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submitted by George Poulos on 18.06.2004

Mad Max 4 - on hold.

Road rage. Mel Gibson as Max Rockatansky.

Mad Max vehicle comes to a dead end

Sunday, Herald Sun, Melbourne, Victoria.

By ADAM ZWAR

13jun04

THE long-awaited fourth Mad Max film, Fury Road, has collapsed after three years of development, costing hundreds of thousands of dollars.

Sets have been locked away in warehouses, the film's production offices have shut and the caterers have been cancelled.
It appears Mad Max: Fury Road director Dr George Miller has turned his attention to making the third instalment of the successful family movie, Babe.

Mad Max: Fury Road was due to go into production last July in Namibia, but was stalled because of security concerns following the outbreak of war in Iraq.

A year later, the $100 million Fury Road has been shelved indefinitely.

Miller said he could not move the film to Australia, where the previous three Mad Max films were made, because he feared the cars used in the new movie would become bogged in the Australian desert.

"Unfortunately, we won't be able to shoot in Australia, although I'd dearly love to," he said.

"We need some real big stretches of desert where the cars don't get bogged.

"Those deserts in South Australia would do, but it's not practical for the cars."

And, as for Mel Gibson, who was signed on to revive the role of road warrior Max Rockatansky, well, his enthusiasm for the project seems to have waned in recent months.

"I'm too old and I can't deal with the action stuff any more," he said. "It's getting to the point where they'll start calling it Fat Max."

Miller has apparently written and illustrated a 400-page storyboard/comic book of the proposed film.

The original Mad Max, released in 1979, was filmed outside Broken Hill for $500,000 and returned more than $100 million at the box office.

Photos > Working Life

submitted by George Poulos on 14.06.2004

Harry Poulos Testimonial Dinner creates a Media frenzy

Extended family of Professor Harry Poulos in attendance at the Testimonial Dinner.


On Saturday 8th May, at The Hellenic Club Restaurant, 5th Floor, 251-253 Elizabeth Street, Sydney, the Kytherian Ladies Auxiliary organised a Testimonial Dinner for Emeritus Professor Harry Poulos.

The evening was a sellout, with 150 Kytherians, Greek-Australians and Australians, packing out the restaurant.

The Testimonial Dinner triggered a media frenzy.

Ο ΕΛΛΗΝΙKΟΣ KΗΡΥKAΣ - The Greek Herald -began the frenzy on Tuesday 11th May, 2004, page 6, with an article entitled:

Kυθήριακή AδελΦότητα Aυστραλίας.
Συγκινητικές στιγμές στο δείπνο προς τιμήν του Επίτιμου Kαθηγητή ΗAΡΥ ΠΟΥΛΟΥ.

Ο Kόσμος, joined in on Wednesday 12 May, 2004,page 13, in the Ειδήσεις section, publishing a lengthy article in Greek on the Testimonial.

The title was:

ΗAΡΥ ΠΟΥΛΟΣ: Ενας μεγάλος Ελληνοαυστραλος
επιστήμονας τιμήθηκε σε δείπνο των Kυθήριων.

Both these articles, written in Greek, are destined to appear in the Greek section of kythera-family.net.

The following article, appeared in
Ο Kόσμος, News In English (section), on Tuesday 11 May 2004, on pages 23 & 24.

TESTIMONIAL DINNER FOR PROFESSOR H. POULOS.

A Testimonial Dinner was held at the Hellenic Club on Saturday 8th May in honour of Emeritus Professor Harry Poulos. The dinner was very successful and lots of guests travelled long distances to attend the night - including Theo Poulos, Professor Poulos' brother, and Nick and Theodora Politis, and Lexi Poteri.

John Comino was the Master of Ceremonies for the evening. Saturday night's Dinner was proudly hosted by the Kytherian Ladies Auxillary for the Kytherian Association of Australia.

Among the special guests were:
* Wife of the Consul-General of Greece, Mrs. Polixeni Raptakis.
* President of the Kytherian Association of Australia, Dr Victor Kepreotes and his wife Kathy.
* President of the Kytherian Ladies Auxiliary, Mrs Catherine Economos, and her husband, Dr John Economos.
* Professor John Carter, from the University of Sydney, and his wife, Heather.
* Past Presidents of the Kytherian Association, Mr Peter Comino, John Prineas, Peter Aroney.

The Kytherian Association of Australia is one of the most established Greek community organisations in Australia. The Association plays a key role in the development of the Greek Australian community and culture.

Saturday nights dinner was a tribute to another great Greek Australian - who stands out in the Greek comunity and the greater Australian community as a leader, as a man with passion, commitment, intelligence and integrity. All qualities worth celebrating. In a snapshot - Professor Harry Poulos is an internationally acclaimed civil engineer and academic.

After studying at the University of Sydney, it was only a short time later that he joined the Department of Civil Engineering, and was then appointed as a Professor.

Professor Poulos is well published [see other entry - this section, for a comprehensive list of piblications], and has worked here and internationally on a range of challenging projects.

Professor Poulos is now a Senior Principal of Coffey Geosciences, and has been well awarded by his peers throughout his career, culminating in 1993, when he was made a Member of the Order of Australia, and most recently, in 2003, Professor Poulos was awarded a Centenary Medal from the Federal Government.

John Cominos, after referring briefly to Professor Harry Poulos, introduced CAtherine Economos, President of the Kytherian Ladies Auxilary, who spoke on behalf of the Kytherian Association of Australia.

Catherine gave a brief outline of Professor Poulos's family history:

"In Shakespeare’s Henry IV, Falstaff asserts that “the better part of valour is discretion”. Perhaps, if Shakespeare were writing today, he would pen a similar verse about Emeritus Professor Poulos. For he would go a long way before he would find a better example of a man who has discretely gone about his work, achieving world class excellence, while seeking little fan fare.

For whenever you meet someone who knows Professor Poulos, the one comment they universally make, is that he is such an unassuming man, a man of great discretion.

It is this very quality of discretion that makes it doubly important for us as the Kytherian Association of Australia to conduct an evening such as this.

For it is important to acknowledge that within the extended Kytherian family, there are people achieving wonderful things and it is our role as an Association to convey these achievements to the wider community. But perhaps what makes this evening even more special, is the fact that these personal traits of Professor Poulos, show that he is a man driven not by personal gain, but simply by the idea of achieving excellence.

Professor Poulos, we feel fortunate as an Association to have a man of your calibre borne out of our community.

When it was suggested to the Committee that we hold a Testimonial dinner for Professor Poulos, the idea was unanimously embraced, as most of us had heard of the Professor and his outstanding achievements, but few of us had been fortunate enough to meet him.

So I set upon the task of tracking Professor Poulos down. With each phone call, I discovered he was in a different corner of the globe and soon realised just how much in demand he really is.
Professor Poulos was born in 1940 in Katoomba, the second son of George Poulos, and Eleni Zantiotis originally from the village of Karavas, Kythera.

George Poulos, like so many of his generation, joined the wave of migration and became part of the Kytherian diaspora. He arrived in Australia in 1926, leaving behind his wife Eleni and young son Theo.

In Australia, George joined his brother and two cousins who owned the Niagara Café in Katoomba. Some 13 years passed before the family was reunited. In 1939, after negotiating Australia’s immigration restrictions and surviving the depression of the ‘30’s, Eleni and by then 14 year-old son Theo, arrived in Australia. Harry was born the following year.

Reunited, George and Eleni set about creating a family home for their sons. George, a well-liked, gentle man, worked in various Katoomba establishments and Eleni, a talented woman, filled their home with handicrafts she created with flair, and meticulously tended her beautiful garden. Eleni will turn 100 this year and we know how very proud she will be feeling tonight.

It is also worth noting that Eleni’s mother, Professor Poulos’ grandmother, who joined the family in Katoomba, Stamatina Zantiotis, was also a lady of extraordinary ability, who was able to recite passages from any part of the bible.

Professor Poulos spent many hours of his youth kicking a ball around the backyard and avidly reading whatever children’s books came to hand. In fact, I’ve had stories recounted to me by cousins of Harry who, as children, scurried to hide their favourite books when they heard Harry was coming over, for fear they’d be borrowed, and not returned. This was the beginning of a lifetime of book collecting. His love of reading continues to this day, filling the many hours spent travelling the globe in his work as a consultant for Coffey Partners International.

In Katoomba, Harry learned to play the saxophone and violin, but it was the guitar that was to prove his forte. He joined a musical group and played regularly. At school he grasped concepts easily, but when challenges presented themselves, he had a unique way of dealing with them. He would lock himself in his room and play his guitar. When he emerged, the problem was solved.

Though never pressured by his parents, Harry duxed Katoomba High in 1956. After finishing school, he considered undertaking a pharmacy degree. But to do so, he first needed to obtain an apprenticeship. Luckily, he was unable to find a pharmacy with a position to fill. A simple comment pointed him in a direction that would change the practice of engineering and construction globally. “You’re good at maths - why don’t you do engineering” a teacher fortuitously remarked.

At 16, Harry Poulos moved to Sydney as the houseguest of his uncle and aunt, Angelo and Stella Zantey and entered Sydney University. He completed his undergraduate degree within four years achieving 1st class honours and followed straight on with his PHD.

Angelo and Stella marvelled at his ability to cope with a noisy household and streams of visitors. Harry studied in his room, classical music in the background, sometimes with two toddler cousins on his knee, if they promised to be quiet. Come midnight, he was known to shut himself in the bathroom so as not to disturb anyone, and play his guitar.

On departing the Zantey household, he presented his prize possession, his guitar, to his young cousin Harry, as a gesture of his deep appreciation for their warmth and support.

It was during his university years that Harry met Maria Langley, a Grafton girl, like himself of Kytherian decent and only sweet 16 at the time. At 19 she moved to Sydney where they met again. Maria invited Harry to her 21st birthday party. Unable to attend, he sent a gift, a pearl on a necklace, with a characteristically simple note, “A pearl for a pearl of a girl”.

Soon after he invited Maria on their first date – attending the very first Beatles concert in Australia, accompanied, of course, by Maria’s younger sister, Theodora.

Two years later he married his pearl of a girl at St George Church, Rose Bay. Over the ensuing ten years, Harry and Maria had four children, George, Elena, James and Peter. These were busy years, with Harry moving quickly up the university ranks, being appointed as a lecturer in the Department of Civil Engineering in his first year of their marriage, quickly rising to the position of Head of the School of Civil and Mining Engineering, researching, writing and delivering ground breaking papers.

But he managed to live a balanced family life by adhering to the maxim “never bring work home on weekends.” He read to the children at night, played cricket at the Bexley Club and Sydney Uni Veterans, collected cats (at one stage I’m told the Poulos household consisted of Mum, Dad, four kids and seven cats), and coaching the boys’ soccer team. An avid sports fan, one of his proudest achievements was coaching son James’s Under 16 Roselea team to the State Championships in 1987, boldly swooping the cup from a professionally-coached team.

Today, Professor Poulos’ family has grown to include seven beautiful grandchildren, with whom he will share many new sporting adventures.

Throughout his academic life, Professor Poulos could be relied upon to deliver brilliantly, without drama. His interests in books which started from a young age continues. His home is filled with books ranging from archaeology, history, art, sociology, philosophy and photography, and he is still adding to his collection.

As a Doctorate student, when asked what he did for a living, he’d answer, “I tinker with machines”. As Emeritus Professor, with a string of outstanding achievements, within Australia and abroad, he remains as approachable, affable and as discrete as ever. In the words of his son James, “I don’t think that there’s person who has met Dad who has not liked him. He is the classic gentleman, polite and dignified.”

Professor Poulos, it has been a pleasure compiling this brief outline of your life. By all accounts it is a wonderful and honourable life.

On behalf of the Kytherian Association of Australia, I would like to say how deeply proud we are that you are a part of our extended Kytherian family.

Thank you.

After the beautiful speech delivered by Catherine Economos, John Comino called on Professor John Carter to share his insights into Profesor Poulos.

Afterwards, John Comino welcomed to the stage the Guest of Honour, the man himself Emeritus Professor Harry Poulos. He thanked him for humbly sharing his life with them that night and before moving on to some presentations, mentioned: "Thank you Professor Poulos. You are truly a credit to our community and through your life and your life's work you have set a great example for the rest of us and for the younger generation to follow. Although progress reports on the Athens Olympic facilities beg to differ - you could say that the Greeks are no strangers to engineering.

Professor Poulos is exception. With a career full of highlights, I am sure the future holds continued success and happiness and on behalf of everyone here tonight we wish you all the best for the years ahead."

Presentations were made by Catherine Economos to Professor Carter and Professor Poulos.

John Comino concluded:
"On behalf of everyone here tonight, I would like to thank the Ladies Auxiliary for all their hard work in making tonight a success. An event like this does not happen over night. I make special mention of the Executive Committee: Catherine Economos, Kyranne Thomas, Aphrodite Samios, Koula Mallos, Paula Giaouris, Helen Kanaris, Matina Samios, Kathy Samios, and all the other members who have helped organise tonight: Effie Cassamaty, Helen Comino, Rene Condoleon, KAtie Gerakiteys, Vicki Conomos, Lula Kass, Coula Macarounis, Mary Notaras, Koula Cassimatis, Marina Notaras, Anne Prineas, Rini Sophios, Chrissa Vlandis.

I would like to present Catherine with a small gift of thanks for all her efforts this evening."

After the presentations, formalities for the evening were brought to a close, but the evening was far from over.

Guests remained and enjoyed the hospitality of the Kytherian Association.

Photos > Working Life

submitted by George Poulos on 18.06.2004

Theodore Simos - Justice - Member, Australian Law Reform Commission

[Note, KYTHERIAN Mr., (later, Justice), THEODORE SIMOS'S long involvement with the Law Reform Commission - 1981-1990.

Judge Simos was born in Katoomba; his parents owned the Paragon Cafe for many decades. (See entries, under Photography, Diaspora - subsection - Shops and Cafes).

This list from
http://www.austlii.edu.au/au/other/alrc/publications/reports/90/3.html

where the history of the Law Reform Commission is also clearly laid out. (G.C.P.)]

Members of the Law Reform Commission
1975-2000*

Member
Position
Years

Justice Michael Kirby
Chairman
1975-1984

Professor Alex Castles
part time
1975-1981

Mr Gareth Evans
part time; full time
1975

Associate Professor Gordon Hawkins
part time
1975-1981

Mr Gerard Brennan
part time
1975-1978

Mr John Cain
part time
1975-1977

Emeritus Professor Sir Zelman Cowen
part time
1976-1977

Justice Murray Wilcox
full time
part time
Acting Chairman 1976-1977
1978-1979 1986-1989
1984-1985
Mr Russell Scott
full time
1976-1978

Professor David Kelly
full time
part time 1976-1980
1980-1981 1983-1985
Mr Howard Schreiber
part time
1976

Mr James Spigelman
part time
1976-1979

Mr Allan Hall
part time
1977-1979

Mr Brian Shaw
part time
1977-1981

Mr John Ewens
part time
1978-1980

Mr Bruce Debelle
full time
part time 1978-1981
1981-1983

Professor Duncan Chappell
full time
1978-1979

Dr John Seymour
part time
1979

Mr James Mazza
part time
1979-1984

Associate Professor Robert Hayes full time
part time 1980-1984
1984-1989

Mr Tim Smith
full time
part time
1980-1983
1984-1986

Mr G Aarons
part time
1980-1983

Justice F Neasey
part time
1980-1984

Mr Gerald Fitzgerald
part time
1981-1984

Mr Theodore Simos
part time
1981-1990

Dr James Crawford
full time
part time 1982-1984
1984-1990

Professor Alice Ehr-Soon Tay
part time
1982-1987

Professor David Hambly
full time
part time
1983-1986
1986-1989

Professor Michael Chesterman
full time
part time
1983-1987
1987-1992

Dr Michael Pryles
part time
1983-1987

Sir Maurice Byers
part time
1984-1985

Justice Josephine Maxwell
part time
1984-1988

Dr Donnell Ryan
part time
1984-1990

Mr Ron Harmer
full time
part time
1984-1987
1987-1988

Mr George Zdenkowski
full time
1984

Mr Nick Seddon
part time
1984-1992

Professor Richard Harding
part time
1984-1989

The Hon Xavier Connor
President
1985-1987

Mr Richard Fisher
part time
1986-1989

Mr John Basten
part time
1986-1987

Mr Peter Cashman
part time
1986- 1987

Mr John Greenwell
Deputy President
1987-1992

Professor John Goldring
full time
part time
1987-1990
1990-1992

Justice Elizabeth Evatt
President
part time
1988-1993
1993-1994

Justice Peter Nygh
part time
1989-1992

Ms Greta Bird
part time
1990-1991

Dott Paolo Totaro
part time
1990-1991

Mr Jim Armitage
part time
1991-1992

Mr Leigh Hall
part time
1991-1992

Mr Chris Sidoti
full time
1992-1995

Mr Stephen Mason
full time
1992-1993

Justice John von Doussa
part time
1992-

Professor James Lahore
part time
1993-1995

Professor Bettina Cass
part time
1993-1997

Professor Peter Baume
part time
1993-1997

Professor Rebecca Bailey-Harris
part time
1993-1995

Justice Ian Coleman
part time
1993-

Professor Brent Fisse
part time
1993-1994

Professor Hilary Charlesworth
part time
1993-1994

Professor Reg Graycar
part time
1993-1994

Professor Jennifer Morgan
part time
1993-1994

Ms Sue Tongue
Deputy President
1993-1995

Mr Michael Ryland
full time
1994-1996

Mr Alan Rose
President
1994-1999

Mr David Edwards
Deputy President
1995-1999

Dr Kathryn Cronin
full time
Deputy President
1996-1999
1999-

Justice Mark Weinberg
part time
1998-

Professor David Weisbrot
President
1999-

Mr Ian Davis
full time
2000-

Mr Brian Opeskin
full time
2000-


* Titles used in this table are those applicable during the Member's service at the Commission.

Photos > Working Life

submitted by George Poulos on 04.06.2004

Bill Casimaty - Rural Legend

Bill Casimaty

by Clare Hammond

You'll hear Bill Casimaty's name mentioned at the Davis Cup, the Melbourne Cricket Ground, and even Lords Cricket Club. Which would make you think this determined man is a sports fanatic.

But that's far from the truth. Bill Casimaty is in fact one of the pioneers of the turf industry.

Every boom is followed by a bust, and it was the slump after the Korean War wool boom that sent Bill Casimaty in the opposite direction to sheep and wheat farming.

In 1957 he finished studying at Dookie Agricultural College in Victoria and returned to his family's Richmond property, in the Coal River Valley of Tasmania. He was to decide very early on that the property wasn't viable as a wool and wheat growing operation.

From that point on, the property that his father had bought some 50 years before was to be transformed. Bill's father arrived from the Greek island of Kythera at the age of 13, to begin a new life on another island, Tasmania, on the other side of the world. Much to the surprise of the locals, the Casimatys started growing mushrooms.

But the pivotal year for Bill was 1966, when he won a Nuffield Farming Scholarship to study an agricultural pursuit overseas. A college friend of his had set up a turf farm in Victoria, so Bill decided to investigate turf farming in the United States. He was so impressed by this trip to the US and the UK that he came home and bought his friend's farm, and set up the Strathayr Turf business in Tasmania as well.

It was an inauspicious start for a business which would, over the next 30 years, supply turf to some of the biggest horse racing tracks in the world, as well as American sporting stadiums and even the prestigious Lords cricket pitch in England. At home, horses galloped on Bill Casimaty's turf at Moonee Valley, Flemington and Sandown. Footballers flew high for a mark off Casimaty turf at Waverley Park in Melbourne, cricketers dived for the ball on it at the Melbourne Cricket Ground. And Bill was even responsible for a turf trial with Tennis Australia, to lay the surface at the recent Davis Cup final between Australia and France.

Relaxed, sitting back in a wooden chair looking out over his Richmond farm, Bill Casimaty is adamant that the success of his business lays in the hands of research and development. He has scientists working in laboratories trying to solve sporting turf problems.

"We look for sport turf problems, then try to find economic and practical solutions. I suppose it's our R and D that keeps us in front. Science is the essence of good turf – the soil profile is just as important as the visual appeal of good, fast-growing turf."

Bill calls it 'root zone hydraulics'. His attitude – and most likely, the key to his success – seems to be 'if you wait for someone else to find the solution, then you'll never lead the pack.'

Setting up the turf industry in Australia's southern cool climate was always a risky business. In the beginning, Strathayr grew turf for the mining industry on the west coast of Tasmania to protect the slopes from erosion. A local market for residential lawn began to grow, before the company embarked on its first export job. The project required turf to cover one of Hong Kong's largest race tracks. It was grown in Victoria and flown to the customer. Things have changed since those days. Contractors now grow the turf nearby, Bill says, to prevent spoilage and cost blow-outs.

Like many family businesses, there came a day when the founder had to hand over the reins to those with more energy. Bill says he still calls Strathayr home, but these days he is rarely there to absorb the charm of the old property, which includes a restored hop kiln house. His son, Frank, works on the Richmond property and his daughter, Kate, manages the marketing and publicity side of the business from Victoria. Bill says it's now "time to step aside and take on a smaller role."

The job has taken him all over the globe to find new markets. Admiring the view of the lush Coal River Valley from his back yard, he reflects on what has been a fast-paced lifestyle.

It's an appropriate analogy, to describe Bill Casimaty as a man who never lets the grass grow under his feet. Next time you're at a high profile sporting event, take a moment to think about who grew the grass for that multi-million dollar stadium.

From,

http://www.abc.net.au/rural/legends/stories/18_1.htm

Photos > Working Life

submitted by George Poulos on 01.06.2004

George Miller awarded an Honorary Doctorate of Letters at the University of New South Wales

MILLER CRITICISES MOOTED
EDUCATION REFORM

15 October 1999

Multi-award-winning Australian film-maker George Miller today described the Federal Government's proposal to deregulate higher education as the educational equivalent of a "power blackout and a train smash."


Miller made the comments in a speech at a ceremony awarding him an Honorary Doctorate of Letters at the University of New South Wales - the University's highest honour.


"Universities need to remain playgrounds of ideas. Because it's those playful, accidental interactions of ideas that always make for the most exciting times," Dr Miller said.


"The economic rationalists in Canberra who're trying to tinker with the education system by deregulating student fees and handing it over to market forces run the great risk of ruining the culture and economy of universities and causing the educational equivalent of a power blackout and a train smash."


A UNSW medical graduate in 1971, Miller has won 25 Australian Film Industry awards and has been nominated for two Academy Awards. He was awarded an Honorary Doctoral degree at his alma mater for his distinguished contribution to film.


Dr George Miller, who is also a medical doctor, went on to give a free public lecture at UNSW on Tuesday, October 26.

In his talk, Dr Miller will used his unique perspective as both a man of science and a successful creative artist to look at the way the arts and sciences are changing and blending at the end of the millennium.


UNSW graduate, entertainer, activist, and conservationist Peter Garrett was also awarded an Honorary Doctorate of Letters on the same day, for his distinguished contributions to music and conservation.

From,

http://www.unsw.edu.au/news/pad/articles/1999/oct/142millercriticises.html

Photos > Working Life

submitted by George Poulos on 01.06.2004

Peter Christianos (right) inspecting a find by Megalos & Partners

Peter Christianos (right) inspecting a find by Megalos & Partners.

Location: Cooper Pedy.

From Rena Briands book: 'White man in a hole'.

For more background information see entry in this Working Life section entitled, "Christianos Family of Opaline Pty Ltd, and their interaction with Kytherians"

or go to,

http://www.opaline.com.au/history.html

Photos > Working Life

submitted by George Poulos on 01.06.2004

Ten mile camp. Peter Christianos and partner Bill Petrohelos Circa. 1963

Ten mile camp. Peter Christianos and partner Bill Petrohelos Circa. 1963.

For more background information see entry in this Working Life section entitled, "Christianos Family of Opaline Pty Ltd, and their interaction with Kytherians"

or go to,

http://www.opaline.com.au/history.html

Photos > Working Life

submitted by George Poulos on 01.06.2004

Peter Christianos Snr standing next to a dry rumbler in Lightning Ridge, c. 1961

Peter Christianos Snr standing next to a dry rumbler in Lightning Ridge, c. 1961

For more background information see entry in this Working Life section entitled, "Christianos Family of Opaline Pty Ltd, and their interaction with Kytherians"

or go to,

http://www.opaline.com.au/history.html

Photos > Working Life

submitted by George Poulos on 07.10.2005

Christianos Family of Opaline Pty Ltd, and their interaction with Kytherians

The Christianos family at 8 mile camp Circa. 1957

[I include a background to Opaline Pty Ltd here, not because the founders, the Christianos family were from Kythera. They in fact derive from Halkidiki.

But for three other reasons:

1. Over the years, The Christianos family interacted with a number of Kytherians; including Archie Kalokerinos, Bill Petrohelos, and the Megalos family.
Many Kytherians were involved in this industry - a fact little known and explored in the literature.
I hope this entry will help to elicit a number of Kytherian "opal mining" stories.

2. The prominence of Greek-Australians in opal mining per se, and in opal mining communities, is also little known, and little explored.

3. Opal mining "manïa" reveals the "gambling" side of the Kytherian/Greek Australian character very well.
The Christianos family - "got very, very lucky" - as reading the remainder of this short entry will reveal. G.C.P.]

Australian Opal Mining - OPALINE AUSTRALIA PTY LTD

Opaline's Australian opal mining started out in Coober Pedy South Australia and has spread Australia wide. We are specialists in opal mining of Black Opals, Boulder Opals & Crystal Opals. Read about our history in opal mines and continuing successes in opal mining.

Opaline is a third generation family opal mining company founded by Peter Christianos Snr., who has over forty-five years experience in the Australian opal and gemstone industry.

In 1956, the founders' parents George & Zoë Christianos left Adelaide in search of Australian opal with their four young sons. Peter was thirteen years old. It was a hot, grinding ten and a half day journey by light truck with van in tow on rough, dusty, dirt tracks. Through rain, muddy bogs, a dozen flats and sixty odd gates later they arrived at the great treeless and almost featureless plain that was Coober Pedy.

Today the same trip to Coober Pedy takes only eight and a half hours by vehicle on a sealed bitumen highway. When you arrive at Coober Pedy it now looks like a 'moonscape' riddled with mine dumps resembling craters. Those dumps at Coober Pedy are so plentiful because of modern drilling rigs for opal mining.

Back then, Peter and his brother Emmanuel would sink opal mine shafts with a pick and shovel an opal mine up to 90 foot down into all types of rock. Sometimes a hammer and chisel were used to dig holes, Gelignite was packed into these opal mine holes and exploded, the dirt and rubble was removed from the opal mines by hand-operated winches to the surface.

Old man George expertly shaped and sharpened their picks and augers for opal mining, he had them up and working at dawn and out of the opal mine shaft not long before sundown. Zoë kept an open camp, she fed her boys and any other hungry opal miners three square meals a day, but many times lunch was had down the opal mine shaft when the old man was not satisfied with the progress.

Water was extremely scarce and had to be carted from up to 50 km away, but the native emus made a great preserve and kangaroo tail made a great soup, even the odd bush turkey flew into the pot on occasion.

In 1959 after several seasons of opal mining their toil and acclimatisation in the face of unforgiving heat and harsh conditions finally yielded an unprecedented fortune at the famous Eight-Mile field. Many fellow Greeks were enticed and encouraged by the Christianos' and their find to try their own luck in the Opal mining fields. It is no coincidence that Coober Pedy's largest minority group is its Greek community.

In 1961, Peter Christianos went in search of Australian opals and his own destiny to Lightning Ridge New South Wales; Peter and his two new partners Bill Petrohelos and Les Voller worked for a syndicate funded by Professor Charles Phipps of Sydney University. Despite having filled Calico bags with Nobbies on a daily basis, the three young men each made the meager sum of 120 Quid for two whole seasons hand opal mining at the Nine-Mile and The Coorcoran Opal mining fields.

Thus, Peter, his brother Ross and partner Bill made an arduous three and a half week journey to Coober Pedy, through mud and rain with only 20 Pounds between them, resolved to make their fortune. The trio made camp and began working in earnest at the Ten Mile field. Nearly a year later Bill became homesick and returned to Collarenebri NSW, Ross also went walkabout, as was his custom.

For almost another year, Peter toiled at opal mining alone without success and became increasingly indebted to the grocer Bepe Coro to the tune of several hundred Pounds. He persevered and at the age of twenty made a most remarkable strike at the Ten Mile with an unheard of number of opal bearing levels in his claim. SIX LEVELS OF GOOD OPAL!

Later an open-cut by George Christianos, at his son's mine, with the first D8 Bulldozer in Coober Pedy revealed there were in fact TEN LEVELS OF OPAL-almost unbelievable.

Having found many thousands of ounces of Australian opals, Peter had the perfect opportunity to develop his innate skills at sorting, classing and pricing Opal. So he turned his hand to merchandising, he was well respected and entrusted by many with their Opal for classing, valuation and sale. He began exporting Australian opals to Japan in the 1963, then to Hong Kong, including his own opal factory there. Later he started exporting Australian opals including those from his own opal mines to the USA and Germany.

Peter Christianos has handled select quality Opals from all major fields in Australia including: Andamooka, Coober Pedy and Mintabie in South Australia; Lightning Ridge and White Cliffs opal fields in New South Wales; Jundah, Quilpie, Winton and Yowah in Queensland.

In the 1970's Peter was involved in the development of the Boi Morto opal mine in Pedro Segundo Piaui State Brazil, he has mined for Opaline materials (Opal & Chrysoprase) in every state of Australia except Tasmania and Victoria (hitherto unproductive for Opal).

Other forays include Diamond mining in Sierra Leone West Africa in the early 1980's, and Tourmaline mining in Minas Gerais Brazil in the mid 1990's.

The tradition of opal mining has passed on to Peter Jnr. son of the founder, who has taken an active managerial roll in the operations of Opaline Australia. Both father and son have been immersed in the Australian opal industry since childhood and continue to earn colourful stripes.

From,

http://www.opaline.com.au/history.html

I thank Peter Christianos Jnr very much, for permission to re-print this article, and to reprint various photographs from the opaline website.

See other photographs in this Working Life section.

Photos > Working Life

submitted by George Poulos on 26.05.2004

Archie Kalokerinos - Medical Pioneer of the 20th Century. Dr. Archie Kalokerinos, an Autobiography - Acknowledgments and Introduction.

INTRODUCTION

............Usually, an autobiography follows an orderly sequence of events - one leading naturally to another until the author decides on a cut-off point where,
more often than not, readers can turn the final page and know that a lifetime of work is finished. I have found it impossible to follow this pattern because,
after a critical stage, everything became mixed with events, experiences and discoveries covering widely separated fields intertwined in a manner that
cannot be followed if described in a true chronological manner. This applies, particularly, to the chapters dealing with medical problems such as The Sudden
Infant Death Syndrome, Otitis Media, Vaccine Reactions, Shaken Babies and Zinc Deficiencies. Trying to understand and solve these conditions involved years
of observation, thinking, and research. Eventually, it became obvious that the only way to pass on the knowledge obtained was to simply deal with each disorder separately. They are, in fact, not separate disorders because nature has connected them in a fascinating manner.

My aim is not to claim total
originality or total personal credit, because many colleagues provided me with the support and information that eventually led to an understanding of what I observed clinically. I hope that what I have written will act as a stimulus towards a broader view of medicine, and take some of the stress away from physicians who are forced to deal so much with problems they cannot solve.

............Some academics will be critical and detail aspects where I display a lack of knowledge. There may also be some errors generated by this lack of knowledge. However, I believe that, if this is so, the errors are minor and do
not, from a practical point of view matter very much. I state this because I have been able to demonstrate clearly, and beyond any doubt, that what I have learned enabled me to achieve a dramatic drop in infant mortality rates and treat in better fashion many previously resistant disease patterns.

............The ‘technical’ chapter on opal acts as division between the two parts of my life. This study marked the end of what I call ‘my innocent years’, when the idealism of youth vanished and I was forced to face the fact that modern medicine had, in some vital aspects, gone off the rails and prevented progress.

Often, I long for a return to the psychological calmness of my youth but I know that this cannot be when I consider the trauma initiated by many bitter
experiences. On the other hand I know that I have been exceptionally privileged and supported by Australians, Greeks and people all over the world.

............Obviously, anyone reading this book will realise that Vitamin C is critical to most things that are important. Of course this is so, but for those who want to delve deeply I must suggest that the chapter on otitis media, if properly considered, opens the door to a new and better understanding of medicine. This, more than anything else, excites me and make me realise that life has, after all, been worthwhile.

Note: ............The following description of scurvy is important so that the reader of this book can more clearly understand many of the described clinical situations.

Understanding Vitamin C and Scurvy

Without this nothing makes sense. Know it and the practice of medicine will become easier, more productive, and certainly, far less stressful.

............The medical dictionary definition of scurvy is ‘a disease due to deficiency of ascorbic acid, marked by weakness, anaemia, spongy gums and mucocutaneous haemorrhages’. This definition almost certainly refers to the classically presenting acute symptoms of scurvy.

............However, scurvy is not a ‘pure disease’. The so- called ‘classical’ descriptions, found in text books, certainly exist but there is an almost limitless list of varieties that taper off into an equally limitless variety of other conditions that, normally, one would not even remotely associate with Vitamin C deficiency.

............Even the ‘pure’ disease is almost infinitely variable. Bone changes, for example, may be found in some cases but not in others. Rib changes may be found in all ribs or only one rib. Petechial hemorrhages may only be seen in some cases. Intracranial hemorrhages follow a similar pattern. And the list goes on and on.

............Much depends on precipitating factors. The classical example of this is scurvy precipitated by infections. In such cases there may be symptoms and signs predominantly due to infection, or scurvy signs may dominate. Needless to say, there is usually a complex mixture of the two pathologies.

............Some individuals have a predisposition to scurvy. That is; under similar conditions - as far as such can be estimated - one individual may suffer from obvious scurvy and another will not.

............The two major divisions of scurvy are acute (clinically presenting) scurvy and chronic (subclinical) scurvy.

............1. ............Acute scurvy. This presents with the classical clinical picture of scurvy as a result of extremely low, or absent, levels of Vitamin C. Bruising, bleeding gums, general aches and pains, and ultimately, major haemorrhaging. Once presented with these signs and symptoms, unless treatment is commenced urgently, convulsions and death invariably follow. These final stages of Vitamin C deficiency can be induced quite rapidly by major acute infections, massive trauma or by endotoxin. *Endotoxin is produced by gram-negative organisms (most often of gut origin) and is, particularly in infants, a painful and sometimes extremely rapid precipitating factor of scurvy. The final stages of scurvy, of course may also be reached a lot more slowly, but once Vitamin C levels are extremely low, or absent, the signs and symptoms of acute scurvy will be induced.

............* ............ Endotoxin is a breakdown product of the cell walls of gram negative bacteria such as E.coli, Proteus, Pseudomonas, Salmonella and Shigella. It therefore occurs both normally and under disease conditions in the body, but is generally controlled by a variety of molecules - including Vitamin C. Being a breakdown product only, endotoxaemia can exist without bacteraemia or septicaemia.
..Acute (clinical) scurvy presents differently in adults and infants.
............(a) ............Infantile scurvy. This presents differently from adult scurvy because of the active growth sites in infants and young children. Localised signs are tenderness and swelling most marked at the knees and ankles. A disruption of the epiphysis especially in the growth plate area results in extensive areas of rarefaction demonstrable on x-ray. Enlargement of the costochondral junctions produces the scorbutic rosary. Acute scurvy infants are also invariably fretful, show a loss of appetite, and exhibit pallour.
............ ............Petechiae (small red spots due to escape of a small amount of blood) and bruises are less common than in adults. Bleeding may, however, occur anywhere in the skin or from mucous membranes including the gums (especially from teeth that have recently erupted).
............ ............In infancy, intracranial haemmorrhages are rapidly progressive if treatment is delayed, and death may occur. Microcytic, hypochromic anaemia is common. Older children may develop characteristic perifollicular haemorrhages and hair changes seen in the adult.
............(b) ............Adult scurvy. Early symptoms are weakness, fatigue, shortness of breath and aching bones, joints and muscles, especially at night. These symptoms are followed by characteristic changes in the skin and hair. Acne, broken and coiled hairs and perifollicular haemorrhages are common. Frank bleeding is a late feature of scurvy, however, bleeding into viscera or the brain can lead to convulsions and shock; death may occur abruptly.
............2. ............Chronic (subclinical) scurvy. This does not present with the classical picture of acute scurvy. Instead, as a result of chronically low levels of Vitamin C, patients are in poor health and have low resistance to disease, poisons and other stresses due to the vital role of Vitamin C in supporting the immune system, detoxification and glandular function. This is probably the most common presentation of scurvy in the modern era.

General Discussion

............Mention acute scurvy to health practitioners and they will immediately think of debilitating sickness, bruising and haemorrhage.
............Chronically very low levels of Vitamin C may ultimately result in an acute presentation of scurvy. As Vitamin C is required as a cofactor in the manufacture of healthy, strong cross-linked collagen fibres, any deficiency in Vitamin C can manifest as poorly cross-linked, weaker, collagen fibres and/or lower levels of total collagen in the connective tissue. In either case the tensile strength of the connective tissue will be weakened. Perivascular mucopolysaccharide secretion may also be decreased in Vitamin C deficiency. The final result is capillary walls that are very fragile making the person much more subject to bruising and haemorrhage. In acute scurvy this can manifest as petechiae, generalised bruising and intracranial and periosteal haemorrhages.

............Vitamin C may also be involved as a cofactor in the coagulation cascade. The bleeding tendency due to fragile capillary walls will therefore be accentuated. Haemorrhage may be further increased by excessive circulating levels of endotoxin (endotoxaemia). Endotoxin in the blood stream is normally adsorbed by a host of normal metabolites including bilirubin and uric acid. Notably, Vitamin C is very important in the adsorption and inactivation of endotoxin. This adsorption can produce a rapid reduction in Vitamin C levels.

............Endotoxin, produced by gram-negative organisms (most often of gut origin such as E.coli) is, particularly in infants, a painful and sometimes extremely rapid, precipitating factor of acute scurvy. Excess endotoxin can induce widespread weakening of the endothelial lining of the capillary walls, weakening them and inducing haemorrhage. Vitamin C levels can quickly be compromised during this endotoxaemia, or their previously low levels may allow the endotoxin to act extremely quickly - which can exacerbate the bleeding tendency. Widespread haemorrhage and death can follow quite quickly.

............The amount of Vitamin C required to treat the life threatening symptoms (such as haemorrhages, convulsions and shock) of acute scurvy is in general, probably quite small - maybe of the order of hundreds of milligrams rather than grams. However, the amount of Vitamin C required to treat the underlying or resulting diseases of Vitamin C deficiency, may well be much higher - in the order of many grams/day for an adult. High levels of Vitamin C are notably very virucidal, detoxifying and a potent stimulant of the immune system. This is certainly a point of scientific debate but is based on over 50 years of clinical observations by myself and numerous notable physicians and scientists around the world including many published papers in credible scientific and medical journals. Additionally, time and time again, I (and numerous other physicians) have observed the ‘miraculous’ results of many grams of intravenous Vitamin C in treating, in particular, acute viral disorders. Furthermore, on many occasions, when high oral doses of Vitamin C did not work, I have found that under some circumstances 500mg or even considerably more injected intramuscularly into the buttocks of severely ill infants resulted in rapid resolution of their life threatening illness. The levels of Vitamin C required to maintain adequate tissue levels, under most circumstances can be obtained from oral doses - either through diet or through oral supplements. However, when the body is acutely stressed the need for higher levels of Vitamin C is increased. These high levels are difficult to obtain only through diet and/or oral supplementation, especially when gut absorption is poor (due for example to perasitic infection, diarrhoea or other inflammatory conditions). Under these circumstances the delivery of Vitamin C needs to bypass the gastro-intestinal tract and be delivered via intramuscular or intravenous injection. The history of my understanding of this phenomenon occupies much of the subject of this book.

Refs:
............1. ............Scurvy, Past and Present by Alfred F. Hess, MD, 1920, J.B. Lippincott Company.
............2. ............Vitamin C, Vols 1 to 3 by Professor Alan B. Clemetson, 1989, CRC Press.
............3. ............Handbook of Vitamins, 2nd Edition, Ed by Laurence Machlin, 1991, Marcel Dekker, Inc.
A CHALLENGE

............There has been (and still is) a tendency to ‘rubbish’ Vitamin C. Why this substance has been singled out, I believe, is riddled with complex politics. There, more often than not, is very little good quality science emenating from the opponants of high levels of Vitamin C supplementation.

............Now, I understand and empathise with all those medical doctors, nutritionists, and other health professionals (who have been taught at Universities and other institutions) that we require only 40 - 60mg/day of Vitamin C to prevent scurvy. So much more knowledge now abounds in the literature to demonstrate the rapid utilisation of Vitamin C under a whole range of stressful conditions - necessitating higher levels of supplementation to prevent chronic and acute scurvy.

............Why don’t the academics and general medical community recognise this? Well, the answer almost certainly lies in ‘funding’ of research.
............New, complex, exciting, exotic and patented drugs are required to make money for major pharmaceutical compaines. There simply is very little money in promoting Vitamin C as one of the most important fundamental nutrients in treating many, if not most, of the chronic and acute diseases of mankind.
............I challenge anyone to question the validity of my findings in this book. The implications of my discoveries (verified and validated by numerous physicians and scientists - including nobel prize laureate Linus Pauling) are far-reaching. Correct and maintain Vitamin C levels at all times as a primary fundamental treatment in virtually all clinical situations. Patients will benefit enormously! To not pay attention to this, as a primary method of treatment, I believe, with the passage of time, will become unheard of.

............Naturally, other supplements, drugs and methods of treatment may also be required. However, if anybody wishes to dispute my findings, the challenge I would like to make is that they come up with more than one peer reviewed scientific paper that have stood the test of time and not been invalidated subsequent to their initial publication.

STATEMENT

............To photographically depict or write about individuals who are dead is disturbing to many Aborigines. I respect the reasons for this and know that parts of this book will create resentment and sorrow.

............By fate and choice I have been burdened with the responsibility of doing what I can to improve the intolerable state of Aboriginal health in Australia. If advances are to be made it is necessary to make available details of the battles that have been fought and the deaths of those who have paid the price of being poor and black. I can recall many instances where publicity leading to public awareness and demands has saved lives. Often I look at a photograph of a sweet little girl, dressed in a pretty pink dress, and sitting wondering eyed on my office couch. Her ankles and elbows display the scars of medical intervention. She was there only because someone (a nurse) had read about my work and had the courage to apply the right treatment.

............There is, therefore, no need for me to ask for forgiveness for tearing apart some things that normally should remain in perpetual darkness. I ask only that people understand and utilise what we have learned rather than allow some who are alive today to die before their time.

Archie Kalokerinos.

A DISCLAIMER

............What is written in this book is not intended as a total replacement for standard medical procedures. Whenever a medical problem surfaces the standard process involving the taking of a case history, a physical examination, special investigations, if necessary, and referral to a specialist or specialist team, if necessary, should be carefully followed.

............Vitamin and mineral supplements, including intravenously administered Vitamin C, are not intended as total replacements for standard medications or standard treatments. Advice from a qualified and experienced practitioner is recommended in all cases.

............Self-diagnosis and self-treatment can be dangerous and is not recommended. If a conflict arises between a patient and a practitioner, and cannot be easily resolved, it is recommended that another practitioner be consulted.

A. Kalokerinos

Photos > Working Life

submitted by George Poulos on 26.05.2004

Foreword - Medical Pioneer of the 20th Century. Dr. Archie Kalokerinos, an Autobiography

FOREWORD
by
Dr. Ian Dettman Ph.D. (Biochem),
F.R.M.I.T. (Microbiol, Biochem, Genetics), ND.

............Dr Archie Kalokerinos is a gentle, sensitive, dedicated man. He has not sought personal gain as the prime motive for the help he has given to his fellow human beings. Even now, well into his 70’s, he still gives his time
freely to help people that he believes are being treated unfairly.

............Like all of us, Archie can become outraged at injustice and he becomes especially angry when young infants may be dying because of ignorance and/or bureaucratic blindness by some areas of the medical establishment. Not only did Archie perceive poor health and injustice in the Aboriginal community, he
vigorously pursued the truth behind its causes.

............Dr Kalokerinos challenged not only government officials but the very
foundations of modern medicine. His acute powers of observation and persistent
determination to evaluate situations honestly and fairly led of course to a
great deal of conflict in his professional life.

............This is an exciting book. It tells of the early days of Greek migrant struggle, of his adventures at medical school and early understanding of
bureaucratic bungles and cover up by some medical incompetents. The seeds are
sown in these early years for the adventures (truly spectacular “Hollywood”
style) to come.

............His disillusionment with the medical establishment was reinforced when
they refused to believe or to do anything about the extremely high rate of infant death amongst the Aboriginal population. He searched for answers, and despite practicing all the university based medicine he was taught, the children (mainly Aborigines) continued to die.

............His disenchantment with these medical outcomes led him to postpone his
medical career. He went to seek his fortune as an opal miner. Like all aspects of his life, Archie developed a deep understanding of opals and opal
mining. In fact he became a world expert in opals and has authored some books on the subject. However, even in this area of life, his honesty and sense of fair play were set to lead him into some of the biggest adventures in his
life. Because of his medical doctor status some of the villains involved in a
multimillion dollar opal robbery confided in him, and he eventually became a victim of their wrath.

............During this opal mining time, Archie started to solve the jigsaw puzzle
of the high rate of Aboriginal death. He returned to medicine and started another enthralling series of events. Archie and Dr Glen Dettman (Medical Scientist) became inseparable at this stage in solving many of the complex medical issues surrounding the high rate of Aboriginal infant death. Vitamin C was found to be a critical factor. Archie and Glen travelled the world several times and shared their experiences at many international conferences. They
befriended many notable scientists and doctors including Professor Linus Pauling (the only man to have won two unshared Noble Prizes), Dr Frederick Klenner (physician extraordinare), Dr Irwin Stone (a very astute Medical Scientist who championed the understanding of the requirements for Vitamin C
supplements), Dr Robert Cathcart (a very notable Orthopaedic Surgeon who invented the modified prosthetic hip, and later went on to become intensely involved in nutritional therapies), Dr Bob Erdmann, Dr Roy Kupsinell and Dr Wendell Belfield (a very experienced and successful orthomolecular veterinarian who has authored several books) and many others.

............Because of the perserverence of Dr Kalokerinos he successfully reduced
the Aboriginal infant death rate from virtually every second child who presented with some risk factor, to zero. He kept these records of the reduction in the mortality rate for 10 years. But still, many Health Authorities with predetermined bigoted concepts that Vitamin C was only good for preventing scurvy, refused to believe him.

............I recommend this book to all sections of the population. It’s full of excitement. It will make you laugh, it will make you cry. It will have you
not wanting to put the book down right to the very end.

Recently, Dr Kalokerinos has been awarded Greek Australian of the Century by the very notable and considerable Greek Community in Australia. Furthermore, it has been suggested that he may be in line for an Australian Medical Doctor of the
Century award. Why he has not been granted a formal award by the Australian
Government for his discoveries and achievements I cannot understand.

............God bless Dr Kalokerinos, he is a courageous man, one whose discoveries, I believe, have saved countless lives. Furthermore his message of correcting some very basic nutritional deficiencies (especially Vitamin C) will eventually become enshrined in basic medical doctrine.

Ian Dettman Ph.D.

Photos > Working Life

submitted by George Poulos on 26.05.2004

Archie Kalokerinos - GREEK AUSTRALIAN OF THE CENTURY

8th February 2000

Daan Spijer

The Australian Greek community has honoured Dr. Archie Kalokerinos, MBBS, FACNEM, by naming him Greek Australian of the century.

This is a singular recognition of the wonderful work done by Dr. Kalokerinos in his many years as a GP, ministering to small and remote communities in NSW and the Northern Territory.

Dr. Kalokerinos was a pioneer in the recognition of vitamin C deficiency as a major cause of morbidity and death, especially among the Aboriginal children. His book Every Second Child (see booklist) was lauded by some and criticised by many - the latter totally failing or unwilling to understand the importance of what Dr. Kalokerinos was trying to make the world aware of.

It is a tribute to his persistence and dedication that he persevered in the face of vicious attacks against him by colleagues and the medical establishment. Like so many pioneers, he saw what everyone saw but no-one else was willing to acknowledge. There were times when Dr. Kalokerinos had to physically fight other medical professionals in order to save the life of a child.

More recently, Dr. Kalokerinos has been sought after to give evidence in the Courts as a witness for the defence of people charged with the death of babies through physical abuse. His evidence has been accepted by the Courts that these children could also have died from scurvy, or vitamin C deficiency - the symptoms include bruising and internal bleeding. He does not say that people aren't abusing children in their care; however, the possibility exists that in many cases the accused are innocent and the child died of vitamin C deficiency.

From the Australasian College of Nutritional and Environmental Medicine(ACNEM) website, reproduced with permission, for which we are very grateful.
We thank in particular, Daan Spijer
CEO.

See,

See, http://www.acnem.org

Photos > Working Life

submitted by George Poulos on 26.05.2004

Archie Kalokerinos - Extracts from Chapter 21: Medical Pioneer of the 20th Century

Extracts from Chapter 21:

Medical Pioneer of the 20th Century by Dr. Archie Kalokerinos

For a review of the book, see Culture, subsection, Bibliography.

The Trial of Nancy Young

…Evelyn was born on February 23, 1968. Superficially, like most Aboriginal infants, she was healthy. When discharged to the reserve she weighed just over eight pounds. Nobody bothered to check the environment to which Evelyn was going. Nobody bothered to find out if Nancy could afford to feed her. Nobody bothered about anything, but Evelyn was sent to suffer for a crime she had not committed - being born into a world that would not care for her. But the fact is that this care could have been provided. The machinery was there - health workers and officials; money was available for welfare. The crime was that this was not provided. Of course, it could be argued that this was Nancy’s responsibility but think of her situation - developed over the years. Think of the entire Aboriginal problem. Was Nancy responsible?

In retrospect I know that Evelyn, at birth, even though she appeared to be healthy, was not. Because of her poor diet her Vitamin C status was almost certainly low. Her immune responses, like that of almost all Aboriginal infants, must have been incapable of dealing with the insults about to be hurled at them.…

…From the time of discharge from hospital as a newborn Evelyn was fed on a brand of powdered milk known as ‘Sunshine Milk’. This was never intended to be a food for infants and was not fortified with vitamins. However, it was a ‘standard’ food for infants in many parts of Australia. Problems only arose when vitamins were not added. Nancy had not been told to do this.…

…When she was discharged, [from hospital] her mother was advised to feed her with vegetables, potato and pumpkin.…In actual fact, even though Evelyn was so young, such a diet, up to a point, may have suited her - but only if she was a healthy infant. Furthermore, Nancy did not have money to buy vegetables.

At this stage nothing was done to assist Evelyn or advise Nancy how feedings should be prepared. No arrangements were made for a follow-up. Nothing was said about the low weight gain or the fact that even while in hospital weight gain had been almost zero.

Thus, for two months, Evelyn ran the gauntlet of reserve conditions, poor diet and infections. It is a miracle that she survived as long as she did.…she died at 4am on July 9. She had been treated with antibiotics, both penicillin and chloromycetin. Her temperature was elevated for the 24 hours prior to her death.…

…[from the post-mortem report] ‘On external examination there was extensive bruising over the sacrum, the lower back, about the ankles, wrists, shoulders and on the right side of the chest. There was a puncture mark on the right side of the chest posteriorly where a subcutaneous drip was inserted. On incising the bruised areas bruising was evident in the subcutaneous tissues. Examination of the cranial cavity was normal. On macroscopic examination there was patchy bronchopneumonia on both lower lobes of the lungs. Subsequent microscopic examination showed an acute interstitial pneumonitis. This was an acute pneumonia. The pericardium, heart and blood vessels were normal. The stomach was small and pale. It contained a small amount of milky material. There was a marked absence of fat from the mesenteric and retroperitoneal tissues. They are tissues fixed to the intestines and in front of the muscles of the back. The liver appeared enlarged and pale. The other organs were normal. The immediate cause of death was bronchopneumonia. Contributing to her death was her state of malnutrition.’…

…The Defender [at Nancy Young’s manslaughter trial] did his homework well. Sometimes I think that it was the hand of God that led him to check the literature on Aboriginal infant deaths. He found many references to malnutrition, neglect, ignorance, socioeconomic problems and so forth. He also found the letter that I had written in response to the advice received from my brother, James.

The Defender could now see that Evelyn might have died from causes not associated with criminal neglect or maltreatment. It was possible that Evelyn had scurvy! And that is why I received that famous phone call. A few days later I was reading transcripts of the court hearings.

I sat down to a session of horror, grief, disbelief and sorrow. I cried as I thought of other Aboriginal infant deaths and of infant deaths all over the world.

As I read the reports I relived my experiences with Aborigines. I visualised the days when Europeans first came to Australia and destroyed a culture so beautiful they could not understand. I thought about the diseases we introduced, the terror of the massacres and the way we took and violated the sanctity of the land. I thought of the children who died in my arms and I thought of those who survived. I remembered Billy Pepper, the deserts, the legends. All this I thought about and I knew how Nancy must have been suffering.

She was, undoubtedly, Aboriginal in her thinking. Her associates like ‘Ten Cent Jackson’ the rainmaker were the last of the traditional Aborigines in the area. Her desire to live in her ‘tribal home’ and not move to a more tolerable place was another demonstration of her Aboriginal sensitivity. This meant that Nancy was subjected to the inability to fit into the European society. She had a feeling of hopelessness and the desire to escape to the comfort of alcoholic binges. All Australians, I felt, should weep for Nancy - not charge her with manslaughter.

The medical reports were a litany of horror. To me, the facts were clear. Evelyn had been fed for months on a diet of unfortified Sunshine Milk. Her recurrent colds (demonstrated by a running nose) and bouts of diarrhoea would have used up what little reserve of Vitamin C she possessed. Even before birth Evelyn was deficient because her mother’s diet was deficient.

Failure to thrive was, therefore, inevitable. If Nancy had been given correct advice concerning feedings after Evelyn’s first admission to hospital, and if suitable welfare had been arranged, Evelyn would not have died.

During Evelyn’s last days, if a diagnosis of scurvy had been made instead of a diagnosis of maltreatment, the outlook may have been different.

My evidence, case histories and colour slides, was presented. My opinion was asked for and recorded. But it was a waste of time. Nancy was found guilty. I watched as she was escorted away to jail. But it was not just to any jail. It was to Boggo Road Jail where her mother died while she was serving a sentence for the murder of the man with whom she was living. To incarcerate an Aboriginal person near the spirit of a dead relative is the ultimate hell. I tried to persuade the authorities to take Nancy to another jail. They did not listen. Nancy was psychologically destroyed.…

Dr. Kalokerinos’ book is full of such stories.

From Australasian College of Nutritional and Environmental Medicine, website; see,

http://www.acnem.org

Photos > Working Life

submitted by George Poulos on 02.06.2004

George Miller and Mel Gibson Mad Max Movies

George Miller and Mel Gibson on the set of Mad Max II.

Photos > Working Life

submitted by George Poulos on 01.06.2004

George Miller

George Miller

Photos > Working Life

submitted by George Poulos on 17.05.2004

Catherine Economos's Speech - Harry Poulos Testimonial Dinner, 8th May, 2004

President of the Ladies Auxiliary Committee, Kytherian Association of Australia, Catherine Economos, introducing Professor Harry Poulos to the audience.

For a brief overview of the Life and Achievements of Professor Harry Poulos, please refer to the People section - subsection - High Achievers - of kythera-island.net.

For impact of the Poulos [Tzortzopoulos] families in the evolution of Katoomba, NSW - see entry under History - General History - Poulos -Tzortzopoulos.

On Saturday 8th May, at The Hellenic Club Restaurant, 5th Floor, 251-253 Elizabeth Street, Sydney, the Kytherian Ladies Auxiliary organised a Testimonial Dinner for Emeritus Professor Harry Poulos.

The evening was a sellout, with 150 Kytherians, Greek-Australians and Australians, packing out the restaurant.

The dynamic President of the Ladies Auxiliary Committee, Catherine Economos, made the introductory speech, which provided glimpses into Professor Harry's personal and familial life.

Harry Poulos Testimonial Dinner
Speech

Presented by Catherine Economos

Good evening ladies and gentlemen, it gives me great pleasure to be speaking on behalf of the Kytherian Association of Australia.

In Shakespeare’s Henry IV, Falstaff asserts that “the better part of valour is discretion”. Perhaps, if Shakespeare were writing today, he would pen a similar verse about Emeritus Professor Poulos. For he would go a long way before he would find a better example of a man who has discretely gone about his work, achieving world class excellence, while seeking little fan fare.

For whenever you meet someone who knows Professor Poulos, the one comment they universally make, is that he is such an unassuming man, a man of great discretion.

It is this very quality of discretion that makes it doubly important for us as the Kytherian Association of Australia to conduct an evening such as this.

For it is important to acknowledge that within the extended Kytherian family, there are people achieving wonderful things and it is our role as an Association to convey these achievements to the wider community. But perhaps what makes this evening even more special, is the fact that these personal traits of Professor Poulos, show that he is a man driven not by personal gain, but simply by the idea of achieving excellence.

Professor Poulos, we feel fortunate as an Association to have a man of your calibre borne out of our community.

When it was suggested to the Committee that we hold a Testimonial dinner for Professor Poulos, the idea was unanimously embraced, as most of us had heard of the Professor and his outstanding achievements, but few of us had been fortunate enough to meet him.

So I set upon the task of tracking Professor Poulos down. With each phone call, I discovered he was in a different corner of the globe and soon realised just how much in demand he really is.
Professor Poulos was born in 1940 in Katoomba, the second son of George Poulos, and Eleni Zantiotis originally from the village of Karavas, Kythera.

George Poulos, like so many of his generation, joined the wave of migration and became part of the Kytherian diaspora. He arrived in Australia in 1926, leaving behind his wife Eleni and young son Theo.

In Australia, George joined his brother and two cousins who owned the Niagara Café in Katoomba. Some 13 years passed before the family was reunited. In 1939, after negotiating Australia’s immigration restrictions and surviving the depression of the ‘30’s, Eleni and by then 14 year-old son Theo, arrived in Australia. Harry was born the following year.

Reunited, George and Eleni set about creating a family home for their sons. George, a well-liked, gentle man, worked in various Katoomba establishments and Eleni, a talented woman, filled their home with handicrafts she created with flair, and meticulously tended her beautiful garden. Eleni will turn 100 this year and we know how very proud she will be feeling tonight.

It is also worth noting that Eleni’s mother, Professor Poulos’ grandmother, who joined the family in Katoomba, Stamatina Zantiotis, was also a lady of extraordinary ability, who was able to recite passages from any part of the bible.
_ _ _

Professor Poulos spent many hours of his youth kicking a ball around the backyard and avidly reading whatever children’s books came to hand. In fact, I’ve had stories recounted to me by cousins of Harry who, as children, scurried to hide their favourite books when they heard Harry was coming over, for fear they’d be borrowed, and not returned. This was the beginning of a lifetime of book collecting. His love of reading continues to this day, filling the many hours spent travelling the globe in his work as a consultant for Coffey Partners International.

In Katoomba, Harry learned to play the saxophone and violin, but it was the guitar that was to prove his forte. He joined a musical group and played regularly. At school he grasped concepts easily, but when challenges presented themselves, he had a unique way of dealing with them. He would lock himself in his room and play his guitar. When he emerged, the problem was solved.

Though never pressured by his parents, Harry duxed Katoomba High in 1956. After finishing school, he considered undertaking a pharmacy degree. But to do so, he first needed to obtain an apprenticeship. Luckily, he was unable to find a pharmacy with a position to fill. A simple comment pointed him in a direction that would change the practice of engineering and construction globally. “You’re good at maths - why don’t you do engineering” a teacher fortuitously remarked.

At 16, Harry Poulos moved to Sydney as the houseguest of his uncle and aunt, Angelo and Stella Zantey and entered Sydney University. He completed his undergraduate degree within four years achieving 1st class honours and followed straight on with his PHD.

Angelo and Stella marvelled at his ability to cope with a noisy household and streams of visitors. Harry studied in his room, classical music in the background, sometimes with two toddler cousins on his knee, if they promised to be quiet. Come midnight, he was known to shut himself in the bathroom so as not to disturb anyone, and play his guitar.

On departing the Zantey household, he presented his prize possession, his guitar, to his young cousin Harry, as a gesture of his deep appreciation for their warmth and support.

It was during his university years that Harry met Maria Langley, a Grafton girl, like himself of Kytherian decent and only sweet 16 at the time. At 19 she moved to Sydney where they met again. Maria invited Harry to her 21st birthday party. Unable to attend, he sent a gift, a pearl on a necklace, with a characteristically simple note, “A pearl for a pearl of a girl”.

Soon after he invited Maria on their first date – attending the very first Beatles concert in Australia, accompanied, of course, by Maria’s younger sister, Theodora.

Two years later he married his pearl of a girl at St George Church, Rose Bay. Over the ensuing ten years, Harry and Maria had four children, George, Elena, James and Peter. These were busy years, with Harry moving quickly up the university ranks, being appointed as a lecturer in the Department of Civil Engineering in his first year of their marriage, quickly rising to the position of Head of the School of Civil and Mining Engineering, researching, writing and delivering ground breaking papers.

But he managed to live a balanced family life by adhering to the maxim “never bring work home on weekends.” He read to the children at night, played cricket at the Bexley Club and Sydney Uni Veterans, collected cats (at one stage I’m told the Poulos household consisted of Mum, Dad, four kids and seven cats), and coaching the boys’ soccer team. An avid sports fan, one of his proudest achievements was coaching son James’s Under 16 Roselea team to the State Championships in 1987, boldly swooping the cup from a professionally-coached team.

Today, Professor Poulos’ family has grown to include seven beautiful grandchildren, with whom he will share many new sporting adventures.

- - -

Throughout his academic life, Professor Poulos could be relied upon to deliver brilliantly, without drama. His interests in books which started from a young age continues. His home is filled with books ranging from archaeology, history, art, sociology, philosophy and photography, and he is still adding to his collection.

As a Doctorate student, when asked what he did for a living, he’d answer, “I tinker with machines”. As Emeritus Professor, with a string of outstanding achievements, within Australia and abroad, he remains as approachable, affable and as discrete as ever. In the words of his son James, “I don’t think that there’s person who has met Dad who has not liked him. He is the classic gentleman, polite and dignified.”

- - -

Professor Poulos, it has been a pleasure compiling this brief outline of your life …. by all accounts it is a wonderful and honourable life.

On behalf of the Kytherian Association of Australia, I would like to say how deeply proud we are that you are a part of our extended Kytherian family.

Thank you.


....And thank you very much, Catherine Economos, for permission to reproduce your speech. [GCP].

Congratulations to the Ladies Auxiliary Committee, Kytherian Association of Australiam, for organising a superb evening.

Photos > Working Life

submitted by George Poulos on 14.05.2004

Professor Harry Poulos - Collected books, and papers in learned journals

Professor Harry Poulos, delivering his "Epistle of Civil Engineering to the Kytherians", Testimonial Dinner, 8th May, 2004, Hellenic Club, Sydney.
Most of the audience, including myself, did not realise how exciting and dynamic "civil engineering" could be.
Read a copy of this speech, in another entry, in this section.


Professor Harry Poulos
The University of Sydney
College of Sciences and Technology
Faculty of Engineering
Department of Civil Engineering
NSW 2006 Australia.


PROFESSOR HARRY G. POULOS - LIST OF PUBLICATIONS

(a) Books

(1) Poulos, H.G. and Davis, E.H., (1974) "Elastic Solutions for Soil and Rock Mechanics". John Wiley and Sons, New York.

(2) Poulos, H.G. and Davis, E.H., (1980) "Pile Foundation Analysis and Design". John Wiley and Sons, New York.

(3) Poulos, H.G., (1988) "Marine Geotechnics". Unwin Hyman, London.

Note: I have also prepared the SI version of the standard text "Soil Mechanics" by T.W. Lambe and R.V. Whitman, John Wiley and Sons, New York, 1979.


(b) Chapters in Books

(1) Morgan, J.R. and Poulos, H.G. (1968) "Settlement and Stability of Deep Foundations". Ch. 9 in `Soil Mechanics Selected Topics', Ed. I.K. Lee, pp. 528-609, Butterworths.

(2) Poulos, H.G. (1974) "Some Recent Developments in the Theoretical Analysis of Pile Behaviour". Ch. 7 in `Soil Mechanics - New Horizons', Ed. I.K. Lee, Butterworths.

(3) Poulos, H.G. (1977) "Settlement of Pile Foundations". Ch. 10 in `Numerical Methods in Geotechnical Engineering', Ed. C.S. Desai and J.T. Christian, McGraw-Hill, New York.

(4) Poulos, H.G. (1979) "Foundation Settlement Analysis Using Elastic Theory". In `The Profession of a Civil Engineer', Ed. D. Campbell-Allen and E.H. Davis, pp. 119-146, Sydney University Press.

(5) Duncan, J.M. and Poulos, H.G. (1981) "Modern Techniques for Analysis of Engineering Problems in Soft Clay". In `Soft Clay Engineering', Ed. E.W. Brand and P. Brenner, Elsevier.

(6) Poulos, H.G. (1987) "Piles and Piling", Ch. 52 of Ground Engineer's Reference Book, Ed. F.G. Bell, Butterworths, London.

Poulos, H.G. (1991) "Foundation Settlement Analysis". De Mello Volume, Editora Edgard Blucher Ltda, Sao Paulo, Brazil, pp. 379- 387.
Poulos, H.G. & Small, J.C. (2000). “Development of design charts for concrete pavements and industrial ground slabs”. Chapter 2, Design Applications of Raft Foundations, Ed. J.A. Hemsley, Thomas Telford, 39-70.

Poulos, H.G. (2000). “Practical design procedures for piled raft foundations”. “Chapter 15, Design Applications of Raft Foundations, Ed. J.A. Hemsley, Thomas Telford, 425-467.

Poulos, H.G. (2001). “Spannungen und setzungen im bodem”. Grundbau-Taschenbuch, Ed. U. Smoltzyk, Ernst und Sohn, Berlin.

Poulos, H.G. (2001). “Pile foundations”. Ch. 10 of Geotechnical and Geoenvironmental Engineering Handbook, Ed. R.K. Rowe, Kluwer Academic Press, Boston, pp. 261-304.

Poulos, H.G. (2002). “Calculation of stresses and settlements”. Chapter 1.6 of Geotechnical Engineering Handbook, Volume 1, Fundamentals, Ed. U. Smoltczyk, Ernst & Sohn, Berlin, pp. 259-312.

Small, J.C. and Poulos, H.G. (2003). “Structural integrity issues associated with soils and rock in civil engineering industries”. Ch. 1.11, Comprehensive Structural Integrity, Ed. Karihaloo et al, Elsevier, Amsterdam, pp. 217-239.


(c) Sole Papers

1967

(1) Poulos, H.G. (1967) "Stresses and Displacements in an Elastic Layer Underlain by a Rough Rigid Base". Geotechnique, 17:378- 410.

(2) Poulos, H.G. (1967) "The Use of the Sector Method for Calculating Stresses and Displacements in an Elastic Mass". Proc. 5th Australia-New Zealand Conference on Soil Mechanics, Auckland, pp. 198-204.

1968

(3) Poulos, H.G. (1968) "Analysis of the Settlement of Pile Groups". Geotechnique, 18:449-471.

(4) Poulos, H.G. (1968) "The Behaviour of a Rigid Circular Plate Resting on a Finite Elastic Layer". Civil Eng. Trans. of Inst. of Engrs. Aust., Vol. CE 10, pp. 213-219.

(5) Poulos, H.G. (1968) "The Influence of a Rigid Pile Cap on the Settlement Behaviour of an Axially-Loaded Pile". Civil Eng. Trans. of Inst. of Engrs. Aust., Vol. CE 10, 206-208.

1969

(6) Poulos, H.G. (1969) "The Settlement of Under-Reamed and Step-Taper Piles". Civil Eng. Trans. of Inst. Of Engrs. Aust., Vol. CE 11, 83-87.

1971

(7) Poulos, H.G. (1971) "The Behaviour of Laterally-Loaded Piles: 1. Single Piles". Jnl. Soil Mechs. and Fndns. Div. Amer. Soc. Civil Engrs. Vol. 97, No. SM5, 711-731.

(8) Poulos, H.G. (1971) "The Behaviour of Laterally-Loaded Piles: 11. Pile Groups". Jnl. Soil Mech. and Fndns. Div. Amer. Soc. Civil Engrs. Vol. 97, No. SM5, 733-751.

1972

Poulos, H.G. (1972) "The Behaviour of Laterally-Loaded Piles: 111. Socketed Piles". Jnl. Soil Mech. and Fndns., Div. Amer. Soc. Civil Engrs., Vol. 98, No. SM4, pp. 341-360.

(10) Poulos, H.G. (1972) "Load-Settlement Prediction for Piles and Piers". Jnl. Soil Mech. and Fndns. Div. Amer. Soc. Civil Engrs., Vol. 98, No. SM9, pp. 879-897.

(11) Poulos, H.G. (1972) "Difficulties in Prediction of Horizontal Deformations of Foundations". Jnl. Soil Mech. and Fndns. Div. Amer. Soc. Civil Engrs., Vol. 98, No. SM8, pp. 843-848.

(12) Poulos, H.G. (1972) "Settlement Analysis of Two Buildings on End-Bearing Piles". Proc. 3rd South-East Asian Conf. on Soil Eng., Hong Kong, pp. 129-134.

(13) Poulos, H.G. (1972) "Observed and Predicted Behaviour of Two Embankments on Clay". Geotechnical Eng., Vol. 3, No. 1, pp. 1-20.

(14) Poulos, H.G. (1972) "A Theoretical Approach to the Design of Caissons and Piers". Proc. 3rd South-East Asian Conf., on Soil Eng., Hong Kong, pp. 381-385.

1973


(15) Poulos, H.G. (1973) "Analysis of Piles in Soil Undergoing Lateral Movement". Jnl. Soil Mechs. and Fndns. Divn. Amer. Soc. Civil Engrs., Vol. 99, No. SM5, pp. 391-406.

(16) Poulos, H.G. (1973) "Load-Deflection Prediction for Laterally-Loaded Piles". Aust. Geomechs. Jnl., Vol. G3, No. 1, pp. 1-8.

1974

(17) Poulos, H.G. (1974) "Analysis of Longitudinal Behaviour of Buried Pipes". ASCE Speciality Conf. on Analysis and Design in Geot. Engineering, Austin, Texas, Vol. 1, pp. 199-223.

(18) Poulos, H.G. (1974) "Analysis of Pile Groups Subjected to Vertical and Horizontal Loads". Aust. Geomechanics Jnl., Vol. G4, No. 1, pp. 26-32.

1975

(19) Poulos, H.G. (1975) "Settlement Analysis of Structural Foundation Systems". Proc. 4th St.-East Asian Conf. Soil Eng., Kuala Lumpur.

(20) Poulos, H.G. (1975) "Lateral Load-Deflection Prediction for Pile Groups". Jnl. Geot. Eng. Div. ASCE, Vol. 101, No. GT1, pp. 19-34.

(21) Poulos, H.G. (1975) "Torsional Response of Piles". Jnl. Geot. Divn., ASCE, Vol. 101, No. GT10, pp. 1019-1035.

(22) Poulos, H.G. (1975) "Settlement of Isolated Foundations". Symposium on Recent Developments in Analysis of Soil Behaviour and their Application to Geotechnical Structures, University of NSW, pp. 181-212.

1976

(23) Poulos, H.G. (1976) "Behaviour of Laterally Loaded Piles near a Cut or Slope". Aust. Geomechs. Jnl., Vol. G6, No. 1, pp. 1-12.

1977

(24) Poulos, H.G. (1977) "Pile Groups and Pile Settlement". The Design of Piled Foundation. Extension Course. Aust. Geomechs. Soc., Vic. Group, Instn. Engrs. Aust., pp. 37-49.

(25) Poulos, H.G. (1977) "Estimation of Pile Group Settlement", Ground Engg., March, pp. 40-50.

1978

(26) Poulos, H.G. (1978) "Normalised Deformation Parameters for Kaolin". ASTM, Geot. Testing Journal, Vol. 1, No. 2, June, pp. 102-106.

1979

(27) Poulos, H.G. (1979) "Settlement of Single Piles in Non-homogeneous Soil". Jnl. Geot. Eng. Divn., ASCE, Vol. 105, No. GT5, pp. 627-641.

(28) Poulos, H.G. (1979) "Development of an Analysis for Cyclic Axial Loading of Piles". Proc. 3rd Int. Conf. Num. Methods in Geomechs., Aachen, Vol. 4.

(29) Poulos, H.G. (1979) "An Approach for the Analysis of Offshore Pile Groups". Proc. Conf. Num. Methods in Offshore Piling, Instn. Civ. Engrs., London.

(30) Poulos, H.G. (1979) "Group Factors for Pile Deflection Estimation". Jnl. Geot. Eng. Divn., ASCE, Vol. 105, No. GT12.

1980

(31) Poulos, H.G. (1980) "Comparisons Between Theoretical and Observed Behaviour of Pile Foundations". 3rd Australia-New Zealand Conf. Geomechs., Wellington.

1981

(32) Poulos, H.G. (1981) "Cyclic Axial Response of Single Pile." Jnl. Geot. Eng. Divn., ASCE, Vol. 107, No. GT1, pp. 41-58.

(33) Poulos, H.G. (1981) "Some Aspects of Skin Friction of Piles in Clay Under Cyclic Loading". Geotechnical Engineering, Vol. 12, No. 1.

(34) Poulos, H.G. (1981) "General Report - Session No. 5 - Soil-Structure Interaction". Proc. 10th Int. Conf. Soil Mech. Fndn. Eng., Stockholm, Vol. 4.

1982

(35) Poulos, H.G. (1982) "Developments in the Analysis of Static and Cyclic Lateral Response of Piles". 4th Int. Conf. Num. Methods in Geomechanics, Edmonton.

(36) Poulos, H.G. (1982) "Influence of Cyclic Loading on Axial Pile Response". 2nd Int. Conf. Num. Meths. in Offshore Piling, Austin, pp. 419-440.

(37) Poulos, H.G. (1982) "Single Pile Response to Cyclic Lateral Load". Jnl. Geot. Div. ASCE, Vol. 108, No. GT3, pp. 355-375.

1983

(38) Poulos, H.G. (1983) "Cyclic Axial Pile Response - Alternative Analyses". ASCE Spec. Conf. on Geot. Practice in Offshore Eng., Austin, pp. 403-421.

(39) Poulos, H.G. (1983) "Pile Foundations Subjected to Vertical Loading". Geot. Aspects of Coastal and Offshore Structures, Ed. Yudhbir and A.S. Balasubramaniam, A.A. Balkema, Rotterdam, pp. 61-78.

(40) Poulos, H.G. (1983) "Pile Foundations Subjected to Lateral Loading". Geot. Aspects of Coastal and Offshore Structures, Ed. Yudhbir and A.S. Balasubramaniam, A.A. Balkema, Rotterdam, pp. 79-93.

(41) Poulos, H.G. (1983) "Prediction of Performance of AIT Test Embankment". Geotech. Eng, Vol. 14, No. 2, pp. 147-163.

(42) Poulos, H.G. (1983) "Parametric Solutions for Strip Footings on Swelling and Shrinking Soils". Proc. 5th Int. Conf. on Expansive Soils, Adelaide, pp. 149-153.

1984

(43) Poulos, H.G. (1984) "Cyclic Degradation of Pile Performance in Calcareous Soils". Analysis and Design of Pile Foundations, ASCE, pp. 99-118.

1985

(44) Poulos, H.G. (1985) "Foundation Problems in Marine Calcareous Sands". Proc. Int. Symp. on Ocean Space Utilization, Tokyo, pp. 485-495.

(45) Poulos, H.G. (1985) "Ultimate Lateral Pile Capacity in Two-Layer Soil". Geotech. Eng, Vol. 16, No. 1, pp. 25-37.

1986

(46) Poulos, H.G. (1986) "Some Recent Developments in Pile Design and Determining of Pile Parameters". Keynote Lecture, Proc. Symp. on Piled Foundations for Engineering Structures, Auckland, pp. 1-17.

(47) Poulos, H.G. (1986) "Engineering Properties of Bass Strait Sediments". Recent Sediments in Eastern Australia-Marine Through Terrestrial, Ed. E. Frankel, J.B. Keene and A.E. Waltho. Pub. Geol. Soc. Aus. NSW Dirn. No. 2, pp. 77-85.

1987

(48) Poulos, H.G. (1987) "Analysis of Residual Stress Effects in Piles". Jnl. Geot. Eng., ASCE, Vol. 113, No. 3, pp. 216-229.

1988

(49) Poulos, H.G. (1988) "Contemporary Approaches to Pile Design". Keynote Lecture, First Hellenic Conf. on Geotechnical Eng., Athens, Vol. 1, pp. 1-18.

(50) Poulos, H.G. (1988) "From Theory to Practice in Pile Design". 2nd E.H. Davis Memorial Lecture, C.E. Trans. I.E. Aust., Vol. CE30, No. 3, pp. 107-137.

(51) Poulos, H.G. (1988) "Modified Calculation of Pile-Group Interaction". Jnl. Geot. Eng., ASCE, Vol. 114, No. 6, pp. 697-706.

(52) Poulos, H.G. (1988) "Cyclic Stability Diagram for Axially Loaded Piles". Jnl. Geot. Eng., ASCE, Vol. 114, No. 8, pp. 877-895.

(53) Poulos, H.G. (1988) "Evaluation of Grouted Pile Friction from Grouted Section Tests", Eng. for Calc. Sediments, A.A. Balkema, Rotterdam, Vol. 2, pp. 627-637.

1989

(54) Poulos, H.G. (1989) "The Mechanics of Calcareous Sediments". John Jaeger Memorial Lecture. Aust. Geomechanics, Special Edition, pp. 8-41.

(55) Poulos, H.G. (1989) "Prediction of Axial Behaviour of Piles". Predicted and Observed Axial Behaviour of Piles, Ed. R. J. Finno, ASCE Geot. Spec. Pub. No. 23, pp. 83-95.

(56) Poulos, H.G. (1989) "Cyclic Axial Loading Analysis of Piles in Sand". Jnl. Geot. Eng. ASCE, Vol. 115, No. 6, pp. 836-852.

(57) Poulos, H.G. (1989) "Pile Behaviour - Theory and Application". 29th Rankine Lecture. Geotechnique, Vol. 39, No. 3, pp. 365-415.

1990

(58) Poulos, H.G. (1990) "Design of Piles for Negative Friction". Piletalk International '90, Jakarta, pp. 123-129.

1991

(59) Poulos, H.G. (1991) "Analysis of Piled Strip Foundations". Computer Methods and Advances in Geomechanics, Ed., G. Beer, J. R. Booker, and J. P. Carter, A A Balkema, Vol. 1, pp. 183-191.

(60) Poulos, H.G. (1991) "Pile Group Design by Conventional and Limit State Approaches". Aust. Geomechs., No. 20, pp. 54-70.

(61) Poulos, H.G. (1991) "Foundation Economy via Pile-Raft Systems". Keynote Paper Piletalk 91, Kuala Lumpur, pp. 97-106.

(62) Poulos, H.G. (1991) "Relationship Between Local Soil Conditions and Structural Damage in the 1989 Newcastle Earthquake". Aust. Civil Eng. Trans., I. E. Aust., Vol. CE33, No. 3, pp. 181-199.

1992

(63) Poulos, H.G. (1992) "Class A Predictions of Pile Behaviour". Proc. 6th Aust.-N.Z. Conf. Geomechs., Christchurch, Vol. 1, pp. 185-189.

(64) Poulos, H.G. (1992) "Pile Foundation Settlement Prediction - Hand and Computer Methods". Int. Conf. on New Tech. for Foundn. Eng. Hanoi, Vietnam, Vol. 1, pp. 287-316.

(65) Poulos, H.G. (1992) "Interaction Between Piles and Expansive Soil". Proc. 9th Asian Reg. Conf. Soil Mechs. Foundn. Eng. Bangkok, Vol. 2, pp. 325-329.

1993

(66) Poulos, H.G. (1993) "An Approach to Seismic Microzonation for Environmental Planning and Management". Envir. Management, Geo-Water and Eng. Aspects, Ed. Chowdhury and Sivakumar, Balkema, Rotterdam, pp. 49-62.

(67) Poulos, H.G. (1993) "Piled Rafts in Swelling or Consolidating Soils". Jnl. Geot. Eng. ASCE, Vol 119, No. 2, pp. 374-380.

(68) Poulos, H.G. (1993) "Thoughts on the Future of Geomechanics Research in Australia". Aust. Geomechs. No. 23 (March), pp. 9-10.

(69) Poulos, H.G. (1993) "Effect of Earthquakes on Settlement and Axial Pile Response in Clays". Aust. Civ. Eng. Trans. I.E. Aust. Vol. CE35, No. 1, pp. 43-48.

(70) Poulos, H.G. (1993) "Settlement of Bored Pile Groups". Deep Foundations on Bored and Auger Piles, Ed. Van Impe, Balkema, Rotterdam, pp. 103-117.

(71) Poulos, H.G. (1993) "Patterns and Practices in Future Geotechnical Engineering Education". Proc. 13th ICSMFE, New Delhi, Vol. 5, pp.245-253.

(72) Poulos, H.G. (1993) "An Approximate Numerical Analysis of Pile-Raft Interaction". Int. Jnl. Num. Anal. Methods in Geomechs., Vol. 18, pp. 73-92.

(73) Poulos, H.G. (1993) "Alternative Design Strategies for Piled Raft Foundations". Keynote paper, 3rd Int. Conf. on Deep Foundn. Practice, Singapore, pp. 239-244.

(74) Poulos, H.G. (1993) “Design of Underpinning Piles to Reduce Settlement”. Vert. and Horzl. Deformns. of Foundns. and Embankments, Geotech. Spec. Pub. No. 40, ASCE, New York, Vol. 2, pp. 1000-1010.

(75) Poulos, H.G. (1993) "Settlement Prediction for Driven Piles and Pile Groups". Vert. and Horizl. Deformns. of Foundns, and Embankments, Geotech. Spec. Publ. No. 40, ASCE, New York, Vol. 2, pp 1629-1649.

(76) Poulos, H.G. (1993) "Class A Prediction of Shallow Footings Settlements". Pred. and Msd. Behaviour of Five Spread Footings on Sand. Geotech. Spec. Pub. No. 41, ASCE, New York, pp. 133-136.

(77) Poulos, H.G. (1993) "Design of Piles Subjected to Lateral Soil Movements". Keynote Lecture, Proc. 5th Indonesian Geotechnical Conference, Jakarta, pp. 1-32.

(78) Poulos, H.G. (1993) "Analysis and Design of Piles Through Embankments". Proc. Int. Conf. on Des. and Constrn. of Deep Foundations, Orlando, Florida, Vol. 3, pp 1403-1421.

(79) Poulos, H.G. (1993) "Effect of Pile Driving on Adjacent Piles in Clay". Can. Geot. Jnl., Vol. 31, No. 6, pp. 856-867.

1994

(80) Poulos, H.G. (1994) "Patterns and Practices in Future Geotechnical Engineering Education". Proc. 13th ICSMFE, New Delhi, Vol. 5, 245-253.

(81) Poulos, H.G. (1994) "An Approximate Numerical Analysis of Pile-Raft Interaction". Int. Jnl. Num. Anal. Methods in Geomechs., Vol. 18, 73-92.

(82) Poulos, H.G. (1994) "Alternative Design Strategies for Piled Raft Foundations". Keynote paper, 3rd Int. Conf. on Deep Foundn. Practice, Singapore, 239-244.

(83) Poulos, H. G. (1994) "Design of Underpinning Piles to Reduce Settlements". Vert. and Horizl. Deformns. of Foundns. and Embankments, Geotech. Spec. Pub. No. 40, ASCE, New York, Vol. 2, 1000-1010.

(84) Poulos, H.G. (1994) "Settlement Prediction for Driven Piles and Pile Groups". Vert. and Horizl. Deformns. of Foundns. and Embankments, Geotech. Spec. Publ. No. 40, ASCE, New York, Vol. 2, 1629-1649.

(85) Poulos, H.G. (1994) "Class A Prediction of Shallow Footing Settlements". Pred. and Obs. Behaviour of Fire Spread Footings on Sand. Geotech. Spec. Pub. No. 44, ASCE, New York, 133-136.

(86) Poulos, H.G. (1994) "Design of Piles Subjected to Lateral Soil Movements". Keynote Lecture, Proc. 5th Indonesian Geotechnical Conference, Jakarta, 1-32.

(87) Poulos, H.G. (1994). "Analysis and Design of Piles Through Embankments". Proc. Int. Conf. On Des. and Constrn. Of Deep Foundations, Orlando, Florida, Vol. 3, 1403-1421.

(88) Poulos, H.G. (1994). "Effect of Pile Driving on Adjacent Piles in Clay". Can. Geot. Jnl., Vol. 31, No. 6, 856-867.

1995

(89) Poulos, H.G. (1995). "Design of Reinforcing Piles to Increase Slope Stability". Canadian Geot. Jnl., vol. 32, No. 5, 808-818.

1996

(90) Poulos, H.G. (1996). "A Comparison of Some Methods for the Design of Piles Through Embankments". Special Lecture. Proc. 12th S.E. Asian Geot. Conf., Kuala Lumpur, (IEM), Vol. 2, 157-167.

(91) Poulos, H.G. (1996). "Professional Issues - General Report". Proc. 7th Aust. New Zealand Conf. on Geomechs., Adelaide, 939-942.

(92) Poulos, H.G. (1996). "The Warren Centre Underground Space Project". Keynote Lecture, Proc. 9th Aust. Tunnelling Conf. I.E. Aust., Sydney, 317-327.

1997

(93) Poulos, H.G. (1997). "Failure of a Building Supported on Piles". Proc. Int. Conf. On Foundation Failures, Singapore, I.E.S., 53-66 (Invited lecture).

(94) Poulos, H.G. (1997). "Piles Subjected to Negative Friction: A Procedure for Design". Geot. Eng., Vol. 28, No. 1, 23-44.

(95) Poulos, H.G. (1997). "Behaviour of Pile Groups with Defective Piles". Proc. 14th Int. Conf. Soil Mechs. Foundn. Eng., Hamburg, Balkema, Rotterdam, Vol. 2, 871-876.

1998

(96) Poulos, H.G. (1998). "The Design of Piles with Particular Reference to the Australian Piling Code". Symp. on Recent Developments in Piling In-Situ, Sydney, AGS, 1-21. Re-published in Australian Geomechanics, Dec. 1999, 25-39.

(97) Poulos, H.G. (1998). "A Method for Analyzing Piled Embankments". Proc. 13th S.E. Asian Geot. Conf., Taipei, 1: 551-556.

1999

Poulos, H.G. (1999. ”Common Procedures for Foundation Settlement Analysis – Are They Adequate?” Keynote Lecture, Proc. 8th Aust. – New Zealand Conf. Geomechanics, Hobart, 1: 1-25.

Poulos, H.G. (1999). “Some Aspects of the Design of Piled Raft Foundations”. Anal. Design and Constrn. and testing of Deep Founds., Ed. J.M. Roesset, ASCE Geot. Spec. Pub. No. 88, 96-114.

Poulos, H.G. (1999). “Geotechnical Education Towards 2000”. Theme Lecture, Proc. 14th Int. Conf. Soil Mechs. & Found. Eng., Hamburg, A.A. Balkema, Rotterdam, 4: 2565-2572.

Poulos, H.G. (1999). “Pile Defects – Influence on Foundation Performance”. Keynote Lecture, Proc. 4th Int. Conf. on Deep Founds., Singapore, CI Premier, 57-69.

Poulos, H.G. (1999). “Design of Slope Stabilizing Piles”. Keynote Lecture, Slope Stability Eng., Ed. Yagi, Yamaguchi & Jiang, A.A. Balkema, Rotterdam, 1:83-100.

Poulos, H.G. (1999). “The Effects of Ground Movements on Pile Foundations”. Darmstadt geotechnics, @; (4): 237-254.

Poulos, H.G. (1999). “Approximate Computer Analysis of Pile Groups Subjected to Loads and Ground Movements. “ Int. Jnl. Num. Anal. Methods in Geomechs., 23: 1021-1041.

Poulos, H.G. (1999). “The Design of Piles With Particular Reference to the Australian Piling Code”. Aust. Geomechanics, 34(4): 25-39.

2000

Poulos, H.G. (2000). Some Aspects of Pile Skin Friction in Calcareous Sediments”. Engineering for Calcareous Sediemnts, Ed. Al-Shafei, Balkema, Rotterdam, 2: 457-471.

Poulos, H.G. (2000). “Pile Load Test Methods – Applications and Limitations”. Libro Homenage a Jose Antonio Jiminez Salas, geotecnica en al ano 2000. Soc. Espanola de Mecanica del Suelo e Ingeeria Geotecnica, Madrid, 101-109.

Poulos, H.G. (2000). “Pile Testing – From the Designer’s Viewpoint”. Statnamic Loading Test, Ed. Kusakabe, Kuwabara & Matsumoto, Balkema, Rotterdam, 3-21.

Poulos, H.G. (2000). “The Pile-Enhanced Raft – An Economical Foundation System”. Keynote lecture, Proc. 11th Brazilian Congress on Soil Mechs., Brasilia, 4: 27-43.

Poulos, H.G. (2000). “Pile-Raft Interaction – Alternative Methods of Analysis”. Devels. in Theoretical Geomechs., Ed. D.W. Smith & J.P. Carter, Balkema, Rotterdam, 445-463.

2001

Poulos, H.G. (2001). “Piled Raft Foundations – Design and Applications”. Geotechnique, 51(2): 95-113

Poulos, H.G. (2001). “Geotechnical Education for 2000 and Beyond”. Keynote Lecture, Proc. 11th Asian Regional Conf. Soil Mechs. Geot. Eng., Seoul, Hong et al, Eds., Swets and Zeitlinger, 2: 579-590.

2002

Poulos, H.G. (2002). “Simplified Design Procedure for Piled Raft Foundations”. Deep Foundations 2002, Ed. M.W. O’Neill and F.C. Townsend, ASCE Spec. Geot. Pub. 116, 1:441-458.

Poulos, H.G. (2002). “Experiences with Soil Structure Interaction in the Far East”. Keynote Lecture, Proc. 2nd Int. Conf. Soil-Struct. Interaction in Civil Eng., Zurich, 1:39-65.

2003

Poulos, H.G. (2003). “The Significance of Ground Characterization for Foundation Deformation Prediction”. Chin Fung Kee Lecture, Geotechnical Engineering, Ed. K.K. Ho and K.S. Li, Balkema Rotterdam, 3: 125-145.

Poulos, H.G. (2003). “Slope Stabilization with Piles”. Jubilee Volume, Vienna Technical University, 2nd Ed., 23-40.

Poulos, H.G. (2003). “Deep Foundations – Can Further Research Assist Practice?” Theme Lecture, Deep Foundations on Bored and Auger Piles, Van Impe (Ed.), Millpress, Rotterdam, 45-55.

Poulos, H.G. (2003). “Analysis of Soil Extraction for Correcting Uneven Settlement of Pile Foundations”. Proc. 12th Asian Reg. Conbf. SMGE, Singapore, Ed. C.F. Leung et al, World Scientific, New Jersey,1: 653-656.

Poulos, H.G. (2003). “Pile Performance Prediction for the Emirates Project, Dubai”. Proc. Soil and Rock America 2003, Ed. Culligan, Einstein and Whittle, Verlag Gluckhauf GMBH, Essen, 3:1885-1894.

2004

Poulos, H.G. (2004). “An Approach for Assessing Geotechnical Reduction Factors for Pile Design”. Proc. 9th Australia-New Zealand Conf. on Geomechanics, Auckland, 1: 109-115.





(d) Joint Papers

1963

(1) Davis, E.H. and Poulos, H.G. (1963) "Triaxial Testing and Three-Dimensional Settlement Analysis". Proc. 4th Australia-New Zealand Conf. Soil Mechs. and Fnd. Eng. p. 233.

1965

(2) Davis, E.H. and Poulos, H.G. (1965) "Analysis Of Settlement Under Three-Dimensional Conditions". Symposium Of Soft Ground Engineering, Brisbane.

1967

(3) Davis, E.H. and Poulos, H.G. (1967) "Laboratory Investigations Of The Effects Of Sampling". Civil Engineering Trans. Of Inst. Of Engrs. Aust., Vol. CE9, No. 1, p. 88.

1968

(4) Davis, E.H. and Poulos, H.G. (1968) "The Use Of Elastic Theory For Settlement Prediction Under Three-Dimensional Conditions". Geotechnique, 18:67-91.

(5) Poulos, H.G. and Davis, E.H. (1968) "The Settlement Behaviour Of Single Axially-Loaded Incompressible Piles and Piers". Geotechnique, 18:351-371.

1969

(6) Mattes, N.S. and Poulos, H.G. (1969) "Settlement Of A Single Compressible Pile". Jnl. Soil Mechs. and Fndns. Div. Amer. Soc. Civil Engrs, Vol. 95, No. SM1, Pp. 189-207.

(7) Poulos, H.G. and Mattes, N.S. (1969) "The Behaviour Of Axially-Loaded End-Bearing Piles". Geotechnique, 19:285-300.

(8) Poulos, H.G. and Mattes, N.S. (1969) "The Analysis Of Downdrag In End-Bearing Piles Due To Negative Friction". Proc. 7th Int. Conf. Soil Mechs. Fndn. Eng., Vol. 2., pp. 203-209.

(9) Davis, E.H. and Poulos, H.G. (1969) "A Summary Of Some Recent Solutions For The Theoretical Behaviour Of Piles". 7th Int. Conf. Soil Mechs and Fndn. Engineering, Specially Session No. 8.

(10) Smiles, D.F. and Poulos, H.G. (1969) "The One-Dimensional Consolidation Of Columns Of Soil Of Finite Length". Aust. Jnl. Soil Research, 7, pp. 285-291.

1971

(11) Poulos, H.G. and Mattes, N.S. (1971) "Settlement and Load Distribution Analysis Of Pile Groups. Aust. Geomechanics Journal, Vol. G1, No. 1, pp. 18-28.

(12) Poulos, H.G. and Mattes, N.S. (1971) "Displacements In A Soil Mass Due To Pile Groups". Aust. Geomechanics Journal, Vol. G1, No. 1, pp. 29-35.

(13) D'Appolonia, D.J., Lambe, T.W. and Poulos, H.G. (1971) "Evaluation Of Pore Pressures Beneath An Embankment". Jnl. Soil Mechs. and Fndns. Div. Amer. Soc. Civil Engrs. Vol. 97, No. SM6, pp. 881-897.

(14) Mattes, N.S. and Poulos, H.G. (1971) "Model Tests On Piles In Clay". Proc. 1st Australia-New Zealand Geomechanics Conf., Melbourne, p. 254-259.

(15) Poulos, H.G. and Madhav, M.R. (1971) "Analysis Of The Movement Of Battered Piles". Proc. 1st Australia-New Zealand Geomechanics Conf., Melbourne, pp. 268-275.

(16) D'Appolonia, D.J., Poulos, H.G. and C.C. Ladd. (1971) "Initial Settlement Of Structures On Clay". Jnl. Soil Mech. and Fndns. Div. Amer. Soc. Civil Engrs. Vol. 97, No. SM10.

1972

(17) Poulos, H.G. and C.M. Gerrard. (1972) "Use Of Computers In Geomechanics". 1st Nat. Conf. On Use Of Computers In Civil Engineering, Brisbane, pp. 237-289.

(18) Poulos, H.G., Booker, J.R. and Ring, G.J. (1972) "Simplified Calculation Of Embankment Deformations", Soils and Foundations. Vol. 12, No. 4, pp. 1-17.

(19) Poulos, H.G. and Davis, E.H. (1972) "Laboratory Determination On In-Situ Horizontal Stress In Soil Masses". Geotechnique, Mar., Vol. 22, No. 1, pp. 177-182.

(20) Davis, E.H. And Poulos, H.G. (1972) "Rate Of Settlement Under Three Dimensional Conditions", Geotechnique, March, Vol. 22, No. 1, pp. 95-114.

(21) Poulos, H.G. and Davis, E.H. (1972) "The Development Of Negative Friction With Time In End-Bearing Piles". Australian Geomechanics Journal, Vol. G2, No. 1, pp. 11-20.

(22) Davis, E.H. and Poulos, H.G. (1972) "The Analysis Of Pile-Raft Systems", Australian Geomechanics Jnl., Vol. G2, No. 1, pp. 21-27.

1973

(23) Poulos, H.G. and Davis, E.H. (1973) "Theory Of Piles In Swelling and Shrinking Soils". Proc. 8th Int. Conf. Soil Mech. and Found. Eng. Moscow, Vol. 2.2, pp. 169-176.

1974

(24) Poulos, H.G. and Mattes, N.S. (1974) "Settlement Of Pile Groups Bearing On Stiffer Strata". Jnl. Geot. Eng. Div. ASCE, Vol. 100, Np. GT2, pp. 185-190.

(25) Poulos, H.G. and Ahlston, A.T. (1974) "A Study Of The Deformation Parameters Of Kaolin". Proc. 1st Aust. Conf. On Eng. Materials University Of NSW, Sydney, pp. 371-384.

(26) Booker, J.R. and Poulos, H.G. (1974) "Analysis Of Embankment Deformations Due To Water Loading". Geotechnical Engineering, Vol. 5, No. 1, pp. 73-87.

1975

(27) Poulos, H.G. and Mattes, N.S. (1975) "A Theoretical Examination Of Errors In Measured Settlement Of Test Piles". 2nd Australian-New Zealand Conf. On Geomechanics, Brisbane, pp. 174-178.

(28) Carter, J.P., Poulos, H.G. and Booker, J.R. (1975) "Effect Of Seepage On Embankment Deformations Due To Water Loading". 2nd Australian-New Zealand Conf. On Geomechanics, Brisbane, pp. 159-163.

(29) Poulos, H.G. and Davis, E.H. (1975) "Prediction Of Downdrag Forces In End-Bearing Piles". Jnl. Geot. Div. ASCE Vol. 101, No. GT2, p. 189.

(30) Brown, P.T., Poulos, H.G. and Wiesner, T.J. (1975) "Piled Raft Foundation Design". Proce. Symp. On Raft Foundations, CSIRO, Perth, WA, pp. 13-21.

(31) Balaam, N.P., Poulos, H.G. and Booker, J.R. (1975) "Finite Element Analysis Of The Effects Of Installation On Pile-Load Settlement" Geotechnical Eng. Vol. 6, No. 1, pp. 33-48.

(32) Davis, E.H. and Poulos, H.G. (1975) "Predicted and Measured Behaviour Of An Embankment On Boston Blue Clay". Aust. Geomechs. Jnl. Vol. G5, No. 1, pp. 1-9.

(33) De Ambrosis, L.P. and Poulos, H.G. (1975) "Use Of A Phenomenological Model To Analyse Soil Creep". Geotechnical Engineering, Vol. 6, No. 2, pp. 95-118.

1976

(34) Poulos, H.G., De Ambrosis, L.P. and Davis, E.H. (1976) "Method Of Calculating Long-Term Creep Settlement". Jnl. Geot. Divn., ASCE, Vol. 102, No. GT7, pp. 787-804.

(35) Booker, J.R. and Poulos, H.G. (1976) "Analysis Of Creep Settlement Of Foundations". Jnl. Geot. Eng. Divn., ASCE, Vol. 102, No. GT1, pp. 1-14.

(36) Booker, J.R. and Poulos, H.G. (1976) "Finite Element Analysis Of Piles In Viscoelastic Soil". 2nd Int. Conf. On Num. Methods In Geomechanics, pp. 425-437.

(37) Balaam, N.P., Poulos, H.G. and Booker, J.R. (1976) "Analysis Of Granular Pile Behaviour Using Finite Elements". International Conference On Finite Element Methods In Engineering, Adelaide, pp. 29.1-29.13.

1977

(38) Ladd, C.C., Foott, R., Ishihara, K. Schlosser, F. and Poulos, H.G. (1977) "Stress-Deformation and Strength Characteristics". State Of The Art Report, 9th Int. Conf. Soil Mech. and Foundn. Eng., Tokyo, Vol. 2, pp. 421-494.

(39) Balaam, N.P., Poulos, H.G. and Brown, P.T. (1977) "Settlement Analysis Of Soft Clays Reinforced With Granular Piles". Proc. 5th SE Asian Conf. Soil Eng., Bangkok, pp. 81-92.

1978

(40) Balaam, N.P. and Poulos, H.G. (1978) "Methods Of Analysis Of Single Stone Columns", Symp. On Soil Reinf. and Stab. Techniques, NSW Inst. Tech., Sydney, pp. 497-512.

(41) Brown, B.S. and Poulos, H.G. (1978) "Finite Element Analysis Of Reinforced Earth Embankments". Symp. On Soil Reinf. and Stab. Techniques, NSW Inst. Tech., Sydney, pp. 233-252.

1979

(42) Rowe, R.K. and Poulos, H.G. (1979) "A Method For Predicting The Effect Of Piles On Slope Behaviour". Proc. 3rd Int. Conf. Num. Methods In Geomechs., Aachen, Vol. 3, pp. 1073-1085.

(43) Poulos, H.G. and Adler, M.A. (1979) "Lateral Response Of Piles Of Non-Uniform Section". Proc. 6th Asian Reg. Conf. Soil Mechs. Fndn. Eng., Singapore, Pp. 327-331.

1980

(44) Davis, E.H. and Poulos, H.G. (1980) "The Relief Of Negative Skin Friction On Piles By Electro-Osmosis". 3rd Australia-New Zealand Conf. Geomechs., Wellington.

1981

(45) Brown, B.S. and Poulos, H.G. (1981) "Analysis Of Foundations On Reinforced Soil". Proc. 10th Int. Conf. Soil Mech. Fndn. Eng., Stockholm, Vol. 3, pp. 595-598.

1982

(46) Swane, I.C. and Poulos, H.G. (1982) "A Theoretical Study Of The Cyclic Shakedown Of Laterally Loaded Piles". Proc. 4th Int. Conf. Num. Methods In Geomechanics, Edmonton.

(47) Randolph, M.F. and Poulos, H.G. (1982) "Estimating The Flexibility Of Offshore Pile Groups". 2nd Int. Conf. Num. Meths. In Offshore Piling, Austin, Texas.

(48) Poulos, H.G., Uesugi, M. and Young, G.S. (1982) "Strength and Deformation Properties Of Bass Strait Carbonate Sands". Geot. Eng. Vol. 13, No. 2, pp. 189-211.

(49) Carter, J.P., Booker, J.R. and Poulos, H.G. (1982) "Finite Element Analysis Of The Creep Behaviour Of Laterally Loaded Piles". 4th Int. Conf. In Aust. On Finite Element Methods, Melbourne, pp. 99-103.

1983

(50) Poulos, H.G. and M.F. Randolph. (1983) "A Study Of Two Methods For Pile Group Analysis". Jnl. Geot. Eng. Divn., ASCE, Vol. 109, No. GT3.

(51) Balaam, N.P. and Poulos, H.G. (1983) "The Behaviour Of Foundations Supported By Clay Stabilised By Stone Columns". Proc. 8th Eur. Conf. Soil Mechs. Foundn. Eng, Helsinki.

1984

(52) Redman, P.G. and Poulos, H.G. (1984) "Study Of Two Field Cases Involving Undrained Creep". Geot. Eng. Jnl., ASCE, Vol. 110, No. 9, pp. 1307-1321.

(53) Poulos, H.G., Chua, E.W. and Hull, T.S. (1984) "Settlement Of Model Footings On Calcareous Sand". Geot. Eng., Vol. 15, No. 1, pp. 21-35.

(54) Poulos, H.G., Hull, T.S. and Chua, E.W. (1984) "Foundation Behaviour In Calcareous Sands". Proc. 9th Aust. Conf. On Mechs Of Structs and Materials, Sydney, pp. 28-32.



1985

(55) Swane, I.C. and Poulos, H.G. (1985) "Shakedown Analysis Of A Laterally Loaded Pile Tested In Stiff Clay". Civ. Eng. Trans. I.E. Aust., Vol. CE27, No. 3, pp. 275-280.

(56) Selby, A.R. and Poulos, H.G. (1985) "Lateral Load Tests On Model Pile Groups". Civ. Eng. Trans. I.E. Aust., Vol. CE27, No. 3, pp. 281-285.

(57) Brown, B.S. and Poulos, H.G. (1985) "Analysis Of Full-Scale Experimental Reinforced Embankments". Civ. Eng. Trans. I.E. Aust., Vol. CE27, No. 3, pp. 269-274.

(58) Poulos, H.G. and Chan, E.W. (1985) "Bearing Capacity Of Foundations On Calcareous Sand". Proc. 11th Int. Conf. Soil Mechs. Foundn. Eng, San Francisco, pp. 1619-1622.

1986

(59) Poulos, H.G. and Hewitt, C.M. (1986) "Axial Interaction Between Dissimilar Piles In A Group". Proc. 3rd Int. Conf. Num. Methods In Offshore Piling, Nantes.

(60) Poulos, H.G. and Hewitt, C.M. (1986) "Behaviour Of Pile Groups Containing Piles Of Unequal Length". Geotech. Eng, Vol. 17, No. 1, pp. 109-114.

(61) Pressley, J.S. and Poulos, H.G. (1986) "Finite Element Analysis Of Mechanisms Of Pile Group Behaviour". Inst. Jnl. For Num. and Anal. Methods In Geomechanics, Vol 10, pp. 213-221.

(62) Poulos, H.G. and Brown, P.T. (1986) "Problems In Determination Of Design Parameters From In-Situ Tests". Keynote Lecture, Symp. On Interpretation Of Field Testing For Design Parameters, Adelaide.

(63) Poulos, H.G. and Chan, K.F. (1986) "Laboratory Study Of Pile Friction In Calcareous Sand". Geotech. Eng. Vol. 17, No 2.

(64) Yuan, M. and Poulos, H.G. (1986) "Effect Of Loading Rate On Pile Skin Friction In Sands". Australian Geomechanics News, No. 11, pp. 19-23.

1987

(65) Booker, J.R., Carter, J.P., Small, J.C., Brown, P.T. and Poulos, H.G. (1987) "Some Recent Applications Of Numerical Methods To Geotechnical Analysis". Proc. 5th Int. Conf. In Aust. On Finite Element Methods, Melbourne, p. 123-132.

1988

(66) Allman, M.A. and Poulos, H.G. (1988) "Stress-Strain Behaviour Of An Artificially Cemented Calcareous Soil". Eng. For Calc. Sediments, A.A. Balkema, Rotterdam, Vol. 1, pp. 51-60.

(67) Hull, T.S., Poulos, H.G. and Alehossein, H. (1988) "The Static Behaviour Of Various Calcareous Sediments". Eng. For Calc. Sediments, A.A. Balkema, Rotterdam, Vol. 1, pp. 87-96.

(68) Kaggwa, W.S., Poulos, H.G. and Carter, J.P. (1988) "Response Of Carbonate Sediments Under Cyclic Triaxial Conditions". Eng. For Calc. Sediments, A.A. Balkema, Rotterdam, Vol. 1, pp. 97-108.

(69) Poulos, H.G. and Chan, K.F. (1988) "Tests On Model Instrumented Piles In Calcareous Soil". Eng. For Calc. Sediments, A.A. Balkema, Rotterdam, Vol. 1, pp. 245-254.

(70) Poulos, H.G. and Lee, C.Y. (1988) "Model Tests On Grouted Piles In Calcareous Sediment". Eng. For Calc. Sediments, A.A. Balkema, Rotterdam, Vol. 1, pp. 255-260.

(71) Allman, M.A., Poulos, H.G., Carter, J.P. and Yeung, S.K. (1988) "Model Footing Tests On Artificially Cemented Calcareous Soil". Proc. 5th Aust-New Zeal. Conf. On Geomechs., Sydney, pp. 268-272.

(72) Hewitt, C.M. and Poulos, H.G. (1988) "Cyclic Axial Response Of Model Pile Groups In Clay". Proc. 5th Aust-New Zeal. Conf. On Geomechs., Sydney, pp. 521-525.

(73) Lee, C.Y. and Poulos, H.G. (1988) "Predicted And Measured Performance Of Piles In Calcareous Soils". Proc. 5th Aust.- New Zeal. Conf. On Geomechs, Sydney, pp. 533-536.

(74) Lee, C.Y. and Poulos, H.G. (1988) "Influence Of Excess Pore Pressures On Axial Offshore Pile Response". Geot. Eng., Vol. 19, No. 1, pp. 73-93.

(75) Roper, H. and Poulos, H.G. (1988) "Glass-Mat Reinforced Epoxy Backings For Building Stone Strengthening". Eng. Geol. Of Ancient Works, Monuments And Historical Sites, A.A. Balkema, Rotterdam, Vol. 2, pp. 907-909.

(76) Lee, C.Y. and Poulos, H.G. (1988) "Jacked Model Pile Shafts In Offshore Calcareous Soils". Marine Geotechnology, Vol. 7, No. 4, pp. 247-274.

(77) Poulos, H.G., Randolph, M.F. and Semple, R.M. (1988) "Evaluation Of Pile Friction From Conductor Tests". Eng. For Calc. Sediments, A.A. Balkema, Rotterdam, Vol. 3, pp. 599-605.

(78) Randolph, M.F., Poulos, H.G. and Jewell, R.J. (1988) "Evaluation Of Pile Lateral Performance". Eng. For Calc. Sediments, A.A. Balkema, Rotterdam, Vol. 2, pp. 639-745.

(79) Lee, C.Y. and Poulos, H.G. (1988) "Effective Stress Dependence Of Pile Shaft Capacity In Calcareous Sand". Jnl. Geot. Eng., ASCE, Vol. 114, No. 10, pp. 1189-1193.

(80) Allman, M.A., Lee, C.Y. and Poulos, H.G. (1988) "Behaviour Of Model Grouted Piles In Cemented And Uncemented Calcareous Soils". Proc. BOSS 88 Conference, Trondheim, pp. 379-391.

1989

(81) Booker, J.R., Carter, J.P., Small, J.C., Brown, P.T., and Poulos, H.G. (1989) "Some Recent Applications Of Numerical Methods To Geotechnical Analysis". Computers And Structures, Vol. 31, No. 1, pp. 81-92.

(82) Lee, C.Y., Allman, M.A. and Poulos, H.G. (1989) "Static Behaviour Of Piles In Cemented Calcareous Sands". Foundation Engineering: Current Principles And Practices, Ed. F.H. Kulhawy, ASCE, New York, No. 1, pp. 485-499.

(83) Poulos, H.G. and Hull, T.S. (1989) "The Role Of Analytical Geomechanics In Foundation Engineering". Foundation Engineering: Current Principles And Practices, Ed. F.H. Kulhawy, ASCE, New York, Vol. 2, pp. 1578-1606.

(84) Kuwabara, F. and Poulos, H.G. (1989) "Downdrag Forces In Group Of Piles". Jnl. Geot. Eng., ASCE, Vol. 115, No. 6, pp. 806-818.

(85) Poulos, H.G. and Lee, C.Y. (1989) "Behaviour Of Grouted Piles In Offshore Calcareous Sand". Proc. 12th ICSMFE, Rio De Janeiro, Vol. 2, pp. 955-958.

(86) Wong, K.C., Poulos, H.G. and Thorne, C.P. (1989) "Expert Systems In Geotechnical Engineering". Proc. Aust. Conf. On Expert Systems In Eng., Arch, And Construction, Sydney, pp. 63-79.

(87) Wong, K.C., Poulos, H.G. and Thorne, C.P. (1989) "Site Classification By Expert Systems". Computers And Geotechnics, Vol. 8, pp. 133-156.

1990

(88) Poulos, H.G., Lee, C.Y. and Small, J.C. (1990) "Predictions For An Embankment Built To Failure On Malaysian Marine Clay". Proc. Int. Symp On Trial Embankments On Malaysian Marine Clays, Kuala Lumpur, Vol. 2, pp. 1.22-1.31.

(89) Lee, C.Y. and Poulos, H.G. (1990) "Axial Response Analysis Of Piles In Vertically And Horizontally Non-Homogeneous Soils". Computers And Geotechnics, Vol. 9, No. 3, pp. 133-148.

(90) Lee, C.Y. and Poulos, H.G. (1990) "Behaviour Of Offshore Piles Subjected To Storm Loading". Geot. Eng., Vol. 21, pp. 193-210.

(91) Rahman, M.S., Poulos, H.G. and Hwang C-W. (1990) "On Sea Floor Instability: Mechanics And Analysis". Reviews In Aquatic Sciences, Vol. 3, Issue 1, pp. 81-93.

(92) Poulos, H.G. and Sim, K.B. (1990)"Engineered Piles To Improved Cyclic Load Capacity". Marine Geotechnology, Vol. 9, pp. 131-140.

(93) Chin, J.T., Chow, Y.K. and Poulos, H.G. (1990). "Numerical Analysis Of Axially Loaded Vertical Piles And Pile Groups". Computers And Geotechnics, Vol. 9, No. 4, pp. 273-290.

1991

(94) Lee, C.Y., Poulos, H.G. and Hull, T.S. (1991). "Effect Of Seafloor Instability On Offshore Pile Foundations". Can. Geot. Jnl., Vol. 28, No. 5, pp. 729-737.

(95) Chin, J.T. and Poulos, H.G. (1991). "Axially Loaded Vertical Piles And Pile Groups In Layered Soil". Int. Jnl. Num. Anal. Methods In Geomechs., Vol. 15, pp. 497-511.

(96) Wong, K.C., Poulos, H.G. and Thorne, C.P. (1991). "Development Of Expert Systems For Pile Foundation Design". Aust. Civ. Eng. Trans., I. E. Aust., Vol. CE33, No. 2, pp. 119-127.

(97) Pells, P.J.N., Poulos, H.G. and Best, R.J. (1991). "Rock Reinforcement Design For A Shallow Large Span Cavern". Proc. 7th Int. Congress On Rock Mechanics, Aachen, Vol. 2, pp. 1193-1198.

(98) Lee, C.Y. and Poulos, H.G. (1991). "Tests On Model Instrumented Grouted Piles In Offshore Calcareous Soil". Jnl. Geotech. Eng., ASCE, Vol. 117, No. 11, pp. 1738-1753.

(99) Poulos, H.G., Lee, C.Y. and Small, J.C. (1991). "Predicted And Observed Behaviour Of A Test Embankment On Malaysian Soft Clay". Aust. Geomechs., No. 20, pp. 7-23.

(100) Chin J.T. and Poulos H.G. (1991). "A "T-Z" Approach For Cyclic Axial Loading Analysis Of Single Piles". Computers And Geotechnics, Vol. 12, pp. 289-320.

(101) Challa, P.K. and Poulos, H.G. (1991). "Behaviour Of Single Pile In Expansive Soil". Geotech. Eng. Vol. 22, No. 2, pp. 189-216.

1992

(102) Hull, T.S., Lee, C.Y. and Poulos, H.G. (1992). "Behaviour Of Fixed And Free Head Piles In A Laterally Sliding Soil". Proc. 6th Aust.-N.Z. Conf. Geomechs, Christchurch, Vol. 1, pp. 151-156.

(103) Poulos, H.G. and Al-Douri, R.H. (1992). "Influence Of Soil Density On Pile Skin Friction In Calcareous Sediments". Proc. 6th Aust.-N.Z. Conf. Geomech., Christchurch, Vol. 1, pp. 375-380.

(104) Nielsen, A.F., Lord, D.B. and Poulos, H.G. (1992). "Dune Stability Considerations For Building Foundations". Aust. Civ. Eng. Trans. Instn. Engrs. Aust., Vol. CE34, No. 2, pp. 167-174.

(105) Al-Douri, R.H. And Poulos, H.G. (1992). "Static And Cyclic Direct Shear Tests On Carbonate Sands". Geot. Testing Jnl., Astm, Vol. 15, No. 2, Pp. 138-157.

(106) Lee, C.Y. and Poulos, H.G. (1992). "Static And Cyclic Load Tests On Model Grouted Piles". Geotech. Eng. Vol. 23, No. 1, pp. 5-27.

(107) Chin, J.T. and Poulos H.G. (1992). "Cyclic Axial Pile Loading Analyses: A Comparative Study". Computers And Geotechnics, Vol. 13, No. 3, pp. 137-158.

(108) Airey, D.W., Al-Douri, R.H. and Poulos, H.G. (1992). Estimation Of Pile Friction Degradation From Shearbox Tests". Geot. Testing Jnl., Astm, Vol. 15, No. 4, pp. 388-392.

1993

(109) Poulos, H.G. Johnston, I.W. and Mostyn, G.R. (1993). "Priority Areas In Australian Geomechanics Research". Aust. Geomechs., No. 23, pp. 14-17.

(110) Harrison, H.B. and Poulos H.G. (1993). "Jack William Roderick 1913-1990". Historical Records Of Aust. Science, Aust. Acad. Of Science, Vol. 9, No. 3, pp. 270-277.

(111) Lee, C.Y. and Poulos, H.G. (1993). "Cyclic Analysis Of Axially Loaded Piles In Calcareous Soils". Can. Geotech. Jnl., Vol. 30, No. 1, pp. 82-95.

(112) Chen, L. and Poulos, H.G. (1993). "Analysis Of Pile-Soil Interaction Under Lateral Loading Using Infinite And Finite Elements". Computers And Geotechnics, Vol. 15, No. 4, pp. 189-220.

(113) Pells, P.J.N., Best, R.J. and Poulos, H.G. (1993). "Design Of Roof Support Of The Sydney Opera House Underground Parking Station". Proc. 8th Aust. Tunnelling Conf. Sydney, pp. 213-218.

(114) Al-Douri, R.H., Hull, T.S. and Poulos, H.G. (1993). "Influence Of Test Chamber Boundary Conditions On Sand Bed Response". Geot. Testing Jnl., Vol. 16, No. 4, pp. 550-562.

1994

(115) Al-Douri, R.H. and Poulos, H.G. (1994). "Cyclic Behaviour Of Pile Groups In Calcareous Sediments". Soils And Foundations, Vol. 34, No. 2, pp. 49-59.

(116) Makarchian, M. and Poulos, H.G. (1994). "Numerical Study Of Underpinning By Piles For Settlement Control Of Strip Foundations". Vert. And Horizl. Deformns. Of Foundns. And Embankments, Geotech. Spec. Pub. No. 40, Asce, New York, Vol. 1, pp. 303-313.

(117) Makarchian, M. and Poulos, H.G. (1994). "A Comparison Of Underpinning By Piles And Foundation Enlargement". Computer Methods And Advances In Geomechs., Siriwardane & Zaman (Eds), Balkema, Rotterdam, Pp. 2355-2360.

(118) Chen, L. And Poulos, H.G. (1994). "A Method Of Pile-Soil Interaction Analysis For Piles Subjected To Lateral Soil Movement". Computer Methods And Advances In Geomechs, Siriwardane & Zaman (Eds)., Balkema, Rotterdam, pp. 2311-2316.

(119) Makarchian, M. and Poulos, H.G. (1994). "Underpinning By Piles: A Numerical Study". Proc. 13th ICSMFE, New Delhi, Vol. 4, pp. 1467-1470.

(120) Al-Douri, R.H. and Poulos, H.G. (1994). "Interaction Between Jacked Piles In Calcareous Sediments". Proc. 13th Icsmfe, New Delhi, Vol. 4, pp. 1669-1672.

(121) Pell, R.J.N., Best, R.J. and Poulos, H.G. (1994). "Design Of Roof Support Of The Sydney Opera House Underground Parking Station". Tunnelling & Underground Space Technology, Vol. 9, No. 2, pp. 201-207.

(122) Al-Douri, R.H. and Poulos, H.G. (1994). "Behaviour Of Pile Groups In Calcareous Sand". Geotech. Eng. Vol. 25, No. 2, pp 3-19.

1995

(123) Al-Douri, R.H. and Poulos, H.G. (1995). "Predicted And Observed Cyclic Performance Of Piles In Calcareous Sand". Jnl. Geot. Eng., ASCE, Vol. 121, No. 1, pp 1-16.

(124) Poulos, H.G. and Small, J.C. (1995). "Development Of New Design Charts For Concrete Industrial Slabs". Proc. Concrete 95 Toward Better Concrete Structures, Brisbane, Vol. 2, Pp. 615-624.

(125) Poulos, H.G. And White, W. (1995). "Earthquake Response Of Typical Soil Deposits In The Newcastle Area". Proc. Conf. On Eng. Geology Of The Newcastle-Gosford Region, Newcastle, pp. 393-404.

(126) Lee, C.Y., Hull, T.S. and Poulos, H.G. (1995). "Simplified Pile-Slope Stability Analysis". Computers And Geotechnics, Vol. 17, No. 1, pp. 1-16.

(127) Al-Douri, R.H. and Poulos, H.,G. (1995). "Predicted and Observed Cyclic Performance Of Piles In Calcareous Sand". Jnl. Geot. Eng., ASCE, Vol. 121, No. 1, 1-16.

(128) Seedsman, R., Poulos, H.G. and Best, R. (1995). "Application Of Pile Theory To Ground Support Design". Proc. Underground Operators Conf. Kalgoorlie, 3-8.

(129) Love, D.N., Bierbaum, S.J., Poulos, H.G. and Greenhalgh, S.A. (1995). "Seismic Risk Analysis and Microzonation Of Adelaide". Proc. Pacific Conf. On Earthquake Eng. Melbourne, Vol. 2, 59-67.

(130) Tabucanon, J.T., Airey, D.W. and Poulos, H.G. (1995). "Pile Skin Friction In Sands From Constant Normal Stiffness Tests". Geot. Testing Jnl., ASTM, Vol. 18, No. 3, 350-364.

(131) Poulos, H.G., Chen, L.T. and Hull, T.S. (1995). "Model Tests On Single Piles Subjected To Lateral Soil Movement". Soils and Foundations, Vol. 35, No. 4, 85-92.

1996

(132) Makarchian, M. and Poulos, H.G. (1996). "A Theoretical Study Of Underpinning Of Rigid Circular Foundations By Piles". Proc. 6th Int. Conf. Pilings and Deep Foundations, Bombay, 1.16.1-1.16.6.

(133) Chin, J.T. and Poulos, H.G. (1996). "Cyclic Model Pile Tests In Calcareous Sand". 12th S.E. Asian Geot. Conf., Kuala Lumpur (IEM), Vol. 1, 447-452.

(134) Poulos, H.G., Love, D.N. and Grounds, R.W. (1996). "Seismic Zonation Of The Adelaide Area". Proc. 7th Aust. New Zealand Conf. On Geomech., Adelaide, 331-342.

(135) Chen, L.T. and Poulos, H.G. (1996). "Some Aspects Of Pile Response Near An Excavation". Proc. 7th Aust. New Zealand Conf. On Geomech., Adelaide, 604-609.

(136) Tabesh, A and Poulos, H.G. (1996). "Response Of Piles To Typical Earthquakes". Proc. 7th Aust. New Zealand Conf. On Geomech., Adelaide, 349-354.

(137) Poulos, H.G. (1996). "Measured and Predicted Settlements Of Shallow Foundations On Sand". Proc. 7th Aust. New Zealand Conf. On Geomech., Adelaide, 686-692.

(138) Sinha, J. and Poulos, H.G. (1996). "Behaviour Of Stiffened Raft Foundations". Proc. 7th Aust. New Zealand Conf. On Geomech., Adelaide, 704-709.

(139) Chin, J.T. and Poulos, H.G. (1996). "Tests On Model Jacked Piles In Calcareous Sand". Geot. Testing Jnl., ASTM, Vol. 19, No. 2, 164-180.

(140) Makarchian, M. and Poulos, H.G. (1996). "Simplified Method For Design Of Underpinning Piles". Jnl. Geot. Eng., ASCE, Vol. 122, No. 9, 745-751.

(141) Poulos, H.G. and Chen, L.T. (1996). "Pile Response Due To Unsupported Excavation-Induced Lateral Soil Movement". Can. Geotech. Jnl., Vol. 33, 670-677.

(142) Poulos, H.G. and Tabesh, A. (1996). "Seismic Response Of Pile Foundations - Some Important Factors". Paper No. 2085, 11th World Conf. On Earthquake Eng., Acapulco.

1997

(143) Poulos, H.G. and Chen, L.T. (1997). "Pile Response Due To Excavation - Induced Lateral Soil Movement". Jnl. Geot. & Geoenvir. Eng., ASCE, Vol. 123, No. 2, 94-99.

(144) Chen, L.T., Poulos, H.G. and Hull, T.S. (1997). "Model Tests On Pile Groups Subjected To Lateral Soil Movement". Soils and Foundns., Vol. 37, No.1, 1-12.

(145) Makarchian, M. and Poulos, H.G. (1997). "Model Footing Tests On Clay". Proc. 4th Int. Conf. On Civil Eng., Sharif Univ. Of Technology, Iran, Vol. 2, 278-287.

(146) Poulos, H.G., Small, J.C., Ta, L.D., Sinha, J. and L. Chen (1997). "Comparison Of Some Methods For Analysis Of Piled Rafts". Proc. 14th Int. Conf. Soil Mechs. Foundn. Eng. Hamburg, Balkema, Rotterdam, Vol. 2, 1119-1124.

(147) Sinha, J. and Poulos, H.G. (1997). "Piled Raft Foundation Systems In Swelling and Shrinking Soils". Proc. 14th Int. Conf. Soil Mechs, Foundn. Eng., Hamburg, Balkema, Rotterdam, Vol. 2, 1141-1144.

(148) Makarchian, M. and Poulos, H.G. (1997). "An Experimental Study Of Foundation Upgrading By Piles". Proc. 14th Int. Conf. Soil Mechs. Foundn. Eng., Hamburg, Balkema, Rotterdam, Vol. 2, 835-838.

(149) Chen, L.T. and Poulos, H.G. (1997). "Piles Subjected To Lateral Soil Movements". Jnl. Geot. and Geoenvir. Eng., ASCE, Vol. 123, 802-811.

(150) Gupta, V., Poulos, H.G. and Reid, S.G. (1998). "Micro-Zonation Of Delhi: An Urgent Need". Proc. 2nd Int. Conf. On Envir. Mgmt., Wollongong, Elseviour, Amsterdam, Vol. 2, 1055-1063.

(151) Chen, L.T. and Poulos, H.G. (1997). "Effects Of Tunnelling On Piled Foundations". Proc. Int. Conf. On Computer Meths. and Advances In Geomechanics, Wuhan, Yuan, Balkema, Rotterdam, Vol. 3, 2183-2188.

1998

(152) Loganthan, N. and Poulos, H.G. (1998). "Analytical Prediction For Tunnelling - Induced Ground Movements In Clays". Jnl. Geot. & Geoenvir. Eng., ASCE, Vol. 124, 9, 846-856.

1999

Poulos, H.G. and Bandyopadhyay, S. (1999). “Effect of Static Interaction on Vertical Vibration of Pile”. Jnl. Geotech. and Geoenvir. Eng., ASCE, 125(2): 155-157.

Chen, L.T., Poulos, H.G. and Loganathan, N. (1999). “Pile Responses Caused by Tunnelling”. Jnl. Geotech. and Geoenvir. Eng., ASCE, 125(3): 207-215.

Sinha, J. and Poulos, H.G. (1999). “Piled Raft Systems and Free Standing Pile Groups in Expansive Soils”. Proc. 8th Aust. – New Zealand Conf. Geomechs., Hobart, 1: 207-212.

Chen, L.T. and Poulos, H.G. (1999). Design Charts for Analysis of Piles Subjected to Lateral sSoil Movements”. Proc. 8th Aust. – New Zealand Conf. Geomechs., Hobart, 1: 367-373.

Reyno, A.J., Hull, T.S. and Poulos, H.G. (1999). “Effect of Pile Jacking on Adjacent Piles in Sand”. Proc. 8th Aust. – New Zealand Conf. Geomechs., Hobart, 1: 437-443.

Tabesh, A. and Poulos, H.G. (1999). “Kinematic Versus Static Interaction of Pile and Soil”. Proc. 8th Aust. – New Zealand Conf. Geomechs., Hobert, 1: 445-450.

Loganathan, N. and Poulos, H.G. (1999). “Tunnelling Induced Ground Deformations and Their Effects on Adjacent Piles”. Proc. 10th Aust. Tunnelling Conf., Melbourne, Aus. IMM, 241-250.

Mayne, P.W. and Poulos, H.G. (1999). “Approximate Displacement Influence Factors for Elastic Shallow Founadtions”. Jnl. Geot. and Geoenvir. Eng., ASCE, 125(6): 453-460.

Tabesh, A. and Poulos, H.G. (1999). “The Effect of Soil Yielding on Internal Pile response”. Earthquake Geot. Eng., Ed. Pedro S. Seco e Pinto, Balkema, Rotterdam, 1: 327-333.

Gupta, V., Poulos, H.G. and Reid, S.G. (1999). “Engineering Geology of Delhi: an Overview”. Indian Geot. Jnl., 29 (3): 262-274.

2000

Loganathan, N., Poulos, H.G. and Stewart, D.P. (2000). “Centrifuge Model Testing of Tunnelling-Induced Ground and Pile Deformations”. Geotechnique, 50 (3): 283-294.

Xu, K.J. and Poulos, H.G. (2000). “General Elastic Analysis of Piles and Pile Groups”. Int. Jnl. Num. Anal. Methods in Geomechs., 24: 1109-1138.

Xu, K.J. and Poulos, H.G. (2000). “Measured and Predicted Axial Response of Piles with Diameter Discontinuities”. Geot. Eng., 31(3): 171-191.

Sales, M.M., Cunha, R.P., Farias, M.M., Small, J.C. and Poulos, H.G. (2000). “Comparisons of Some Programs Analysing Classical Piled Raft Problems”. Geotech. Year 2000, Devels. in Geotech. Eng., AIT, Bangkok, 1: 317-326.

Cunha, R.P., Small, J.C. and Poulos, H.G. (2000). “Class C Analysis for a Piled Raft Case History in Gothenburg, Sweden”. Geotech. Year 2000, Devels. in Geotech. Eng., AIT, Bangkok, 1: 271-280

Xu, K.J. and Poulos, H.G. (2000). “Theoretical Study of Pile Behaviour Induced by a Soil Cut”. GeoEng 2000, CD Proceedings, Melbourne.

Chen, L.T., Poulos, H.G. and Loganathan., N. (2000). “Approximate Design Charts for Piles Adjacent to Tunnelling Operations”. GeoEng 2000, CD Proceedings, Melbourne.

Gupta, V., Poulos, H.G. and Reid, S.G. (2000). “Seismic Microzonation of Delhi”. GeoEng 2000, Melbourne, CD Volume.

Tabesh, A. and Poulos, H.G. (2000). “A Simple Method for the Seismic Analysis of Piles and its Comparison with the Results of Centrifuge Tests”. Proc. 12th World Conf. On Earthquake Eng., Auckland, New Zealand, Paper 1203.


2001

Wong, S.C. and Poulos, H.G. (2001). “Analysis of Piled Pavement System”. Comp. Methods and Advances in Geomechs., Ed. Desai et al, Balkema, Rotterdam, 3: 1395-1400.

Tabesh, A. and Poulos, H.G. (2001). “The Effects of Soil Yielding on Seismic Response of Single Piles”. Soils and Foundations, 41(3): 1-16.

Xu, K. and Poulos, H.G. (2001). “3-D Elastic Analysis of Vertical Piles Subjected to Passive Loadings”. Computers and Geotechnics, 28: 349-375.

Xu, K. and Poulos, H.G. (2001). A General Load-Settlement Analysis of Pile Groups”. Proc. 5th Int. Conf. On Deep Foundn. Practice inc. Piletalk, Singapore, 403-410.

Wong, S.C. and Poulos, H.G. (2001). Performance of Various Piled Embankment Systems”. Proc. 5th Int. Conf. On Deep Foundn. Practice inc. Piletalk, Singapore, 395-401.

Cunha, R., Poulos, H.G. and Small, J.C. (2001). “Investigation of Design Alternatives for a Piled Raft Case History”. Jnl. Geot. Geoenv. Eng., ASCE, 127(8): 635-641.

Liyanapathirana, S. and Poulos, H.G. (2001). “Assessment of Soil Liquefaction During Earthquakes”. Proc. 15th Int. Conf. Soil Mechs. Geot. Eng., Istanbul, Balkema, 1: 195-198.

Cunha, R., Pereira, J.H.F., Soares, J.M., Mota, N.M.B. and Poulos, H.G. (2001). “Backanalyses of Field Loading Tests on Deep Foundations in a Tropical Clay”. Proc. 15th Int. Conf. Soil Mechs. Geot. Eng., Istanbul, Balkema, 2: 869-872.

Xu, K.J. and Poulos, H.G. (2001). “Behaviour of a Pile Group Containing Defective Piles”. Proc. 15th Int. Conf. Soil Mechs. Geot. Eng., Istanbul, Balkema, 2: 1039-1042.

Tabesh, A. and Poulos, H.G. (2001). “Pseudostatic Approach for Seismic Analysis of Single Piles”. Jnl. Geot. Geoenv. Eng.,m ASCE, 127(9): 757-785.

Xu, K.J. and Poulos, H.G. (2001). “Interaction Analysis of Intact and Defective Piles”. Computer Methods and Advances in Geomechs., Ed. Desai et al, Balkema, Rotterdam, 2: 1507-1510.

Nguyen, V.D., Small, J.C. and Poulos, H.G. (2001). “The Effects of Groundwater Pumping on Piled Foundations”. Computational Mechanics: New Frontiers for the New Millennium, Ed. S. Valliappan and N. Khalili, 433-438.

Loganathan, N., Poulos, H.G. and Xu, K.J. (2001). “Ground and Pile-Group Responses due to Tunnelling”. Soils and Foundations, 41(1): 57-67.

2002

Loganathan, N. and Poulos, H.G. (2002). “Centrifuge Modelling: Tunnelling-Induced Ground Movements and Pile Behaviour”. Proc. 28th World Tunnel Congress, Sydney, Paper FP.03, CD Volume.

Poulos, H.G., Carter, J.C. and Small, J.C. (2002). “Foundations and Retaining Structures – Research and Practice”. Theme Lecture, Proc. 15th Int. Conf. Soil Mechs. Geot. Eng., Istanbul, Balkema, 4:2527-2606.

Liyanapathirana, S. and Poulos, H.G. (2002). “Numerical Simulation od Soil Liquefaction due to Earthquake Loading”. Soil Dynamics and Earthquake Engineering, 22: 511-523.

Liyanapathirana, S. and Poulos, H.G. (2002). “A Numerical Model for Dynamic Soil Liquefaction Analysis”. Soil Dynamics and Earthquake Engineering, 22: 1007-1015.

Carter, J.P., Poulos, H.G. and Tanner, R.I. (2002). “John Robert Booker 1942-1998”. Historical Records of Aust. Science, Vol. 14, 2: 143-168.

2003

Poulos, H.G., Badelow, F. and Powell, G.E. (2003). “A Theoretical Study of Constructive Application of Excavation for Foundation Correction”. Proc. Int. Conf. On Response of Buildings to Excavation-Induced Ground Movements, London, CIRIA Spec. Pub. 199, Ed. F.M. Jardine, 469-484.

Liyanapathirana, S. and Poulos, H.G. (2003). “A Pseudostatic Approach for Seismic Analysis of Piles in Liquefying Soil”. Proc. 2003Pacific Conf. Earthquake Eng., Auckland, Paper No. 021, CD Volume.

Liyanapathirana, S. and Poulos, H.G. (2003). “”Seismic Lateral Response of Piles in Liquefying Soil”. Proc. 2003Pacific Conf. Earthquake Eng., Auckland, Paper No. 022, CD Volume.

Jaksa, M.B., Kaggwa, W.S., Fenton, G.A. and Poulos, H.G. (2003). “A Framework for Quantifying the Reliability of Geotechnical Investigations”. Applicn. Of Statistics and Probability in Civil Eng., Der Klreghian, Medanet and Pestana (Eds.), Millpress, Rotterdam, 1285-1291.

Wong, S.C. and Poulos, H.G. (2003). “Smoother Transition of Approach Embankments Supported on Piles”. Preoc. 12th Asian Reg. Conf. SMGE, Singapore, Ed. C.F. Leung et al, World Scientific, New Jersey, 1: 661-664.

Wong, S.C. and Poulos, H.G. (2003). “Numerical Analysis of Piled Pavement Responses”. Geot. Eng., JNl. SE Asian Geot. Society, 34(3): 149-160.

2004

Poulos, H.G. and Deng, W. (2004). “An Investigation on Tunnelling-Induced Reduction of Pile Geotechnical Capacity”. Proc. 9th Australia-New Zealand Conf. on Geomechs., Auckland, 1: 116-122.

Goldsworthy, J.S., Jaksa, M.B., Fenton, G.A., Kaggwa, W.S., Griffiths, D.V., Poulos, H.G. and Kuo, Y.L. (2004). “Influence of Site Investigations on the Design of Pad Footings”. Proc. 9th Australia-New Zealand Conf. on Geomechs., Auckland, 1: 282-288.

Photos > Working Life

submitted by George Poulos on 25.05.2004

Professor Harry George Poulos - Speech - delivered at his Testimonial Dinner, 8th May, 2004,

Presentation of gifts by the Ladies Auxillary, Kytherian Association of Australia.
Katherine Economos, President of the Ladies Auxillary, Professor Harry Poulos, Professor John Carter, and the wife of the Consul of Greece, in Sydney, Polixeni Raptakis. [Polixeni is a Castellorizian-Australian, born and raised in Perth.]

TESTIMONIAL DINNER

8th May, 2004, Hellenic Club, Sydney.

"I am extremely proud to have been born a Kytherian, and extremely grateful to be recognized so generously tonight by my fellow Kytherians." HGP, 2004.


For a brief overview of the Life and Achievements of Professor Harry Poulos, please refer to the People section - subsection - High Achievers - of kythera-island.net.

For impact of the Poulos [Tzortzopoulos] families in the evolution of Katoomba, NSW - see entry under History - General History - Poulos -Tzortzopoulos.


On Saturday 8th May, at The Hellenic Club Restaurant, 5th Floor, 251-253 Elizabeth Street, Sydney, the Kytherian Ladies Auxiliary organised a Testimonial Dinner for Emeritus Professor Harry Poulos.

The evening was a sellout, with 150 Kytherians, Greek-Australians and Australians, packing out the restaurant.

Professor Harry Poulos
The University of Sydney
College of Sciences and Technology
Faculty of Engineering
Department of Civil Engineering
NSW 2006 Australia.

What follows is the speech that Professor Harry Poulos delivered.

It is important because it provides insights into the extraordinary character of Harry Poulos. Insights to which we would otherwise not be privy.

It also provides added details about the working life of Professor Harry Poulos.

We thank Professor Harry Poulos very much for permission to re-print his speech.

SPEECH – 08/05/04

I wish to express my sincere gratitude and thanks to John Carter for his kind words, and to the Kytherian Ladies Association for organizing this wonderful testimonial dinner. I am overwhelmed at being recognized in this way.

The Spanish philosopher, Jose Ortega y Gasset said of the human condition: “I am myself and my circumstance”.
a. Following this definition, I will describe something of myself (from my own subjective viewpoint);
b. Then I describe something of my circumstances and my professional work.
c. Then, I will take the liberty of sharing with you some of my views on a number of issues relating to engineering and to modern university education.

First, regarding myself:
d. I was born in Katoomba, and enjoyed a very happy childhood, despite the somewhat difficult times during and after WW2. My mother, father and brother gave me love and support and enabled me to have opportunities that they were not able to have.
e. I went to school in Katoomba, and was fortunate to have some excellent “old-style” teachers who instilled discipline but also cared for their students.

5 MAJOR DECISIONS.
On reflection, I think that I have made 5 major decisions in my lifetime after leaving school, and these have had a defining influence on my life. Remarkably, all 5 of these decisions have proved to be fortunate ones.

f. THE FIRST- Was deciding to go to Sydney University to study Civil Engineering. This was not a pre-meditated decision. I had in fact wanted to become a pharmacist, but could not find a pharmacist who could take me on as an apprentice. On the advice of one of my high school teachers, I chose engineering, because he said that civil engineering was a suitable career for someone who had some mathematical ability.

g. I have to mention at this stage my good fortune to be able to stay with my late Uncle Angelo Zantey and Aunt Stella in Sydney while studying. Their generosity and kindness was a major factor in my being able to go to University, and I regarded them as my second set of parents.

h. THE SECOND: After finishing my undergraduate course, I was persuaded by the late Prof. Ted Davis to continue my studies and to carry out research for a PhD degree. The subject in which I chose to study was Soil Mechanics, a relatively new subject at that time (1961) which I did not then understand very well, but one which was intriguing because of its complexity and the opportunities it seemed to provide for expanding knowledge.

i. THE THIRD: Towards the end of my PhD studies, I met again a most attractive young lady, Maria Langley, that I had first met at my brother Theo’s wedding. A few months later, I took the advice of the Greek philosopher Socrates, who said:

”My advice is to get married: if you find a good wife, you’ll be happy. If not, you’ll become a philosopher.”

j. I am pleased to say that I did not become a philosopher, and we are still happily married and have four wonderful children, George, Elena, James and Peter, all of whom are now married (and all but James are here tonight) and 7 energetic but delightful grandchildren as a consequence.

k. THE FOURTH: Soon after Maria and I were married, I made my 4th big decision, to return to Sydney University as a Lecturer, rather than to continue working as a consulting engineer, which I had been doing for almost a year after completing my PhD. This was again a fortunate decision, as I was able to teach and better understand the subject of soil mechanics, and also to do research into foundation systems and how to better design them. It also gave me the opportunity to travel overseas, and I spent 3 periods of sabbatical leave in the USA with my family, which was extremely beneficial to my career. My 2 periods at MIT in Boston were particularly important, as I worked with some of the world’s leading people in my area, including Professor T. William Lambe. In these days of instant communication, it is difficult for us to understand how important such contacts with eminent overseas persons were in those days in the late 1960’s, when an international phone call cost a substantial proportion of one’s weekly salary, and when Australia was very much isolated from the rest of the world.

l. THE FIFTH: The last major decision I took was in 1989, when I decided to accept an offer to join the consulting firm of Coffey Partners International, while retaining a part-time appointment with the University. This has enable me to blend research with its application to practice, a combination which I have found to be both stimulating and satisfying.

WHAT IS SOIL MECHANICS & GEOTECHNICAL ENGINEERING?
m. Most of the general public are largely unaware of the subject of soil mechanics, which in its broader context, is now known as geotechnical engineering. Despite this lack of awareness, everyone is influenced, often in rather subtle ways, by this “hidden” profession.

n. Let me try and illustrate with some examples the range of human activities that geotechnical engineering influences.

o. Some of you may have come here tonight via the Eastern Distributor tunnel. This has had a major input from geotechnical engineers (as do all tunnels) because the tunnels and the surrounding ground must be made strong enough to withstand the weight of the ground and the traffic above the tunnel, and the disturbance caused by boring the tunnel must be kept under control to avoid damaging existing buildings in the vicinity. In addition, the water inflow from the ground into the tunnel must be controlled so that the tunnel does not leak excessively or flood.

p. Many of you will have driven north along the F3 freeway and observed the deep cuts into the sandstone that enabled the road to be constructed. These cuts must be made as steep as possible to minimize the amount of rock that has to be excavated and disposed of, but must not be so steep that they collapse and endanger the people using the road. Again, geotechnical engineers will have been instrumental in designing the slope of the cut to balance economic requirements with safety requirements.

q. Anyone flying into or out of Sydney to go overseas will use the International Terminal at Sydney airport. This has been a major foundation challenge for geotechnical engineers because the airport is located on an area where there is very soft soil, and where, if the foundations were inadequate, air transport would be paralyzed. The design of the pile foundations for that terminal has again relied heavily on the expertise of the geotechnical engineer.

r. Those of you who have parked in the Opera House Car Park may not be aware of the role that geotechnical engineers played in its construction. It is one of the largest span caverns in the world, and the shallow depth of rock above the roof required that the rock be reinforced with many steel rock bolts, and that the excavation of the rock be carried out with extreme care and precision, and with careful measurements being taken to check that there was no damage to nearby historic buildings, including Government House. These were tasks that my colleagues and I at Coffey were fortunate enough to undertake.

s. I could go on and quote many other examples, but hopefully you will realize that all the infrastructure that you use and the buildings that you visit and occupy have all involved significant input from geotechnical engineers.


SOME PROJECT HIGHLIGHTS WHICH INFLUENCED MY RESEARCH ACTIVITIES:

I would like to mention a few projects with which I have been involved, and which have had some influence on my professional career and on the research work that I have been involved with.

t. I-95 embankment in USA – This was a prediction event held in the early 1970’s. Prof. Davis and I were among a dozen persons from around the world invited to predict what would happen to a section of interstate freeway near Boston when additional earth was added to it. We were moderately successful in this, and through this experience, I developed a greater understanding of a number of issues related to the construction of road embankments on soft clay soils, some of which are relevant to the upgrading of the Pacific Highway in northern NSW.

u. North Rankin platform – This was a major offshore oil and gas platform which encountered major problems with the foundation piling. The cost of remedial works for the foundations was about A$350 million, andf I was part of a team that investigated the causes of the problem, and ways of repairing the foundations. This work influenced my research for over a decade in the 1980’s. I became involved in issues related to calcareous soils, piling in such soils, and the effects of repeated loading arising from extreme wave action on offshore oil and gas platforms. An outcome of this work was a text book that I published on Marine Geotechnics.


v. The Newcastle earthquake – 1989. The Institution of Engineers Australia set up an investigation into the reasons for the extensive amount of damage that this moderate earthquake caused. My involvement in this investigation led to research into the response of foundation piles during earthquakes, and the effects of soil liquefaction on pile behavior.


w. Emirates Twin Towers Dubai. We at Coffey were the foundation designers for the Emirates twin towers in Dubai, currently the 9th and 17th tallest buildings in the world. This work led to improved approaches to analyzing and designing piled raft foundations, and to an appreciation of the problems in predicting settlements.


x. Hong Kong Buildings on Inadequate Piles – Following on a series of foundation problems in Hong Kong due to inadequate design and construction methods, I was involved in developing methods of correcting uneven settlements of tall buildings, and of analyzing the behavior of pile groups containing defective piles. Over the past three years, we successfully applied these techniques to two 41-storey buildings that were tilting excessively.


y. Egnatia Highway, Greece – This project involves the construction of nearly 700 km of freeway linking the west coast of Greece with the Turkish border to the east, and will be a major European road. Some of this road passes through old landslide areas, and I have been involved with the design of slope-stabilizing measures, including the use of piles. This project has aught me much about the complex geology of the north-western part of Greece, and has allowed me to gain an appreciation of the great importance of working WITH, rather than against, the geology of an area.


SOME THOUGHTS ABOUT THE PRESENT STATE OF CIVIL ENGINEERING, AND THE FUTURE

z. CE EDUCATION

i. I have a concern that many good graduates finish up outside the immediate profession, We lose a great deal of talented engineering graduates to finance and business, although it is their training in problem-solving that makes them so employable in areas outside engineering.

ii. There are increasing volumes of knowledge to impart to students, but it is still a 4-year course, as it was almost 50 years ago when I did my degree.

iii. There has been a de-emphasis of technical subjects in favor of management-oriented subjects. While this is not necessarily a bad thing, I do have some concern that the deeper understanding of the technical aspects is being lost because of the necessary watering-down of the core technical subjects.


iv. I am concerned with the “de-academization” of academic staff, who are increasingly immersed in trivial administrative tasks and in touting for business. Their pay and conditions are certainly not adequate for the responsibility they have for the future welfare of the country.


aa. CIVIL ENGINEERING RESEARCH
i. It is increasingly difficult to obtain funding for research in civil engineering, both here and overseas. Research funding is being poured into high-tech areas which are novel and attractive, but which may not always contribute greatly to the benefit of modern society.

ii. I believe that there is still much useful research to be done, but we must re-orient this research to focus on our future activities and needs.

iii. For example, there will be increased focus on the assessment and repair of existing facilities, rather than simply on new construction as in the past. I can quote for example the case of the Atlanta sewers, which were in the news in Atlanta every day when I was there last October, and which were in need of more than 1 billion dollars-worth of rehabilitation. Future research could well be oriented towards more effective means of investigating, and repairing in-situ, ageing infrastructure and buildings.

iv. Following on from this, because of the constraints of modern urban development, there will be an inevitable continuation of underground infrastructure development. Developing means of creating underground space more economically, and with reduced risks, appears to be a priority research area involving many sub-disciplines within civil engineering.

v. There would also appear to be an opportunity for civil engineers to become much more involved in the generation of energy from alternative sources. For example, there is already technology being developed to extract energy from pile foundations by using the thermal gradients that exist along such piles. This has been used in Austria, Germany and the UK, and has potential application here in Australia. There is already work in the structural and geotechnical design of wind farms, and this area seems to have significant potential fro improvement through research.

bb. CIVIL ENGINEERING PRACTICE
i. I am concerned about the inhibition of innovation because of legal liability concerns, although this is not necessarily a new thing. There appear to have been not dissimilar constraints to activities in Ancient Greece around 500BC!

ii. In particular, I am concerned that geotechnical professionals have to deal with huge uncertainties and high risks, but have to do so with severely constrained budgets. This “budget-approach” to geotechnics benefits no one in the long run, other than the legal profession, and the expert witnesses who become involved, and for whom budgets are far less constrained.

iii. Society expects us to get things right! We cannot afford to be like economists, of whom the American author Laurence Peter says:

”An economist is an expert who will know tomorrow why the things he predicted yesterday did not happen today”.


iv. I am concerned about the general lack of visibility of the civil engineering sector of our profession. We seem to be taken very much for granted, and only become visible when something goes wrong. Then we are branded as the villains. It is perhaps time that some action was taken to redress this, and to take steps to inform the public about our role as the “quiet achievers”.


SOME THOUGHTS FOR ACTION

cc. Engineers should embark upon a more visible campaign to publicize our contribution to society. We need to emphasize that we influence not only society as a whole, but INDIVIDUALS. Unless we can do this, we will remain largely invisible. An example of successful profession-advertising is the CPA publicity campaign, which has been most effective and appeals to a broad cross – section of the community.

dd. I firmly believe that the development of societies in both developed and developing countries relies critically on the contributions of the civil engineer, and that this role needs to be emphasized to decision-makers.

ee. In developing countries, we can help to find more economical ways of using available resources to create infrastructure.

ff. In developed countries, we can help to find more efficient and cost-effective means of delivering (both technically and financially) the facilities required for economic growth.

FINALLY

In one of the classic texts by Plato, Socrates, Philebus and Protarchus discuss the nature of pleasure.

They identify at least three different types of pleasure:
The pleasure of knowledge;
The pleasure of family;
The pleasure of memory and recollection.

I have been privileged to enjoy all these three forms of pleasure.

My work has enabled me to derive a great amount of pleasure by accumulating and employing knowledge.

My family has been a source of enormous pleasure and of continuous support throughout my life. My parents George and Elene (who is now in her 100th year), did everything possible to give me opportunities that they never had.

My wife Maria and our children George, Elena, James & Peter, have been loving, patient, supportive and tolerant of my frequent absences from home.

My brother Theo and sister-in-law Annette and my nieces Elenie and Maria, have been among my greatest supporters, together with my late uncle Angelo and Aunt Stella, who made their house my home away from home, my father-in law James Langley and my mother-in-law Angela (who is here tonight), my sisters-in-law Alexandra and Theodora (who are also here tonight), and also my cousins Theo and Lillian Poulos.

In addition to my family, my professional colleagues at Sydney University, MIT, and Coffeys have all been continuous sources of encouragement and support. To all of them, and to so many more, I owe a great debt of gratitude.

Finally, in relation to the third source of pleasure that Socrates identified, the memory of this evening will afford me continuing pleasure in the future by recollecting the kindness and good wishes of all of you at this gathering.

I am extremely proud to have been born a Kytherian, and extremely grateful to be recognized so generously tonight by my fellow Kytherians.

I thank the Kytherian ladies auxiliary very much again for arranging this event, and I thank you all for coming here this evening.

Photos > Working Life

submitted by James Victor Prineas on 18.05.2004

Professor John Carter, on - The life and achievements of Professor Harry Poulos

Challis Professor John Carter


For a brief overview of the Life and Achievements of Professor Harry Poulos, please refer to the People section - subsection - High Achievers - of kythera-family.net.

For impact of the Poulos [Tzortzopoulos] families in the evolution of Katoomba, NSW - see entry under History - General History - Poulos -Tzortzopoulos.


On Saturday 8th May, at The Hellenic Club Restaurant, 5th Floor, 251-253 Elizabeth Street, Sydney, the Kytherian Ladies Auxiliary organised a Testimonial Dinner for Emeritus Professor Harry Poulos.

The evening was a sellout, with 150 Kytherians, Greek-Australians and Australians, packing out the restaurant.

Challis Professor John Carter, BE PhD MASCE FIEAust CPEng, Director for the Centre for Geothechnical Research was invited to introduce Profesor Harry Poulos to the audience.

Professor John Carter
The University of Sydney
College of Sciences and Technology
Faculty of Engineering
Department of Civil Engineering
NSW 2006 Australia.

The two Professors have been close associates over many years.

What follows is the speech that Professor Carter gave to introduce Harry Poulos.

It is important because it provides insights into the extraordinary character of Harry Poulos. Insights to which we would otherwise not be privy.

It also provides added details about the working life of Professor Harry Poulos.

We thank Professor Carter very much for permission to re-print his speech.


Harry George Poulos, AM, FAA, FTSE

Ladies and Gentlemen, it is a great pleasure and a privilege for me to have this opportunity to say a few words about someone who was my former teacher, and I’m proud to say is now my friend, my mentor and my esteemed colleague. I am so grateful to the Kytherian Ladies’ Auxiliary for making the opportunity available to me this evening to talk to you on this happy occasion about Harry Poulos, for he is someone I regard, and I know many others in my line of work regard, as a truly great Australian. Men and women of learning, particularly in science and engineering, receive all too little recognition in this sports mad country of ours, so it is particularly gratifying that I can tell you just a little about someone from your community who really is a national and world leader in his chosen field of endeavour. I am very happy to provide some background for you about Harry’s brilliant academic career, and his many professional and other achievements.

We have just heard how Harry was born in Australia, but of course of Greek descent, and justifiably he is very proud of that. I don’t know if it was the Greek parentage and rich cultural heritage or just simply the ambience of Katoomba where he grew up, or perhaps a combination of both, but the outcome of Harry’s upbringing has been a person of great dignity, civility and calm self-assuredness. These are qualities Harry has carried with him without faltering, throughout his life. He brings a calmness to all he undertakes and in all his dealings with people. He is quite simply the quintessential gentleman.

It was interesting that Catherine Economos chose to begin her description of Harry’s family background with a Shakespearean allusion. I would like to extend that metaphor if I may and suggest that Harry is quite like Shakespeare himself. For Shakespeare not only wrote wonderful scripts, but we are told he often acted out his part in some of them. Well, so too it is with Harry Poulos. Not only has he written the technical scripts for many other engineers to use and to follow in their day-to-day practice, but he has also been an active practitioner of what he has preached. He has had a spectacular professional career as both an academic of the highest calibre by all world standards, and as a consultant, who has been much sought after in the profession for his high level of technical expertise, his integrity and always his eminent good sense.

Looking back on his stellar career we can see a long string of marvellous achievements and great career milestones, some of which I shall mention. But before I do it is also interesting to observe that the calm unruffled demeanour Harry developed early on, has probably provided the ideal basis for all the marvellous achievements of his life so far.

I shall talk about Harry’s life as both an academic and a practitioner of engineering. I can’t possibly cover all his achievements; we’d be here a long time even if I just simply tried to list them. Instead, I’ll try to give you a flavour of the man and his achievements by highlighting a few of them.

Harry has had a very close association with the University of Sydney for a period of more than 40 years. It was always important to him, and it was certainly important to the University. It was at the University he did much of his groundbreaking research in geotechnical engineering and where he forged his international reputation. He first entered the University as a student in 1957, graduating with a 1st class honours degree in Civil Engineering in 1961. He undertook Ph.D. studies, commencing in 1961, under the supervision of our late colleague Professor Ted Davis, and was awarded a Ph.D. degree in 1965 for his study of the “Settlement of Clay Soils”. He was also awarded a higher Doctorate in 1976 for his “Collected Papers” in the field of soil mechanics and foundation engineering. It is worth noting that his was only the second higher doctorate in Engineering at that time, the first having been awarded to J.J.C. Bradfield, the famous engineer and builder of the Sydney harbour bridge, Sydney’s underground rail system and other notable Australian landmarks.

In the period from April 1964 until January 1965, Harry gained his early professional experience, working as a consulting engineer with the firm MacDonald, Wagner and Priddle. He returned to join the academic staff of the Department of Civil Engineering at the University of Sydney in January 1965. He has held the full-time positions of Lecturer, Senior Lecturer, Reader, Professor, Head of the School of Civil and Mining Engineering, Director of the Post-Graduate Civil Engineering Foundation, and founding Director of the Centre for Geotechnical Research over the 25-year period from 1965 until the late 1980s. Since July 1988, he has worked as a consultant with Coffey Partners International, which later became Coffey Geosciences. At same time he also maintained a fractional professorial appointment with the University of Sydney, an association I personally have valued very much. Many in academia and the engineering profession know Harry as a tireless worker. His efforts and his energies are legendary. As if the combined life of a consultant and teacher and researcher were not enough, in this period Harry also held the post of Director of the Civil Engineering Foundation from 1995 until the end of 2000, and he served as a member of the Board of the Warren Centre for Advanced Engineering at the University of Sydney from 1990 until the present time. If you want a job done well, give it to a busy man.

Harry has also been a Senior Fulbright Scholar and worked as an academic at MIT, the University of Western Ontario, Virginia Polytechnic and State University and the University of Rhode Island. He was appointed as an Adjunct Professor at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. He has been in great demand as a lecturer and indeed he has received numerous invitations to deliver lectures throughout the world. He has always obliged by delivering those lectures with his characteristic enthusiasm and charm at various institutions of higher learning in the USA, England, Germany, France, Canada, Thailand, Singapore, India, Malaysia, Vietnam, Greece, South Africa and Hong Kong.

His personal contributions to teaching, research and design in geotechnical engineering are simply enormous. He is the author of three books, at least ten chapters in books that I’m aware of and more than 300 technical papers on Geotechnical engineering, with a large number dealing with his favourite subject of pile foundations. Quantitatively, his output is quite remarkable, much more than most good academics achieve in a lifetime. But the quality is also there, and in abundance. Harry is acknowledged internationally as one of the leading practitioners in the design of pile foundations. His practical expertise has always been founded on solid theory. Much of that theory he invented. He is the author of the definitive textbook on pile foundations. You can be sure that anyone designing and installing piles anywhere in the world today would be singing from the Poulos songbook.

Harry’s personal contributions to teaching, research and engineering practice have greatly enhanced both his own reputation and the reputation of the University of Sydney as a centre of excellence for scholarship and research in the field of geotechnics. His many fine contributions have been recognised formally by the award of Member of the Order of Australia (1993), his election as a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Science (1988), his Fellowship of the Australian Academy of Technological Sciences and Engineering (1996), his Honorary Fellowship of the Institution of Engineers Australia (1999), the award of the Warren Prize (1972) and Warren Medal (1985) of the Institution of Engineers, Australia, and the State-of-the-Art Award by the American Society of Civil Engineers (1995), to list only a few. He has also been invited to present highly prestigious lectures such as the E.H. Davis Memorial Lecture (1987) and the John Jaeger Memorial Award (1988) to the Australian Geomechanics Society. He was invited to present the Rankine Lecture to the British Geotechnical Society in 1989 and the Terzaghi Lecture to the American Society of Civil Engineers, this year, in 2004. I should point out that taken together, if not separately, these last two awards, from the British and the Americans, are effectively the Nobel Prize in our discipline of geotechnical engineering. Of course, Nobel Prizes are not awarded in Engineering, so these are the highest, most prestigious awards that anyone can achieve in our field.

Harry has also been recogised by receiving invitations to deliver the Schiffman Lecture at Cornell University in 1996, the Ardaman Lecture at the University of Florida in 1997, the inaugural Athenian Geotechnical Lecture in Greece in 2000, the 8th Spencer Buchanan Lecture at Texas A&M University in 2000, the Chin Fung Kee Memorial Lecture to the South East Asian Geotechnical Society in 2001, as well the 5th Sowers Lecture at the Georgia Institute of Technology in 2002.

I think from that incomplete list of the awards and prizes he has received you should get the idea that Harry really is regarded as a world leader in his chosen field of Engineering. As I said, he built his reputation as an academic and then thoroughly cemented it later as a practitioner.

Harry’s service to the engineering profession has also reflected most favourably upon himself and the University of Sydney. He has long been a contributor to the activities of the Australian Geomechanics Society (AGS). He was a long-term member of the National Committee of AGS and its Chairman from 1982 to 1985. From 1989-1994, he was Australasian Vice-President of the International Society of Soil Mechanics and Foundation Engineering. He is currently a specially appointed member of the Board of this International Society. He has also been a member of the editorial boards of at least 6 leading learned engineering journals.

During the period of his full-time employment with the University, Harry was heavily involved in the consulting activities of the Department, with major projects including investigations for foundations for offshore oil and gas platforms in Bass Strait and on the North-West Shelf. He has advised many other organizations involved in piling projects and problems throughout the world, particularly since his time with Coffeys. The list of his projects and achievements is large and impressive. Suffice to say that it is well known in the profession that if an Australian structure is founded on piles, it is likely that Professor Harry Poulos has had some involvement, if not directly, then probably indirectly through the large number of engineers he has taught and influenced.

Since the late 80s, when he started to devote the greater share of his professional efforts to consulting he has been asked to work on some really wonderful projects, some of them landmarks in their own right. Again, I don’t have time or space to list them all, but I shall mention just a few. Perhaps Harry will tell us more about some of them when he speaks.

His projects span the globe. From Australia to Indonesia, to Hong Kong, Singapore, Taiwan, Malaysia, the Middle East, Greece and even in the North Sea. They include the design of foundations for tall buildings, offshore oil platforms, major bridges and power stations. If you travel down the Hume highway over the bridge on the Mittagong by-pass, think of Harry, for he designed the piles that support that bridge. As you park your car in the Sydney Opera House Car Park, think of Harry. He worked together with a team from his firm Coffey Partners to devise a very clever way of ensuring that the thin sandstone roof of that car park would stay in place safely for the life of that structure. His team came up with a really innovative solution to that particular problem. If you are ever in Dubai, and you visit the Emirate Towers, a major and impressive man-made landmark in that part of the world, you might think of Harry also. He devised the foundation system that supports those structures in some quite problematic ground conditions. And if you are ever in that part of the world staying in the Chicago Beach Tower Hotel in Dubai, think of Harry for similar reasons.

One project of his that I should single out for special mention is one that he is currently engaged on with other professional colleagues. The project involves the construction of a major highway, in northern Greece. What is most interesting about the project is that the highway has to cross a major landslide. Harry is providing advice on how to stabilise the hillside so that the highway remains safe. I think there is a lovely symmetry here. The Greeks, first “exported” Harry to us, as it were, here in Australia, and now he repays the favour by exporting his Australian technology and expertise back to Greece. There is much that is satisfying in such arrangements between the old and the new worlds.

Just last year, the body that represents all professional engineers in Australia, Engineers Australia, chose Harry to be its Civil Engineer of the Year for 2003. This award was fitting recognition of a lifetime devoted to his chosen profession, to improving it through teaching, research and innovation in engineering design. Harry has always led by example, and the profession is very proud of what he has managed to do to improve the level of geotechnical engineering both in Australia and elsewhere in the world.

I hope I have managed to give you some idea of the measure of the man, at least as an engineer. I must say I also hold him the highest regard as a person. As we have heard, he is a very modest man, somewhat self-effacing, but he has always been willing to lend advice and a helping hand to friends and colleagues, both young and old. There are many that have benefited from his wisdom over the years, myself included.

I have emphasised Harry’s many contributions to our society. I did try hard to think of his foibles, but really there none that are obvious and few that come readily to mind. He exercises such great self-control. I suppose one of his passions, perhaps a weakness, is for collecting books and recorded music. We have heard about his collection already. If you have the privilege of browsing through Harry’s personal library, you will find some rather obscure titles. For example, he is the only person I know with his own copy of a book entitled “The Grasses of Wyoming”. Perhaps he might like to tell us why?

Harry Poulos is one of the greatest civil engineers this country has produced, and I am confident that history will accord him that honour. He has simply been an inspiration to many, and has taught us as much by example as by formal instruction.

I want to finish now by thanking two people. The first is Harry’s wife Maria, for her love and support of him. I don’t have to tell you Maria that you are married to a remarkable person, but the whole engineering community values what you have done to support Harry while he produced so much that has been of lasting benefit to the engineering profession.

And finally, I would like to thank Catherine Economos for inviting me to this marvellous occasion and for allowing me to speak about someone I so admire. It has been an enormous pleasure for me. Thank you all for your attention.

John Carter
Saturday, 8 May 2004