namesake). After visiting Hearn's childhood home and talking with locals who remembered old stories about his family, they decided to ask the college to sponsor a statue to commemorate Hearn.

"At the time, there was no door for foreign artists to get into Greece," recalls Noda.

Years later, as Noda's profile in the art world strengthened, he finally got the greenlight to create the sculpture "Open Mind of Lafcadio Hearn." The finished piece is a tangle of metallic wings twisting toward the sky: One points Westward, the other East. In the middle is empty space — but viewed from the right angle, it forms a heart. "I came up with the name," jokes Efstathiou, "but Noda brought the heart."

While the original idea was a single sculpture, it blossomed into an entire exhibition of works celebrating Lafcadio Hearn's multicultural mindset. It was the success of the Greek show that laid the groundwork for the current exhibition in Matsue, complete with a sister statue, also by Noda, standing on the shores of Lake Shinji.

The main venue for the exhibition was, until Nov. 3, the striking Matsue Castle (from tomorrow until Nov. 14 the show will move to Karakoro Art Studio and the Lafcadio Hearn Memorial Museum). Looming over Lake Shinji from its hilltop perch, the castle was evocatively described by Hearn as a "vast, iron-grey dragon." But trying to book the ancient keep for the show wasn't easy.

"Everyone was against it at the start," recalls Shoko Koizumi, head of the Koizumi Yakumo Society. "But eventually, with persistence and the right contacts, we were able to get permission."

A diversity of themes were at play among the thick, wooden beams of the castle: Hearn as man, traveller, storyteller, symbol of multiculturalism, and even figure of myth and legend. Masatoshi Izumi's abstract "Kokoro," for example, is a smooth, gently curving stonework that seemingly represents the source of all living things.

Others take a more direct approach: Debra Bowden and Christos P. Garoufalis base their portraits on famous images of Hearn, while Seiho Wada depicts Jozan Inari shrine, one of Hearn's favorite places. Ynez Johnston paints a delightful picture of Hearn the exotic traveler, while Zoe Savina draws inspiration from Greek myth. Her poem, "To the Plum Trees — The Other Odysseus Dedicated to Lafcadio Hearn," is written in Hearn's three tongues, Japanese, English and Greek, and displayed on a striking azure wall-hanging of clouds and butterflies.

Other artists look to Hearn's stories. "I read 'Kwaidan,' which I couldn't put down," reveals Irish artist Stacia Blake, "and I especially loved 'The Dead Secret.' " The story concludes with a monk discovering a letter containing "O-Sono's secret," a mystery not revealed to the reader. Blake's abstract piece depicts what she imagines the secret to be.

Another engaging work is Aris Stoidis' "Death Giving Life, Rebirth." Taking a cue from "The Story of Kogi the Priest," Stoidis presents a giant, transparent paper fish. When illuminated, an outline of a human skeleton becomes visible, representing Hearn's rebirth in Japan.

But the most stirring works explore Hearn the orphan looking for a home. From Mitsumasa Anno, we have a portrait of Hearn's mother, based on recollections by Lefkada residents. This is particularly poignant as Hearn is said to have wanted a portrait of his mother so badly that he'd have given a fortune to have it. Along similar lines is a work by Vassiliki Koskiniotou suggestive of Hearn's search for a mother-figure and ultimately finding it in his wife Setsu.

A number of contributors to the original Greek show have returned for the Matsue exhibition, including Alexandros Maganiotis. "It's a digital collage," Maganiotis said of his piece. "Even though it's new in technique, it's old in the way it looks." Resembling a yellowing parchment, the piece depicts a double image of Hearn. One is dressed in western garb, its mirror image in kimono. "I think he was looking for a place that felt like home because he was dislocated to start with. . . . I think he found a home in Japan."

The end of Hearn's romance with Japan is a well-kept secret only obliquely referred to in this show. Hearn arrived in a time of great turmoil. Japan had just won the Sino-Japanese war and was rapidly Westernizing. Old traditions were under threat. Writing to his friend Basil Chamberlain in 1893, Hearn lamented that the "the world of electricity, steam, mathematics, is blank and cold and void." The exhibition chooses to touch on the diversity and contradiction within Hearn's thoughts with this quote: "To the child, the world is blue and green; to the old man, grey — both are right."

Photos > Kytherian Art

submitted by Kytherian Art World on 27.01.2011

Kamares VII 1972

Sculpted by,

Marea GAZZARD

born 1928.

Resides, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

Marea’s father, Charalambos Ploumedis (he changed his name to Harry Medis) migrated to Brisbane from the island of Antikythera in 1920. He married Christina Rudkin, a woman of English and Scottish descent, and Marea was born in 1928, when her parents moved to Surry Hills.

Kamares VII 1972
glazed stoneware 67.0 h x 26.6 w x 74.0 d cm
Crafts Board of the Australia Council Collection 1980
Accession No: NGA 82.1521
© Marea Gazzard.

Artists usually name their work when it is finished, ready for exhibition. The title Kamares is from Greek objects I have admired over the years. My father was Greek and I am familiar with Greek culture.

Kamares VII formed part of a prestigious exhibition, Clay & fibre, which the noted fibre artist Mona Hessing and I were invited to stage at the National Gallery of Victoria in 1973. I say ‘stage’ because we saw the huge special exhibition space as a design challenge! Mona chose fibre colours from beige to earth red in tone, and I chose white as a jewel-like contrast. It was gratifying for Mona and me, after 2 1/2 years work, to know that thousands of people saw the exhibition. (Even now, 30 years later, I meet people who remember it!) Kamares VII is handbuilt (coiled and flattened). I worked on a kiln shelf which, later on, slides into a kiln for firing. I enjoy working in clay — whether it is to be cast in bronze, or fired as clay.

To develop an idea (the difficult bit) I do many full size sketches on paper and then small maquettes and full size clay pieces to see if it ‘works’. Having resolved technical problems, as well as the aesthetic, I do some variations on the theme, to make a family (or group) of several pieces. Kamares VII is the last of the Kamares group. The idea behind the Kamares group came from looking at everything — artefacts from museums all over the world (museums are a passion of mine) as well as natural objects: shells, seedpods, stones, the ears of elephants, and manta rays. In Kamares VII, I wanted to give a feeling of free movement to the work.

Marea Gazzard 2002


Text © National Gallery of Australia, Canberra 2010

From: Anne Gray (ed), Australian art in the National Gallery of Australia, National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, 2002