kythera family kythera family
  

Modern Landscapes

Photos > Modern Landscapes

Showing 181 - 200 from 936 entries
Show: sorted by:

Photos > Modern Landscapes

submitted by George Vardas on 09.08.2013

Sailing to Kythera

The wake of the Vincenzo Kornaros enroute to Kythera

Photos > Modern Landscapes

submitted by George Vardas on 09.08.2013

Vivid Diakofti

The beach umbrellas at Diakofti are punctuated by the view of the Nordland wreck

Photos > Modern Landscapes

submitted by Stephen Trifyllis on 20.06.2013

''ITs LIKE A PUB WITH NO BEER ''

potamos platia in april with no panaretos restaurant, its the winter version with only the restaurant open downstairs under the bank ,with a lovelty fire burning to warm you up ..

Photos > Modern Landscapes

submitted by Stephen Trifyllis on 27.05.2013

WINTER POTAMOS MARKETS ..

this is the potamos markets in late april on a gloomy and cold sunday morning somewhat different to the markets in august !!!

Photos > Modern Landscapes

submitted by Stephen Trifyllis on 21.05.2013

ON THE ROAD TO POTAMO

the old with the new , transport from days gone by and modern transport , one of the very few donkeys that is used for getting around the island , the donkey was used in all aspects of kytherian life from the fields and as transport

Photos > Modern Landscapes

submitted by Neos Kosmos, Melbourne on 15.05.2013

The double bays at Kapsali. From Tzeli Hadjidimitriou's book, in Search of Kythera and Antikythera.

With one of the largest Kytherian populations living in Sydney, the small Greek island has seen a steady flow of Australian tourists visiting its shores

The tiny island offers all the best of the Greek islands without the tourist traffic.

Neos Kosmos, 15 May 2013

HELEN VELISSARIS


It's rare to find a Greek island that has the beauty of Santorini and the peacefulness of Paros, without the tourists.

Kythera has that luxury. Off the coast of the Peloponnese, the small island of about 4,000 locals caters to something quite rare in the rest of the Greek island tourism trade. It's primarily visited by Australians.

Thanks to the thousands of Kytherians that came in the first wave of migration to Australia in the early 20th century, the little island has been catering to the many Greek Australians of Kytherian decent looking to learn more about their ancestry.

It is estimated that there are at least 60,000 people of Kytherian descent living in Australia and the Kytherian community of Sydney is one of the oldest communities in Australia.

The unique migration story of the Kytherians doesn't fit into the stereotypical migration wave of the '50s and '60s who were fleeing post-war Greece.

Rather, the island's small size facilitated the move.

Cultural officer of the Kytherian community of Australia George Vardas says the population played a big part.

"Kythera is a small island and it couldn't sustain the population," he tells Neos Kosmos.

"It's not the most fertile island, you've got a permanent population of somewhere between 3,500 to 4,000.

"At the height of the migration wave there would have been about 10,000 on the island."

When America tightened its borders in the late 19th century, many decided instead to settle in Sydney and Brisbane.

That's why many Australians of Kytherian background are second and third generation Greeks. That ancestral connection is what brings many of them back to the idyllic island without tipping off the tourists.

Located off the southern coast of the Peloponnese, legend has it the goddess Aphrodite was born off Kythera's shores. The location is fitting, with waterfalls and natural springs, terraced olive groves, hidden caves and sandy, pebbly beaches.

Quite unique to other Greek islands is Kythera's worldly influence by different cultures. Thanks to years of influence by the Byzantine Empire and visits from the Venetians and the British, the island's architecture is a confusing parade of the old and the foreign.

"There are schools with Gothic architecture, you turn the corner and there's a Venetian castle," says Mr Vardas.

But still the island remains relatively untouched by tourists. You do see the odd German or Scandinavian old couple on the walking trails, but with a lack of flights to the island and infrequent ferries, the island remains a hidden treasure for those who seek it out.

'In search of Kythera and Antikythera: Venturing to the Island of Aphrodite' is a new travel guide, compiled by acclaimed photographer and writer Tzeli Hatzidimitriou, that hopes to inform more on the island's hidden gems.

The book, which is about to be released in English for Australian audiences, tells the story of Kythera through vivid photography and gives details about local history, mythology, architecture, arts and crafts, cuisine and local lifestyles.

"It's almost like a Lonely Planet guide for Kythera," says Mr Vardas.

The community is hoping to use the book to promote the island to Greek Australians and was a major contributor to the English edition of the book.

Author Tzeli Hatzidimitriou spent years documenting the island through photos and created the book to show the world a forgotten side of Greece.

The book was launched today, Wednesday May 15 at a special luncheon hosted by the Kytherian Association of Australia, at George's Mediterranean Bar & Grill, The Promenade (10 Lime Street) King Street Wharf, NSW.

Email, Cultural Officer, Kytherian Association of Australia

Front Cover of In Search of Kythera and Antikythera

HOW TO ORDER THE BOOK: In Search of Kythera and Antikythera. Venturing to the Island of Aphrodite.

Author: Tzeli Hadjidimitriou

When Published: 2013

Publisher: Tzeli Hadjidimitriou

Language: ENGLISH

Available: 2013

In Europe, Available from:

http://www.odoiporikon.com/shop/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=54

It will also be available in all the book shops on the island of Kythera, during the 2013 summer season.

In Australia & Asia Pacific: (From June 30, 2013, but you can place a forward order, because they WILL sell out)

Kytherian Association of Australia Bookshelf

Kytherian World Heritage Fund Order Form

Description: 252 page hand held guide book - "Lonely Planet guide standard".

ISBN: 978-960-00330-5-3

Photos > Modern Landscapes

submitted by Kytherian Publishing & Media on 12.05.2013

The churches and the ravine of Kato Hora

page 164 of Tzeli Hadjidimitriou's new book in English, In Search of Kythera and Antikythera. The most sophisticated tourist guide of Kythera ever produced.

Author: Tzeli Hadjidimitriou

When Published: 2013

Publisher: Tzeli Hadjidimitriou

Language: ENGLISH

Available: 2013

In Europe, Available from:

http://www.odoiporikon.com/shop/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=54

It will also be available in all the book shops on the island of Kythera, during the 2013 summer season.

In Australia & Asia Pacific:

Kytherian Association of Australia Bookshelf

Kytherian World Heritage Fund Order Form

Description: 252 page hand held guide book - "Lonely Planet guide standard".

ISBN: 978-960-00330-5-3


Front Cover, In Search of Kythera and Antikythera

Text and photographs by Tzeli Hadjidimitriou

Translated into English by Despina Christidoulou

Designed by Yiannis Alexandropoulos and Alexis Veroucas



It’s printed and on the way from Greece!

A dedicated guide book on Kythera, in English.

Highly acclaimed professional photographer and travel writer, Tzeli Hadjidimitriou was the author and visual artist behind the Unexplored Kythera & Antikythera guide book in Greek.

It’s probably the best selling book relating to Kythera, ever.

The English version is called In Search of Kythera & Antikythera and will be
available for purchase in Australia from the end of May, just in time to take over for Kytherian summer. Great for those visiting the island for
the first time, or seasoned travellers wanting to get more out of their stay. Great for the grandkids!

A handheld guide book with 252 dedicated pages on Kythera. In Australia it is available for $25 plus postage from the Kytherian Association of Australia, and from the Kytherian World Heritage Fund. The Kytherian Association of Aiustralia partly sponsored the book.

See also www.kytherianassociation.com.au/books.html

In Greece it is available through

Tzeli Hadjidimitriou
photographer & travel writer

14 Tideos str.
11635 Athens
Greece
0030-6972216970

Email, odoiporikon

Email, odoiporikon 2
www.odoiporikon.com


Download the 3-page .pdf segment from the April (Kytherian Association of Australia) Newsletter, here:

kaa newsletter tzeli april 2013 pp1-3 A.pdf

Tzeli Hadjidimitriou. Author of In Search of Kythera and Antikythera

About Tzeli Hadjidimitriou


Tzeli Hadjidimitriou was born in Mytilene, Lesbos in 1962. She holds a degree in Economics from the University of Thessaloniki (1980–86) and
pursued further studies in the field of Direction of Photography for the Cinema, in Rome (1986–88).

In 1985, on a scholarship from the Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore in Milan, she attended a series of seminars by Michelangelo Antonioni on the art of cinematography. She also holds a superior diploma as an official translator of the Italian language and a certificate in video-montage.

A professional photographer in Greece since 1988, she has worked in television for ten years and also in the cinema industry as a stage photographer, collaborating with many film and photography
directors.

Although mostly described as an “artistic landscape photographer”, her “lens” has also focused extensively on artworks, interiors and archaeological subjects and she collaborates with museums, galleries, architects and publishing houses.

Her work is regularly presented in individual and group exhibitions in Greece and abroad. She is a regular contributor of articles and photographs to several newspapers and magasines.

Tzeli Hadjidimitriou organises photography workshops on Kythera and Lesvos in Spring time and in Autumn. In this journey on the islands of
Lesvos and Kythera, you will travel an interior meditation path, where the relationship of the soul and the light will reflect in your photographs.
This travel photography workshop provides a platform for those who seek to know a place in its history, people, tradition and culture, through
the lens of a camera.

Rather than being a laboratory for learning the latest techniques in digital photography, participants will try to capture the atmosphere of the Greek soul. We’ll learn how to “see” and how to compose the image in our minds, before taking the picture. In other words, we will get to know a place by learning how to capture and see the light on a face, a landscape or an object, and connect this place with ourselves through photography.

A Typical page, page 164

Download page 164 as a .pdf, here:

KYTHIRA GUIDE 2013 page 164.pdf

[Text on the page]


Option One

(recommended for walking as far as Kato Hora)

Your first walk, in order to cover the historical landscape of Mylopotamos, entails going down to the district of Kato Hora, with its Venetian castle and fantastic view and romantic sunset. We recommend you come to this point on foot to enjoy the architecture of the houses and arches as well as the gardens full of bougainvilleas in the houses along the narrow lanes.

Signs guide you to the asphalt road on the left and, after 400 m, to the right, down to the gulley. After 1.4 km, after passing another district of M opotamos, Piso Pigadi, you reach Kato Hora, the prettiest village dis­trict in the whole of Kythera. It still retains the island's traditional colours and typical architecture.The houses built within the castle and those around it share the same homogenous features. Due to the lack of space, they have two storeys and do not communicate internally but via an external staircase that terminates in a terrace supported by an arch beneath which was the ground floor entrance, that was also used as an ad hoc storage space for agricultural produce and tools. The ground floor spaces were low, stone-built arches with the characteristic corner fireplace. Note the innovative chimneys, designed to withstand the force of the powerful winds, as well as the stone flower­boxes, standing on stone supports called fourousia. These were usually placed under the windows and their origin is Venetian.

In the small square you can also see the old English School, built in 1825 with funds donated by Mylopotamiots. Behind it is a little road that leads to the castle. Imposing and dominating, just like his city, the Lion of Saint Mark of the Serene Republic of Venice still keeps a lookout over the visitors' entrance. Visitors are impressed with the expansive view from the walls over the gorge towards the permanently stormy west, which is still wild, precipitous and forested.

The castle of Kato Hora (Lower Hora) was built by the Venetians to protect the inhabitants from pirate raids and also so that they could oversee the stormy west coastline. It's said that 50 refugee families from Crete and Cyprus who lived in the castle in 1545, suppfied the essential army in order to guard it It grew especially after the destruction of the castle-city of Agios Dimitrios (Paleochora) by Barbarossa in 1537 and after the conquest of Monemvasia by the Turks in 1540. when the inhabitants who were saved fled there
for protooion. The presently empty, but wonderfully restored, houses of Kato Hora and the narrow lanes.........

Making the tsipoura

Photos > Modern Landscapes

submitted by Kytherian Newsletter Sydney on 10.05.2013

Slide of the Kourvoulis Water Mill, Karavas

Kourvoulis is a "parachoukli" of one of the the Tzortzopoulos clans.

Shown at the Karavas Water Project presentation.

The Presentation was made by:

Timothy E. Gregory (Ohio State University)
Lita Tzortzopoulou-Gregory (Ohio State University)


The presentation was held at the University of Sydney at 7.15pm, Wednesday, March 20th 2013

At the Centre of Classical and Near Eastern Studies Board Room, in the Madsen Building  Level 4,
Room 480 (one storey up and directly behind the building’s main foyer on the Eastern Avenue pedestrian mall).

What follows is George Vardas's Report of the event.

Download a .pdf of George's Report, here:

KARAVAS WATER PROJECT ARTICLE TOTAL.pdf

Download Tim and Lita's summary of their presentation, here:

Download a .pdf version of this article here:

Gregory_karavas_water_kythera_summer_2013.pdf

"Traditional mills belong to the cultural memory of people because they are associated to a still recent past and appeal to the countryside roots of people". (1)

KARAVAS WATER PROJECT EXPLAINED

The watermills of Kythera are traditionally associated with the village of Milopotamos (literally, the village of the watermills). However, to the north of the island, the verdant terraced landscape of Karavas is also rich in water, deep green gorges, free-running springs, walking trails and abandoned stone-built watermills which the Karavas Water Project seeks to explore.

On 20 March 2013 the leaders of this project, Professor Timothy Gregory and his colleague and wife, Lita Tzortzopoulou-Gregory, of Ohio State University gave an enthralling presentation to an audience of more than fifty (including a number of Karavites) at the Centre of Classical and Near Eastern Studies Board Room at Sydney University.
Lita started off by setting the scene for what it would have been like to live in the village of Karavas when the water mills were operating and how the social life often gravitated around those mills and the famous water springs, for which the village was renown, and vividly recalled the abundance of popular folk legends and stories associated with them.
Professor Gregory then proceeded to explain how the Karavas Water Project, by taking an environmental, topographic, archaeological and historical approach, seeks to examine the historical use of water resources in the northern part of Kythera throughout antiquity and up to the modern day.

According to the local historian and writer, Ioannis Cassimatis, the first watermills appeared in Kythera in the late eighteenth century. It is thought they were introduced from Crete where mills were built during the Ottoman and Venetian occupations. Traditionally, the mills, which were either single or two storey buildings, were built in the prevailing architectural style of the village.

Professor Gregory observed that Karavas stands out because of its plentiful springs and deep green gorges that resemble a sub-tropical rainforest in marked contrast to the barren, parched landscape of other parts of Greece. Indeed, the defining marker of Karavas is its watershed that runs in a generally southwest-northeast direction from the heights near Gerakari to the sea at Plateia Ammos.

From 2011 Timothy and his team took to the island small groups of university students as volunteers to help clear overgrown vegetation from the springs and watermills and undertake research on the various water installations, including the channels, cisterns and mills, and their use. They also spoke to local residents and former residents about their memories of the mills and have begun recording those oral histories. The cleared walking trails have also helped enhance Karavas’ reputation as an eco-tourism destination.

By means of a powerpoint presentation, including photographs and drawings of what some of the areas in Karavas now look like, once they have been cleaned of the dense vegetation, Timothy took the audience on a virtual tour of some of the ten watermills in the gorges of Karavas, including the impressive Magganou mill and cistern, and the mills of Paliomylos, Kourvoulis, Portokalia and Keramari and their sophisticated water channels and storage areas. He also mentioned Loutro which may date back to the 18th and 19th centuries (according to travellers’ accounts) and the possibility of its being used for bathing in Roman times.

As the molinologist Stelios Mouzakis has observed:

“The watermills of Kythera … are constructions on a small scale of the anonymous traditional architecture of Kythera. They are impressive in their special characteristics, the harmony of their volumes, their simplicity, their picturesque appearance, the modesty of their local building materials, the solutions they manifest to various constructional difficulties, but mainly by their unpretentious, effortless incorporation into their surroundings.”(2)

Professor Gregory also discussed how the systems of irrigation were used for the perivolia and the communal arrangements made between farmers and mill operators to exploit and share the water. Tim even alluded to a reference to the watermills in Spiro Stathis’ remarkable Kytherian Review published in 1923. In his survey of industry on Kythera in the year 1923, Stathis reported on the number of operating watermills on the island. Apart from Mylopotamos, we learn that there were five functioning watermills in Karavas operated by Panagiotis Coroneos, Haris Vanges, T. Tzortzopoulos, P. Tzortzopoulos and Ioannis Venardos.

Sadly, according to Cassimatis, the last watermill on Kythera ceased to operate in the late 1940s as the advent of power on the island meant that the mills were no longer economical to operate.

Finally, it is noteworthy that Timothy and Lita Gregory have established the impressive Amir Ali research centre, incorporating a library and dormitory, in Karavas to promote further research and greater understanding of the Karavas watershed and the historic, archaeological and cultural traditions and structures associated with water use on the island.

A big thank you goes to Timothy and Lita for their passionate and ongoing interest in Kytherian archaeology, as well as to Wayne Mullen, Executive Director of the Australian Archaeological Institute at Athens, for offering the venue at Sydney University for the lecture.

After the presentation, members of the audience were treated to coffee and biscuits put on by the Kytherian Association together with some exquisite chocolate offerings from Fardoulis Chocolates. It was enough to make anyone thirsty.

(1) J. C. Viegas & J. A. Miranda, “Rehabilitation of traditional mills” in C.A. Brebbia (ed.) Structural Studies, Repairs and Maintenance of Heritage Architecture VIII (2003) p.657

(2) S. Mouzakis, “Watermills of the Greek Islands of Kythera and Antikythera” International Molinology (2004, Vol. 69, no. 2) p. 4

George Vardas

Photos > Modern Landscapes

submitted by Timothy Gregory on 10.05.2013

The Karavas Water Project - A Presentation

Presented by:

Timothy E. Gregory (Ohio State University)
Lita Tzortzopoulou-Gregory (Ohio State University)


The presentation was held at the University of Sydney at 7.15pm, Wednesday, March 20th 2013

At the Centre of Classical and Near Eastern Studies Board Room, in the Madsen Building  Level 4,
Room 480 (one storey up and directly behind the building’s main foyer on the Eastern Avenue pedestrian mall).

What follows is George Vardas's Report of the event.

Download a .pdf of George's Report, here:

KARAVAS WATER PROJECT ARTICLE TOTAL.pdf

Download Tim and Lita's summary of their presentation, here:

Download a .pdf version of this article here:

Gregory_karavas_water_kythera_summer_2013.pdf

"Traditional mills belong to the cultural memory of people because they are associated to a still recent past and appeal to the countryside roots of people". (1)

KARAVAS WATER PROJECT EXPLAINED

The watermills of Kythera are traditionally associated with the village of Milopotamos (literally, the village of the watermills). However, to the north of the island, the verdant terraced landscape of Karavas is also rich in water, deep green gorges, free-running springs, walking trails and abandoned stone-built watermills which the Karavas Water Project seeks to explore.

On 20 March 2013 the leaders of this project, Professor Timothy Gregory and his colleague and wife, Lita Tzortzopoulou-Gregory, of Ohio State University gave an enthralling presentation to an audience of more than fifty (including a number of Karavites) at the Centre of Classical and Near Eastern Studies Board Room at Sydney University.
Lita started off by setting the scene for what it would have been like to live in the village of Karavas when the water mills were operating and how the social life often gravitated around those mills and the famous water springs, for which the village was renown, and vividly recalled the abundance of popular folk legends and stories associated with them.
Professor Gregory then proceeded to explain how the Karavas Water Project, by taking an environmental, topographic, archaeological and historical approach, seeks to examine the historical use of water resources in the northern part of Kythera throughout antiquity and up to the modern day.

According to the local historian and writer, Ioannis Cassimatis, the first watermills appeared in Kythera in the late eighteenth century. It is thought they were introduced from Crete where mills were built during the Ottoman and Venetian occupations. Traditionally, the mills, which were either single or two storey buildings, were built in the prevailing architectural style of the village.

Professor Gregory observed that Karavas stands out because of its plentiful springs and deep green gorges that resemble a sub-tropical rainforest in marked contrast to the barren, parched landscape of other parts of Greece. Indeed, the defining marker of Karavas is its watershed that runs in a generally southwest-northeast direction from the heights near Gerakari to the sea at Plateia Ammos.

From 2011 Timothy and his team took to the island small groups of university students as volunteers to help clear overgrown vegetation from the springs and watermills and undertake research on the various water installations, including the channels, cisterns and mills, and their use. They also spoke to local residents and former residents about their memories of the mills and have begun recording those oral histories. The cleared walking trails have also helped enhance Karavas’ reputation as an eco-tourism destination.

By means of a powerpoint presentation, including photographs and drawings of what some of the areas in Karavas now look like, once they have been cleaned of the dense vegetation, Timothy took the audience on a virtual tour of some of the ten watermills in the gorges of Karavas, including the impressive Magganou mill and cistern, and the mills of Paliomylos, Kourvoulis, Portokalia and Keramari and their sophisticated water channels and storage areas. He also mentioned Loutro which may date back to the 18th and 19th centuries (according to travellers’ accounts) and the possibility of its being used for bathing in Roman times.

As the molinologist Stelios Mouzakis has observed:

“The watermills of Kythera … are constructions on a small scale of the anonymous traditional architecture of Kythera. They are impressive in their special characteristics, the harmony of their volumes, their simplicity, their picturesque appearance, the modesty of their local building materials, the solutions they manifest to various constructional difficulties, but mainly by their unpretentious, effortless incorporation into their surroundings.”(2)

Professor Gregory also discussed how the systems of irrigation were used for the perivolia and the communal arrangements made between farmers and mill operators to exploit and share the water. Tim even alluded to a reference to the watermills in Spiro Stathis’ remarkable Kytherian Review published in 1923. In his survey of industry on Kythera in the year 1923, Stathis reported on the number of operating watermills on the island. Apart from Mylopotamos, we learn that there were five functioning watermills in Karavas operated by Panagiotis Coroneos, Haris Vanges, T. Tzortzopoulos, P. Tzortzopoulos and Ioannis Venardos.

Sadly, according to Cassimatis, the last watermill on Kythera ceased to operate in the late 1940s as the advent of power on the island meant that the mills were no longer economical to operate.

Finally, it is noteworthy that Timothy and Lita Gregory have established the impressive Amir Ali research centre, incorporating a library and dormitory, in Karavas to promote further research and greater understanding of the Karavas watershed and the historic, archaeological and cultural traditions and structures associated with water use on the island.

A big thank you goes to Timothy and Lita for their passionate and ongoing interest in Kytherian archaeology, as well as to Wayne Mullen, Executive Director of the Australian Archaeological Institute at Athens, for offering the venue at Sydney University for the lecture.

After the presentation, members of the audience were treated to coffee and biscuits put on by the Kytherian Association together with some exquisite chocolate offerings from Fardoulis Chocolates. It was enough to make anyone thirsty.

(1) J. C. Viegas & J. A. Miranda, “Rehabilitation of traditional mills” in C.A. Brebbia (ed.) Structural Studies, Repairs and Maintenance of Heritage Architecture VIII (2003) p.657

(2) S. Mouzakis, “Watermills of the Greek Islands of Kythera and Antikythera” International Molinology (2004, Vol. 69, no. 2) p. 4

George Vardas

Photos > Modern Landscapes

submitted by Timothy Gregory on 10.05.2013

The “picnic area” at the Manganou spring, after being cleared in 2011

Environmental Archaeology and History in Northern Kythera: The Karavas Water Project

Timothy E. Gregory (Ohio State University)
Lita Tzortzopoulou-Gregory (Ohio State University)

Download a .pdf version of this article here:

Gregory_karavas_water_kythera_summer_2013.pdf


The Karavas Water Project is an example of a new kind of history that seeks to learn from the past in order to maintain the beauty and the richness of small-scale eco-niches. The project is based on the recognition that the area of Karavas (in the northern part of Kythera) is known for its plentiful springs and deep green gorges that create an environment that more resembles a sub-tropical rain forest than it does the parched landscape of many parts of Greece. The project has as its goal the detailed exploration and recording of the main Karavas watershed that runs in a generally southwest-northeast direction from the heights near Gerakari to the sea at Plateia Ammos. The research includes the basic mapping of the area and the identification of the many natural and humanly modified springs, as well as the water devices that were constructed to convey and store the water and to utilize water for a variety of purposes, including irrigation and power, most notably the water mills that still mark the sides of the watershed at various points.

The Keramari Mill below Diakopoulianika

A major consideration of the project is the broader realization that natural resources in particular areas often allow small or even isolated societies, over the centuries, to develop systems of production and exchange so that they can survive, frequently despite political, military, or even significant economic shifts. Indeed, many localities in Kythera, such as Karavas, were able to develop and prosper, change their means of subsistence, and survive – at least until modern times. Thus, the Kythera Water Project uses an environmental approach to examine the interactions between resources and production in order to understand better the systems of interaction that lay behind the prosperity and resilience of local society in the past, hopefully as a clue to imagine similar survival there, and in many other areas, into the future.

Chronologically, the project begins most naturally, with the “present,” meaning the location, condition, size, characteristics, and use of these elements as they are now. We then seek to push our research back into the past, using, first of all the characteristics of the humanly-made structures, their chronological elements and what we can say of their change over time. In addition, we make significant use of oral information, which many inhabitants of Karavas or Kytherians living elsewhere have provided, to help us understand the use of water and water power back into the more distant past. Beyond this, we have begun an examination of documents in the Kythera Historical Archive since these include contracts, wills, and agreements that not uncommonly mention places and even specific buildings that are of importance in our present study. Finally, although the project is not formally archaeological in nature, we realize that many of the resources that we have identified would also have been of use in the much more distant past and that, on some occasions, we can hypothesize how they might have been used in the past. Thus, it may not be an accident that one of the already known tombs of prehistoric date in the Karavas area is located very close to some of the more impressive cistern systems we explored. Although those cisterns, which are still being used, are modern in their present form, it is not impossible that they had also been used by individuals living in the prehistoric settlement that must have been located nearby.

Students clearing undergrowth at the Manganou Spring, Karavas

Our fieldwork over the past two years was carried out with the assistance of students from the Ohio State University (USA), who volunteered to help us clear many of the watercourses, springs, and watermills that had become nearly completely impassable, covered over with a thick covering of thorny vines and other unpleasant vegetation. Despite uncountable scrapes and punctures, torn clothes and ripped boots, and many falls into the cold Karavas water, these students opened many passageways and cleared several springs, allowing us to examine in detail some of the facilities that were built to move, store, and use water over the centuries. As a result, we are beginning to see how people in the past were able to preserve and maintain the natural resources on which their livelihood depended, in part as an important lesson for us today.

Cleaning the watercourse just below the Keramari spring

In addition, the gorges around Karavas are a beautiful retreat, where visitors can enjoy the wonders of nature, the coldness of the clear water, and the works of human activity for centuries on end. We hope that visitors and local people will do their best to keep the streams and paths of the Karavas area clean and open, so all will be able to enjoy them.

A waterfall near the Portokalia spring

You can contact us at : Tim Gregory</a> and / or <a href="mailto:gregory.257@osu.edu">Lita Tzortzopoulou-Gregory, or 07360-33565.

Photos > Modern Landscapes

submitted by Timothy Gregory on 10.05.2013

A waterfall near the Portokalia spring

Environmental Archaeology and History in Northern Kythera: The Karavas Water Project

Timothy E. Gregory (Ohio State University)
Lita Tzortzopoulou-Gregory (Ohio State University)

Download a .pdf version of this article here:

Gregory_karavas_water_kythera_summer_2013.pdf


The Karavas Water Project is an example of a new kind of history that seeks to learn from the past in order to maintain the beauty and the richness of small-scale eco-niches. The project is based on the recognition that the area of Karavas (in the northern part of Kythera) is known for its plentiful springs and deep green gorges that create an environment that more resembles a sub-tropical rain forest than it does the parched landscape of many parts of Greece. The project has as its goal the detailed exploration and recording of the main Karavas watershed that runs in a generally southwest-northeast direction from the heights near Gerakari to the sea at Plateia Ammos. The research includes the basic mapping of the area and the identification of the many natural and humanly modified springs, as well as the water devices that were constructed to convey and store the water and to utilize water for a variety of purposes, including irrigation and power, most notably the water mills that still mark the sides of the watershed at various points.

The Keramari Mill below Diakopoulianika

A major consideration of the project is the broader realization that natural resources in particular areas often allow small or even isolated societies, over the centuries, to develop systems of production and exchange so that they can survive, frequently despite political, military, or even significant economic shifts. Indeed, many localities in Kythera, such as Karavas, were able to develop and prosper, change their means of subsistence, and survive – at least until modern times. Thus, the Kythera Water Project uses an environmental approach to examine the interactions between resources and production in order to understand better the systems of interaction that lay behind the prosperity and resilience of local society in the past, hopefully as a clue to imagine similar survival there, and in many other areas, into the future.

The “picnic area” at the Manganou spring, after being cleared in 2011

Chronologically, the project begins most naturally, with the “present,” meaning the location, condition, size, characteristics, and use of these elements as they are now. We then seek to push our research back into the past, using, first of all the characteristics of the humanly-made structures, their chronological elements and what we can say of their change over time. In addition, we make significant use of oral information, which many inhabitants of Karavas or Kytherians living elsewhere have provided, to help us understand the use of water and water power back into the more distant past. Beyond this, we have begun an examination of documents in the Kythera Historical Archive since these include contracts, wills, and agreements that not uncommonly mention places and even specific buildings that are of importance in our present study. Finally, although the project is not formally archaeological in nature, we realize that many of the resources that we have identified would also have been of use in the much more distant past and that, on some occasions, we can hypothesize how they might have been used in the past. Thus, it may not be an accident that one of the already known tombs of prehistoric date in the Karavas area is located very close to some of the more impressive cistern systems we explored. Although those cisterns, which are still being used, are modern in their present form, it is not impossible that they had also been used by individuals living in the prehistoric settlement that must have been located nearby.

Students clearing undergrowth at the Manganou Spring, Karavas

Our fieldwork over the past two years was carried out with the assistance of students from the Ohio State University (USA), who volunteered to help us clear many of the watercourses, springs, and watermills that had become nearly completely impassable, covered over with a thick covering of thorny vines and other unpleasant vegetation. Despite uncountable scrapes and punctures, torn clothes and ripped boots, and many falls into the cold Karavas water, these students opened many passageways and cleared several springs, allowing us to examine in detail some of the facilities that were built to move, store, and use water over the centuries. As a result, we are beginning to see how people in the past were able to preserve and maintain the natural resources on which their livelihood depended, in part as an important lesson for us today.

Cleaning the watercourse just below the Keramari spring

In addition, the gorges around Karavas are a beautiful retreat, where visitors can enjoy the wonders of nature, the coldness of the clear water, and the works of human activity for centuries on end. We hope that visitors and local people will do their best to keep the streams and paths of the Karavas area clean and open, so all will be able to enjoy them.

You can contact us at : Tim Gregory</a> and / or <a href="mailto:gregory.257@osu.edu">Lita Tzortzopoulou-Gregory, or 07360-33565.

Photos > Modern Landscapes

submitted by Timothy Gregory on 10.05.2013

Cleaning the watercourse just below the Keramari spring

Environmental Archaeology and History in Northern Kythera: The Karavas Water Project

Timothy E. Gregory (Ohio State University)
Lita Tzortzopoulou-Gregory (Ohio State University)

Download a .pdf version of this article here:

Gregory_karavas_water_kythera_summer_2013.pdf


The Karavas Water Project is an example of a new kind of history that seeks to learn from the past in order to maintain the beauty and the richness of small-scale eco-niches. The project is based on the recognition that the area of Karavas (in the northern part of Kythera) is known for its plentiful springs and deep green gorges that create an environment that more resembles a sub-tropical rain forest than it does the parched landscape of many parts of Greece. The project has as its goal the detailed exploration and recording of the main Karavas watershed that runs in a generally southwest-northeast direction from the heights near Gerakari to the sea at Plateia Ammos. The research includes the basic mapping of the area and the identification of the many natural and humanly modified springs, as well as the water devices that were constructed to convey and store the water and to utilize water for a variety of purposes, including irrigation and power, most notably the water mills that still mark the sides of the watershed at various points.

The Keramari Mill below Diakopoulianika

A major consideration of the project is the broader realization that natural resources in particular areas often allow small or even isolated societies, over the centuries, to develop systems of production and exchange so that they can survive, frequently despite political, military, or even significant economic shifts. Indeed, many localities in Kythera, such as Karavas, were able to develop and prosper, change their means of subsistence, and survive – at least until modern times. Thus, the Kythera Water Project uses an environmental approach to examine the interactions between resources and production in order to understand better the systems of interaction that lay behind the prosperity and resilience of local society in the past, hopefully as a clue to imagine similar survival there, and in many other areas, into the future.

The “picnic area” at the Manganou spring, after being cleared in 2011

Chronologically, the project begins most naturally, with the “present,” meaning the location, condition, size, characteristics, and use of these elements as they are now. We then seek to push our research back into the past, using, first of all the characteristics of the humanly-made structures, their chronological elements and what we can say of their change over time. In addition, we make significant use of oral information, which many inhabitants of Karavas or Kytherians living elsewhere have provided, to help us understand the use of water and water power back into the more distant past. Beyond this, we have begun an examination of documents in the Kythera Historical Archive since these include contracts, wills, and agreements that not uncommonly mention places and even specific buildings that are of importance in our present study. Finally, although the project is not formally archaeological in nature, we realize that many of the resources that we have identified would also have been of use in the much more distant past and that, on some occasions, we can hypothesize how they might have been used in the past. Thus, it may not be an accident that one of the already known tombs of prehistoric date in the Karavas area is located very close to some of the more impressive cistern systems we explored. Although those cisterns, which are still being used, are modern in their present form, it is not impossible that they had also been used by individuals living in the prehistoric settlement that must have been located nearby.

Students clearing undergrowth at the Manganou Spring, Karavas

Our fieldwork over the past two years was carried out with the assistance of students from the Ohio State University (USA), who volunteered to help us clear many of the watercourses, springs, and watermills that had become nearly completely impassable, covered over with a thick covering of thorny vines and other unpleasant vegetation. Despite uncountable scrapes and punctures, torn clothes and ripped boots, and many falls into the cold Karavas water, these students opened many passageways and cleared several springs, allowing us to examine in detail some of the facilities that were built to move, store, and use water over the centuries. As a result, we are beginning to see how people in the past were able to preserve and maintain the natural resources on which their livelihood depended, in part as an important lesson for us today.

In addition, the gorges around Karavas are a beautiful retreat, where visitors can enjoy the wonders of nature, the coldness of the clear water, and the works of human activity for centuries on end. We hope that visitors and local people will do their best to keep the streams and paths of the Karavas area clean and open, so all will be able to enjoy them.

A waterfall near the Portokalia spring

You can contact us at : Tim Gregory</a> and / or <a href="mailto:gregory.257@osu.edu">Lita Tzortzopoulou-Gregory, or 07360-33565.

Photos > Modern Landscapes

submitted by Timothy Gregory on 10.05.2013

Students clearing undergrowth at the Manganou Spring, Karavas

Environmental Archaeology and History in Northern Kythera: The Karavas Water Project

Timothy E. Gregory (Ohio State University)
Lita Tzortzopoulou-Gregory (Ohio State University)

Download a .pdf version of this article here:

Gregory_karavas_water_kythera_summer_2013.pdf


The Karavas Water Project is an example of a new kind of history that seeks to learn from the past in order to maintain the beauty and the richness of small-scale eco-niches. The project is based on the recognition that the area of Karavas (in the northern part of Kythera) is known for its plentiful springs and deep green gorges that create an environment that more resembles a sub-tropical rain forest than it does the parched landscape of many parts of Greece. The project has as its goal the detailed exploration and recording of the main Karavas watershed that runs in a generally southwest-northeast direction from the heights near Gerakari to the sea at Plateia Ammos. The research includes the basic mapping of the area and the identification of the many natural and humanly modified springs, as well as the water devices that were constructed to convey and store the water and to utilize water for a variety of purposes, including irrigation and power, most notably the water mills that still mark the sides of the watershed at various points.

The Keramari Mill below Diakopoulianika

A major consideration of the project is the broader realization that natural resources in particular areas often allow small or even isolated societies, over the centuries, to develop systems of production and exchange so that they can survive, frequently despite political, military, or even significant economic shifts. Indeed, many localities in Kythera, such as Karavas, were able to develop and prosper, change their means of subsistence, and survive – at least until modern times. Thus, the Kythera Water Project uses an environmental approach to examine the interactions between resources and production in order to understand better the systems of interaction that lay behind the prosperity and resilience of local society in the past, hopefully as a clue to imagine similar survival there, and in many other areas, into the future.

The “picnic area” at the Manganou spring, after being cleared in 2011

Chronologically, the project begins most naturally, with the “present,” meaning the location, condition, size, characteristics, and use of these elements as they are now. We then seek to push our research back into the past, using, first of all the characteristics of the humanly-made structures, their chronological elements and what we can say of their change over time. In addition, we make significant use of oral information, which many inhabitants of Karavas or Kytherians living elsewhere have provided, to help us understand the use of water and water power back into the more distant past. Beyond this, we have begun an examination of documents in the Kythera Historical Archive since these include contracts, wills, and agreements that not uncommonly mention places and even specific buildings that are of importance in our present study. Finally, although the project is not formally archaeological in nature, we realize that many of the resources that we have identified would also have been of use in the much more distant past and that, on some occasions, we can hypothesize how they might have been used in the past. Thus, it may not be an accident that one of the already known tombs of prehistoric date in the Karavas area is located very close to some of the more impressive cistern systems we explored. Although those cisterns, which are still being used, are modern in their present form, it is not impossible that they had also been used by individuals living in the prehistoric settlement that must have been located nearby.

Cleaning the watercourse just below the Keramari spring

Our fieldwork over the past two years was carried out with the assistance of students from the Ohio State University (USA), who volunteered to help us clear many of the watercourses, springs, and watermills that had become nearly completely impassable, covered over with a thick covering of thorny vines and other unpleasant vegetation. Despite uncountable scrapes and punctures, torn clothes and ripped boots, and many falls into the cold Karavas water, these students opened many passageways and cleared several springs, allowing us to examine in detail some of the facilities that were built to move, store, and use water over the centuries. As a result, we are beginning to see how people in the past were able to preserve and maintain the natural resources on which their livelihood depended, in part as an important lesson for us today.

The Keramari Mill below Diakopoulianika

In addition, the gorges around Karavas are a beautiful retreat, where visitors can enjoy the wonders of nature, the coldness of the clear water, and the works of human activity for centuries on end. We hope that visitors and local people will do their best to keep the streams and paths of the Karavas area clean and open, so all will be able to enjoy them.

A waterfall near the Portokalia spring

You can contact us at : Tim Gregory</a> and / or <a href="mailto:gregory.257@osu.edu">Lita Tzortzopoulou-Gregory, or 07360-33565.

Photos > Modern Landscapes

submitted by Timothy Gregory on 10.05.2013

The Keramari Mill below Diakopoulianika

Environmental Archaeology and History in Northern Kythera: The Karavas Water Project

Timothy E. Gregory (Ohio State University)
Lita Tzortzopoulou-Gregory (Ohio State University)

Download a .pdf version of this article here:

Gregory_karavas_water_kythera_summer_2013.pdf


The Karavas Water Project is an example of a new kind of history that seeks to learn from the past in order to maintain the beauty and the richness of small-scale eco-niches. The project is based on the recognition that the area of Karavas (in the northern part of Kythera) is known for its plentiful springs and deep green gorges that create an environment that more resembles a sub-tropical rain forest than it does the parched landscape of many parts of Greece. The project has as its goal the detailed exploration and recording of the main Karavas watershed that runs in a generally southwest-northeast direction from the heights near Gerakari to the sea at Plateia Ammos. The research includes the basic mapping of the area and the identification of the many natural and humanly modified springs, as well as the water devices that were constructed to convey and store the water and to utilize water for a variety of purposes, including irrigation and power, most notably the water mills that still mark the sides of the watershed at various points.

The “picnic area” at the Manganou spring, after being cleared in 2011

A major consideration of the project is the broader realization that natural resources in particular areas often allow small or even isolated societies, over the centuries, to develop systems of production and exchange so that they can survive, frequently despite political, military, or even significant economic shifts. Indeed, many localities in Kythera, such as Karavas, were able to develop and prosper, change their means of subsistence, and survive – at least until modern times. Thus, the Kythera Water Project uses an environmental approach to examine the interactions between resources and production in order to understand better the systems of interaction that lay behind the prosperity and resilience of local society in the past, hopefully as a clue to imagine similar survival there, and in many other areas, into the future.

Chronologically, the project begins most naturally, with the “present,” meaning the location, condition, size, characteristics, and use of these elements as they are now. We then seek to push our research back into the past, using, first of all the characteristics of the humanly-made structures, their chronological elements and what we can say of their change over time. In addition, we make significant use of oral information, which many inhabitants of Karavas or Kytherians living elsewhere have provided, to help us understand the use of water and water power back into the more distant past. Beyond this, we have begun an examination of documents in the Kythera Historical Archive since these include contracts, wills, and agreements that not uncommonly mention places and even specific buildings that are of importance in our present study. Finally, although the project is not formally archaeological in nature, we realize that many of the resources that we have identified would also have been of use in the much more distant past and that, on some occasions, we can hypothesize how they might have been used in the past. Thus, it may not be an accident that one of the already known tombs of prehistoric date in the Karavas area is located very close to some of the more impressive cistern systems we explored. Although those cisterns, which are still being used, are modern in their present form, it is not impossible that they had also been used by individuals living in the prehistoric settlement that must have been located nearby.

Students clearing undergrowth at the Manganou Spring, Karavas

Our fieldwork over the past two years was carried out with the assistance of students from the Ohio State University (USA), who volunteered to help us clear many of the watercourses, springs, and watermills that had become nearly completely impassable, covered over with a thick covering of thorny vines and other unpleasant vegetation. Despite uncountable scrapes and punctures, torn clothes and ripped boots, and many falls into the cold Karavas water, these students opened many passageways and cleared several springs, allowing us to examine in detail some of the facilities that were built to move, store, and use water over the centuries. As a result, we are beginning to see how people in the past were able to preserve and maintain the natural resources on which their livelihood depended, in part as an important lesson for us today.

Cleaning the watercourse just below the Keramari spring

In addition, the gorges around Karavas are a beautiful retreat, where visitors can enjoy the wonders of nature, the coldness of the clear water, and the works of human activity for centuries on end. We hope that visitors and local people will do their best to keep the streams and paths of the Karavas area clean and open, so all will be able to enjoy them.

A waterfall near the Portokalia spring

You can contact us at : Tim Gregory</a> and / or <a href="mailto:gregory.257@osu.edu">Lita Tzortzopoulou-Gregory, or 07360-33565.

Photos > Modern Landscapes

submitted by Stephen Trifyllis on 20.04.2013

'' plenty of seats at the platia''

a late april winters bleak morning at potamos platia, some of the locals sit at the platia rugged up to keep warm ....

Photos > Modern Landscapes

submitted by Stephen Trifyllis on 17.04.2013

''it just another day ''

office with a great view , goat shepard enjoys another day at work looking after his goats and enjoying the view of mainland greece... does he want an assistant ?

Photos > Modern Landscapes

submitted by Stephen Trifyllis on 17.04.2013

APRIL WINDS

rough seas at the popular summer beach neo kosmos agia pelagia... if you swim in those conditions you'll end up in americanos cafe across the road !!!!

Photos > Modern Landscapes

submitted by Stephen Trifyllis on 17.04.2013

'' high seas ''

late april high sirocco winds give neo kosmos beach at agia pelagia niagara falls like conditions , many of us swim at that beach in july august , waves cross the road ,bit differant than the summer !!!!

Photos > Modern Landscapes

submitted by Kytherian Ecology on 07.03.2013

Restoring Fire damaged Kapsali

For Greek text please see below.

©2013 R.C.TECH | 6 Chatzioannou str. | Athens, Greece | 115 24

Download a .pdf of this call for funds here:

Kapsali Initiative.pdf

Dear Friends,

The fire that broke out last August close to Chora’s main square, following the fire that burned the area around Agia Elessa a month earlier, set in motion the formation of the Kapsali Initiative which had existed earlier as a thought and was initiated by Dr. Panagiotis Vardas.

The first action was to proceed with the pruning and clearing of the pine tree forest area in Kapsali along with the removal of remnant vegetation, so as to minimize the risk of fire. The conservation of this small forest, covering an area of about 52 stremmata, is of great importance for the island.

The works, performed by Michalis Kalligeros and his crew, are already underway at fast pace and so the landscape is steadily being transformed to a healthy and viable green park, now easily accessed by visitors and locals.

The total cost for the project has been estimated at around 22.000€. The works are being supervised voluntarily by a small committee, in which Vassilis Douridas participates on behalf of R.C.TECH.
The Kapsali Initiative needs the help of friends that will support it financially. So far the amount of 9.375€ has been collected through the following donations by various individuals wanting to help:
Μ.Κ.: 300€, Π.B.: 1.000€, Γ. Ζ.: 1.000€, Ν.Μ.: 2.500€, Ν.Σ.: 500€, Β.Ξ.: 1.000€, Ι.Κ.: 500€, Γ.Φ.: 100€, Π.Α.: 500€, E.K.: 100€, Γ.Δ.: 500€, Β.Δ.: 500€, M.K.: 875€

The amount remaining can be raised only through additional contributions. To become active supporters of the Iniative’s work in Kapsali you can use the following bank account which has been opened in the National

Bank of Greece:
ΙΒΑΝ: GR 4801 1038 0000 0038 0296 03628
Name: Κυθηραϊκός Σύνδεσμος (Kythiraikos Syndesmos)


Our aim is to raise the needed amount before Easter time since works of this kind are typically not allowed later than that due to the approaching summer season. You can find updated photos and videos of the project here, throughout the duration of the works.

Thanking you in advance for your support,

Friends of the Kapsali Initiative.

Αγαπητοί Φίλοι,

Η φωτιά του περασμένου Αυγούστου, που εκδηλώθηκε σε απόσταση αναπνοής από την πλατεία της Χώρας, ως συνέχεια της πυρκαγιάς που κατέκαψε την περιοχή της Αγίας Ελέσσας ένα μήνα νωρίτερα, ενεργοποίησε την Πρωτοβουλία για το Καψάλι, που υπήρχε νωρίτερα ως σκέψη και ξεκίνησε από τον ιατρό Παναγιώτη Βάρδα.

Ως πρώτη ενέργεια υιοθετήθηκε ο καθαρισμός και η εξυγίανση (κλαδέματα, απομάκρυνση ξερής φυτικής ύλης κ.α.) του πευκοδάσους στο Καψάλι, ώστε να προστατευθεί από τον κίνδυνο της φωτιάς. Πρόκειται για έκταση περίπου 52 στρεμμάτων χωρίς την περιοχή του camping (ενδεικτικά αναφέρεται ότι η έκταση του Εθνικού Κήπου στην Αθήνα είναι 75 στρέμματα), η προστασία της οποίας αναδεικνύεται πλέον ως άμεση ανάγκη.

Το έργο του καθαρισμού και της εξυγίανσης, εκτελείται ήδη με γοργό ρυθμό από τον Μιχάλη Καλλίγερο και το συνεργείο του και έτσι η πευκόφυτη έκταση έχει πλέον πάρει την εικόνα ενός υγιούς και βιώσιμου δασικού παρκου, προσβάσιμου εύκολα από τους επισκέπτες και τους κατοίκους του νησιού.

Η συνολική δαπάνη του έργου προβλέπεται να ανέλθει στις 22.000€ περίπου. Οι εργασίες παρακολουθούνται αφιλοκερδώς από μικρή επιτροπή, στην οποία μετέχει εκ μέρους της R.C.TECH ο Βασίλης Δουρίδας.

Η Πρωτοβουλία για το Καψάλι χρειάζεται ενεργούς φίλους που θα την υποστηρίξουν οικονομικά. Μέχρι σήμερα έχουν συγκεντρωθεί 9.375€ μέσα από τις ακόλουθες συνεισφορές φίλων της Πρωτοβουλίας:
Μ.Κ.: 300€, Π.B.: 1.000€, Γ. Ζ.: 1.000€, Ν.Μ.: 2.500€, Ν.Σ.: 500€, Β.Ξ.: 1.000€, Ι.Κ.: 500€, Γ.Φ.: 100€, Π.Α.: 500€, E.K.: 100€, Γ.Δ.: 500€, Β.Δ.: 500€, M.K.: 875€
Το ποσό που υπολείπεται μπορεί να συγκεντρωθεί μόνο μέσα από τις προσφορές σας. Για να γίνετε ενεργοί υποστηρικτές της Πρωτοβουλίας και του έργου της στο Καψάλι μπορείτε να χρησιμοποιήσετε τον λογαριασμό που διατηρείται στην Εθνική Τράπεζα με τα παρακάτω στοιχεία:
ΙΒΑΝ: GR 4801 1038 0000 0038 0296 03628
Κυθηραϊκός Σύνδεσμος


Στόχος μας είναι να συγκεντρωθεί το απαιτούμενο ποσό πριν το Πάσχα διότι αργότερα δεν επιτρέπονται εργασίες αυτού του είδους. Ενημερωμένο φωτογραφικό υλικό και video του έργου μπορείτε να βρίσκετε καθ' όλη τη διάρκεια των εργασιών εδώ.
Σας ευχαριστούμε εκ των προτέρων,

Οι ενεργοί φίλοι της Πρωτοβουλίας για το Καψάλι.

Photos > Modern Landscapes

submitted by Stephen Trifyllis on 06.11.2012

'' majestic panayia despina ''

on the way to karava late in the afternoon maybe to get water from the the vrisi at karava , you will see PANAYIA DESPINA that overlooks mainland greece and keeps a eye on all the traffic in the shipping channel ...