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Photos > Working Life

submitted by Victor Panaretos on 29.05.2006

Kythera Close signpost. Looking back towards the city of Grafton.

The Close leads to a Property Development by Arthur Bernard. Grafton, NSW.

Kythera Park, a residential housing estate, with each block on several acres.

A typical quality residence on the Estate can be seen on the corner in the background.

The estate is on the main road leading to Nymboida.

The development was undertaken by George Peter Bernard  ( Venados ) —- Son of Peter Bernard ( Venardos ) of Karavas.

Bernard Family, Grafton. Brief history.

Adapted from Peter Tsicalas' notes, held in repository, Clarence River Historical Society, Grafton

Panagiotis Athanasios Venardos, (Peter Arthur Bernard), b. Aug 1900 Karavas, son of Arthur Emmanuel, landed Mar 1911 with father and brother. Spent lyr Allora, 2yrs Esk, lyr Sydney, until going into business with father at Cessnock. Remained for 4yrs until moving to Katoomba for 1-2 yrs thence Grafton early 1931. Married Violet White (b. 1911 NZ) 1931 Paddington. Arthur born 30/6/33 Grafton, George b. 20/10/36 Grafton.

Peter Bernard owned the Popular Cafe,75 Prince Street

He is believed to be related to the Aroneys of Murbah. His son Arthur still lives in Grafton.  George is enjoying annual trips to Kythera with his wife in retirement.


Peters' son George retired to the Gold Coast. His married sister Kerani is living in Marybourgh Qld.

 

Peters Popular Cafe in Prince Street was purchased by son George  on 3 /7/ 1961 closed the doors 16 /9 /1968 when he established the Gold Fish Bowl coffee shop  in Parkway arcade ( built by the brothers ) Prince Street Grafton until 25 /1/ 1971.

 

The brothers in partnership then  built, and George managed  the Camden Lodge Motel in Villiars Street Grafton.


Peter Bernard was Deanna Psaros’s (Inverell) Nono, in fact she was christened at the Cafe. Subsequentley he was the best man at her wedding to Peter McCarthy in Inverell in 1962. The McCarthys moved to Grafton in 1964, at which time Peter had retired and the shop was run by his sons George and Arthur.

Photos > Working Life

submitted by Victor Panaretos on 29.05.2006

Kythera Close signpost, leading to a Property Development by Arthur Bernard. Grafton, NSW.

Kythera Park, a residential housing estate, with each block on several acres.

A typical quality residence on the Estate can be seen in the background, on the opposite corner.

The estate is on the main road leading to Nymboida.

The development was undertaken by Arthur Bernard, (Vernados), son of Peter Bernard (Karavas).

Bernard Family, Grafton. Brief history.

Adapted from Peter Tsicalas' notes, held in repository, Clarence River Historical Society, Grafton

Panagiotis Athanasios Venardos, (Peter Arthur Bernard), b. Aug 1900 Karavas, son of Arthur Emmanuel, landed Mar 1911 with father and brother. Spent lyr Allora, 2yrs Esk, lyr Sydney, until going into business with father at Cessnock. Remained for 4yrs until moving to Katoomba for 1-2 yrs thence Grafton early 1931. Married Violet White (b. 1911 NZ) 1931 Paddington. Arthur born 30/6/33 Grafton, George b. 10/10/36 Grafton.

Peter Bernard owned the Popular Cafe,75 Prince Street

He is believed to be related to the Aroneys of Murbah. His son Arthur still lives in Grafton and owns and operates The Abbey Motor Inn.

Peters' brother George retired to the Gold Coast. Their married sister lives at Sawtell.

Peter Bernard was Deanna Psaros’s (Inverell) Nono, in fact she was christened at the Cafe. Subsequentley he was the best man at her wedding to Peter McCarthy in Inverell in 1962. The McCarthys moved to Grafton in 1964, at which time Peter had retired and the shop was run by his sons George and Arthur.

Photos > Working Life

submitted by Victor Panaretos on 29.05.2006

Property Development. Grafton NSW.

Kythera Park, a residential housing estate, with each block on several acres.

The estate is on the main road leading to Nymboida.

The development was undertaken by Arthur Bernard, (Vernados), son of Peter Bernard (Karavas).

Bernard Family, Grafton. Brief history.

Adapted from Peter Tsicalas' notes, held in repository, Clarence River Historical Society, Grafton

Panagiotis Athanasios Venardos, (Peter Arthur Bernard), b. Aug 1900 Karavas, son of Arthur Emmanuel, landed Mar 1911 with father and brother. Spent lyr Allora, 2yrs Esk, lyr Sydney, until going into business with father at Cessnock. Remained for 4yrs until moving to Katoomba for 1-2 yrs thence Grafton early 1931. Married Violet White (b. 1911 NZ) 1931 Paddington. Arthur born 30/6/33 Grafton, George b. 10/10/36 Grafton.

Peter Bernard owned the Popular Cafe,75 Prince Street

He is believed to be related to the Aroneys of Murbah. His son Arthur still lives in Grafton and owns and operates The Abbey Motor Inn.

Peters' brother George retired to the Gold Coast. Their married sister lives at Sawtell.

Peter Bernard was Deanna Psaros’s (Inverell) Nono, in fact she was christened at the Cafe. Subsequentley he was the best man at her wedding to Peter McCarthy in Inverell in 1962. The McCarthys moved to Grafton in 1964, at which time Peter had retired and the shop was run by his sons George and Arthur.

Photos > Working Life

submitted by Victor Panaretos on 05.05.2006

World War II. S Sklavos. 1945.

WEWAK AREA, NEW GUINEA, 1945-06-17. STRETCHER BEARERS CARRYING OUT CASUALTIES DURING THE ATTACK BY B COMPANY, 2/8 INFANTRY BATTALION AGAINST HILL 2.
IDENTIFIED PERSONNEL ARE:-
PTE P.C. SKLAVOS (1);
PTE M.S. ROBERTSON (5).

Photographic ID No: 093155
Australian War Memorial.

Photos > Working Life

submitted by Victor Panaretos on 05.05.2006

World War II. S. Sklavos.

Lae, New Guinea. 3 November 1944. Swimmers homeward bound in the jeep after an enjoyable day at Malahang Beach. Left to right: Signaller (Sig) G. Dalton of Hobart, Tas; S. Sklavos of Sydney, NSW; M. Dalton of Hobart, Tas; and in front seat J. Johnson of Brisbane, Qld; Sig G. Sweeney of Hobart, Tas; Private P. Becker of Sydney, NSW.

Photo ID No: 017785
Australian War Memorial.

Photos > Working Life

submitted by George Sophios on 26.11.2005

Professor Harry Lourandos. Eminent archaeological author.

CONTINENT OF HUNTER-GATHERERS: NEW PERSPECTIVES IN AUSTRALIAN PREHISTORY

Harry Lourandos
1997

Cambridge University Press: Melbourne
ISBN 0521359465
xvii+390pp; 103 figs; 5 tables

Reviewed by Ian McNiven

[Originally published in Australian Archaeology 45:66-67]

The scene was the Staff Club at the University of Queensland. A group of post-grad archaeology students was having a drink with Harry Lourandos. Suddenly, Harry pulls out this letter from CUP inviting him to write a text on Australian archaeology. He wanted to know what we thought. After a few comments such as 'get real' and 'whose shout?', Harry eventually left while we stayed on and celebrated. It's been nearly a decade since that night and Harry Lourandos's book has now arrived!

Fifteen years have passed since the last broadscale, academic text on the archaeology of indigenous Australia was published. While Josephine Flood's Archaeology of the Dreamtime has kept the general public and students (and quite a few academics I may add) up to date with major findings since Peter White and Jim O'Connell's 1982 text, a desperate need has remained for a higher level, scholarly synthesis of Autralian archaeology. In Continent of Hunter-Gatherers, Lourandos not only has fulfilled this need admirably, he has produced the first synthesis of Australian archaeology embedded explicitly within broader theoretical debates on the nature and evolution of hunter-gatherer societies. While scope for such a synthesis has been aided by major advances over the last two decades in our archaeological knowledge base, the book owes most of its thrust to Lourandos's social evolutionary views on the complexity and dynamism of Aboriginal Australia. His theoretically challenging views were aired widely in the 1980s, and became encapsulated in the so-called 'great intensification debate'. Continent of Hunter-Gatherers is much more than an empirical update of that debate: it expands Lourandos's socio-demographic model of cultural change and elaborately integrates environmental and social explanatory frameworks through more explicit reference to differing chronological and spatial scales of analysis.

The book is divided into three major sections: a theoretical introduction to hunter-gatherer studies and perspectives on Aboriginal Australians (Chapters 1 and 2), detailed regional overviews of sites and archaeological data (Chapters 3-7), and syntheses of major substantive and theoretical issues of local and international interest (Chapters 8-10). It is the first and last sections of the book which will have the most enduring impact on the discipline. Chpater 1 elaborates Lourandos's theoretical views on archaeological approaches to defining and explaining long- and short-term changes in hunter-gatherer societies from environmental and socio-cultural perspectives. Again, the important point is made that our models of past cultural change are tied directly to historical perceptions of the complexity, structure and dynamism of Aboriginal society. Lourandos sees the static, simplistic and somewhat environmentally deterministic paradigm which has dominated Australian archaeology as reflecting deep-seated 19th century colonialist constructions of Aboriginal primitivism. While I agree, couching the argument within the growing body of post-colonial literature, and particularly representational theory, would have strengthened the argument. Chapter 2 is a useful re-evaluation of the variability and organisational complexity of Aboriginal Australians in historic times, emphasising the effects of social dynamics on economic intensification.

Chapters 3-7 represent the substantive core of the book. Following an overview of evidence for earliest colonisation (Chapter 3), overviews of archaeological sites for the tropical north (Chapter 4), arid and semiarid zones (Chapter 5), and temperate south (Chapter 6) and Tasmania (Chapter 7) are presented. The regional chapters are divided into Pleistocene and Holocene periods, each beginning with a short summary of major environmental trends followed by critical summaries of major sites and developmental trends within sub-regions. The regional approach provided more scope for examining long-term evolutionary trends, particularly cultural responses to changes in bioproduction. While substantive chapters tended to be comprehensive and up-to-date, I was surprised to see no reference to Luke Godwin's and Kierin Hotchin's PhD theses, which represent major regional studies. Furthermore, the time has long since passed where a synthesis of Australian archaeology can ignore unpublished consulting reports. Aboriginal Affairs Victoria has on file nearly 1000 reports alone! In terms of dividing chapters into the Pleistocene and the Holocene, I am not the first to note that the use of these broad geological time periods to frame cultural change is fast becoming conceptually redundant.

The final three synthesis chapters vary considerably in quality. I found Chapter 8, which focused on typological trends in stone implements, somewhat outdated. Her Lourandos missed an opportunity to show how Australian technological analyses, such as Hiscock's work in the Hunter Valley and at Lawn Hill, have provided significant insights for understanding inter-assemblage variation. The culture historical flavour of the chapter seemed at odds with the rest of the text. In marked contrast, in Chapters 9 (Interpretations) and 10 (Concluding Perspectives), Lourandos skillfully pulls together previous chapters in a synthesis of major substantive and theoretical issues that will influence Australian archaeological research agendas well into next century. A key issue is why no simple correlation exists between changes in bioproduction and changes in population density and social complexity. It is difficult to disagree with Lourandos's theoretical stance that human-environmental interaction is mediated by socio-cultural factors. The suggestion that these factors can themselves be the product of long-term, and perhaps even regionally specific, historical trajectories provides enormous scope for future archaeological research in Australia.

The book is well written and highly readable, with good use made of figures and tables. The poor quality of some figures was surprising, however, as was the new location for Lake Keilambete (Fig. 6.10). The excellent flow of the book owes much to Lourandos's deep understanding of archaeological and anthropological theory, which has allowed him to construct a cogent, stimulating and challenging view of Australia's Aboriginal past. Continent of Hunter-Gatherers marks a maturing of Australian archaeology, where old research agendas built around prospecting for Pleistocene dates has given way tomore theoretically challenging explorations of hunter-gatherer cultural dynamics. Despite the book's explicit theoretical bent, the broad coverage given to basic site data and general issues of Australian archaeology will ensure its place as compulsory reading not only for Australian archaeologists (both students and professionals), but for all those interested in Aboriginal studies.

See also:

Australian Archaeological Association Inc website

http://www.australianarchaeologicalassociation.com.au

Photos > Working Life

submitted by Dean Coroneos on 06.10.2005

Archie Kalikerinos. Medical Visonary.

Archie Kalokerinos, High Achiever. With links to stories and photographs pertaining to various aspects of his life

Review of the book, Medical Pioneer of the Twentieth Century, including details about where to purchase it

On Thursday 4th October, 2005, The Sydney Morning Herald, under the title Good gut instincts win pair a Nobel, published the following:

"Two Australian researchers who turned medicine upside down by showing that peptic ulcers and gastritis could be caused by a bacterium, have been awarded the 2005 Nobel Prize for physiology or medicine.

One Barry Marshall, proved his point to doubters by swallowing a glassful of the bacteria.

About a week later he started vomiting and suffering other painful symptoms of gastritis.

Before the discovery in 1982 that Helicobacter pylori played a role in gastritis and peptic ulcers, stress and lifestyle were considered the main cause of peptic ulcer disease.....

Announcing the prize yesterday, the Nobel Assembly, said Robin Warren, 68, a pathologist from Perth, "observed small curved bacteria colonising the lower part of the stomach in about 50% of patients from which biopsies had been taken. He made the crucial observation that signs of inflammation were always present in the gastric mucosa close to where the bacteria were seen".

Professor Marshall, 54, became interested in Dr Warren's findings, and together they initiated a study of biopsies from 100 patients. "After several attempts, Marshall succeeded in cultivating a hitherto unknown bacterial species - later denoted Helocbacter pylori - from several of these biopsies", the Assembly said....".

More information, see:

http://nobelprize.org/

http://www.bacteriaalive.com/discoveryofstomachulcerbacteria/


The parrallels with Kalokerinos's research and life work are obvious.

Acute observation, running counter to the established medical paradigm, leading to antipathy from the "medical establishment".

On Wednesday 5th October, the day after the article appeared in the Sydney Morning Herald, the following letter, appeared in the Letters Page, page 14.

"Robin Warren and Barry Marshall, who have just been awarded a Nobel Prize in medicine (Good gut instincts win pair a Nobel, Herald, October 4), have, at long last, received what should have been given to them many years ago.

They achieved something that changed the practice of medicine in a dramatic and far-reaching manner. It was a triumph of simple, but careful observation and common sense, over complex technology. Every student should be told the story of this historical event on entering medical school - and be reminded of it frequently.

I have many reasons to respect and admire these men.

Australia should be proud of them.

Dr A Kalokerinos, Cooranbong.

Photos > Working Life

submitted by Association Of Kytherian University Professors on 27.11.2008

Theodore Sougiannis

PERSONAL:

Born: Athens, Greece, September 27, 1954.
United States Citizen.

WORK ADDRESS:

Department of Accountancy
College of Commerce and Business Administration
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
360 Wohlers Hall
1206 South Sixth Street
Champaign, IL 61820
(217) 244-0555
e-mail address: sougiani@uiuc.edu

HOME ADDRESS:

2505 Bedford Drive
Champaign, IL 61820.
(217) 398-8463

Curriculum Vita

September 2005

EDUCATION:


Ph.D. Business Administration (Accounting) - University of California at Berkeley, 1990.
Masters in Business Administration (Finance) - York University, Toronto, 1986.
Master of Arts (Economics) - York University, Toronto, 1984.
Bachelor of Business Administration (Accounting) - University of Pireaus, Greece, 1977.

DISSERTATION:

"The Valuation of R&D Firms and the Accounting Rules for R&D Costs."

JOURNAL ARTICLES:

"R&D Reporting Biases and their Consequences," with Baruch Lev and Bharat Sarath.
Forthcoming at Contemporary Accounting Research.
"The Accrual Effect on Future Earnings," with Konan Chan and Narasimhan Jegadeesh. [2004]
Review of Quantitative Finance and Accounting, 22; 97-121.
"Do Financial Analysts Get Intangibles?" with Eli Amir and Baruch Lev. [2003] European
Accounting Review, 12:4, 635-659.
"Greece in the European Union: policy lessons from two decades of membership," with Elisabeth
Oltheten and George Pinteris. [Winter 2003] The Quarterly Review of Economics and
Finance, 43; 774-806.
"Using Forecasts of Earnings to Simultaneously Estimate Growth and the Rate of Return on Equity
Investment," with Peter Easton, Gary Taylor, and Pervin Shroff. [June 2002] Journal of
Accounting Research, 40; 657-676.
"The Stock Market Valuation of Research and Development Expenditures," with Louis Chan and
Josef Lakonishok). NBER working Paper 7223. [Dec 2001] Journal of Finance, 56; 2431-2456.
"The Accuracy and Bias of Equity Values Inferred from Analysts' Earnings Forecasts," with Takashi
Yaekura). [Fall 2001] Journal of Accounting, Auditing and Finance, 16; 331-362.
"Analysts' Interpretation and Investors' Valuation of Tax Carryforwards," with Eli Amir. [Spring
1999] Contemporary Accounting Research, 16; 1-33.
"Penetrating the Book-to-Market Black Box: The R&D Effect," with Baruch Lev. [April/May 1999]
Journal of Business Finance and Accounting, 26; 419-449.
"A comparison of Dividend, Cash Flow, and Earnings Approaches to Equity Valuation," with
Stephen Penman. [Fall 1998] Contemporary Accounting Research, 15; 343-383. One of the
"Top Ten All Time Hits" in http://papers.ssrn.com/
"The Cyclical Valuation of Catastrophic Losses in the Insurance Industry," [1997] Journal of
Financial Statement Analysis, 3; 32-43.
"The Dividend Displacement Property and the Substitution of Anticipated Earnings for Dividends in
Equity Valuation," with Stephen Penman. [1997] The Accounting Review, 72; 1-21.
"Recent Advances in Inflation Accounting and their Implications for the Multinational Corporation,"
[September/October 1997] Corporate Finance Review, 2; 12-19.
"The Capitalization, Amortization, and Value Relevance of R&D," with Baruch Lev. [1996] Journal
of Accounting and Economics 21; 107-138. Best Paper Award in 1997 from the Financial
Reporting Section of the American Accounting Association.
"The Accounting Based Valuation of Corporate R&D," [1994] The Accounting Review, 69; 44-68.
"Causality Between Money and the Index of Industrial Production in the Greek Economy," [1985]
Spoudai: Quarterly Economic Journal (Greece) 35; 94-103.

DISCUSSIONS AND CHAPTERS IN BOOKS

Discussion: “Market Reaction to Proposed Changes in Accounting for Purchased Research and
Development in R&D Intensive Industries” [Fall 2004] Journal of Accounting, Auditing
and Finance, 19:4; 429-433.
“R&D and Intangibles” Blackwell Encyclopedia of Accounting, 2nd Edition (forthcoming).
"The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 as a Response to Corporate Scandals: Analysis, Criticism and
Implications for the International Market," (in Greek) with Elisabeth Oltheten. [March
2004]. Economic Mailman (Greek economic periodical).
OTHER WORKING PAPERS:
"The Relevance of Quantifiable Auditor Qualifications in the Valuation of IPOs," with Dimitrios
Ghikas and Afroditi Papadaki. Submitted to the European Accounting Review.
"The Impairment of Auditor Credibility: Stock Market Evidence from the Enron-Andersen
Saga," with Rajib Doogar and Hong Xie. Under revision for resubmission to the Journal
of Accounting Research.
"Liability/Equity Classification Decisions and Shareholder Valuation," with Tom Linsmeier and
Cathy Shakespeare. Being prepared for submission to the Accounting Review.
“Accounting Estimates: Pervasive, Yet of Questionable Usefulness” with Baruch Lev and Siyi Li.
Under revision.
“An Evaluation of SFAS No. 130 Comprehensive Income Disclosures,” with Dennis Chambers,
Tom Linsmeier and Cathy Shakespeare. Under revision for resubmission to the Review of
Accounting Studies. Presented at the 2005 American Accounting Association meetings.
"Do Accounting Earnings or Free Cash Flows Provide a Better Estimate of a Stock's Value?"
with James Gentry and David Whitford.

RESEARCH IN PROGRESS:

"The Stock Market Valuation of Capital Expenditures," with Louis Chan and Josef Lakonishok.
“An Evaluation of the Use of a Second Auditor in IPOs?" with Dimitrios Ghikas.
“The Information Content and Pricing of Cash Flow and Accrual Changes,” with Ying Cao,
James Myers and Linda Myers.
“Predicting the Return on Operating Assets,” with Louis Chan and Josef Lakonishok.
“Detecting Earnings Smoothing and Earnings Management,” with Siyi Li and Joshua Ronen.

CASE STUDIES:

"Titan Cement Company S.A." 2001, (with Elisabeth Oltheten). The Athens Laboratory of Business
Administration (ALBA).

REFEREED CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS:

"R&D Reporting Biases and their Consequences” presented at the Multinational Finance Society
conference, July 2005.
“An Evaluation of SFAS No. 130 Comprehensive Income Disclosures,” presented at the 2005
American Accounting Association meetings.
“Accounting Estimates: Pervasive, Yet of Questionable Usefulness” presented at the London
Business School 2004 summer conference on financial reporting, the 2004 joint Columbia
University-NYU accounting research conference, and the 2004 Washington University –
Saint Louis accounting research mini-conference.
"Liability/Equity Classification Decisions and Shareholder Valuation," European Accounting
Association (EAA) annual meetings, Athens, Greece, April 2001.
"The Accuracy and Bias of Equity Values Inferred from Analysts' Earnings Forecasts." Journal of
Accounting, Auditing and Finance conference, New Jersey, August 2000. Sixteenth Annual
International Symposium on Forecasting, Istanbul, Turkey, June 1996.
"Estimating the Cost of Capital Using Forecasts of Profitability? (now titled "Using Forecasts of
Earnings to Simultaneously Estimate Growth and the Rate of Return on Equity
Investment," European Financial Management Association (EFMA) annual meetings,
Athens, Greece, June 2000.
"What Value Analysts?" (now titled "Do Financial Analysts Get Intangibles?"), American
Accounting Association annual meetings, San Diego, California, 1999. Canadian Academic
Accounting Association annual meetings, Halifax, Nova Scotia, 2000.
"R&D Reporting Biases and their Consequences". Second Intangibles Conference, NYU, New
York, May 1999.
"The Stock Market Valuation of Research and Development Expenditures". National Bureau of
Economic Research (NBER), Behavioral Finance Meetings, University of Chicago, October
1998. Accounting Association of Australia and New Zealand annual conference, Cairns,
Australia, July 1999. American Accounting Association annual meetings, San Diego,
California, 1999. Third Annual Conference on Contemporary Issues in Capital Markets,
University of Cyprus, September 2000.
"Analysts' Interpretation and Investors' Valuation of Tax Carryforwards". Contemporary Accounting
Research conference, Toronto, Canada, November 1997. Hong Kong University of Science
and technology, 1999 Summer Symposium on Accounting Research. Hong Kong, June
1999.
"Penetrating the Book-to-Market Black Box: The R&D Effect". Third International Conference on
Contemporary Accounting Issues, Taipei, Taiwan, July 1996.
"A Comparison of Dividend, Cash Flow, and Earnings Approaches to Equity Valuation". American
Accounting Association annual meetings, Orlando, Florida, August 1995. Midwest Finance
Association annual meetings, Cincinnati, Ohio, March 1995. The 37th annual conference of
the Western Social Science Association (Finance & Business), Oakland, California, April
1995. The European Finance Association meetings, Milan, Italy, August 1995.
"The Substitution of Anticipated Earnings for Dividends in Equity Valuation". American
Accounting Association annual meetings, San Francisco, California 1993.
"The Capitalization, Amortization, and Value Relevance of R&D". American Accounting
Association annual meetings, Washington, D.C., 1992.
"The Accounting Based Valuation of Corporate R&D", Third Annual Conference on Financial
Economics and Accounting, New York, 1992.

OTHER CONFERENCE PARTICIPATION:

Invited Participant, London Business School and Journal of Accounting Research, Conference on
International Financial Reporting Standards, London, July 2005.
Discussant, Multinational Finance Society conference, Athens, Greece, July 2005.
Invited Participant, Federation of Schools of Accounting and Delloitte and Touche conference on,
Risk Management in a Sarbanes-Oxley Era, Chicago, 2005.
Invited Speaker, Bocconi University 2004 conference on “Sustainability, Financial Performance,
and Market Valuation,” Milan, Italy. Theme of speech: “The Market Value of R&D: An
Application to Telecommunication Companies.”
Invited Discussant, International Journal of Accounting and Athens University of Economics and
Business, Conference in International Accounting issues, Athens-Greece, 2004.
Invited Participant, Contemporary Accounting Research Conference, Montreal, Canada, 2004.
Invited Participant, Review of Accounting Studies Conference, University of Notre Dame, 2004.
Invited Discussant, Journal of Accounting, Auditing and Finance Conference, Stern School of
Business, New York University, 2004.
Invited Participant, Contemporary Accounting Research Conference, Toronto, Canada, 2003.
Invited Participant, KPMG Faculty Symposium, Chicago, August 2002.
Invited Participant, KPMG & UIUC Business Measurement Research Program Workshop, San
Antonio, August 2002.
Invited Participant, Financial Statement Analysis Conference, University of Southern California,
February 2002.
Invited Participant, Contemporary Accounting Research Conference, Waterloo, Canada, 2003.
Member of the scientific committee, European Accounting Association (EAA) annual meetings,
Athens, Greece, April 2001.
Member of the organizing committee, Accounting and Auditing in the New Economy, KPMG LLP
sponsored presentation, Athens, Greece, December 2000.
Arthur Andersen conference on Common Accounting Standards in the European Union, The Effects
on the Capital Market and the Hellenic Enterprises, Athens, Greece, December 2000.
Invited Participant, Burton Workshop, Columbia University, October 2000. Presented "The
Incremental Value of Analysts' Earnings Forecasts in Explaining Stock Returns."
Panelist, Third Annual Conference On Contemporary Issues in Capital Markets, University of
Cyprus, September 2000.
Session Chair, Third Annual Conference On Contemporary Issues in Capital Markets, University of
Cyprus, September 2000.
Session Chair, European Financial Management Association (EFMA) annual meetings, Athens,
Greece, June 2000.
Discussant, European Financial Management Association (EFMA) annual meetings, Athens,
Greece, June 2000.
Member of the organizing committee, European Financial Management Association (EFMA)
annual meetings, Athens, Greece, June 2000.
Discussant, Accounting Association of Australia and New Zealand annual conference, Cairns,
Australia, July 1999.
Journal of Accounting Research Conference, University of Chicago, May 1998.
AAA\FASB Financial Reporting Research Conference, University of Michigan, December 1995.
AAA\FASB Financial Reporting Research Conference, Northwestern University, December 1994.
BIG-10 Doctoral Consortium, Minneapolis, MN., May 1994.
AAA/Deloitte & Touche Trueblood Seminar for Professors, Scottsdale, AZ., January 1994.
AAA/FASB Financial Reporting Research Conference, Harvard University, December 1992.
AAA New Faculty Consortium, St. Charles, IL., February 1991.
PAC-10 Doctoral Consortium, Tempe, AZ., February 1990.
AAA Doctoral Consortium, Lake Tahoe, CA., June 1988.

RESEARCH AND TEACHING AWARDS:

KPMG Peat Marwick Fellow, University of Illinois, 2001 -.
Raymond A. Hoffman faculty award, Department of accountancy, University of Illinois, 2002.
Weldon Powell Fellow, University of Illinois, 1998 - 2001.
Athens Laboratory of Business Administration (ALBA). Outstanding Research Award - 2001.
University of Illinois-1999 St. Louis Accountancy Committee Excellence in Teaching Award.
American Accounting Association, Financial Reporting Section, Best Paper Award in 1997 for
"The Capitalization, Amortization, and Value Relevance of R&D", [1996] Journal of
Accounting and Economics 21; 107-138, (with Baruch Lev).
University of Illinois-Incomplete List of Teachers Ranked as Excellent by their Students: Spring
1997, Fall 1997, Spring 1998, and Spring 1999.
University of Illinois Research Board Awards in 1991, 1992, 1998 and 1999.
University of Illinois Center for International Education and Research in Accounting Award, 1998.
University of Illinois Center for International Business Education and Research Awards in 1996 and
1999.
University of Illinois Bureau of Economic and Business Research Award, 1994.
Ernst & Young Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship, 1989 - 1990.
Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada Doctoral Fellowship, 1987 - 1989.
Drum Scholarship and Flood Fellowship, University of California at Berkeley, 1986 - 1987.
Graduate Scholarship, York University, 1982-1986
.
TEACHING AND PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE:

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Professor of Accountancy, College of Business.
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Associate Professor of Accountancy, College of
Business. 1998 – 2004.
Athens Laboratory of Business Administration (ALBA). Visiting Professor of Accounting. 2000-
2001. Course taught: Core MBA course in Financial Reporting and Taxation, Core MBA
course in Management Accounting.
University of Warsaw. International Management Center. Visiting Professor of Accounting. October
1999 and 2000, and January 2002. Course taught: Core MBA course in Financial
Accounting.
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Assistant Professor of Accountancy, College of
Business. 1990 - 1998.
Courses taught:
Undergraduate program: Intermediate Financial Accounting,
Accounting Institutions and Regulation
Masters program: Methods and Practices in Professional Accounting Research,
Risk Management and Accounting Measurement
Doctoral program: Ph.D. Seminar in Financial Economics Applied to
Accounting
University of California at Berkeley, Haas School of Business. Visiting Assistant Professor, Spring
1996.
Courses taught: Managerial Accounting.
University of California at Berkeley. Instructor, Haas School of Business. 1989 - 1990.
Courses taught: Introduction to Managerial Accounting.
University of California at Berkeley. Research Assistant. 1987-1989.
York University, Toronto. Instructor, Department of Economics. 1984 - 1986.
Courses taught: Introduction to Statistics,
Microeconomic Principles,
Macroeconomic Principles.
York University, Toronto. Teaching/Research Assistant. 1982-1984.
Texaco, Athens, Greece. Accountant. 1979 - 1981. Internal Auditing, inventory accounting, and
inter-company accounting.

BUSINESS PRESS CITATIONS:

Research results from various studies have been cited in business press publications such as The
Economist, Fortune, Business Week, Bloomberg Personal Finance, Smart Money Magazine,
CFO Magazine, and The New York Times.

SERVICE:

EDITORIAL:


Board Member, The Accounting Review
Contemporary Accounting Research,
International Journal of Accounting
Journal of Accounting, Auditing and Finance
Journal of Accounting and Public Policy
Review of Accounting Studies
Ad Hoc Reviewer, The Accounting Review,
Accounting Horizons,
Advances in International Accounting,
Journal of Accounting Research,
Journal of Accounting Literature,
Contemporary Accounting Research,
Journal of Accounting, Auditing and Finance,
Journal of Accounting and Public Policy,
Journal of Business,
Journal of Finance,
Journal of Financial Research,
Journal of Multinational Financial Management,
American Accounting Association annual and regional meetings,
Canadian Accounting Association annual meetings,
European Accounting Association annual meetings,
The European Accounting Review
European Financial Management
European Financial Management Association annual meetings,
Financial Management,
International Journal of Accounting,
Management Science,
Pacific Accounting Review,
Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance
Review of Accounting Studies,
Review of Accounting and Finance,
Review of Financial Studies,
Review of Industrial Organization,
Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada,
University of Illinois Research Board,
University of Illinois Auditing Symposium,
University of Illinois Tax Symposium,
University of Southern California -AAA/KPMG International
Research Conference
Reviewer for the textbook, Financial Statement Analysis and
Security Valuation by Stephen Penman, McGraw-Hill/Irwin, 2001.

DISSERTATION COMMITTEES:

Konan Chan (UIUC - Department of Finance)
Jong-Hag Choi (Director of Research)
Joe Comprix (Director of Research)
Keejae Hong
Adel Ibrahim (Chairman)
Tony Kang (Chairman)
Moonchul Kim
Sangwoo Lee (UIUC – Department of Finance)
Taehee Lee
Deanna Lee (Director of Research)
Karl Muller
Michael Oleson
Gyung Paik (Chairman)
Cathy Shakespeare
Vernon Richardson
Dean Smith (External member - University of Waterloo, Canada)
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COLLEGE/DEPARTMENT COMMITTEES:

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CIBER Evaluation Committee
Strategic planning - People Task Force
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PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS:

American Accounting Association
American Finance Association
Canadian Academic Accounting Association

PRESENTATIONS AT ACADEMIC INSTITUTIONS:

Boston University, 2004.
Columbia University, 1994, 2000.
Florida State University, 2003.
George Washington University, 1997.
Harvard University, 1990, 1997.
Indiana University, 1994.
INSEAD, 2000.
London Business School 2000.
MIT, 1990.
Michigan State University, 1998.
New York University, 1990.
Northwestern University, 1997.
Ohio State University, 1995, 1998.
Penn State University, 1995.
Purdue University, 1999.
SUNY at Buffalo, 1993, 1995.
Tel Aviv University, 2000.
Tulane University, 1990, 2002.
University of Alberta, 1999.
University of Arizona, 1990.
University of British Columbia, 1990.
University of California at Berkeley, 1990, 1993, 1996.
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University of Cincinnati, 2003.
University of Florida, 1990.
University of Houston, 2004.
University of Illinois at Chicago 2003.
University of Kentucky, 2003.
University of Maryland, 1990.
University of Michigan, 1995, 1999.
University of Notre Dame, 1996.
University of Pennsylvania, 1990.
University of Texas at Dallas, 2005.
University of Waterloo, 1993.
Washington University, 1991, 1995.

Photos > Working Life

submitted by SUN HERALD on 07.08.2005

Claudia Karvan. Actress. Love My Way

Cult show ... Claudia Karvan on location in Dover Heights. (Sydney)
Photo: Fiona-Lee Quimby

Daughter of Kytherian never far from the Australian television spotlight.

Life of us that's too secret for Karvan fans

By Holly Byrnes
August 7, 2005
The Sun-Herald, page 9.



It's the secret life of us - the very Sydney drama currently filming in and around town that most locals have never even seen.

Love My Way, the Foxtel drama starring Claudia Karvan, has scored critical acclaim and even a Logie since its debut last year. Despite the show's limited pay TV reach, its enthusiastic audience has guaranteed it cult status.

Taking a break from filming the show's second series last week, Karvan said producers were aware of a flourishing black market in pirated episodes, while a viewer feedback session turned into a pseudo support group for frustrated Love My Way fans.

"The biggest criticism people had was that they didn't have anyone to talk to about it," Karvan said. "It was obviously a huge frustration."

For those who have tuned in it's a familiar story, set around Sydney's eastern suburbs.

Karvan herself found the location for her character Frankie's home while driving her real-life daughter Audrey around the streets of Dover Heights.

"This house I spotted when I used to drive Audrey around when she wouldn't fall asleep. And I passed another place the other day when we were walking the dogs which I'm going to suggest."

The production, which also stars Asher Keddie, Dan Wyllie and Brendan Cowell, filmed scenes in Malabar and Bondi recently and will move on to Darlinghurst this week, when Karvan's character returns to art college. Scenes in Coogee, Greenwich, Pyrmont and Stanwell Park are set to follow.

A Sydney girl who moved to Melbourne for her part in the 20-something drama The Secret Life Of Us, Karvan is excited about telling this local story.

"You do get so much out of hearing your own vernacular, your own accent, seeing your local cafes. It's great knowing your own city intimately and being able to have that input," said Karvan, who also co-produces the show.

Production wraps up on the second series on September 27, 2005. It is set to go to air early next year.

Photos > Working Life

submitted by DAILY TELEGRAPH on 04.08.2005

Chippy's grant awarded to Sydney medical team.

Dr Brett Garner and Maureen Frilingos.

Chippy’s grant awarded to Sydney team

The inaugural Peter Frilin­gos Heart Foundation Re­search Grant was awarded to Sydney doctor Brett Garner yesterday.

The Daily Telegraph, 2GB and the National Rugby League helped raise more than $70,000 for the Heart Foundation in memory of chief rugby league writer Peter “Chippy” Frillngos, who died of a heart attack at his desk in May last year.
Dr Garner and his research­ers from the University of NSW will use the grant to develop drugs that promote cholesterol removal from the arteries.
Mr Frilin­gos’ widow, Maureen, sel­ected the re­search pro­ject winner.

Daily Tele­graph editor David Penber­thy said yesterday, it was an honour to help fight heart disease in Chippys memory.
“He was a mentor to a gen­eration of sports writers, a wit with words and a friend to everyone here,” he said.
“Every year over 50,000 Aust­ralIans die after a heart attack. Chippy was one of those and he was the one we all knew, so it makes us proud that we do something in his name that will make a difference to heart disease in the future.
“If there was anything Chippy didn’t like, it was people mak­ing a fuss of him. He will be looking at us now, saying:
"Turn It up! Stop gibberlng and get on with it."

Daily Telegraph, Sydney. Wednesday, July 27, 2005. p.18.

Photos > Working Life

submitted by Georgia Cassimatis on 06.10.2005

Georgia Cassimatis. Journalist.

Georgia Cassimatis began her career as a writer on Australian Cosmopolitan magazine in 1996. After a two year stint, she freelanced for various magazines before being appointed the Editor for teen magazine Barbie. During her time there she met an American man and moved to Los Angeles, which saw her world open up in ways she'd never imagined: she has since worked as a Los Angeles based writer, reporting for lucrative US titles Glamour, Cosmopolitan, Teen and Marie Claire magazines, as well as have her work syndicated internationally.

Born in Australia, Georgia is of Greek decent: her paternal grandfather, John Cassimatis, was born in 1902 in Kythera in the town of Potamos, where his Father was a priest known as Papa Nikolaki. His Mother was Ekaterini Levouni, also of Potamos. He was the 11th of 12 children. Of the nine surviving children, four went to live in Athens and five came to live in Australia, where they had cafes along the Murray River towns. Her grandfather worked in Swan Hill until 1936.

Georgia's paternal grandmother was Georgia Koroneos born in 1917. The second of six children, her father was Panagiotis Koroneos (Poulakis) from Karava and Ayia Pelayia. He was also the President of the Kytherian Society in Athens in the 1930's. Two of his sons went to the USA, and one the aeronautical Engineer returned to live out his life in Agia Pelagia, and the other, became a senator in the Greek parliament.

Panagiotis Koroneos built the wharf at Ayia Pelayia and came to Australia in the late 1950s to find fund raising for the wharf, which lead his travels to many NSW and Queensland towns visiting Kytherians. There is a plaque commemorating his achievement on the wharf.

Georgia Koroneos' mother was Hrisanthi Koroneos who was brought up in the town of Baltimore in the USA where Panagiotis married her, had three kids and returned to Greece.

Georgia's own father, Nicholas Cassimatis, was born in Australia and is a well-known Sydney psychiatrist. Her mother is Anglo Australian with some German blood and loves the Greeks and Kytherian family. Actually her anglo maternal grandfather came to Australia later than her Kytherian forebearers. And Georgia looks Kytherian.

Georgia Cassimatis's two of us article.

Georgia Cassimatis is the author of an article which was published in the Good Weekend Magazine, which forms part of the Sydney-Morning-Herald, Sydney - on April 30th, 2005, page 18.

Cassimatis article about the mateship between George Miller (film director and fim producer) and Micheal "Micky" Jonson, Pharmacist

Photos > Working Life

submitted by William Notaras on 08.04.2005

Newspaper article of brothers Angelo & John Notaras

A 1986 newspaper article of ex-farmers brothers Angelo & John Notaras who made it into the top 50 NSW exporters.

For a more detailed history of Angelo & John Notaras's life and achievements, see entry in "People, subsection, High Achievers, and search "Notaras", "Atom", "Grafton", "Saraton" utilising the internal search engine..

Photos > Working Life

submitted by William Notaras on 08.04.2005

Inventors John Notaras (left) and Angelo Notaras

John holding drilling attachment for chainsaws & Angelo holding the computer ignition system that won the ABC Invention of the Year Award

For a more detailed history of Angelo & John Notaras's life and achievements, see entry in "People, subsection, High Achievers, and search "Notaras", "Atom", "Grafton", "Saraton" utilising the internal search engine..

Photos > Working Life

submitted by Odyssey Magazine on 06.04.2005

It's a Mad Mad Mad Max World

Odyssey Magazine, Vol. 8 No. 1 (September/October2000)

George Miller, director of silver screen hits such as Babe, Witches of Eastwick, and Mad Max, reveals his plans to revive the legendary hero who made Mel Gibson an international star.
George Miller thought his cult hero Mad Max had put away his leathers for good. But then a storyline came to him that he just couldn't ignore. The retiring doctor- turned- director of some of Hollywood's favorite off-beat hits takes a break from plotting the next chapter of Mad Max to tell Victoria Kyriakopoulos about his life, his work, and his healthy mistrust of tinsel town.

Holed up in his Sydney studio, Dr George Miller is working on something he swore he'd never do again. But word is out and the excitement is growing. While Miller and his team of writers and artists hatch the script, cyberspace chat rooms are abuzz with ideas of what could, what should, and what should not happen when Mad Max makes his long overdue screen comeback.
Since Miller made the first groundbreaking, low-budget futuristic thriller as a rookie Australian director in 1979, the movie that launched Mel Gibson's international career has become a cult classic. (The Mad Max trilogy has grossed more than $300 million.) The genteel doctor who put his medical career on hold to try his hand at cinema has become one of Hollywood's least likely filmmakers-a writer, director and producer whose big screen credits also include box-office hits such as Babe, The Witches of Eastwick, Dead Calm, and Lorenzo's Oil.
"After the third one I had said I would never ever do another Mad Max," Miller tells Odyssey during a rare break from his production schedule. "I think Mel said the same."
Never say never. "Then, on a long plane trip about three years ago, with nothing to do flying across the Pacific…a story just played out in my head which had somehow been gestating unconsciously for about 12 years and I thought 'my god that's a damn good story' and I got excited."
The idea was put on the backburner while he produced the ill-fated Babe sequel Pig in the City, but Miller has spent the past year developing storyboards for a new Mad Max with consuming passion. The writing and development phase is expected to take another year, so the results are unlikely to hit the screens for some time yet. But 20 years on, the fate of the film's dark, avenging hero is now in the public domain in a way the 55-year-old Miller could never have imagined when he started out. "People in chat rooms are sending messages 'please don't do this or do this'…people are always trying to guess what the story will be," he says, admitting to being influenced by the feedback. "The Net is so much part of filmmaking today. It might not be an individual voice but there are definitely specific themes that emerge and you get to know some of your core audience and what their concerns are. I think it is a more truthful way of understanding where your film is."
The success and enduring popularity of Mad Max still surprises him.
"I wouldn't have thought 20 years after we made the first Mad Max that it would still impinge on the world culture in some way or another. I am not saying positively, necessarily, but it is still out there.
"You make what you think is your first clumsy effort of a film and it's sort of out there with all its faults and it won't go away. But it's also great fun to do a fourth after all this time."
Miller hopes his script will excite Gibson and lure him back into the role. "People know now that Mel wants to do it but we haven't come to a deal. When he heard we were doing the film he got in touch and we agreed like we always do that when the script is finished we'll talk. The only reason you should do a film for anybody is because you love the story and if Mel likes the story he'll do the film." Could there be another Mad Max without Gibson? "There could be, but it would be a very different Mad Max."

Walkabout

Miller's fly-away hair and trademark spectacles lend him an air of theatricality. He is renowned for being shy, but over lunch at a chic Italian bistro around the corner from his studio in the converted Metro Theatre in Sydney's Kings Cross, he lights up as he describes how fortunate he is to have made a living from his childhood pastime of day dreaming and love of storytelling.
The son of Greek migrants, he grew up in Chinchilla, a town in the remote deep north of Australia, where his family ran a grocery store. "It's flat and dry, rough and incredibly hot, with intense sunlight where you often see the heat haze," says Miller. "When you walked home from school at lunch-time the bitumen was bubbling. We had a fantastic childhood there."
Miller's grandfather, a Smyrna refugee who set up house on the island of Kythira, had spent time in America. There he adopted the name Miller, from the family name Miliotis. Miller's father left Kythira as a nine-year-old in 1919 and went to Queensland to work with his older brothers in the catering trade. He met Miller's mother in Sydney during the war and they moved north to start their own business.
In Chinchilla, the young Miller grew up on a diet of comics and Saturday matinees, playing in the bush, and long Sunday lunches to which people would come from miles around and sit and talk. "Had I not grown up in Chinchilla I don't think I would be a filmmaker because all our time was spent in play," he says. Life was basic but comfortable as the family prospered. "We had the first septic flush toilet in the town, about 1952, and literally for a year I remember strangers would come and say 'can we see the toilet?' And you would take them and flush the toilet for them and they would look at it and then leave."
Miller's father had received little schooling and, like many of that generation of immigrants, was obsessed with educating his four sons. He eventually moved the family to Sydney, where three sons became doctors and one a lawyer. After practicing medicine for 18 months, Miller, who had already been making short documentaries in his spare time, moved to Melbourne to pursue his passion for cinema. With producer and friend Byron Kennedy (who died in a freak helicopter crash in 1983), Miller founded Kennedy Miller which, after Mad Max, went on to produce some of the most notable Australian films and television series of recent times, helping launch the the likes of actress Nicole Kidman and directors Phil Noyce (Dead Calm) and Chris Noonan (co-writer and director of Babe).

I Got You Babe

If the graphic violence and international success of Mad Max carved Miller a unique place in the Australian film industry, his rejection of Hollywood after his well-documented bitter experience during the making of the Witches of Eastwick has kept him outside of the movie world's mainstream.
More than 13 years on, the softly-spoken Miller is still riled by that Hollywood encounter. "The producers and the studio were so morally bankrupt it was the most shattering experience in my life in terms of work." He flinches when discussing his equally unpleasant encounter with Cher during the shoot. "I've been very lucky really, except for Cher, she's the only bad experience I've ever had with an actor. If it wasn't for Jack Nicholson, who I found to be an extraordinary human being, I would have quit. I produced a lot after that but it took me almost five years to direct again, when I did Lorenzo's Oil."
Miller seems somewhat in awe of actors. "I find the best of them are heroic creatures because they are people at the forefront of exploring what it is to be human and they do it in the most unguarded way possible. When they are doing their best work they are trying to find truths about us as human beings and their medium is their own selves."
After nearly 30 years in the industry, Miller has found that though directing comes naturally to him, he is now far more intrigued by the scriptwriting process. "I usually find that the writing is where the greatest creativity happens and that's what I enjoy the most even though it does take a long time. But if a great story comes along of course I'd direct it."
These days Miller prefers to live and work in Sydney, where he made most of the Babe sequel at the recently established Fox Studios. "I don't go to Hollywood often but I am basically a Hollywood filmmaker. I just use Sydney as a base because it is a great city to live in."

The Outer Limits

Being an outsider seems to sit comfortably with him. "I think it is part of being Greek and part of being Australian that you are kind of an outsider, which I always like. I remember when I started making movies, to the movie industry I was the doctor and to the medical profession I was a moviemaker. I was neither a doctor nor a filmmaker, I was neither an Australian nor a Greek, I grew up in the country but I was neither a country or a city boy."
Yet, unlike other notable Greek-Australian filmmakers such as Ana Kokkinos (Head On) or John Tatoulis (Beware of Greeks Bearing Guns), Miller has never directly drawn on his cultural background in his films. He says he has trouble telling Australian stories, period, and prefers to deal with universal themes-the hero myth, the hero's journey. "My films like Mad Max and Babe came out of the world's hyperculture, the global monoculture."
In 1989, Miller travelled to Greece for the first time after his father, then 78, was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease. The entire clan, including Miller's brothers and their families, decided to go while the father's memory was intact. For Miller, the trip helped piece together the puzzle of his remote childhood.
"It was high summer and the moment the plane landed in Kythira I knew exactly why he had gone to Chinchilla because it was the same light, the same colour of the grass, it was the same intensity of life, the dry heat, the cicadas. Dad had created Kythira in the outback of Australia. The lifestyle we led I realized in hindsight was quite Greek, village Greek. When we went to Kythira there was the same long table with 25 people and multi-generational meals that went on for hours."
Miller has both critics and admirers. Yet no-one can dispute his success, most recently with the animated comic morality tale Babe, which received seven Oscar nominations and earned more than $500 million worldwide. The 1998 sequel, however, proved a box-office flop-Miller's first. He says the film was released before the audience had been properly prepared for the its darker undertones.
"The bitter thing about that film was all the effort and knowing that we really fumbled it badly at the end, but then on the other hand we'd had a pretty unbroken string of successes and the idea is not to take them too seriously either.
"I am proud to say that I found my appetite for making films didn't diminish at all and the important things in my life were intact, family and friends, and it was something I just had to put down to experience."
He appears to have reached a happy point of equilibrium in his life, appearing both relaxed and content. He recently became a father for the third time and, with reputation and success well entrenched, he has the freedom to pursue his dreams.
"I'm 55 and when I leave here I'll be doing what I was doing when I was five years old - making up stories in my head."
George Miller on the Big Screen

(Films directed by Miller unless otherwise stated.)
Mad Max (1979)
George Miller's debut film soon became a cult classic and propelled the leather-clad Mel Gibson towards international stardom. A low-budget ($15,000!) futuristic thriller set in a chilling, post-apocalyptic desert wasteland in Australia, Mad Max is about a cop seeking revenge for the murder of his wife and child.
Mad Max II, The Road Warrior (1981)
Max, now retired from the police force, is a wandering road warrior who helps the good guys protect their oil refinery from the bad guys (motorheads, skinheads, metal-freaks). Lots of action, stunts, vehicle-jumping, and multiple car wipeouts. A menacing Grace Jones adds a touch of high camp. According to John Lavin of Movie Magazine International, "The Road Warrior is one of the best action movies that this humble movie fan has ever seen."
The Twilight Zone: The Movie (1983)
Miller co-directed this one with the mighty Spielberg. A spin-off from the popular 1960s TV series, split into four segments, this one received few positive reviews, despite the host of stars.
Mad Max III, Beyond Thunderdome (1985)
Post-nuclear Australia is slowly showing signs of society taking shape in the form of punk capital Bartertown, ruled by queen Aunt Entity (Tina Turner) from her sky palace. Max appears in Bartertown and has a showdown with Aunt Entity's greatest warrior, Master-Blaster, in the giant up-side-down bowl-shaped fighting arena called Thunderdome.
The Witches of Eastwick (1986)
Michelle Pfeiffer, Susan Sarandon, and Cher team up with Jack Nicholson in a hilarious, dark, sexual comedy. What could three manless, divorced, deserted women living in a small town in New England possibly want? Why Daryl Van Horne of course. But the man they conjure up turns out to be a real old devil. Nicholson keeps the film "reeling wildly, with a zest that must be illegal," wrote the Washington Post.
The Year My Voice Broke(1987) (produced by Miller)
A coming-of-age story, in which 15-year-old Danny (Noah Taylor) falls in love with his childhood soul mate Freya (Leone Carmen).
Dead Calm (1989) (produced by Miller)
Well-crafted, tense Hitchcockian thriller directed by Philip Noyce. Sam Neill and Nicole Kidman play husband and wife whose yacht is becalmed in the flat, windless South Seas. They take on board the psychotic Hughie (Billy Zane in his first major role), which proves a major mistake.
Flirting (1991)
In the sequel to "The Year My Voice Broke," Danny is sent to a prissy boarding school, where he comes-of-age once again. This time, he and his mates grow from boys into men under the oppressive headmaster.
Lorenzo's Oil (1992)
Based on the true story of a couple (Nick Nolte and Susan Sarandon) whose son is stricken with a rare and deadly nerve disease (adrenoleukodystrophy).
Babe (1995)
A farmer wins Babe in a raffle and leaves him in a barnyard where he's adopted by sheepdogs. He wins respect from all the animals when he drives off a sheep poacher, decides that he wants to be a shepherd himself, and wins a shepherding contest. Seven Oscar nominations and global success.
40,000 Years of Dreaming (1996)
A documentary. Miller's personal view of Australian films.
Babe - Pig in the City (1998)
This sequel did not go down well with critics, though Babe's journey into the urban landscape to help his farm had a dark edge that was missing from the sometimes schmaltzy original.

[kythera-family contains many references to George Miller, and the Miller family. Search under Miller, Miliotis, or Chinchilla, to access numerous entries].


Author:Odyssey Magazine
When Published: bi-monthly
Publisher: Odyssey Magazine
Available: (See, below).
Description:

Odyssey magazine is a brilliant magazine, originating in Greece, which chronicles people, places and events of the Greek Diaspora.

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Photos > Working Life

submitted by William Notaras on 04.04.2005

Inventors, manufacturers, entrepreneurs and benefactors

John (left) & Angelo Notaras with some of their patented inventions, together with a few of their Australian and International awards.

For a more detailed history of Angelo & John Notaras's life and achievements, see entry in "People, subsection, High Achievers, and search "Notaras", "Atom", "Grafton", "Saraton" utilising the internal search engine.

Photos > Working Life

submitted by William Notaras on 04.04.2005

Inventors, manufacturers, entrepreneurs & benefactors

Angelo Notaras holding the ABC Invention of the Year Award in 1976 with Prime Minister Malcolm Fraser (looking away) & members of the judging panel.

For a more detailed history of Angelo & John Notaras's life and achievements, see entry in People, subsection, High Achievers, and search "Notaras", "Atom", "Grafton", "Saraton" utilising the internal search engine.

Photos > Working Life

submitted by Jim Tzannes on 29.03.2005

Arthur Conomos and Associates building.

Cobar, New South Wales. March 2005.

Photos > Working Life

submitted by Jim Tzannes on 29.07.2005

Arthur Conomos. Accountant. Cobar, New South Wales.

Arthur is the only Accountant in Cobar - a town of 6,000 people.

He ventured to Cobar 19 years ago for a "short stint", and has remained in the town ever since.

He is the son of the late Con Conomos. His mother Helen was a Mavromatis. She lives in Kensington, Sydney.

His fathers' family derive from Milipotamos, and his mothers from Pitsinathes.

His fathers brothers were Terry, Theo and George.

His father ran Peters Cafe in the town of Oberon for 18 years. He also ran a Fruit Shop and a General Store, come Deli in Oberon at the same time.

[It would be interesting to verify whether Peters Cafe was originally established by Peter Capsanis. The entry for Peter in In Their Own Image, by Effie Alexakis & Leonard Janiszewski, (also on this web-site - search under Capsanis), states that Peter was "...born in 1906, (and) left Kythera for Australia at the age of fifteen. After undertaking cafe work in such towns as Uralla and Woodstock in western NSW, and even turning his hand to seasonal fruit picking, in 1935 he settled at Oberon (near Bathurst), where he established a cafe].

[Find a number of other references to Oberon, by utilising the internal search engine.]

Unlike most of the other towns in the Western districts of New South Wales, Cobar has not had a very profound Greek or Kytherian influence over the years.

Untimely Death, Thursday 21st July 2005

Daughter Tina advised me of Arthur's untimely death. His funeral will be held today (Friday 29th July, 2005) at Kingsford, at 11:30.

"To the clear eye and eloquent tongue to the soul made of fire, and the character that bends but does not break… I am ever tender and true.” Charlotte Bronte

Tina Conomos

Photos > Working Life

submitted by Dean Coroneos on 25.02.2005

The Hon. James Miltiadis Samios, M.B.E., B.A., LL.B., M.L.C.

Farewell Dinner. The end of a distiguished Parliamentary life.

Back row (l to r)
Josie Lacey(Jewish Community leader)
Heather Ruddock
Scott Morison (Former State Director of the Liberal Party)
The Hon George Souris MP
Chris McDiven (State President of the Liberal Party)
Lucy Brogden
[To be advised]
Front Row (l to r)
The Hon Philip Ruddock
Rosemary Samios
The Hon James Samios
John Brogden

James, known as Jim was:

Former Member of the Legislative Council
(The Upper House of the New South Wales Parliament).

Held positions of:

Shadow Minister for Public Works and Services,
Shadow Minister Assisting the Leader on Ethnic Affairs

Born in Brisbane, Queensland.
Married. 1 son.

Qualifications, Occupations, Interests:

B.A., LL.B. University of Queensland. Interests include visual and performing arts and tennis.
Parliamentary Service
MLC since 1984. Term expired 52nd Parliament (28 February 2003).

Deputy Leader of Liberal Party in Legislative Council: 1995 to 2003.
Special Adviser to the Opposition Leader on Ethnic Affairs and the Arts: 1999 to 2003;
Shadow Minister for Ethnic Affairs and Assisting Shadow Minister for the Arts: 1995 - 99.
Parliamentary Secretary: 1988-95.
Trustee of the Parliamentary Contributory Superannuation Fund: 1991 to 2003.

Committee Membership
Advisory Committee: Privacy Advisory Committee: 1999 to 2003.
Standing Committees: Standing Committee on Parliamentary Privilege: 1990 -1995. General Purpose Standing Committee No. 3 1999 - 2003.
Select Committees: Select Committee on the Privacy and Data Protection Bill: 1994. Select Committee on Hospital Waiting Lists: 1995 - 96. Select Committee on the Financial Institutions (New South Wales) Bill and cognate (Chairman): 1992. Select Committee on the Conservatorium of Music 1997.
Joint Select Committees: Joint Select Committee on Fixed Term Parliaments (Vice-Chairman): 1991-1992.

Party Activity
Member LP Woollahra Branch

Community Activity
Director St Basil's Homes.
Founding Director of Museum of Contemporary Art.

National Service: 1953 - 54 (RAAF) and P/Officer in General Reserve: 1963.

Photos > Working Life

submitted by Betty Summers (nee, Notaras) on 01.04.2005

Dr Mitchell James Notaras. Surgeon, Educator, and Benefactor.

Left to right:Professor Ben Freedman, Mitchell Notaras and Rowan Nicks at a recent function to announce the Fellowship
.

From: Radius.
Newsletter of the Faculty of Medicine and Medical Graduates‘ Association:
April, 2004. p. 19

Mitchell Notaras, a graduate of Sydney University and a resident at the Royal Prince Hospital, has founded a scholarship in at the Royal Prince Alfred perpetuity in colo-rectal surgery.

The University has received a donation of $1.1million. Mitchell is the son of a Greek immigrant. His father came from the island of Kythera and settled in Grafton,
in NSW. The family became prominent citizens in the town. Mitchell was educated at Grafton high school and
Newington College in Sydney. Drs Mulhearn and Harris,who were doctors in the town stimulated his interest medicine. Both of them had sons who later joined the staff of RPAH.

After graduation he spent two years as
resident medical officer at the hospital. During that time he became interested in surgery and met various visiting surgeons including Rodney Maingot with whom he was associated later in London.

Mitchell travelled as a ships surgeon to England where he obtained jobs at Hammersmith, St Marks and University College Hospital. After obtaining his Fellowship he became Senior Lecturer and
Consultant Surgeon at University College Hospital.

Mitchell was appointed Consultant Surgeon at Barnet and Edgeware General Hospitals where he met and assisted Australian trainees.He was a teacher in surgery at the University of London.
He visited and lectured in many countries and was a named visiting Professor in Norway, Brazil and the Sudan.
Throughout his surgical practice his main interest was colo-rectal surgery.This was stimulated by his time at St Marks. While there he described and published the operation of lateral anal sphincterotomy which remains the procedure of choice for the treatment of anal fissure.
Despite having a busy surgical practice he established,with others, a company, bgene, which became a leader in Europe, specialising in the manufacture of molecular biological reagents, instrumentation and, through collaborations with universities and industrial partners, gene and DNA technology.After some years Abgene was taken over by the Apogent Corporation of the USA.
Dr Notaras studied medicine in Australia with the help of a Commonwealth Scholarship. He has remained grateful for the eduction he received at the Univeristy and the Hospital. He also had a desire to contribute to education, particularly in the field of colorectal cancer. As a result he has established a three-year scholarship which will be available to post fellowship scholars. The program is for one-year research at the University of Sydney, a year in an approved overseas unit of excellence and a year as a senior registrar in colo-rectal surgery at RPAH. The recipients will be selected jointly
by the University and the Colo-rectal Surgical Society. The scholars will be expected to proceed to a higher degree at the University.
To fund the scholarship, Dr Notaras has donated $1.1million. A scholar will be appointed every two years.

Brian Morgan AM MS FRACS

The 2004 Fellowship has been awarded to Dr Chris Byrne.

For a more detailed history of Mitchell's life and achievements see entry in People, subsection, High Achievers, and search Grafton, Saraton, or Notaras, utilising the internal search engine.