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submitted by Namoi Valley Independent on 06.02.2010

Memorial service to celebrate life of Peter Venardos

A young Peter Venardos, who took over the Acropolis Cafe, Gunnedah, NSW, Australia, in partnership with Theo Souris in 1945.

Namoi Valley Independent, Thursday, January 28, 2010. page 11.


DURING his 67 years in Gunnedah, Peter Venardos made many lifetime friends and helped countless others in his quiet, unassuming way. Peter’s death on January 14 after months of very poor health, came as a great blow to a wide cross section of the community.

He was laid to rest beside his brother at Botany Cemetery after the funeral service at St Spirodon Church, Kensington, on January 21.

As many people were unable to attend the funeral, a memorial service has been arranged for Wednesday, February 3, at St Joseph’s Catholic Church, Gunnedah, at 11 am, followed by refreshments at Gunnedah Services and Bowling Club. Everyone is welcome to attend.

At the farewell service in Sydney, Peter’s eldest son George spoke about his father’s love for the community he adopted all those years ago.

“Those who knew him will remember him as a man who took pride in his work and gave back to the town that he believed gave so much to him,” George said. “He will be sorely missed not only by the community he loved but by those who loved him.

“He used to say ‘You’re here for a good time not for a long time’ and it seems that he was, in his own way, able to achieve both, as his passing in his 89th year is testament to his love of life and his persist¬ence and strong will.”

Panagiotis (Peter) Venardos was born in Ayia Anastasia, Kythera, Greece, on September 16, 1921. He migrated to Australia at the young age of 12. Like many other boy migrants to Australia, he never saw his mother again - she had died during the war years when Kythera was occupied by the Germans. Peter never returned to his place of birth but his father George came to Australia for an extensive visit, dying six months after returning to his island home.

One of six children, Peter stayed with relatives in Sydney for a short period moved to Tamworth in 1936, to join his brothers. He was apprenticed to a German baker in Tamworth in the days when all the pastry was rolled by hand. As a young man he worked tirelessly as a baker and waiter at the Golden Bell Cafe.

Peter came to Gunnedah in 1943, a place which remained home to him and his wife Diana for the next 67 years. He entered into a business partner¬ship with his brother-in-law, Theo Souris, purchasing the Acropolis Café on Gunnedah’s main street.

Hard work was the foundation of Peter’s life and many people can all recall him saying ‘hard work never killed anybody’. This is a lesson he instilled in his three sons George, Jim, and Paul, and one he adapted to his business career.

The Acropolis was Peter’s first business endeav¬our in Gunnedah but certainly not the last. Peter also acquired the White Rose Café from the Zantos brothers, and thrived in the social atmosphere that he felt brought the community together, and got people talking.

Adapting his extensive knowledge of the café business, Peter went on to open Thriftway super-market in 1957, which was to be the first of its kind in the northwest of NSW.

The concept itself was innovative for its time as Thriftway was the first in Australia to house groceries, a butcher, deli, fresh fruit and vegetables, and a café, all under the one roof.
Thriftway became a hub of social discourse for the community of Gunnedah, an idea Peter took joy in, as it allowed him to extend his services to those in need throughout the district,” George Venardos said. “Community service was an essential part of his life and something he attributed to his success in business.”

It is well recognised in Gunnedah that Peter believed strongly in lending a helping hand to those less fortunate. He believed that no one should go to sleep hun¬gry, and was known to give many hot meals for free, or in exchange for odd jobs.

Community to him was not only centred around giving to those in need but in improving facilities and showing support for those organisations dedicated to serving the public of Gunnedah. Peter belonged to many clubs and public organisations. Socially, he was a member of the Gunnedah Fire Brigade, Rotary Club and the Gunnedah Free Masons Lodge.

The Coffee Club at Thriftway is one particular social group he enjoyed the most,” George told the congregation at the funeral service.

“Sharing coffee and stories with good friends allowed for a balance of work and play. “Members of this group were some of Peter’s most beloved friends who knew him best. “Roasting him for his unique way of measuring things: ‘That’s great but would it kill a brown dog?’ these friends awarded him a trophy for the ‘most killings’ in one day”.

Support for local law enforcement was very important to Peter Venardos. He became a Justice of the Peace in support of the Gunnedah Police, who he felt were an essential part of any small town.

Sport was one of Peter’s great passions. He believed that everyone should learn to swim and that sport was important for children as it was an essential part of a healthy life and was a great way to meet friends.

The tragic drowning death of a cousin in the Namoi River on Christmas Day caused him great grief and he joined the local crusade for a town swimming pool. He strongly believed that everyone should learn to swim and when the pool opened in 1955 he became actively involved in the swimming club, firing up the “woofer” every morning to heat water in the wading pool which had been covered with plastic for winter training.

By 1970 Peter’s son, George, had claimed a string of NSW titles and was recognised as the holder of six Australian swimming records.

Peter was also actively involved with the cornmunity effort to raise funds for the heated swimming pool and was honoured with Life Membership of the Gunnedah Amateur Swimming Club.

During the winter months, the swimmers would attend the PCYC for boxing training, to keep fit. Peter had done some boxing in his time and he loved being there to strap them up, George Venardos recalled.

All of Peter’s boys were encouraged to play sport and he always took pleasure in watching them participate and excel in different disciplines. Peter was also involved in the formation of water polo in Gunnedah.

Peter finally retired in 1994 at the age 72. He maintained his friendships and was an influential member of the Gunnedah community.

Longtime friend Terry Hagley said Peter Venardos was a great advocate for Gunnedah, and a very proud Australian.

The late Peter Venardos is survived by his wife Diana, (Gunnedah), three sons and their families - George and Robyn, Liza and Sophie, (McMahon’s Point), Jim, and his daughter Artemis, (Northern Territory), and Paul and Joanne, Amy, Jack, Luke and Max (Panania). He is also survived by his brother Mick, aged 94, of Randwick.

Photos > Working Life

submitted by Sydney Morning Herald on 05.02.2010

Tap-dancing penguins return in Happy Feet 2

Kytherian, George Miller, at an event to launch the start of filming of Happy Feet 2 in Sydney

Picture: Peter Rae

Sydney Morning Herald

February 5, 2010


Hot and steamy conditions would frighten off most penguins, but not the batch tap-dancing and thumping around energetically in Sydney weather yesterday to give a taste of the sequel to one of Australia's most successful films.

The reason was they hadn't become penguins yet. They were still humans, but clad in all-black bodysuits – covered in what resembled tiny white lightbulbs – that help facilitate the technological wizardry that will transform them into animated penguins for Happy Feet 2.

During filming, "not only do we watch the dancers live, but if I look at the computer they are penguins live", filmmaker George Miller said at the launch of the sequel's production in Sydney's Fox Studios yesterday. "And not only that, they're in Antarctica".

"This is the exactly technology that drove Avatar, that drove Lord of the Rings."

Choosing Sydney to make the film is a boon to the local film industry, which has done it tough in a hard economic climate. The NSW Premier, Kristina Keneally, said the choice was "terrific for our economy, terrific for our film industry ... it's supporting over 500 jobs locally over three years".

Happy Feet, about a tap-dancing penguin who succeeds against the odds, earned about $US384 million at the box office worldwide and won the 2007 Oscar for best animated feature.

Actors Robin Williams and Elijah Wood return as starring voices and both were on site yesterday but behind closed doors. Miller said the movie had "a different story – a lot of new characters".

The filmmaker said the movie industry was moving towards the intersection of arts and technology. Avatar – the biggest-earning film ever, with gross earnings topping $2.1 billion – had "shown us the way. And there's no reason that this can't be done in this country.

"In NSW and Australia I do believe we've been too lazy. We've let others steal the march. And now it's changing."

Miller pointed to what he called "the most advanced motion-capture studio in the world" at the vast CarriageWorks precinct in the inner city suburb of Eveleigh, a new studio reportedly set up under a deal in which Miller's production company leases the premises from the NSW government for a year.

Motion-capture technology enables people's movements to be filmed then fused onto computer-generated characters to enhance their real-life naturalism.

Miller, who came to prominence as the director of Mad Max three decades ago, will also use the studio to work on his planned fourth instalment in the franchise, Fury Road.

"There will be a huge amount of production going through there if we can keep it in this country," he said. "Everyone thought cinema was dead and now we're getting the kind of movies you're seeing now."

Keneally said the state government invested $5.7 million in 34 local film or television projects in the last six months of last year. "That generated $69 million in expenditure – a good return on investment, growing this industry in NSW."

Photos > Working Life

submitted by Sydney Morning Herald on 14.12.2009

The great Grecian earn: how immigrants made a cafe society

Sydney Morning Herald, December 9, 2009 page 10.

Photo by Jack Patty 's son, Manuel Patty

A newly reprinted book reveals the story of early Greek migrants in Australia, writes Anna Patty.

The dockets at Aroney's Cafe in Katoomba trumpeted its ''famous'' fish dinners and ''famous toasted sandwiches''. But it was the hot chocolates, created by my father, that won the cafe its true acclaim.
Customers travelled from as far as Canberra and Sydney, and even overseas, for a hot chocolate at Aroney's, which was named after its original owner, Peter Aroney. The cafe stayed open until late. The customers decided when it was time to leave.
My father treated every customer - whether they were men down on their luck from the nearby Eldon hostel or the prime minister, Ben Chifley, on his way home to Bathurst - with the same deference.
Aroney's stood at the top of the main street of Katoomba, across the road from the Paragon Cafe and Carrington Hotel, and near Theo Poulos Real Estate, which were also run … by Greeks. The Cordatos, Archondoulis, Zakis, Lekkas, Darias, Bistaros, Stavros, Prineas, Georges, Vrachnos and Fotias families have also run businesses in Katoomba in the past 40 years years.
A book distributed to Greek migrants in 1916, Life in Australia, has just been reprinted and translated into English by the Kytherian World Heritage Fund. The book, being launched at the University of Sydney today, reveals the struggles and successes of Australia's early Greek migrants.
''Greek establishments stand in the most important and most central locations in almost all of the cities in Australia,'' the book says.
''The lengthy nomenclature of their owners mean that such establishments are easily recognisable. Some Greeks, however, have shortened their names, as the Australians find it hard to pronounce such long, difficult names.''
My father, Ioannis Varipatis, left the small Greek island of Kythera, at the southern tip of the Peloponnese, in the mid 1920s, before he was even a teenager. Speaking no English, he accepted the advice of migration officials and swapped the name Ioannis Varipatis for Jack Patty.
My father and his older brother, George, bought Aroney's in 1937. Katoomba was home to a host of Greek cafes, including The Paragon, The AB Cafe and The Savoy, which was owned by another of Dad's brothers, Andy. The cafe became a family affair when Dad invited his brothers-in-law, George and Peter Cassimatis, to join his business.
Like many other Greek migrants, my father and Zacharias Simos, who established the famed Paragon cafe, were assimilated into Australian life - though they maintained a deep pride in their heritage and strong ties with Greek cultural tradition.
In 1934 Zacharias and his wife Mary (Panaretos) gave birth to their son Theodore, who became a top barrister, representing the British Government in the Spycatcher case against one Malcolm Turnbull, and later a Supreme Court Judge. He died aged 75 this year.
Life in Australia presents photos and commentary about other early Greek businesses such as those owned by the Andronicus Brothers and Nicholas Aroney.
My father retired in the late 1980s when he was aged 75. Only then did he make his first trip home to Kythera - after 66 years - and met, for the first time, the youngest of his 11 siblings, his sister Anna.
And yet, it was only during that first and only return visit to Greece that my parents realised how ''Australian'' they were. My mother, who Australianised her name from Caliopy Cassimatis to Poppy Patty, was especially offended at how rarely she heard the words ''please'' and ''thank you'' spoken in Greece.
Life in Australia had already traversed this territory. The Greek migrant is advised: ''If we carefully consider the measured and ordered life of the Australians, we find that Australians, wherever they are, eat, dress, sleep and walk with the greatest of care and circumspection. They begin every conversation with ''please'' and finish it with 'thank you.'''
It further informs: ''Raising your voice, banging your hand on the table, making gestures, forming groups in the streets, impertinence, scruffy dress are, for the Australians, something strange and unattractive. Such habits are disliked and, anyway, belong to uncivilised peoples.''
According to the latest census figures there are now more than 365,000 people of Greek heritage living in Australia. Angelo Notaras, the trustee and administrator of the Kytherian World Heritage Fund, which also runs kythera-family.net, said that he was about 10 years old (in about 1943) when his father showed him a family copy of Life in Australia. It contains a photo of his father, grandfather and uncle John, standing in front of the Marble Bar Cafe in Grafton, in about 1912.
Life in Australia was written, in Greek, in 1916 by Georgios Kentavros and two merchant brothers, Kosmas and Emmanouil Andronikos.
It was was financed by another merchant, John Comino.
''Little did we realise that it was the most important Greek publication in the first 200 years of Australian history,'' Notaras said.
George Poulos, the second administrator and trustee of the Kytherian World Heritage Fund, said he hoped families would be inspired to expand and chronicle the Greek Australian narrative from 1916 to the present day.

Photos > Working Life

submitted by Panayiotis Diamadis on 27.11.2009

One of the many slides displayed by Professor Robert Hannah

...at the Nicholson Museum, Sydney University, Thursday, 26th November, 2009.

Archaeoastronomy at the Nicholson.


The Nicholson Museum at The University of Sydney was packed to the rafters Thursday evening for a fascinating presentation on one of the great mysteries of ancient Hellenism: the Antikythera Mechanism. Professor Robert Hannah, (Classics, University of Otago, New Zealand) delivered a great illustrated lecture on one of the world’s earliest computing devices. Prof. Hannah combined history, science and personal experience in a fascinating evening.

In 1901, a group of sponge fishermen from Symi recovered pieces of metal and wood from an ancient shipwreck off the coast of the island of Antikythera (in the strait between Peloponnesos and Krete. It was one of the first marine archaeological excavations. Since then, many scientists have examined the 82 fragments of the Mechanism in an effort to decode its secrets. What was it for? When was it created? How was it made? A century later, it stubbornly holds on to some of its secrets.

Going by the lettering on the Mechanism, it is commonly agreed that it was created sometime in the first century BC. Consisting of 30 interlocking bronze plates and several gears encased in wood about the size of a modern shoebox, it is commonly agreed that the Mechanism calculated the movement of stars and planets in order to determine important dates such as Panhellenic Games and other religious observances.

A number of aspects of the Antikythera Mechanism fascinate even the non-specialist. How did people more than two thousand years ago make mechanical instruments of such precision? The bronze plates and gears were all hand-carved! How did the ancient Hellenic scientists work out a method of ‘marrying’ three very different calendars: the Egyptian (365 days per year based on the sun), the Zodiac (based on the moon) and the Star Calendar (based on the movements of the stars and planets)? How did they develop a system of such precision that in this one device, three methods of measuring time were combined into one?

Dr Elizabeth Bollen served as Master of Ceremonies, with her usual grace, while George Poulos of the Life in Australia Launch Committee spoke about the coming re-launch of this historic volume. Originally produced in 1916, it will be re-launched at the MacLaurin Hall, University of Sydney on Wednesday 9 December, at 6:00pm.

The function was a combined effort of the Nicholson Museum and the Kytherian World Heritage Fund. This sort of collaboration between Australian Hellenic community organisations and university institutions sets a pattern of cooperation of mutual benefit and is a key way Australian Hellenism can support and encourage Hellenic studies in Australian institutions.

Dr Panayiotis Diamadis

President, Australian Hellenic Educators’ Association

Secretary, Australian Hellenic Council (NSW)

Photos > Working Life

submitted by John Fardoulis on 27.11.2009

Professor Robert Hannah, lecturing to a "packed house"

...at the Nicholson Museum, Sydney University, Thursday, 26th November, 2009.

The "patrons" of www.kythera-family.net look on approvingly, on the right hand side.

Archaeoastronomy at the Nicholson.


The Nicholson Museum at The University of Sydney was packed to the rafters Thursday evening for a fascinating presentation on one of the great mysteries of ancient Hellenism: the Antikythera Mechanism. Professor Robert Hannah, (Classics, University of Otago, New Zealand) delivered a great illustrated lecture on one of the world’s earliest computing devices. Prof. Hannah combined history, science and personal experience in a fascinating evening.

In 1901, a group of sponge fishermen from Symi recovered pieces of metal and wood from an ancient shipwreck off the coast of the island of Antikythera (in the strait between Peloponnesos and Krete. It was one of the first marine archaeological excavations. Since then, many scientists have examined the 82 fragments of the Mechanism in an effort to decode its secrets. What was it for? When was it created? How was it made? A century later, it stubbornly holds on to some of its secrets.

Going by the lettering on the Mechanism, it is commonly agreed that it was created sometime in the first century BC. Consisting of 30 interlocking bronze plates and several gears encased in wood about the size of a modern shoebox, it is commonly agreed that the Mechanism calculated the movement of stars and planets in order to determine important dates such as Panhellenic Games and other religious observances.

A number of aspects of the Antikythera Mechanism fascinate even the non-specialist. How did people more than two thousand years ago make mechanical instruments of such precision? The bronze plates and gears were all hand-carved! How did the ancient Hellenic scientists work out a method of ‘marrying’ three very different calendars: the Egyptian (365 days per year based on the sun), the Zodiac (based on the moon) and the Star Calendar (based on the movements of the stars and planets)? How did they develop a system of such precision that in this one device, three methods of measuring time were combined into one?

Dr Elizabeth Bollen served as Master of Ceremonies, with her usual grace, while George Poulos of the Life in Australia Launch Committee spoke about the coming re-launch of this historic volume. Originally produced in 1916, it will be re-launched at the MacLaurin Hall, University of Sydney on Wednesday 9 December, at 6:00pm.

The function was a combined effort of the Nicholson Museum and the Kytherian World Heritage Fund. This sort of collaboration between Australian Hellenic community organisations and university institutions sets a pattern of cooperation of mutual benefit and is a key way Australian Hellenism can support and encourage Hellenic studies in Australian institutions.

Dr Panayiotis Diamadis

President, Australian Hellenic Educators’ Association

Secretary, Australian Hellenic Council (NSW)

Photos > Working Life

submitted by John Fardoulis on 27.11.2009

Professor Robert Hannah, really warming up during his lecture

...at the Nicholson Museum, Sydney University, Thursday, 26th November, 2009.

The "patrons" of www.kythera-family.net look on approvingly, on the right hand side.

[[picture:"Robert Hannah, Antikythera mechanism Lecture.jpg" ID:16951]]

Archaeoastronomy at the Nicholson.


The Nicholson Museum at The University of Sydney was packed to the rafters Thursday evening for a fascinating presentation on one of the great mysteries of ancient Hellenism: the Antikythera Mechanism. Professor Robert Hannah, (Classics, University of Otago, New Zealand) delivered a great illustrated lecture on one of the world’s earliest computing devices. Prof. Hannah combined history, science and personal experience in a fascinating evening.

In 1901, a group of sponge fishermen from Symi recovered pieces of metal and wood from an ancient shipwreck off the coast of the island of Antikythera (in the strait between Peloponnesos and Krete. It was one of the first marine archaeological excavations. Since then, many scientists have examined the 82 fragments of the Mechanism in an effort to decode its secrets. What was it for? When was it created? How was it made? A century later, it stubbornly holds on to some of its secrets.

Going by the lettering on the Mechanism, it is commonly agreed that it was created sometime in the first century BC. Consisting of 30 interlocking bronze plates and several gears encased in wood about the size of a modern shoebox, it is commonly agreed that the Mechanism calculated the movement of stars and planets in order to determine important dates such as Panhellenic Games and other religious observances.

A number of aspects of the Antikythera Mechanism fascinate even the non-specialist. How did people more than two thousand years ago make mechanical instruments of such precision? The bronze plates and gears were all hand-carved! How did the ancient Hellenic scientists work out a method of ‘marrying’ three very different calendars: the Egyptian (365 days per year based on the sun), the Zodiac (based on the moon) and the Star Calendar (based on the movements of the stars and planets)? How did they develop a system of such precision that in this one device, three methods of measuring time were combined into one?

Dr Elizabeth Bollen served as Master of Ceremonies, with her usual grace, while George Poulos of the Life in Australia Launch Committee spoke about the coming re-launch of this historic volume. Originally produced in 1916, it will be re-launched at the MacLaurin Hall, University of Sydney on Wednesday 9 December, at 6:00pm.

The function was a combined effort of the Nicholson Museum and the Kytherian World Heritage Fund. This sort of collaboration between Australian Hellenic community organisations and university institutions sets a pattern of cooperation of mutual benefit and is a key way Australian Hellenism can support and encourage Hellenic studies in Australian institutions.

Dr Panayiotis Diamadis

President, Australian Hellenic Educators’ Association

Secretary, Australian Hellenic Council (NSW)

Photos > Working Life

submitted by LAIKI BANK on 18.06.2013

BANK OF SYDNEY. Australian Headquarters.


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9.30am – 5.00pm Monday to Friday

Visit our website: http://www.banksyd.com.au/

Email BANK OF SYDNEY, here


Head Office:

Level 4, 219-223 Castlereagh St, Sydney, NSW 2000

General Enquiries

Business Hours: 9.00am and 5.00pm (Monday to Friday)

Telephone: 1300 888 700

From overseas: + 61 2 8262 9000


Proudly supporting our rich heritage

BANK OF SYDNEY

This is the preferred bank of the Kytherian Association of Australia, and the Kytherian World Heritage Fund.

"Find out why we have the reputation for working closely with customers to understand and meet their individual needs."

"Are you looking for an award winning home loan, a no-fee transaction account, a high return savings account or the ability to unlock the investment potential of your superannuation?

If you need business or commercial deposit and lending products, we’re uniquely positioned to offer highly competitive alternatives, with the added benefit of truly personal service.

If its convenience you seek, the rediATM network of over 3100 machines means your funds are always within reach.

Call 1300 888 700 and arrange to meet with one of our banking specialists, or visit http://www.banksyd.com.au and find out more.

Branch List:

Sydney – Australian Head Office & Branch

219-223 Castlereagh Street
Sydney NSW 2000

Sydney – Marrickville
Corner Marrickville and Victoria Roads
Marrickville NSW 2204

Sydney – Kogarah
5 Belgrave Street
Kogarah NSW 2217

Sydney - Kingsford
486 Anzac Parade
Kingsford NSW 2032

Sydney - Bankstown
Corner East Terrace & South Terrace
Bankstown NSW 2200

Sydney – Burwood
Shop 7 & 8, 258 Burwood Rd
Burwood NSW 2134

Sydney – Chullora
Shop 28, Chullora Market Place
355 -357 Waterloo Rd
Chullora NSW 2190

Sydney – Granville
Shop 3, 12 Railway Pde
Granville NSW 2142

Sydney – Merrylands
Shop 1, 197 Merrylands Rd
Merrylands NSW 2160

Sydney – Parramatta
Shop 3, 28 Macquarie St
Parramatta NSW 2160

Melbourne – Victorian State Office & Branch
215 Spring Street
Melbourne VIC 3000

Melbourne – Brunswick
Shop 4, 597 -601 Sydney Rd
Brunswick VIC 3056

Melbourne – Oakleigh
30 Portman Street
Oakleigh VIC 3166

Melbourne – Northcote
Northcote Central Shopping Centre
Corner High and Separation Streets
Northcote VIC 3070

Melbourne – Doncaster
700 Doncaster Road
Doncaster VIC 3108

Adelaide – Mile End
149 Henley Beach Road
Mile End SA 5031

9.30am – 5.00pm Monday to Friday

Visit our website: http://www.banksyd.com.au

Email BANK OF SYDNEY, here

Photos > Working Life

submitted by Kytherian Cultural Exchange on 12.11.2009

Bromley's model of the Antikythera mechanism on display at the Nicholson Museum, Sydney University. 2009.

“The model of the Antikythera mechanism was designed in 1989 by Dr Allan Bromley, who was an Associate Professor in the Basser Department of Computer Science, at the University of Sydney. It demonstrates the complexity of the gears and the dials of the mechanism that manoeuvred the upper cycle of the 19 year calendar, and the lower cycles used to predict solar and lunar eclipses. The recent research of Allan’s collaborator, Michael Wright, has advanced the understanding of the mechanism, beyond that inherent in this model.

The model was made by Frank A Percival, and is on loan from the estate of Dr Allan G Bromley. It has very rarely been put on public display.”

Photos > Working Life

submitted by Sydney Magazine on 10.10.2009

Tess Mallos, cookbook author & broadcaster

Inducted into the Food Hall of Fame, along with fellow Kytherian, Con Prineas.

Photo: Tess Mallos, at Mosman's Accoutrement.

Now in its 7th year, the Sydney Magazine’s annual Food Hall of Fame continues to shine a light on the often unsung heroes of the local food revolution.

This year’s inductees have been selected by the expert panel of Helen Greenwood, Jared Ingersoll, Simon Johnson, & Joanna Savill, to honour excellence in food. They looked for individuals, excluding chefs, who have been consistently at the top of their field and who have influenced the way we eat and our attitude to food. They also considered qualities such as passion, flair, commitment and longevity,

Sydney Magazine invites all Australians to celebrate the 2009 inductees’ accomplishments and thanks them for their dedication.

Tess Mallos, Cookbook author and broadcaster

Tess Mallos has found a way into the homes of most Australians. If it wasn’t as resident chef when Good Morning Australia burst onto our screens in 1981, one of her cookbooks may be on your bookshelf. She has no idea how many books she has sold but estimates the worldwide figure to be about 1.5 to 2 million. She has written 16 since her first, The Australian Book of Meat Cookery, in 1972. “She’s an unsung hero,” says Joanna Savill. ‘She has documented cuisines such as Greek and Middle Eastern that weren’t as trendy at the time.”

The daughter of Greek immigrants, Mallos grew up in Casino, west of Lismore, where her father owned the Marble Bar Café. “My mother had a huge garden, growing things like zucchini, zucchini flowers and eggplant. Our kitchen gave me a great head-start because it took Australia a long time to catch up.”

Although Mallos had aspirations to study pharmacy, her father didn’t believe in higher education for women, so she moved to Sydney and worked as a secretary before marrying John Mallos in 1955. They relocated to Delegate, in NSW’s Southern Tablelands, where they ran The Delegate Café for five years. But it wasn’t until she moved back to Sydney in 1961 that she started to make an impact on the food world. Mallos’s sister, Ellen, who was working in advertising, asked for her assistance in creating a test kitchen to help her agency pitch for the Rice Marketing Board account. A career as a freelance food consultant was born.

Mallos laughs at the difficulty she had in convincing publishers that Australians were ready for her Greek Cookbook (1976). Her 1979 book, Middle Eastern Cooking, remains her biggest mover with sales of about 650,000. “People think migration changed our table and it certainly helped. But it was Australians travelling overseas that really shaped things. It opened people up to food. They’d go to Singapore and come back with a wok.”

MaIlos has never lost her passion to educate along the way. Nor has she slowed down, last year releasing The Food of Morocco. “I am,” she says. “76 years young.

Con Prineas, fruit and vegetable importer

Con Prineas was born to be a fruit and vegetable pioneer. His parents ran the Hollywood Café and Fruit Market in Mudgee and by the time he was 17, he was travelling to Flemington Markets twice a week to buy fresh produce for the business. He loved the markets so much that he moved to them full-time, working as a buyer. ‘The markets were really different in those days,” he recalls. “There were no fork-lifts or road transport: 40,000 cases of tomatoes would arrive by rail car, be unloaded by hand, and then put on the floor by hand.”

For the past 34 years, he has been an importer — and a fruit and veg trendsetter. “Con is a legend at the markets,” says panellist Simon Johnson. “He was the first importer of dates, led the way with citrus varieties and is still breaking new ground with garlic from California.”

In the mid-70’s, Prineas was on holiday in the US when he discovered Medjool dates. “I found them in a health-food store and was instantly taken by the flavour,” he says. “I decided to bring them in, first from California and then Arizona. Same with pomegranates; I brought them in from Fresno and it stimulated farmers locally to go into it.” When Prineas started importing lychees 25 years ago, he says there was virtually no local production. He whet farmers’ appetite for production, as he did with the tangerine, and the Kent variety of mango.

Prineas tutored Sydney chefs on the ins and outs of Sydney’s markets, but rallies against the current generation. “I don’t think the quality is there in restaurants any more,” he says, pointing to mixed bags of salad as an example of sliding standards.

His latest crusade is to discourage inferior imports such as garlic. The 80-year-old, who still spends some three months a year overseas working with farmers and exporters, waxes lyrical about the garlic he has found in California, Central and South America. “The moisture content in Mexican garlic is really something.”

**************************************************
To honour the 2009 inductees into the Food Hall of Fame and to celebrate the Sydney International Food Festival, on October the 19th, a very special dinner was held at Danks Street Depot. Kirsten Galliott, the editor of the Sydney Magazine, hosted the dinner, held in association with Lindt, along with chef and owner, Jared Ingersoll. Ingersoll is a passionate advocate of organic, sustainable produce and he created an extraordinary feast of seven dishes. The evening began in Danks Street Depot before those attending journeyed up to Utopia Art Gallery and into a world of wonderful food, Krinklewood wine, and inspired conversation.

Photos > Working Life

submitted by Sydney Morning Herald on 23.09.2009

Anna Patty wins

Award for Excellence in Education Journalism

The Herald's Education Editor, Anna Patty, has won the top national award for excellence in education journalism for the second year in a row from the Australian Council of Deans of Education.

The award recognises the highest quality of education journalism in Australia.

Patty was awarded the overall orize for her anlaysis of education issues, news and Feature writing.

Her reports included issues such as the disproportionately high number of independent students to claim special provisions for the Higher School Certificate. the burgeoning homework loans on kindergarten students and deficiencies in the Rudd Government's "education revolution".

Photos > Working Life

submitted by Kytherian Historical Record on 22.09.2009

Anna Patty Education Editor at the Sydney Morning Herald,

Education Editor Sydney Morning Herald, Sydney

Anna Patty really mixed the practical with the theoretical when she completed her Master of Arts (Journalism) degree at the University of Wollongong in 1992.

Anna was a young journalist at the Illawarra Mercury when she studied at UOW, working the late “police rounds” shift from 6pm to 1.30am. She’d finish work, grab a few hours sleep, and head off to university for her Journalism studies under Professor Clem Lloyd.

Since completing her course, Anna has worked on some of the biggest newspapers in Britain and Australia, including The Times in London. She is currently The Sydney Morning Herald’s Education Editor.

“When I joined the Mercury I had an undergraduate degree, majoring in English literature, from the University of Sydney,” says Anna. “I thought the Masters degree would provide a good opportunity to expand my skills in an area directly relevant to my career.

” Anna says she was also attracted by the idea of learning from the late Professor Lloyd, who had an outstanding career as a journalist and media educator when he established the Master of Arts (Journalism) course at UOW in 1990.

“Professor Lloyd gave me an enormous amount of encouragement and inspiration,” she says. “He was an excellent teacher and had a great sense of humour, which made the classes enjoyable.

“Anna remembers being exhausted by the schedule of day-time study and night work. “But being much younger, I had enough energy to enjoy campus life and the friendships I made,” she says. “And working at night was fun because there were often opportunities to write late-breaking page one stories, and then pick the paper off the rolling printing press an hour or two later.

“Anna moved from the Mercury to The Sun-Herald and then The Daily Telegraph in Sydney before working in Athens during the 2004 Olympics and The Times, on a News Corporation exchange. She returned to Australia to work at the Telegraph's state parliament bureau.

In 2006 she was appointed Education Editor at the Herald, where she oversees the paper’s coverage of secondary and tertiary education and reports on school-based issues.

Photos > Working Life

submitted by Kytherian Publishing & Media on 24.05.2009

Diggers and Greeks

Author: Maria Hill

When Published: 2010 (March)

Publisher: University of NSW Press

Available: Through University of NSW and its distributors, including all superior bookstores in Australia

Description:320pp,
Appendices, Bibliography
Hard Back, 234x153mm,
ISBN: 9781742230146,

Price: AU$49.95Press,

http://www.mariahill.com.au

O Kosmos, Melbourne, 2-page article - pages 10 & 11 English Section, Monday, 18th May, 2009:

/download/NKEE0518_010_696712708.pdf


Little is known about the real reasons that Australia committed troops to Greece. Australian historians have, for too long, neglected the Greek and Crete campaigns and what has been written until now, has ignored the Greek side of the story. Never before has the impact of fifth-column activity on Australia’s military relationship with Greece been investigated.

This compelling book combines details of the campaigns with an account of the response of Greeks and Cretans to the Allied forces on their soil. It reveals the personal relations that developed between Australian soldiers and Greek civilians and soldiers; these were sometimes hostile but in other cases developed into friendships that lasted decades after the war had finished.

Maria Hill has trawled through archives in Athens and Canberra to show that while miscommunication between the Greek General Staff and the allied forces was frequent, the situation on the ground was far more complex. Her book also shows why the campaigns on mainland Greece and Crete compelled people to behave in altruistic ways, even when it meant placing themselves in danger. It proves that it is possible to form successful relations with people of a completely different culture in conflict situations, and that those relationships are important and should be nurtured, as they are vital to the wellbeing of all involved.

About the Author

Dr Maria Hill is a professional historian and educational consultant and the first Greek-Australian to write about the Australian campaigns in Greece and Crete. She is a former award-winning high school teacher whose publication Federation: Inclusion and Exclusion for the NSW Department of Education and Training earned her a Commonwealth Centenary
Medal
in 2003. She was also the recipient of the State and National Discovering Democracy Award in 2001, and is the author with Ian Bickerton of Contested Spaces: The Historiography
of the Arab-Israeli Conflict
(2003).

Currently she is Visiting Fellow at UNSW @ ADFA: The Australian Defence Force Academy in Canberra.

Endorsement

'Most studies of the Greek campaign have tended to gloss over the contribution of the Greeks. Maria Hill’s book adds a completely new perspective to the campaign. She tells great stories of the interaction between Greek people and Australian soldiers.’

– Professor
David Horner, Official Historian and Professor of Australian Defence History, Australian National University.

‘In Diggers and Greeks Maria Hill considers existing accounts of the Greek and Crete campaigns alongside the Greek version of events. She offers a new understanding of those campaigns, to an extent where I doubt that existing interpretations can be viewed as the
whole story any more.’

– Dr Christopher Clarke, RAAF Historian and Head of the Office of Air Force History in the Air Power Development Centre at Tuggeranong, ACT.

Diggers and Greeks

Contents


Preface

Introduction: Why are the Greek campaigns
not remembered?
1 Greece: The Second Gallipoli?
2 Australia and the Greek campaign: Trickery and Deception
3 Spies, Treachery and the Greek-Australian Military Alliance
4 The Australian campaign on the Greek mainland
5 Sheilas, Nightclubs & Boozing: the Australian soldiers in Athens
6 Diggers and Greeks: relations between Aussies and their allies
7 The Battle for Crete: why was it lost?
8 The Australian Campaign at Rethymnon, Crete
9 The Cretan People
10 Australian soldiers on Crete: Indiscipline & Larrikinism
11 Behind Enemy Lines: ‘Evaders’ & ‘Escapers’
12 Escape from Greece: Diggers and their Greek helpers
13 Australians on the run in Crete
Conclusion: Relationships in Wartime
Appendices
Bibliography

Order your copy using the order form or via the web at this special link www.unswpress.com.au/code13/p146
to receive 20% off the normal price:

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Photos > Working Life

submitted by Sydney Magazine on 04.12.2008

Ed Psaltis. Sailor.

Winner of the Sydney to Hobart Ocean Race. 1998. Ten year anniversary. 2008.

Eye of the storm

The Sydney Magzine. Issue 68, December 2008, pp. 42-51


Ten years after the most tragic events in the Sydney to Hobart’s history, the iconic race has moved on, writes Malcolm Knox


From a distance, the start of the
Rolex Sydney to Hobart Yacht Race looks as picturesque as a painters tableau, silent and graceful. Up close, it feels more like a rugby maul. There is yelling, sledging and sometimes a collision. Partly it is the combat of each yacht timing its run across the starting line; partly it is the congestion of more than 100 boats in Sydney Harbour.

The start of the 1998 race was typical. Barely had the starting gun tired at 1pm on Boxing Day than the 115-boat fleet’s biggest yacht, the 83-foot Nokia, crashed into two competitors less than halt its size:
Sword of Orion and Bright Morning Star. Accusations were shouted and red and yellow protest flags went up. The only boat ot the three to suffer moderate damage was Sword of Orion.

She was one of the best-crewed yachts in the race. Owned by Rob Kothe, she had as principal helmsman Admiral’s Cup sailor Steve Kulmar, a highly experienced yachtsman from Sydney’s northern beaches who’d sailed 16 Hobarts and five Fastnet races. Kothe and Kulmar had met for the first time that September, and Kothe had impressed the sailor with his professionalism. They started to put together an 11-strong crew that included an Englishman, Glyn Charles, 33, who had sailed in the Olympic Games and Admiral’s Cup as well as countless top-flight offsnore races; and a full-time sailing master, the “manager” of the boat, Sydney sailor Darren Senogles.

Among the crew was 24-year-old Sam Hunt, a junior member eager to learn. The professional ethic with which the Sword of Orion crew approached the race was typical of an era when the Hobart race was transforming from a “Corinthian” or amateur event into a professionalised, big-business one. Hunt embraced this fully, having wanted since he was a child to work his way into the elite ranks of offshore sailors who are known by skippers around the world and drawn on for crewing in the big "category one" races, such as the Fastnet off England, the big-budget racing off Newport, Rhode Island and Bermuda, and the Sydney to Hobart. Largely due to the rigours of the Hobart race, Australian offshore sailors are held in high esteem.

Sydney to Hobart sailors are generally versatile, able to squeeze into small boats of about 33 feet in
crews of six, or man maxis with crews of three times that, in more comfortable cabin conditions. But for the serious sailors, the three, four or five days it usually takes to sail the 1170 kilometres to Hobart are all about pushing themselves through sleep deprivation, seasickness and any number of unforeseen emergencies to race their boats quickly and safely.

Once Kothe and Kulmar had put their team together, they won the Hamilton Island regatta, a major lead-up to the race. Hunt remembers their serious team spirit mixed with family feeling. The day before the race, Kulmar and his wife, Libby, entertained crew and family at their Manly home.

Like the rest of the fleet, Sword of Orion’s crew had heard ominous if imprecise news from the pre-race weather briefing. Forecaster Ken Batt, from the Bureau of Meteorology, told the skippers there was a storm brewing further south, but due to the complex way in which different weather systems were converging, the three main models used for forecasts were in conflict. It was impossible, Batt said on the eve of the race, to know precisely how severe the storm would be. That there would be a storm was not in doubt; the only question mark was around its strength.

Once they turned out of the Heads, the crews were on a high. The 115-strong fleet tore down the east coast in the first 24 hours so fast that the leaders, Brindabella and Sayonara, were several hours ahead of race record time. The fleet was past Eden in a day — by comparison, in the tough 1984 race, the fleet had taken four days to get past the south-coast town.

The joy of high-speed racing was tempered, however, by the knowledge that the forces pulling the fleet south were connected to opposite forces awaiting them. The clockwise-spinning low pressure system forming up of the edge of Bass Strait was, like a spiral, perfectly balanced: the leg that was slinging the fleet south would soon be met by the rotation of the system pushing up the other way.

The first yacht to retire from the 1998 race was ABN Amro Challenge, skippered by former world champion lain Murray and navigated by Adrienne Cahalan, the Sydney yachtswoman who had achieved almost everything in world sailing, from 18-footers on Sydney Harbour up to Whitbread Round the World flyers. As a navigator, Cahalan was, and is, right at the cutting edge of weather forecasting technology and interpretation.

“It’s hard to imagine from today’s perspective, but we had no internet on board, none of the instant computerised information that we rely on now,” she says. “Instead, we had paper charts and a VHF radio with a fax machine pumping out weather faxes.” Not all boats had barometers.

In 1998, ABN Amro Challenge didn’t make it as far as the storm that was building down south. They were sailing near Batemans Bay late on the afternoon of the 26th when Cahalan had just picked up a weather fax, which showed the low developing in Bass Strait.
‘I was looking at it with lain, and we were saying there wasn’t much space between those isobars — it looked severe. We were flying south under a 30-knot northerly, and then, bang, the rudder sheared off.”

The jolt nearly tossed Cahalan overboard through the lifelines:
“We had to turn in to Batemans Bay and were the first boat ashore.”

Cahalan was fully aware, however, of what was developing. “Bass Strait is very shallow, and when the seas are big and the wind is blowing strong against the direction of the current, the waves can stand up and break like waves on a beach. By comparison, you can have 85-knot winds in the Atlantic Ocean and be reasonably comfortable because it’s deep water and all the waves are the same height coming from the same direction and not breaking. Boats that had retired and wanted to sail away from the worst of it sailed north, which meant getting beam-on [side-on] to the waves, which increased the chance of the boat being rolled.”

Meanwhile, during the night of the 26th and the morning of the 27th the fleet was flying. Even the older wooden yachts were well ahead of where they would usually be, and Ian Kiernan, the founder of Clean Up Australia and a veteran of a dozen Hobart’s, was aboard his vintage 37-footer, Canon Maris. Twenty-four hours into the race, Kiernan believes his boat was running second on handicap. Also up there was Winston Churchill, Richard Winning’s wooden veteran, which had been an entrant in the very first Hobart race 53 years before. There was a special affinity between Canon Maris and Winston Churchill, Kiernan recalls.
“They were treasured mates of ours, and embodied the qualities of mateship and helping each other that are the best things about this sport,” he says. “We were going like hammer and tongs to beat each other, as we would with any other boat, but it was always fair and tough competition.” As fair as it could be, of course, when father and son race against each other: on Kiernan’s boat was Jonathan Gibson, the son of John Gibson, a crewman on Winston Churchill who’d soon be involved in one of the most dramatic and tragic battles within the battle.

On a hunch, Kiernan had put some improved safety equipment on Canon Maris before the race; yet he had also lightened its weight, taking some equipment off. “I blame myself for what happened,” he says now. “I’d always carried a system of heavy line on the boat which would control the way the boat surfs when it’s going down a wave. We were lighter that year, and not getting that control. It’s fair to say that I always carry that heavier weight now.”

The turning point came with a ferocious suddenness on the race’s second afternoon. As it entered the funnel-like Bass Strait —known as “the paddock” — the fleet was met by winds from the south-west not only at the forecast 40 to 50 knots, but gusting to almost twice that strength. The sea’s surface was whipped white.

At 2pm on December 27, the boats did their “sked”, the twice-daily call-in. In a sked, the radio operator would ask each yacht for its position. It was forbidden for the yachts to give any more information — reporting weather conditions or anything else might give a competitive advantage to other yachts. But on Sword of Orion, Rob Kothe saw fit to break the rule, and for good reason: he reported that his crew was being mauled by winds gusting up to 78 knots.

The bombshell was registered by the entire fleet, all of whom were in severe winds and seas of up to 20 metres by then.

Ed Psaltis was skippering AFR Midnight Rambler, a 35-foot sloop he and Bob Thomas had bought only four weeks earlier. Psaltis was a second-generation Sydney to Hobart veteran; his father Bill was one of the best-known members of the sailing fraternity.

APR Midnight Rambler had been sucked into Bass Strait by the force of the cyclone with the rest of the fleet and was just off Gabo Island at the 2pm sked* (*slanguage for schedule(?) on December 27.

“When we heard Sword of Orion give the wind speed,” Psaltis says, “someone aboard said, ‘Hey, they’re not meant to do that.’ But I realised immediately that it was necessary for safety.”

AFR Midnight Rambler was close to both Sword of Orion and Winston Churchill, and bore the brunt of the storm. Being further southwest than much of the fleet, Psaltis decided to aim “high” into the wind, that is, in more of a southerly direction than most of the fleet, who were tempted to ease off towards New Zealand.

“It was a decision based purely on the direction of the waves coming at us,” Psaltis says. “If we’d headed away from the waves, we would have been beam-on and might have rolled. So we tried to attack the waves more directly. It wasn’t a racing decision; we weren’t racing, we were surviving. If our chances of surviving had been improved by turning around and heading north, we’d have done that.”

Having raced ahead of schedule into Bass Strait, the smaller boats were being pounded the worst. By 3pm rain was driving in like horizontal needles flung by the wind. On Canon Maris, Kiernan had had enough.
“I was off watch at the time and came up on deck,” he recalls. We were cascading down off huge waves in different directions. I said to [then the most experienced Hobart racer and navigator] Dick Hammond, ‘We’re going to roll this boat tonight.’ As a skipper, you have a huge responsibility to the people on board, and to the boat itself. I felt that even if we survived the night, we’d probably do great damage to this boat. So I said we should pull out. Dick growled, ‘Well, Ian, I agree.’"

One incident over the radio “put a dagger of icy fear in me”, Kiernan says: a mayday call from the Winston Churchill. “They were our mates, and we believed that they might all have been lost. Three of them died.” Jonathan Gibson, the member of Kiernan’s crew whose father was on Winston Churchill, would sail back to land and wait for several more hours, not knowing if his father was alive, before learning that he’d reached safety.

On Sword of Orion, the competitive drive, as strong as it was, also had to bow to nature. The crew had been fairly confident of racing on until about 3pm when wind gusts of an extraordinary 92 knots hit them and the irregular angles of the breaking waves, on average 12 metres high but up to 20 metres, put the yacht in constant danger of being rolled. When the barometer was down to 982 kpa — a massive drop in just a few hours — it flew off the wall with the force of a wave and smashed; Kothe and Kulmar decided it was time to retire from the race.
“It was a tough decision and a few of the guys were disappointed,” Hunt recalls. “It’s bad when you think of the time and effort you’ve all put in. But it’s the owner and skipper who make these decisions.”

The boom was lashed to the deck and the boat jibed ahead of the wind, not aiming for land so much as trying for the safest way to get out of the exploding low pressure system. Darren Senogles and Glyn Charles stayed on deck while the others went below to rest.

“I was lying on the middle of the floor sleeping on some sails,” Hunt says. Suddenly, at about 4pm, he was woken when everything went black and the boat was being pitched sideways down a massive wave. Then it rolled. The force of the capsizing motion bent the mast and wrapped it around the starboard side of the boat. After a few seconds the hull righted itself, but the crew below decks had been flung about like rag dolls, some sustaining minor injuries. Immediately, Hunt heard the sickening cry from above: “Man overboard.”

When the boat righted itself, Senogles discovered that Charles’ harness had broken and the Englishman was in the water with the boat drifting away from him in the wind and swell. Senogles told leading sailing writer Rob Mundle in his book Fatal Storm that he saw Charles try to swim a few strokes, labouring with an obvious injury, before losing sight of him.

“It’s self-explanatory what happened,” says Hunt, still emotional about the death of Charles. Senogles has found it hard to talk about the day, and politely declined the Sydney Magazine’s request for an interview.

After drifting on the sea for several hours more, Sword of Orion was located by a navy helicopter, and most of the surviving crew were winched up by a rescue team in the middle of the night while others stayed on board to get the boat to land. Glyn Charles’ body was never found.

There was mayhem in Bass Strait, with emergency services being swamped by calls and the navy called in. Winston Churchill had been abandoned. Three of its crew, Mike Bannister, Jim Lawler and John Dean, died during the night of the 27th when their life raft was rolled by a giant wave. John Gibson and John Stanley were the only two occupants of the raft to survive. On Business Post Naiad, one of the toughest handicappers in the race, skipper Bruce Guy died of a heart attack on board the boat and a crewman, Phil Skeggs, died on board from injuries sustained when the boat rolled. On the mid-fleet yachts there had been capsizes and rescues. In the space of a night, the fleet was decimated by nearly two-thirds.

Even for those boats that finished the race, the survival imperative overrode the racing instinct. AFR Midnight Rambler came through the terrible night of the 27th and progressed south. By the time Psaltis and his crew were alongside Tasmania, we had a lot of water down below, we were baling out constantly, we had no radio, no GPS, and were using only the compass to steer”.

Psaltis felt they were in a good position competitively, but it wasn’t until the high-frequency radio started working again off Bicheno that he realised the race had paled into insignificance.
“That was when we heard on ABC Radio that other boats had rolled, Winston Churchill had sunk and nine men were missing on its life rafts.”

Psaltis and his crew crossed the finishing line on the Derwent at dawn on December 30, tenth across the line and the winner of the race on handicap, the smallest yacht to win in a decade. Only 44 of the 115 starters got to Hobart; 24 boats were abandoned or later written off and 55 sailors were rescued. It was, says Psaltis, “the pinnacle of my career, a fantastic feeling, but mixed with terrible sadness. Jim Lawler had been a good friend of my father. When we were in Hobart, my father told me that Jim had died in the water. It was a tough conversation.”

Before 1998, in 53 years of the race, more than 35,000 sailors had contested the Sydney to Hobart. Only two had ever died from injuries sustained during the event and none had been lost overboard. The old saying about the race — wooden boats and iron men” — was confirmed by the 1998 event and enhanced by the heroics of the rescuers.

Nevertheless, changes were necessary, and 10 years on, this year’s race will carry the legacy of the 1998 event. The Cruising Yacht Club of Australia (CYCA) held its own investigation, and combined its findings with the recommendations made by the NSW Coroner, John Abernethy, to reform the race.

Matt Allen, now the commodore of the CYCA and a sailor in 20 Sydney to Hobart races, summarises the new requirements:

“Fifty percent of each crew must have done the Safety at Sea course, a theoretical and practical course involving life rafts and other safety equipment and what to do during aerial rescues. Two crew must have first-aid training. Half the crew must have completed a category one ocean race, and all must be 18 years old or over. Before the start, all skippers must attend the 8 am weather briefing. There is a lot more compulsory safety equipment, such as personal EPIRBs [Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacons], personal strobes, and approved life vests. All yachts must carry a barometer.

“On Sydney Harbour before the race, all yachts must go past the starter with their storm sails up, to show they’re in working order. Then, during the race, all yachts must report their condition when they pass Green Cape and enter Bass Strait — just to give them pause to think and consider whether they’re ready for the rigours of the crossing.”
And then there is the “Sword of Orion” rule; “When winds are above 40 knots, it is mandatory for the boat to report those winds.”

These requirements have a financial cost, as well as changing the underlying character of the race. As Vanessa Dudley, a former world champion who is also editor of Australian Yachting magazine, says; “The overall experience has changed. The Hobart used to be the race that just came around at Christmas time, but now it’s a much bigger deal.
“There are a lot more full-time professional sailors and crews involved, and the cost of racing has gone up a lot. That’s the case with the sport generally, but the Hobart always used to be a very accessible race for ordinary club boats, unsponsored, with amateur sailors. It would be a shame it the race became inaccessible for dinghy sailors, like I was when I started.”

For all the skippers in the Sydney to Hobart race, preparation are now on more of a professional footing, whether they are full-time pros or not. They assemble their crews earlier, do more racing together day and night, improve their personal fitness, prepare their on-board weight carefully, and test out their boats as rigorously as possible.
Although the past few years have been relatively calm, every Hobart race is an endurance event by its nature and all sailors know that any given year could be another 1998.

But Matt Allen says the amateur spirit hasn’t been drained from the event.
Love and War won the race on handicap two years ago, with an amateur crew and a 33-year-old boat. Of course it costs a lot to put together a line honours contender like Wild Oats XI, but you can still compete at any level. Yes, there used to be more crews that were dad and his sons and a few mates, but people take it more seriously now in a lot of respects, and that’s not a bad thing.”

In this year’s race, weather forecasting information available on the yachts makes 1998 seem like generations ago — which, in yachting terms, it is. Adrienne Cahalan will be navigating on one of the line honours favourites, Wild Oats XI. This will be her 17th Sydney to Hobart race.

Psaltis will be skippering another APR Midnight Rambler, the fourth yacht he has raced under that name. Kiernan will be sailing Canon Maris again, for the first time in the Hobart race since 1998. The reason he hasn’t done the race since then, he says, “apart from the fact that my family didn’t want me to do it again after that race”, is the need for a generous sponsor. This year, with Sanyo, he has managed that, and is racing again in a crew of six.

Hunt, now 34, achieved his dream of becoming a full-time sailor with a high reputation in all positions around the boat. Having spent most of his career doing the daredevil work on the bow, he has graduated towards the leadership positions on and around the helm. This year he will be on the brand-new 63-foot entrant Limit. But little, he says, was left to chance on Sword of Orion in 1998. Like other boats that got into trouble and lost sailors, it had one of the toughest and most gifted offshore racing crews. Yet so traumatic was that year that three of its crew decided not to race the Hobart again.

Not Hunt. “In 1999, Rob Kothe bought a new boat and called it Sword of Orion, giving it the same paint job as the old boat. Some of the guys had their doubts about that, but we went in the Hamilton Island regatta that year and raced together as a group. That was how we closed it all off.
‘A lot of good things have come out of ‘98. Ever since I was a kid, this race was one of the biggest things I could ever do in sailing. It still is. I’ve done the Fastnet and other ocean races overseas, but none of them is quite as big a test as the Hobart. And since ‘98, people have learnt to watch their safety all the time, down to the smallest detail. It’s safety first, all the time.”

Photos > Working Life

submitted by DAILY TELEGRAPH on 04.12.2008

Olive oil ice cream with homemade honeycomb

If you've never tried olive oil ice cream, you’ll be surprised by how smooth and creamy it tastes. It’s a perfect opportunity to put some of your costly olive oil to good use, just be sure to use a mild one that’s not bitter.

Serves 6-8

For the ice cream
(makes 700m1)

250ml whole milk
250 ml double cream
1-2 vanilla pods
150 g caster sugar
5 large egg yolks
150 ml top-quality mild olive oil

For the honeycomb

75 gms clear honey
140g liquid glucose
400g caster sugar
75 ml water
20q bicarbonate of soda

1 Pour the milk and double cream into a medium saucepan. Split the vanilla pod half and scrape out the seeds. Add the seeds and pod, then heat gently to just below boiling. Meanwhile, beat the sugar and egg yolks together until pale and frothy.

2 Gradually pour the hot milk and cream onto the egg mixture while whisking continuously. Pour the mixture into a clean pan and cook over a very low heat, stirring all the time with a wooden spoon. Once the mixture thickens slightly and coats the back of the spoon, remove it from the heat. Pass the custard through a fine sieve into a bowl, then whisk in the olive oil. Cool completely, then churn in an ice cream maker until firm.

3 Line a large, shallow baking tray with baking paper. Warm the honey and liquid glucose in their containers in a pan of hot water (this will make them easier to measure. Once they’ve warmed up, weigh directly into a deep, heavy-based saucepan.

4 Add the sugar and water to the pan and warm over a low heat, stirring occasionally until the sugar has dissolved. Increase the heat to medium and cook to a light, golden caramel. It should measure 150c on a sugar thermometer.

5 As soon as it gets to this temperature, turn off the heat and add the bicarbonate of soda. The mixture will start bubbling and foaming.
When it almost reaches the top of the pan, pour it onto the prepared baking tray.
Leave it to level out and cool until firm and crisp.

Crush or break the honeycomb into pieces and sprinkle them over scoops of the ice cream to serve.

Text and recipes copyright Gordon Ramsey, The Times, London.

Food prepared and photographed by The Daily Telegraph, Sydney.

Stylist: Kate Murdoch

Photographer: John Fotiadis

Photos > Working Life

submitted by DAILY TELEGRAPH on 03.12.2008

White bean soup with parsley

This soup is typical of Greek cooking uncomplicated and using plenty of vegetables, herbs and olive oil. Serve it with crusty bread, feta and olives on the side for an even heartier meal.

Serves 4-6

Ingredients

500g mixture of cooked, canned white beans (such as Iima, cannellini and butter beans)
3 tbsp olive oil
1 large onion, chopped
2 medIum carrots, peeled and diced
2 sticks of celery, diced
2 garlic doves, peeled and finely chopped
4 tomatoes, skinned and roughly chopped
1 tsp tomato puree
1 litre of chlcken or vegetable stock
Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
Large handful of parsley, leaves chopped
Drizzle of extra virgin alive oil, to serve

1 Drain and rinse the beans under a cold tap until the water runs clear. Heat the olive oil in a large saucepan. Saute the onion in the oil for 5 minutes until it has softened without browning. Add the carrots, celery and garlic and sweat for a further 5 minutes.

2 Stir in the chopped tomatoes and tomato puree, then pour in the stock. Bring to the boil, then tip in the beans. Stir and return the liquid to a simmer. Cook for 45 minutes to 1 hour, until the vegetables are cooked and the liquid has thickened slightly.

3 Check for seasoning, then stir in half the parsley. Ladle the soup into warmed bowls, then sprinkle over the remaining parsley, some freshly ground black pepper and drizzle with extra virgin olive oil to serve.

Text and recipes copyright Gordon Ramsey, The Times, London.

Food prepared and photographed by The Daily Telegraph, Sydney.

Stylist: Kate Murdoch

Photographer: John Fotiadis

Photos > Working Life

submitted by DAILY TELEGRAPH on 03.12.2008

All at sea. Why Gordon Ramsay turns to the Greek isles for inspiration

Fresh, sumple fare is Greeks' gift to world

A working stint on a yacht in the Mediterranean was a valuable lesson, writes Gordon Ramsay.

[[picture:"Ramsay Greek food 5a.jpeg" ID:16256]]

When I was 25 years old and starting out as a chef, I spent three months on a boat sailing around the Greek islands. Cooking at sea forces you into real “ingredient cooking”.

Everything has to be quick and simple to prepare, using basic, fresh ingredients such as fish, vegetables, olive oil and herbs.

This style of cooking and the reliance on quality ingredients became ingrained in me, and when I set up my first restaurant I carried on using Greek products. I have also continued going to Greece every summer.

For me, the best part of using Greek ingredients is that they are so simple. When you use high-quality ingredients you need to treat them with respect; it is vital not to overpower and overcomplicate the dishes.

This means that cooking becomes quick and
easy, but the results are full of flavour, as you’ll discover in the recipes that ensure in the next few entries.

Photos > Working Life

submitted by Victor Panaretos on 19.11.2008

Emmanuel Panaretos

Cameraman & editor for Al Jazeera TV News in Athens.


Download Athens News article here:

Manny Panaretos 2.pdf




ATΗENS ΝΕWS 26th September 2008 pp. 14-15

The point of focus is to shoot and run

The Athens News meets Emmanuel –Manny Panaretos, cameraman and editor for Al Jazeera TV News in Athens

By Mike Sweet

Mike Sweet, email


Immanuel Panaretos is not pleased. He’s Just flown in from a shoot in Holland and the airline mislaid his case of video lights again. But Manny is a good-natured, philosophical kind of guy, and after a call from the airports he’s been re-united with some of the vital tools of his trade. The Al Jazeera team are a friendly bunch, their most visible member being correspondent Barnaby Phillips. But behind Phillips is a small highly effective production team comprising of Manny, producer Juan Carlos Van Meek and office manager Alexandra Stergiopoulou. As Manny and I talked in the “AJ” office off Panepestimiou, I was amazed to hear the size of their patch.

“We’re here as a hub to access other countries,” Manny explains, in his soft unmistakable Australian twang. Scribbled locations on the office whiteboard testify to the vast geographical area the team covers: Belgrade, Pristina, Rome, Skopje, Cyprus, Turkey, Lebanon, Israel. And they are often led further a field, reflecting Al Jazeera’s elaborate global news-gathering logistics. August 2008 saw the team in the United States undertaking a three-week assignment on the race for the White House.

Panaretos was born in 1972 in Dubbo, a small country town in New South Wales, Australia. The youngest of three children, his father emigrated to Australia from Kythera in the 1950s. His mum, who was born in Australia, is the daughter of Kytherian parents. Manny’s roots are clearly a source of great pride. “I grew up in a traditional Greek fast food shop. My dad still makes hamburgers and milkshakes today,” he tells me, and confides that, despite travelling the world, and his love of Kythera, his heart will always be in Dubbo.

A graduate of the University of Canberra, where he studied economics, Manny admits to “hating every minute of it”. While still a student, he grabbed his first chance to work in television. I was fortunate to get a part-time job at Parliament House in Canberra as a sound recordist for Australia’s Channel 7.” After graduation, Manny was offered the job full time and over the next two years moved from sound to the camera, and from Channel 7 along the corridor to Channel 9. Still covering political news stories in Canberra, by 1999 Manny had itchy feet. “It was time to break free and explore the world. I knew I could get freelance work in London, so off I went.” In March 1999, the Kosovo war and the NATO intervention brought the media flooding into Kosovo. Freelancers were in high demand. “There weren’t enough cameramen available to cover the story,” Manny remembers, “I got work immediately.”

Manny’s freelance work eventually led him to the BBC, and he soon turned regular freelancing into a staff position in Manchester. For the next five years he travelled widely, shooting in locations from Thailand, when the Tsunami struck, to the US presidential elections, to the Athens Olympics in 2004. He married his Kytherian-born wife Stamatina in Kythera the same year. Living in the UK, they were able to holiday to the ancestral home often, but after five years in Britain, Manny wanted to move on once more. The constellations aligned, and the offer of a job with Al Jazeera brought Manny to Greece.

Since its launch, Doha based Al Jazeera has broken the mould of satellite television news. What’s it like to represent this unique network at the sharp end? “One thing is for certain, Al Jazeera always gets a reaction,” says Manny with a smile. “Sometimes it’s a very positive one.” People will say, “We know who you are - we like the way you tell stories differently.” Most Middle Eastern countries obviously have a liking for AJ. It’s not quite so welcomed in America, where it is not so well-known or appreciated. Manny’s work has often taken him to the most infamous conflicts of recent times like Iraq and the former Yugoslavia. So how does he react to working in such intense and dangerous situations? “Strangely enough, I’ve never feared for my own safety in a war zone. Large crowds with alcohol are for me the place where you need to watch your back. I was really scared in Belgrade this year when the US embassy was set on fire, after the Kosovo declaration of independence. It was a very hostile situation. I stole a few quick shots, the American flag burning, people throwing rocks. Then you get away as quickly as possible once you think you’ve filmed enough.”

And what of the future for Manny Panaretos? “I’ve been working for Al Jazeera for two years now. I do a job I love and I’ve come to a point where I know what I’m doing. I’m very lucky,” Manny declares, “but I promised my dad I’d be away for two years and that was back in 1999! I miss my family and the culture.” For Manny, two or three years more in Europe will be enough; “Australia will always be the light at the end of the tunnel, the point of focus.”

Photos > Working Life

submitted by SUN HERALD on 10.08.2008

Volunteer Steve Horan, who will receive a bionic eye this year.

Bionic breakthrough in sight with a (Kytherian)-Australian first.

Kytherian-Australian opthamologist Minas Coroneo.

Sun Herald, Sydney, Australia, August 10, 2008.

Louise Hall Health Reporter.


AUSTRALIA'S first bionic eye will be implanted by two Sydney researchers.

Using the same cochlear technology that allows the deaf to hear, the device aims to restore basic vision in patients with degenerative eye diseases, allowing them to walk without a cane or guide dog and differentiate between night and day.

Minas Coroneo and Vivek Chowdhury, from Sydney's Prince of Wales Hospital, say the visual prosthesis could be the first - and cheapest - to hit the world market.

Rather than "reinventing the wheel", they have adjusted the cochlear implant to allow patients to perceive light, rather than sound.

"We're using a bionic ear to make a bionic eye," Professor Coroneo said.

It should not cost much more than a cochlear device - $20,000. Instead of a microphone, it will use a camera and more electrodes.

There are 23 groups around the world racing to invent the first functional bionic eye. The ultimate goal is a permanent implant with enough resolution to enable patients to recognise faces and read large print.

But while others - including two rival Australian groups - are working on a prosthesis to be implanted inside the eye on the retina (intraocular), Professor Coroneo's and Dr Chowdhury's device puts electrodes on the outer wall of the eye (extraocular).

The two ophthalmologists, who formed the Australian Bionic Eye Foundation, say their approach is safer, reversible and won't threaten what little vision some people have.

Four overseas groups have implanted prototypes in humans but have failed to prove benefit, or have had serious complications. In 2006, Professor Coroneo and Dr Chowdhury conducted a clinical trial of 20 patients to determine which types of blindness would respond to stimulation. In many conditions causing blindness, the retina is damaged but the nerves connecting to the brain remain largely intact and can be activated by electrical stimulation. It won't work for people born blind.

So far the research has cost just $100,000 and they have asked Federal Health Minister Nicola Roxon for $10 million to begin clinical trials.

Following successful animal studies this year, the researchers have drafted three surgeons to soon implant the device in a cadaver.

By the end of the year, two or three volunteer patients, including Marrickville man Steve Horan, 30, will have a temporary device implanted.

Mr Horan was born with retinitis pigmentosa, for which there is no treatment or cure. As a child he could read a phone book and attend school. Now legally blind, he relies on his guide dog, Casey.

This prototype won't give him any more vision than he now has, but as he ages and his limited sight deteriorates to nil, the device could help. "For people who have no vision to be able to at least navigate and identify basic things would be amazing," he said.

Mr Horan will wear a pair of glasses mounted with a tiny camera that sends images to a small wearable pocket computer, which translates them to a line of 22 electrodes draped over the eye. These electrodes evoke small spots of light in the patient's visual field called phosphenes that trace the outline of solid objects. How the brain interprets the phosphenes remains unknown.

Other researchers are focusing on experiments with more sophisticated, intraocular devices that may help sight-impaired people read.

Professor Coroneo said: "We have been criticised because it was considered such a crude approach it couldn't possibly work but a device that's so sophisticated it would enable reading, we think, is not doable any time soon so we think this is a great starting point."

A functional bionic eye was identified as a key health goal at the 2020 summit in April.

"We believe, in Australia at least, that we're the closest group to getting this done in a patient," Professor Coroneo said.

Photos > Working Life

submitted by James Gavriles on 10.07.2008

Pvt. 1st class Nichole Gavriles U S A F

Nichole Gavriles, Granddaughter of James Nicholas Gavriles, Plymouth, Michigan. Age 20. Daughter of Chris Gavriles.
Stationed at Lacland Air force base in Texas. Will be moving to Malmstrom Air Force Base in Montana in September.

Photos > Working Life

submitted by BBC, Great Britain on 07.11.2007

There are 82 remaining fragments of the mechanism that contain a total of 30 gears. The largest piece contains 27 of the gears.

By Jonathan Fildes

Science and technology reporter, BBC News

The Antikythera Mechanism was explored in an episode of Unearthing Mysteries on BBC Radio 4, on 12 December, 2006.


The delicate workings at the heart of a 2,000-year-old analogue computer have been revealed by scientists.

The Antikythera Mechanism, discovered more than 100 years ago in a Roman shipwreck, was used by ancient Greeks to display astronomical cycles.

Using advanced imaging techniques, an Anglo-Greek team probed the remaining fragments of the complex geared device.

The results, published in the journal Nature, show it could have been used to predict solar and lunar eclipses.

The elaborate arrangement of bronze gears may also have displayed planetary information.

"This is as important for technology as the Acropolis is for architecture," said Professor John Seiradakis of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki in Greece, and one of the team. "It is a unique device."

However, not all experts agree with the team's interpretation of the mechanism.

Technical complexity

The remains of the device were first discovered in 1902 when archaeologist Valerios Stais noticed a heavily corroded gear wheel amongst artefacts recovered by sponge divers from a sunken Roman cargo ship.

A further 81 fragments have since been found containing a total of 30 hand-cut bronze gears. The largest fragment has 27 cogs.

Researchers believe these would have been housed in a rectangular wooden frame with two doors, covered in instructions for its use. The complete calculator would have been driven by a hand crank.

Although its origins are uncertain, the new studies of the inscriptions suggest it would have been constructed around 100-150 BC, long before such devices appear in other parts of the world.

Writing in Nature, the team says that the mechanism was "technically more complex than any known device for at least a millennium afterwards".

Although much of it is now lost, particularly from the front, what remains has given a century's worth of researchers a tantalising glimpse into the world of ancient Greek astronomy.

One of the most comprehensive studies was done by British science historian Derek Solla Price, who advanced the theory that the device was used to calculate and display celestial information.

When you see it your jaw just drops and you think, 'bloody hell that's clever'

Mike Edmunds
Cardiff University

This would have been important for timing agricultural and religious festivals. Some researchers now also believe that it could have been used for teaching or navigation.

Although Solla Price's work did much to push forward the state of knowledge about the device's functions, his interpretation of the mechanics is now largely dismissed.

A reinterpretation of the fragments by Michael Wright of Imperial College London between 2002 and 2005, for example, developed an entirely different assembly for the gears.

The new work builds on this legacy.

Eclipse function

Using bespoke non-invasive imaging systems, such as three-dimensional X-ray microfocus computed tomography, the team was able to take detailed pictures of the device and uncover new information.

The major structure they describe, like earlier studies, had a single, centrally placed dial on the front plate that showed the Greek zodiac and an Egyptian calendar on concentric scales.

On the back, two further dials displayed information about the timing of lunar cycles and eclipse patterns. Previously, the idea that the mechanism could predict eclipses had only been a hypothesis.

Other aspects are less certain, such as the exact number of cogs that would have been in the complete device. The new research suggests 37 gears could have been used.

However, what is left gives an insight into the complexity of the information the mechanism could display.

For example, the Moon sometimes moves slightly faster in the sky than at others because of the satellite's elliptic orbit.

To overcome this, the designer of the calculator used a "pin-and-slot" mechanism to connect two gear-wheels that introduced the necessary variations.

"When you see it your jaw just drops and you think: 'bloody hell, that's clever'. It's a brilliant technical design," said Professor Mike Edmunds.

Planetary display

The team was also able to decipher more of the text on the mechanism, doubling the amount of text that can now be read.

Combined with analysis of the dials, the inscriptions hint at the possibility that the Antikythera Mechanism could have also displayed planetary motions.

"Inscriptions mention the word 'Venus' and the word 'stationary' which would tend to suggest that it was looking at retrogressions of planets," said Professor Edmunds.

"In my own view, it probably displayed Venus and Mercury, but some people suggest it may display many other planets."

One of those people is Michael Wright. His reconstruction of the device, with 72 gears, suggests it may have been an orrery that displayed the motions of the five known planets of the time.

"There is a feature on the front plate that could have made provision for a bearing with a spindle, that carried motion up to a mechanism used to model the planets of Mars, Jupiter and Saturn as well," he told the BBC News website.

"That's how I see it and my reconstruction shows it works well."

Intriguingly, Mr Wright also believes the device was not a one-off.

"The designer and maker of the device knew what they wanted to achieve and they did it expertly; they made no mistakes," he said.

"To do this, it can't have been very far from their everyday stock work."

IMAGING TECHNIQUES

1.Three dimensional X-ray microfocus computed tomography: Developed by X-Tek Systems and similar to medical CAT scans, it allowed 3D images of the fragments to be reconstructed. Crucial for reading text hidden by centuries of corrosion.
2.Digital optical imaging using polynomial texture mapping: Developed by Hewlett Packard, a new method for increasing the photorealism of surface textures in digital pictures. Revealed faint surface details.
3.Digitised conventional film photography: High-quality images allowed the fragments to be studied without being handled.