kythera family kythera family
  

Kytherian Art

Photos > Kytherian Art

Showing 61 - 80 from 115 entries
Show: sorted by:

Photos > Kytherian Art

submitted by James Victor Prineas on 28.07.2008

George Tzanne's Olive Tree Exhibition

George will be exhibiting paintings and prints of Kytherian Olive Trees at the Zeidoros Center for the Arts in Kapsali, Kythera from August 11 - 22.

Photos > Kytherian Art

submitted by Sydney Morning Herald on 04.01.2007

Collectors a portrait of philanthropy.

Sydney Morning Herald

June 17, 2004

Photograph: Logic will prevail ... collectors Ray Wilson, left, and James Agapitos with some of their works. Photo: Jacky Ghossein



A significant collection of Australian surrealist art is about to find a home, writes Steve Meacham.

James Agapitos tells a delicious story against himself. When he began collecting, he was about to buy a Donald Friend work. Then "an acquaintance", an enthusiastic amateur, offered to paint a copy for a fraction of the price.

Being a hard-nosed businessman, Agapitos, agreed. As a result, he says, he deprived himself "of the pleasure of owning an original Donald Friend", and ended up "with a worthless pastiche of no artistic merit".

It was a lesson, the diminutive Agapitos, now 76, never forgot. Which is a great blessing for his adopted country because Agapitos - born in Egypt of Greek parents - is preparing, with Ray Wilson, his partner of 37 years, to donate their collection to the Australian people.

The Agapitos/Wilson Collection of Australian surrealism is worth about $5 million. But in terms of Australian art history, it's invaluable. It includes artists of the stature of Jeffrey Smart, Friend, Sidney Nolan, Arthur Boyd, Robert Klippel, plus the shy, studious man regarded as our greatest surrealist, James Gleeson - once described by art critic Bruce James as "Dali with dignity".

For the past year, many of the 300-odd works in the Agapitos/Wilson have been touring Australia. But on Saturday they return to Sydney, for an exhibition at the National Trust's SH Ervin Gallery at Observatory Hill (with an invitation-only opening by the Premier, Bob Carr, on Tuesday).

It's a proud moment for a couple who have devoted 15 years turning a private passion into public philanthropy. But now the collection is back "home", they face perhaps their hardest decision. Over drinks and canapes, the ghouls in designer clothes will be pressing them to declare which gallery they will bequeath their collection to.

At their home in Bellevue Hill, Agapitos - a spritely, dapper man - bounds down the steps to open the security gate. Their house a spacious, modern, practical dwelling designed by the minimalist architect Alex Popov. The immediate impression is one of orderliness, fastidiousness. In this temple of the surreal, nothing is out of place.

Their walls are heavy with some of their greatest purchases. Gleeson's stunning self-portrait, Portrait of the Artist as an Evolving Landscape, and his biblically inspired The Sign. Two rare surrealist ceramic sculptures by Boyd. Works by Max Ebert and the South Australian Dusan Marek. Plus a dual portrait of themselves by Salvatore Zofrea, on loan from the Art Gallery of New England.

Did they design their home as a private art gallery? "Of course," says Agapitos, leaving the silver-haired Wilson to fill in the details. "We used to live in a big house in Dover Heights," says the younger man. "It had lots of rooms which we never went into, and lovely views. But what we wanted was an inward-looking house, an open house where we could look at and enjoy the art that became more and more an important part of our ordinary life."

Agapitos, who arrived in Australia in 1952, had begun buying paintings before he met the 20-year-old Wilson in 1967. But, in Wilson's phrase, what they purchased was mere "decor without knowledge". This was rammed home most painfully when they invited Lou Klepac, of the SH Ervin Gallery, to inspect their earlier acquisitions. Agapitos recalls asking Klepac: "So what do you think of my collection?" Klepac replied: "Well, you have the beginnings of a collection."

At first, Agapitos was affronted by Klepac's apparent rudeness, but the dismissive phrase made him ponder on the essential difference between a group of unrelated paintings and a collection. He and Wilson began talking about what sort of collection they should amass. They considered neglected women artists "but most neglected women artists are not that great". Then they thought about collecting artists from the Charm school.

But the direction was sealed in 1990 when they bought "our first real painting" - Gleeson's seminal The Attitude of Lightning Towards a Lady-Mountain (1939). It "was totally different from anything we had seen before". By 1993 - when the National Gallery of Australia mounted Surrealism: Revolution by Night - they were convinced Australian surrealism was a rich, but neglected, stream which required passionate advocates.

By that time, they had become friends with Gleeson. They knew he was a scholarly, reserved man, not given to self-promotion. Nevertheless, they asked him to paint their double portrait, hoping to convince him to enter the Archibald Prize. Gleeson declined, but decided to paint a self-portrait. Agapitos and Wilson went to Gleeson's home in Northbridge to see the work in progress. "It was just a blank canvas with a charcoal outline," Wilson recalls. Yet they thought it so extraordinary they bought it on the spot.

Despite the artist's reluctance, they pressured Gleeson into entering Portrait of the Artist as an Evolving Landscape for the 1994 Archibald. To their chagrin, it didn't win. They felt they'd let Gleeson down. "It was a great disappointment for a man of his age," says Wilson. But, adds Agapitos, future generations will have a chance to decide whether the judges erred: "We're planning to donate it to the National Portrait Gallery in Canberra. That is where it belongs."

Gleeson, they acknowledge, is one of the twin pillars of their collection, along with Nolan. They own about 100 of Gleeson's works on paper, and "about 30 paintings, the biggest collection of Gleeson oils in the country". He is the only artist whose modern works they collect: the limit of their collection is 1925 to 1955.

So how have they made the money to fund their philanthropy? Agapitos is the financial brain, though he arrived in Australia as a 24-year-old with nothing except "an HSC certificate in Greek which was hardly of any use in Australia, especially in the 1950s". He worked in a factory, bought a grocery shop, then a newsagency, and finally a printing business which allowed him to build a property portfolio.

Their collection, they say, is one of the most important in Australia. "We cannot compare, value-wise, with the collection John Schaeffer put together, or with James Fairfax," admits Agapitos. Nor, for that matter, with the indigenous collection of Janet Holmes a Court. "But it is the uniqueness of our collection which makes it important."

Not that the collection is complete. Agapitos says he was very disappointed when a key surrealist work - Objects in a Landscape (1936) by James Cant - ended up in the National Gallery due to a misunderstanding with a London dealer. And there are a handful of other works which the owners won't sell, despite his pleas to "name your price". They remain convinced key works by Australian surrealists are lying forgotten in attics.

And so we come to that question. Which gallery will inherit their collection? "That decision hasn't been taken yet," says Agapitos. But there are three contenders: Adelaide, because so many surrealists were from South Australia; The National Gallery of Victoria, because "it's the foremost art institution in Australia"; and the Art Gallery of NSW, "because we're Sydney people".

And the winner will be? "I'm sure logic will prevail," says Agapitos, with an enigmatic smile.

Australian Surrealism: The Agapitos/Wilson Collection ran at the SH Ervin Gallery from June 19 to August 8, 2004.

Photos > Kytherian Art

submitted by Christine France on 24.12.2006

Form and Clay. By Christine France. Biography of Antikytherian sculptor, Marea Gazzard (nee, Poulmides).

Author: Christine France
When Published: 1994
Publisher: Craftsman House*, Sydney.
Available: Out of Print, 2003. Available through Second Hand Dealers.
Description: Profusely illus. with plates t/out. some full page & col.
1st ed. or.cl. d/w. 4to.obl. pp.160.

*Craftsman House acquired by Thames and Hudson Australia Pty Ltd,
Customer Service
11 Central Blv
Fishermans Bend 3207

03) 9646 7788

enquiries@thaust.com.au

Photos > Kytherian Art

submitted by Kytherian Cultural Exchange on 04.11.2006

With a View. By, Orest Keywan. First Prize in the 1999 Sculpture by the Sea.

*Orest Keywan is the life partner of vibrant young Kytherian Sophia Zantiotis. Who in turn is the daughter of former Kytherian optometrist, and "man about town", Steve Zantiotis. Their Kytherian town of origin is Ayia Anastasia.

Steve Zantiotis. 2005

Sophia - my heritage:

"Maternal grandfather: George Combes, born: Katsoulianika, arrived Australia 1912
Maternal grandmother: Sophia Prineas, born Mitata, arrived Australia 1929
Paternal grandfather: Andonis (Anthony) Zantiotis, born Ayia Anastasia, arrived Australia 1911
Maternal grandmother: Eriphilly Coroneo, born Potamo, arrived ?

My mum is Alexandra (Lexie) Zantiotis nee Combes.

Lexie Combes. Steve Zantioitis. 1952

Mum worked at the State Library of NSW for many, many years. During that time she helped Hugh Gilchrist with his original research hunting back through original documentation and source material.

The strongest link for us has always been the Mitata soi, i.e. Peter Prineas (Katsehamos and the Great Idea)'s father, Jim, is my yiayia's brother,

Katsehamos and the Great Idea. The Book

Peter Prineas. The Man

and James Prineas (kythera-net)'s grandmother, Eleni.

The Coroneo soi is Professor Minas, Peter, Eleni Malanos etc

Professor Minas Coroneo. Notable Kytherian

The Combes soi is Manuel the Optometrist

and the Zantiotis soi is Professor Steve Zantis the Optometrist. (formerly Principal Scientist at Bausch & Lomb in New York, then back here at UNSW)".

Orest Keywan.

Orest was born in Marienbad, Czech Republic, on the Czech/German border. He is Ukranian by nationality. He grew up in Canada. He migrated to Australia in the 1960s, where he studied under Lyndon Dadswell, one of Australia's most accomplished sculptors, at the National Art School in Sydney. Orest later became a lecturer at the Alexander Mackie College of Advanced Education (now known as the College of Fine Art, University of NSW).

Acclaimed as 'one of the best sculptors we have' by art critic Sebastian Smee, Orest has represented in public and private collections in Australia and internationally.

He's won numerous awards including the Jackson Smith Sculpture Prize, last week, for miniature sculpture and the Art Gallery of NSW Taskforce Prize at SxS in 2004.

Orest exhibits widely and his work is held in public and private collections both nationally and internationally.

Orest Keywan's history at Sculpture by the Sea.

View/download Orest Ketwan. Profile. 2003., as a .rtf file:

Keywan, Orest – Profile.rtf

Orest has entered Sculpture by the Sea every year since 1998. He is the only sculptor to have been selected 9 consecutive times for the event. He didn't submit anything in its inaugural year.

Orest's work which featured at Sculpture by the Sea in 2005 was entitled Constanta Dreaming. The sculpture stood at 192 x 164 x 132cm and was created out of stainless steel, steel, synthetic resin, wood and concrete.

He was the winner of the Sydney Water Sculpture Prize at Sculpture by the Sea in 1999. He has won first prize again this year. He is the first Australian to win the prize twice.

The 10th annual Sculpture by the Sea Bondi

Bondi - November 2006

The 10th annual Sculpture by the Sea Bondi will be held from 2-19 November 2006.

Sculpture by the Sea turns 10! The Bondi-to-Tamarama coastal walk will again be transformed into a magnificent outdoor art gallery, hosting one of the largest and most popular sculpture exhibitions in the world. This year's exhibition will feature 108 sculptures by artists from 11 different countries.

The celebrations begin a week before the Bondi exhibition with one of the most popular sculptures ever exhibited, 10 little friends by Richie Kuhaupt, making a return visit, popping up right across Sydney in unusual and unlikely places from the Blue Mountains to Bondi Beach. During the exhibition Sculpture by the Sea will be taking to the sky with Guy Warren's Icarus to be created several times by a sky writer for the whole of Sydney to see.

The event has always attracted a strong contingent of international artists and in 2006 the work of sculptors from Scotland, New Zealand, Italy, Japan, England, Germany, Denmark, Sweden, Malaysia and the USA, as well as the work of Australian sculptors, will be exhibited. For more information, see the Artists page.

For information about Bondi, see the About Bondi page.

For further information on Sculpture by the Sea, visit the Sculpture by the Sea website.

Photos > Kytherian Art

submitted by Kytherian Cultural Exchange on 01.11.2006

Western Road Trip. By, Orest Keywan*. Exhibited on Bondi beach, November 2006.

Orest Keywan wins the $30,000 first prize at the 2006 Sculpture by the Sea.

*Orest Keywan is the life partner of vibrant young Kytherian Sophia Zantiotos. Who in turn is the daughter of former Kytherian optometrist, and "man about town", Steve Zantiotis. Their Kytherian town of origin is Ayia Anastasia.

Winner of the Sydney Water Sculpture Prize at Sculpture by the Sea in 1999, Orest has also featured works at Sculpture by the Sea in 1998 and 2000 and appeared again in 2005.

Born in Marienbad, Czech Republic, Orest migrated to Australia in the 1960s, where he studied under Lyndon Dadswell, one of Australia's most accomplished sculptors, at the National Art School in Sydney. Orest later became a lecturer at the Alexander Mackie College of Advanced Education (now known as the College of Fine Art, University of NSW).

Acclaimed as 'one of the best sculptors we have' by art critic Sebastian Smee, Orest has represented in public and private collections in Australia and internationally.

Orest Keywan's work featured at Sculpture by the Sea in 2005 was entitled Constanta Dreaming. The sculpture stood at 192 x 164 x 132cm and was created out of stainless steel, steel, synthetic resin, wood and concrete.


The 10th annual Sculpture by the Sea Bondi

Bondi - November 2006

The 10th annual Sculpture by the Sea Bondi will be held from 2-19 November 2006.

Sculpture by the Sea turns 10! The Bondi-to-Tamarama coastal walk will again be transformed into a magnificent outdoor art gallery, hosting one of the largest and most popular sculpture exhibitions in the world. This year's exhibition will feature 108 sculptures by artists from 11 different countries.

The celebrations begin a week before the Bondi exhibition with one of the most popular sculptures ever exhibited, 10 little friends by Richie Kuhaupt, making a return visit, popping up right across Sydney in unusual and unlikely places from the Blue Mountains to Bondi Beach. During the exhibition Sculpture by the Sea will be taking to the sky with Guy Warren's Icarus to be created several times by a sky writer for the whole of Sydney to see.

The event has always attracted a strong contingent of international artists and in 2006 the work of sculptors from Scotland, New Zealand, Italy, Japan, England, Germany, Denmark, Sweden, Malaysia and the USA, as well as the work of Australian sculptors, will be exhibited. For more information, see the Artists page.

For information about Bondi, see the About Bondi page.

For further information on Sculpture by the Sea, visit the Sculpture by the Sea website.

Photos > Kytherian Art

submitted by Kytherian Cultural Exchange on 01.11.2006

Rocky Moon. By Orest Keywan. On exhibition, Bondi Beach, November 2006.

Orest Keywan wins the $30,000 first prize at the 2006 Sculpture by the Sea.

*Orest Keywan is the life partner of vibrant young Kytherian Sophia Zantiotos. Who in turn is the daughter of former Kytherian optometrist, and "man about town", Steve Zantiotis. Their Kytherian town of origin is Ayia Anastasia.

Winner of the Sydney Water Sculpture Prize at Sculpture by the Sea in 1999, Orest has also featured works at Sculpture by the Sea in 1998 and 2000 and appeared again in 2005.

Born in Marienbad, Czech Republic, Orest migrated to Australia in the 1960s, where he studied under Lyndon Dadswell, one of Australia's most accomplished sculptors, at the National Art School in Sydney. Orest later became a lecturer at the Alexander Mackie College of Advanced Education (now known as the College of Fine Art, University of NSW).

Acclaimed as 'one of the best sculptors we have' by art critic Sebastian Smee, Orest has represented in public and private collections in Australia and internationally.

Orest Keywan's work featured at Sculpture by the Sea in 2005 was entitled Constanta Dreaming. The sculpture stood at 192 x 164 x 132cm and was created out of stainless steel, steel, synthetic resin, wood and concrete.


The 10th annual Sculpture by the Sea Bondi

Bondi - November 2006

The 10th annual Sculpture by the Sea Bondi will be held from 2-19 November 2006.

Sculpture by the Sea turns 10! The Bondi-to-Tamarama coastal walk will again be transformed into a magnificent outdoor art gallery, hosting one of the largest and most popular sculpture exhibitions in the world. This year's exhibition will feature 108 sculptures by artists from 11 different countries.

The celebrations begin a week before the Bondi exhibition with one of the most popular sculptures ever exhibited, 10 little friends by Richie Kuhaupt, making a return visit, popping up right across Sydney in unusual and unlikely places from the Blue Mountains to Bondi Beach. During the exhibition Sculpture by the Sea will be taking to the sky with Guy Warren's Icarus to be created several times by a sky writer for the whole of Sydney to see.

The event has always attracted a strong contingent of international artists and in 2006 the work of sculptors from Scotland, New Zealand, Italy, Japan, England, Germany, Denmark, Sweden, Malaysia and the USA, as well as the work of Australian sculptors, will be exhibited. For more information, see the Artists page.

For information about Bondi, see the About Bondi page.

For further information on Sculpture by the Sea, visit the Sculpture by the Sea website.

Photos > Kytherian Art

submitted by Kytherian Cinema Review on 01.06.2006

George Hatsatouris' (1947- ). Oil painting of Ken G Hall.

Ken G Hall was a famous film director in Australia.

On display at the National Film and Sound Archive, Canberra.

"This portrait was an entrant in the Archibald Prize competition in 1985. It shows a younger Ken Hall with camera and dog at bottom left, and an older Ken Hall at the top right with characters from some of his films. Look for Dad Rudd and Smithy."


Until recently, the the National Film and Sound Archive was known as ScreenSound Australia.

The Archive is part of the Australian Film Commission.

Canberra Office

McCoy Circuit Acton
GPO Box 2002
Canberra ACT 2601
Australia

Tel: 02 6248 2000
Fax: 02 6248 2165

Sydney Office

Fox Studios Australia
Level 1 Frank Hurley Grandstand Building
FSA #63 Driver Avenue
Moore Park NSW 1363 Australia

Tel: 02 9380 1200
Fax: 9380 1201

Melbourne Office
170 Clarendon Street
South Melbourne
Victoria 3205
Australia

Tel: 03 9685 5800
Fax: 03 9685 5810

Email National Film and Sound Archive, here

Website:
www.screensound.gov.au

Photos > Kytherian Art

submitted by Peter Makarthis on 22.04.2006

Red eggs for Easter 2006

Fabia Azara of Bowral assisting her Yaya (Sophia McCarthy) at Inverell preparing eggs for Easter

Photos > Kytherian Art

submitted by John Ellison on 07.04.2006

Monastery on the Hill. Kythera.

From John Ellison's 2005 Exhibition, Katoomba, NSW.

http://www.katoombafineart.com.au/cgi-bin/parts.cgi?rm=artist&aname=John+Ellison

'And Then He Came To The Fountain Where The Lions Are...’. an exhibition of paintings and drawings from Athens, Kythera and Crete.
I had never travelled outside Australia and had no desire to do so. But, my companion Lyn had her mind made up. “Its now or never” she said and it sounded ominous.

I had been reading Henry Miller’s ‘Colossus Of Maroussi’ and ‘A Modern Odyssey’ by Nikos Kazantzakis, author of ‘Zorba The Greek’. The sights and sounds and smells of Crete were vivid in my minds eye, so I said “if we have to go somewhere, how about Greece”?

That was enough. Within a couple of weeks we were flying to Athens. I couldn’t believe my eyes. There really was a huge coloured world out there and it was far more imposing and beautiful than anything I had seen on television or in the travel section of the Sun Herald. I started to draw in a fever.

Athens, Kythera and Crete. The drawings piled up, averaging four or five a day. I had to draw faster and faster in order to digest the plethora of visual experiences on all sides.

Iraklio, the capital of Crete. I am drawing a fountain surrounded by four stone lions. When I finish the drawing, I cross the road and come to a building dedicated to the literary works of Nikos Kazantzakis. I wander in and see on the wall, writ large, ‘And then he came to the fountain where the lions are...’. A quote from ‘Freedom And Death’, one of Kazantzakis’ great books. I am electrified. I had just drawn the Lion Fountain.

Travel as a spiritual experience; nobody told me it could be so. I came home with 95 black and white drawings and proceeded to turn them into paintings. That is what this exhibition is about; a tribute to that marvellous country and the pagan deities that still pulse in the air.

John Ellison

Photos > Kytherian Art

submitted by John Ellison on 07.04.2006

Diakofti. Ship in Harbour. Line drawing.

From John Ellison's 2005 Exhibition, Katoomba, NSW.

http://www.katoombafineart.com.au/cgi-bin/parts.cgi?rm=artist&aname=John+Ellison

'And Then He Came To The Fountain Where The Lions Are...’. an exhibition of paintings and drawings from Athens, Kythera and Crete.
I had never travelled outside Australia and had no desire to do so. But, my companion Lyn had her mind made up. “Its now or never” she said and it sounded ominous.

I had been reading Henry Miller’s ‘Colossus Of Maroussi’ and ‘A Modern Odyssey’ by Nikos Kazantzakis, author of ‘Zorba The Greek’. The sights and sounds and smells of Crete were vivid in my minds eye, so I said “if we have to go somewhere, how about Greece”?

That was enough. Within a couple of weeks we were flying to Athens. I couldn’t believe my eyes. There really was a huge coloured world out there and it was far more imposing and beautiful than anything I had seen on television or in the travel section of the Sun Herald. I started to draw in a fever.

Athens, Kythera and Crete. The drawings piled up, averaging four or five a day. I had to draw faster and faster in order to digest the plethora of visual experiences on all sides.

Iraklio, the capital of Crete. I am drawing a fountain surrounded by four stone lions. When I finish the drawing, I cross the road and come to a building dedicated to the literary works of Nikos Kazantzakis. I wander in and see on the wall, writ large, ‘And then he came to the fountain where the lions are...’. A quote from ‘Freedom And Death’, one of Kazantzakis’ great books. I am electrified. I had just drawn the Lion Fountain.

Travel as a spiritual experience; nobody told me it could be so. I came home with 95 black and white drawings and proceeded to turn them into paintings. That is what this exhibition is about; a tribute to that marvellous country and the pagan deities that still pulse in the air.

John Ellison

Photos > Kytherian Art

submitted by John Ellison on 07.04.2006

Diakofti. Ship in harbour. Painting.

From John Ellison's 2005 Exhibition, Katoomba, NSW.

http://www.katoombafineart.com.au/cgi-bin/parts.cgi?rm=artist&aname=John+Ellison

'And Then He Came To The Fountain Where The Lions Are...’. an exhibition of paintings and drawings from Athens, Kythera and Crete.
I had never travelled outside Australia and had no desire to do so. But, my companion Lyn had her mind made up. “Its now or never” she said and it sounded ominous.

I had been reading Henry Miller’s ‘Colossus Of Maroussi’ and ‘A Modern Odyssey’ by Nikos Kazantzakis, author of ‘Zorba The Greek’. The sights and sounds and smells of Crete were vivid in my minds eye, so I said “if we have to go somewhere, how about Greece”?

That was enough. Within a couple of weeks we were flying to Athens. I couldn’t believe my eyes. There really was a huge coloured world out there and it was far more imposing and beautiful than anything I had seen on television or in the travel section of the Sun Herald. I started to draw in a fever.

Athens, Kythera and Crete. The drawings piled up, averaging four or five a day. I had to draw faster and faster in order to digest the plethora of visual experiences on all sides.

Iraklio, the capital of Crete. I am drawing a fountain surrounded by four stone lions. When I finish the drawing, I cross the road and come to a building dedicated to the literary works of Nikos Kazantzakis. I wander in and see on the wall, writ large, ‘And then he came to the fountain where the lions are...’. A quote from ‘Freedom And Death’, one of Kazantzakis’ great books. I am electrified. I had just drawn the Lion Fountain.

Travel as a spiritual experience; nobody told me it could be so. I came home with 95 black and white drawings and proceeded to turn them into paintings. That is what this exhibition is about; a tribute to that marvellous country and the pagan deities that still pulse in the air.

John Ellison

Photos > Kytherian Art

submitted by John Ellison on 07.04.2006

Beach at Diakofti. Line drawing.

From John Ellison's 2005 Exhibition, Katoomba, NSW.

http://www.katoombafineart.com.au/cgi-bin/parts.cgi?rm=artist&aname=John+Ellison

'And Then He Came To The Fountain Where The Lions Are...’. an exhibition of paintings and drawings from Athens, Kythera and Crete.
I had never travelled outside Australia and had no desire to do so. But, my companion Lyn had her mind made up. “Its now or never” she said and it sounded ominous.

I had been reading Henry Miller’s ‘Colossus Of Maroussi’ and ‘A Modern Odyssey’ by Nikos Kazantzakis, author of ‘Zorba The Greek’. The sights and sounds and smells of Crete were vivid in my minds eye, so I said “if we have to go somewhere, how about Greece”?

That was enough. Within a couple of weeks we were flying to Athens. I couldn’t believe my eyes. There really was a huge coloured world out there and it was far more imposing and beautiful than anything I had seen on television or in the travel section of the Sun Herald. I started to draw in a fever.

Athens, Kythera and Crete. The drawings piled up, averaging four or five a day. I had to draw faster and faster in order to digest the plethora of visual experiences on all sides.

Iraklio, the capital of Crete. I am drawing a fountain surrounded by four stone lions. When I finish the drawing, I cross the road and come to a building dedicated to the literary works of Nikos Kazantzakis. I wander in and see on the wall, writ large, ‘And then he came to the fountain where the lions are...’. A quote from ‘Freedom And Death’, one of Kazantzakis’ great books. I am electrified. I had just drawn the Lion Fountain.

Travel as a spiritual experience; nobody told me it could be so. I came home with 95 black and white drawings and proceeded to turn them into paintings. That is what this exhibition is about; a tribute to that marvellous country and the pagan deities that still pulse in the air.

John Ellison

Photos > Kytherian Art

submitted by John Ellison on 07.04.2006

Ancient Huts - Kythera.

From John Ellison's 2005 Exhibition, Katoomba, NSW.

http://www.katoombafineart.com.au/cgi-bin/parts.cgi?rm=artist&aname=John+Ellison

'And Then He Came To The Fountain Where The Lions Are...’. an exhibition of paintings and drawings from Athens, Kythera and Crete.
I had never travelled outside Australia and had no desire to do so. But, my companion Lyn had her mind made up. “Its now or never” she said and it sounded ominous.

I had been reading Henry Miller’s ‘Colossus Of Maroussi’ and ‘A Modern Odyssey’ by Nikos Kazantzakis, author of ‘Zorba The Greek’. The sights and sounds and smells of Crete were vivid in my minds eye, so I said “if we have to go somewhere, how about Greece”?

That was enough. Within a couple of weeks we were flying to Athens. I couldn’t believe my eyes. There really was a huge coloured world out there and it was far more imposing and beautiful than anything I had seen on television or in the travel section of the Sun Herald. I started to draw in a fever.

Athens, Kythera and Crete. The drawings piled up, averaging four or five a day. I had to draw faster and faster in order to digest the plethora of visual experiences on all sides.

Iraklio, the capital of Crete. I am drawing a fountain surrounded by four stone lions. When I finish the drawing, I cross the road and come to a building dedicated to the literary works of Nikos Kazantzakis. I wander in and see on the wall, writ large, ‘And then he came to the fountain where the lions are...’. A quote from ‘Freedom And Death’, one of Kazantzakis’ great books. I am electrified. I had just drawn the Lion Fountain.

Travel as a spiritual experience; nobody told me it could be so. I came home with 95 black and white drawings and proceeded to turn them into paintings. That is what this exhibition is about; a tribute to that marvellous country and the pagan deities that still pulse in the air.

John Ellison

Photos > Kytherian Art

submitted by John Ellison on 07.04.2006

The Sunken Boat, Diakofti, Kythera.

From John Ellison's 2005 Exhibition, Katoomba, NSW.

http://www.katoombafineart.com.au/cgi-bin/parts.cgi?rm=artist&aname=John+Ellison

'And Then He Came To The Fountain Where The Lions Are...’. an exhibition of paintings and drawings from Athens, Kythera and Crete.
I had never travelled outside Australia and had no desire to do so. But, my companion Lyn had her mind made up. “Its now or never” she said and it sounded ominous.

I had been reading Henry Miller’s ‘Colossus Of Maroussi’ and ‘A Modern Odyssey’ by Nikos Kazantzakis, author of ‘Zorba The Greek’. The sights and sounds and smells of Crete were vivid in my minds eye, so I said “if we have to go somewhere, how about Greece”?

That was enough. Within a couple of weeks we were flying to Athens. I couldn’t believe my eyes. There really was a huge coloured world out there and it was far more imposing and beautiful than anything I had seen on television or in the travel section of the Sun Herald. I started to draw in a fever.

Athens, Kythera and Crete. The drawings piled up, averaging four or five a day. I had to draw faster and faster in order to digest the plethora of visual experiences on all sides.

Iraklio, the capital of Crete. I am drawing a fountain surrounded by four stone lions. When I finish the drawing, I cross the road and come to a building dedicated to the literary works of Nikos Kazantzakis. I wander in and see on the wall, writ large, ‘And then he came to the fountain where the lions are...’. A quote from ‘Freedom And Death’, one of Kazantzakis’ great books. I am electrified. I had just drawn the Lion Fountain.

Travel as a spiritual experience; nobody told me it could be so. I came home with 95 black and white drawings and proceeded to turn them into paintings. That is what this exhibition is about; a tribute to that marvellous country and the pagan deities that still pulse in the air.

John Ellison

Photos > Kytherian Art

submitted by John Ellison on 07.04.2006

Fishing boats, Kythera, Crete.

From John Ellison's 2005 Exhibition, Katoomba, NSW.

http://www.katoombafineart.com.au/cgi-bin/parts.cgi?rm=artist&aname=John+Ellison

'And Then He Came To The Fountain Where The Lions Are...’. an exhibition of paintings and drawings from Athens, Kythera and Crete.
I had never travelled outside Australia and had no desire to do so. But, my companion Lyn had her mind made up. “Its now or never” she said and it sounded ominous.

I had been reading Henry Miller’s ‘Colossus Of Maroussi’ and ‘A Modern Odyssey’ by Nikos Kazantzakis, author of ‘Zorba The Greek’. The sights and sounds and smells of Crete were vivid in my minds eye, so I said “if we have to go somewhere, how about Greece”?

That was enough. Within a couple of weeks we were flying to Athens. I couldn’t believe my eyes. There really was a huge coloured world out there and it was far more imposing and beautiful than anything I had seen on television or in the travel section of the Sun Herald. I started to draw in a fever.

Athens, Kythera and Crete. The drawings piled up, averaging four or five a day. I had to draw faster and faster in order to digest the plethora of visual experiences on all sides.

Iraklio, the capital of Crete. I am drawing a fountain surrounded by four stone lions. When I finish the drawing, I cross the road and come to a building dedicated to the literary works of Nikos Kazantzakis. I wander in and see on the wall, writ large, ‘And then he came to the fountain where the lions are...’. A quote from ‘Freedom And Death’, one of Kazantzakis’ great books. I am electrified. I had just drawn the Lion Fountain.

Travel as a spiritual experience; nobody told me it could be so. I came home with 95 black and white drawings and proceeded to turn them into paintings. That is what this exhibition is about; a tribute to that marvellous country and the pagan deities that still pulse in the air.

John Ellison

Photos > Kytherian Art

submitted by John Ellison on 07.04.2006

Waterfront, Diakofti.

From John Ellison's 2005 Exhibition, Katoomba, NSW.

http://www.katoombafineart.com.au/cgi-bin/parts.cgi?rm=artist&aname=John+Ellison

'And Then He Came To The Fountain Where The Lions Are...’. an exhibition of paintings and drawings from Athens, Kythera and Crete.
I had never travelled outside Australia and had no desire to do so. But, my companion Lyn had her mind made up. “Its now or never” she said and it sounded ominous.

I had been reading Henry Miller’s ‘Colossus Of Maroussi’ and ‘A Modern Odyssey’ by Nikos Kazantzakis, author of ‘Zorba The Greek’. The sights and sounds and smells of Crete were vivid in my minds eye, so I said “if we have to go somewhere, how about Greece”?

That was enough. Within a couple of weeks we were flying to Athens. I couldn’t believe my eyes. There really was a huge coloured world out there and it was far more imposing and beautiful than anything I had seen on television or in the travel section of the Sun Herald. I started to draw in a fever.

Athens, Kythera and Crete. The drawings piled up, averaging four or five a day. I had to draw faster and faster in order to digest the plethora of visual experiences on all sides.

Iraklio, the capital of Crete. I am drawing a fountain surrounded by four stone lions. When I finish the drawing, I cross the road and come to a building dedicated to the literary works of Nikos Kazantzakis. I wander in and see on the wall, writ large, ‘And then he came to the fountain where the lions are...’. A quote from ‘Freedom And Death’, one of Kazantzakis’ great books. I am electrified. I had just drawn the Lion Fountain.

Travel as a spiritual experience; nobody told me it could be so. I came home with 95 black and white drawings and proceeded to turn them into paintings. That is what this exhibition is about; a tribute to that marvellous country and the pagan deities that still pulse in the air.

John Ellison

Photos > Kytherian Art

submitted by Jim Tzannes on 08.10.2005

View of Capsali and Hora Castle.

"Capsali" Lithograph, 58 cm x 13 cm.

Edition 150, 1981

Landscape: View of Capsali [Kapsali] and Hora Castle

Painting by George Tzannes

Detailed information about George Tzannes

See also

http://mysite.verizon.net/vzeoxdoo/tzannesart/

Photos > Kytherian Art

submitted by Jim Tzannes on 08.10.2005

View of Hora from the castle.

"Hora" Lithograph, 58 cm x 13 cm. Edition 150, 1981
Landscape: View of Hora from the castle.

Painting by George Tzannes.

Detailed information about George Tzannes

See also

http://mysite.verizon.net/vzeoxdoo/tzannesart/

Photos > Kytherian Art

submitted by Jim Tzannes on 08.10.2005

Architectural details.

"Architectural Details" Four Lithographs, 8 cm x 8 cm each.

Edition 150, 1982.

Architecture: Capital, Window, Rooftop, Door.

Available only as a set of four prints.

Detailed information about George Tzannes

See also

http://mysite.verizon.net/vzeoxdoo/tzannesart/

Photos > Kytherian Art

submitted by Jim Tzannes on 08.10.2005

Terraced Meadows. Fields near Aroniadika.

"Terraced Meadows" Litho/Silkscreen,

46 cm x 36 cm. Edition 125, 1976

Landscape: Fields near Aroniadika.

Detailed information about George Tzannes

See also

http://mysite.verizon.net/vzeoxdoo/tzannesart/