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submitted by George Poulos on 30.10.2004

Group photograph.

This group photograph was given to me by my uncle Manuel Belos Coroneos.

I cannot place any of the faces.

Can anyone help?

Photos > Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by George Poulos on 30.10.2004

Manuel (Belos) Coroneos & Vangelli (Hlihlis) Tzortzopoulos, from Karavas. 1940's.

Two young mates from Karavas, Manuel (Belos) Coroneos & Vangelli (Hlihlis) Tzortzopoulos.

Manuel was the youngest son of long time mayor Triunduphilos Coroneos, and Georgia (nee, Mentis.)

Evangelos, known as Vangelli, was the son of Haralambos Tzortzopoulos, and Panayota (nee, Vangis.)

Both were in their teens at the time this photograph was taken.

As destiny would have it Haralambos's brother; my father, Con(standinos) (Tzortzo)Poulos, would later marry Manuel's older sister, Evangalia (Angie), my mother.

From my vantage point, (1º of separation??), I/we are now viewing a photograph of my Uncle Manuel, and my first cousin Vangelli.

Both men are now unfortunately deceased.

Photos > Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by George Poulos on 29.03.2010

Yeoryi Dimitri Tzortzopoulos (1872?-1918), and Olympia Tzortzopoulos (nee, Tzortzopoulos), (? - 1960), Karavas, Kythera.

[In the photograph above, the portrait of my grandmother has been superimposed next to the portrait of my grandfather. My grandfather never knew my grandmother - at the age she is portrayed in this photograph. The reason will become obvious if you proceed to read their life stories below. The picture represents the idealised relationship between the two, from my grandmother's perspective.]

Yeoryi Dimitri Tzortzopoulos was born in Karavas in the 1870's. His parachoukli was Hihlis; not to be confused with the soi, Yeoryopoulos, Ayia Pelagia, who share the same nickname. He married Olympia Tzortzopoulos (Pappayogigi(?), a different soi), and they had 12 children.

4 of the children, all girls, either died in childbirth, or died young. Three died during the birth of the first 3-4 surviving children, whilst Georgia, the last born, died as a 4 year old.

The 8 surviving children were:

Katina (1894?)
Marouli (1896?)
Dimitri (1898?)
Minas (1900?)
Haralambos (1910?)
Theothoros (1912?)
Panayotis (1914?)
Constandinos (1916?)

Of these 8, five were destined to emigrate to Australia; Katina, Dimitri, Minas, Panayotis, and Costandinos.
In 1896, Yeoryi built the Tzortzopoulo patriko spiti, which lies at the base of the steps that lead up to the murmaro, and the church of Ayios Haralambos, in Karavas. The house was one of the larger houses in Karavas, but, given such a large family, conditions were overcrowded. Three or four children slept to a room.

Yeoryi was a man driven to "better himself.". He maintained large herds of various types of animals. He aquired a large land holding, including a large tract of land in Ayia Pelagia, from which he operated a factory to manufacture tiles. [I wonder whether anyone is in posssession of a photograph of the factory?] He was a good sailor, and a good trader - and frequently sailed from Kythera to Pireaus and back - trading in commodities. He established a successful emporio.

Because of Yeoryi's diverse interest, wife Olympia was forced to work hard. During Yeoryi's frequent absences, she helped to tend the herds, the crops, and the "businesses". By WWI, they had established themselves, and their family, quite well in Karavas.

During WWI, Greece entered a period of political turmoil, which almost culminated in the latter years, in civil war.

Brief background history of political tensions in Greece during WWI

Tension was high between monarchists and republicans - those "for Constandinos" - and those against him. In 1916, in Potamos, Yeoryi, a vassilikos - an avowed monarchist; made the fatal mistake of declaring himself "for the king". An altercation ensured. Later, Yeoryi was taken away by authorities, and brutally bashed with a bourthola - a large elastic like stick. He sustained multiple injures. Particularly debilitating were serious injury to his kidneys. Although he survived the attack, he never fully recovered his health. He was weakened, becoming susceptible to all kinds of infection. In 1918, the Spanish flu epidemic struck Kythera, and Yeoryi succumbed to it.

My father, Con(standinos) Yeoryi (Tzortzo)Poulos remembers, as a two year old, being summoned to his bedroom, were he was lying grieviously ill, and his father saying goodbye to him. Yeoryi kissed him. By the next morning he was dead.

Wife Olympia, was left to fend for 9 children, aged from 20, to recently born. (Georgia, the youngest, would die soon after her father.)

In 1922, with money accumulated by Yeoryi, Olympia sent Dimitri, the eldest son to Australia. In 1928, Panayotis, followed, (sponsored by Capitan Minas, an older cousin, they called barba, who later settled in Molong). [See separate entries for Capitan Minas]. Katina and Constandinos emigrated to Australia after WWII. Many of the other children, had, in the intervening period left Kythera, to find work in Athens and Pireaus.

Olympia died at age 80, in 1960, after falling twice down the aspa, slope, to the rear of the family property in Karavas. Like so many other Kytherian mothers (see separate entries for Peter Venardos, and Dimitri Miller for example), Olympia did not see the 5 children who had emigrated to Australia again; including my father Con(standinos). Dimitri died in a tragic car accident in 1936.

Circumstances of Dimitri's death, and his wedding photograph


Letter from Dimitri's wife, Athena, to Olympia, describing the circumstances of Dimitri's death

The others were too busy establishing themselves in a "new" country to return to visit.

Olympia's life story typifies the hardships of numerous Kytherian women - hard work, death of spouse, deaths in childbirth (often both mother and child, ), estrangement from children at a very young age, breakup of the family. (Imagine "shipping" 11, 12, ..14 year old chidren off to a distant country - knowing that you may never see them again.)

Photos > Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by George Poulos on 04.11.2006

Yeoryi Dimitrios Tzortzopoulos, (Hlihlis), Karavas, Kythera. 1872(?)-1918.

Yeoryi Dimitri Tzortzopoulos was born in Karavas in c. 1869. His parachoukli was Hlihlis; not to be confused with the soi, Yeoryopoulos, Ayia Pelagia, who share the same nickname. He married Olympia Tzortzopoulos (Pappayogigi(?), (1874-1958), a different soi), and they had 12 children.

4 of the children, all girls, either died in childbirth, or died young. Three died during the birth of the first 3-4 surviving children, whilst Georgia, the last born, died as a 4 year old.

The 8 surviving children were:

Aikaterini, Katina (1897-1976)
Marouli (1899-1984)
Dimitrios (1900-1936)
Minas (1903-1958)
Haralambos (1909-1978)
Theothoros (1911-1983)
Panayotis (1914-1959)
Costandinos (1916- )

Of these 8, five were destined to emigrate to Australia; Katina, Dimitri, Minas, Panayotis, and Costandinos.

In 1896, Yeoryi built the Tzortzopoulo patriko spiti, which lies at the base of the steps that lead up to the murmaro, and the church of Ayios Haralambos, in Karavas. The house was one of the larger houses in Karavas, but, given such a large family, conditions were overcrowded. Three or four children slept to a room.

Yeoryi was a man driven to "better himself". He maintained large herds of various types of animals. He aquired a large land holding, including a large tract of land in Ayia Pelagia, from which he operated a factory to manufacture tiles. [I wonder whether anyone is in posssession of a photograph of the factory?] He was a good sailor, and a good trader - and frequently sailed from Kythera to Pireaus and back - trading in commodities. He established a successful emporio.

Because of Yeoryi's diverse interest, wife Olympia was forced to work hard. During Yeoryi's frequent absences, she helped to tend the herds, the crops, and the "businesses". By WWI, they had established themselves, and their family, quite well in Karavas.

During WWI, Greece entered a period of political turmoil, which almost culminated in the latter years, in civil war. [See entry, Seal of the autonomous state of Kythera, under History, subsection, Documents, for a brief background history.] Tension was high between monarchists and republicans - those "for Constandinos" - and those against him. In 1916, in Potamos, Yeoryi, a vassilikos - an avowed monarchist; made the fatal mistake of declaring himself "for the king". An altercation ensured. Later, Yeoryi was taken away by authorities, and brutally bashed with a bourthola - a large elastic like stick. He sustained multiple injures. Particularly debilitating were serious injury to his kidneys. Although he survived the attack, he never fully recovered his health. He was weakened, becoming susceptible to all kinds of infection. In 1918, the Spanish flu epidemic struck Kythera, and Yeoryi succumbed to it.

My father, Con(standinos) Yeoryi (Tzortzo)Poulos remembers, as a two year old, being summoned to his bedroom, were he was lying grieviously ill, and his father saying goodbye to him. Yeoryi kissed him. By the next morning he was dead.

Wife Olympia, was left to fend for 9 children, aged from 20, to recently born. (Georgia, the youngest, would die soon after her father.)

In 1922, with money accumulated by Yeoryi, Olympia sent Dimitri, the eldest son to Australia. In 1928, Minas and Panayotis, followed, (sponsored by Capitan Minas, an older cousin, they called barba, who later settled in Molong). [See separate entries for Capitan Minas]. Katina and Costandinos emigrated to Australia after the war. Many of the other children, had, in the intervening period left Kythera, to find work in Athens and Pireaus.

Olympia died at age 84, in 1958, after falling twice down the aspa, slope, to the rear of the family property in Karavas. Like so many other Kytherian mothers (see separate entries for Peter Venardos, and Dimitri Miller for example), Olympia did not see the 5 children who had emigrated to Australia again; including my father Con(standinos). Dimitri died in a tragic car accident in 1936. The others were too busy establishing themselves in a "new" country to return to visit.

Olympia's life story typifies the hardships of numerous Kytherian women - hard work, death of spouse, deaths in childbirth (often both mother and child, ), estrangement from children at a very young age, breakup of the family. (Imagine "shipping" 11, 12, ..14 year old chidren off to a distant country - knowing that you may never see them again.)


Katina married Anastasios Levantis, and they had 4 children:
Helen, Tony, George, and Platon (Paul).

Marouli married Andoni Larios, and they had 1 child:
Sophia.

Dimitrios married Athena ...., and they had 4 children:
George, Con, Harry, and Olympia.

Minas married Froso Tzortzopoulos, and they had 5 children:
Olympia, Maria (deceased at 13 months), George, Stamatina (Metti), and Theodora (Dora).

Haralambos married Panayiota Vanges, and they had 4 children:
George, Vangelis, Stephanos and Eleni.

Theothoros married Maria Krithary, and they had 2 children:
1 stillborn, and Olympia (deceased).

Panayotis married Argero Aloizos, and they had 6 children:
1 stillborn, Olympia, Ourania, Georgia, George, and Peter.

Costandinos married Evangalia Coroneos, and they had 5 children:
George, Olympia (deceased), Peter, Phillip, and Theothoros (Eric).

Photos > Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by George Poulos on 18.11.2004

Theothori Tzortzopoulos, outside the Patriko skolio, Karavas, 25 Feb, 1968.

Theothori (Ri-Ri) Tzortzopoulos, one of a number of children born to George Dimitri Tzortzopoulos, and Olympia (nee, Tzortzopoulos) in Karavas, Kythera.

In birth order, these children were, Katina, Marouli, Dimitri, Minas, Haralambos, Theothoros, Panayotis, and Costas.

5 of the children left the island, and/or Greece, emigrating to Australia, Theothori, along with Marouli, and Haralambos, remained.

He married the "famous" Mummi - midwife - Maria Krithari - and lived in the Tzortzopoulo patriko spiti - at the base of the steps leading up to the marmaro, and Church of Ayios Haralambos, in Karavas.

Behind him is the Patriko skolio, [the Agricultural School, named after its original patron, (see other entries at kythera-family)] which as of 1968, was obviously in very fine condition.

He is inspecting olives on a very thriving olive tree at the front of the skolio.

Photos > Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by George Poulos on 28.10.2004

Harry Aliferis on a fishing vessel at Neapolis, early 1930's.

Harry is the strong young man in the centre. He would have been about 19-20 years of age at the time.

I include this photograph because a number of Kytherians would have worked on such boats prior to WWII.

It would be interesting to see photographs of those boats, etc etc.

The whole "sea" culture that derives from being a small isolated island has barely been explored at kythera-family to date
(Oct, 2004).

Another entry at History, subsection, Archives/Research outlines a brief biography of Harry Aliferis:

"Born: 13.11.1914, Lahi, Greece
Wife, Maria (nee, Dermatis), from Neapolis.
[Both villages located in Southern Greece, opposite Kythera].
Current address: Dover Heights, NSW.
[Both alive, as of Oct 2004.]

Harry Aliferis came to Australia in 1938 aged in his early 20s, having been sent by his father who saw few opportunities for him in Greece. On arrival, Aliferis worked as a cleaner in a butchers's shop.

In 1941 he started in partnership in a butcher shop on Albion Street, Sydney. Having acquired sufficient skills by the late 1940s, he set himself up in a butchery at 425 Oxford Street, Bondi Junction.

It was at this address that the Hellenic Talkies Coy Australasia could be found from 1951 to 1955. Realising that there were a number of Greek people in Sydney and other major centres, Aliferis, who was assisted by his father-in-law and his own brother, imported five Greek dialogue films from Finos Films in Greece. They cost £2000 for the hiring and screening rights.

The first attempt to screen them in a local hall was thwarted because it did not have a projection box and the film, being nitrate, was considered dangerous.

In Bronte Road, Hoyts owned the former Kings theatre and, in 1951, it was here that the Hellenic Talkies Coy Australasia first started. The films were also shown at Five Dock, Newcastle, Melbourne and Brisbane over the next few years.

Because Aliferis was unable to travel with the films, other arrangements had to be made for the screenings. Unfortunately, the operating costs affected the viability of the project and it was discontinued within a few years.

Aliferis was, in a way, 'before his time'. Before the close of the decade, an enterprising Cypriot Greek, Chris Louis, was importing foreign dialogue films and screening them to audiences in Sydney and Melbourne".

For other entries and photographs of Harry Aliferis, type Aliferis into the internal search engine.

Photos > Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by George Poulos on 28.10.2004

Aliferis bothers, Harry & Yanni, in a group Navy portrait, c.1936.

Harry Aliferis is on the extreme right, top row.
Yannis (John) Aliferis is in the centre of the front row.

Two years later, Harry would migrate to Australia.

I am uncertain as to when Yanni migrated.

Another entry at History, subsection, Archives/Research outlines a brief biography of Harry Aliferis:

"Born: 13.11.1914, Lahi, Greece
Wife, Maria (nee, Dermatis), from Neapolis.
[Both villages located in Southern Greece, opposite Kythera].
Current address: Dover Heights, NSW.
[Both alive, as of Oct 2004.]

Yanni Aliferis, later returned to Greece, and has since died there.

Harry Aliferis came to Australia in 1938 aged in his early 20s, having been sent by his father who saw few opportunities for him in Greece. On arrival, Aliferis worked as a cleaner in a butchers's shop.

In 1941 he started in partnership in a butcher shop on Albion Street, Sydney. Having acquired sufficient skills by the late 1940s, he set himself up in a butchery at 425 Oxford Street, Bondi Junction.

It was at this address that the Hellenic Talkies Coy Australasia could be found from 1951 to 1955. Realising that there were a number of Greek people in Sydney and other major centres, Aliferis, who was assisted by his father-in-law and his own brother, imported five Greek dialogue films from Finos Films in Greece. They cost £2000 for the hiring and screening rights.

The first attempt to screen them in a local hall was thwarted because it did not have a projection box and the film, being nitrate, was considered dangerous.

In Bronte Road, Hoyts owned the former Kings theatre and, in 1951, it was here that the Hellenic Talkies Coy Australasia first started. The films were also shown at Five Dock, Newcastle, Melbourne and Brisbane over the next few years.

Because Aliferis was unable to travel with the films, other arrangements had to be made for the screenings. Unfortunately, the operating costs affected the viability of the project and it was discontinued within a few years.

Aliferis was, in a way, 'before his time'. Before the close of the decade, an enterprising Cypriot Greek, Chris Louis, was importing foreign dialogue films and screening them to audiences in Sydney and Melbourne".

For other entries and photographs of Harry Aliferis, type Aliferis into the internal search engine.

[I include this entry for the tangential reason that a number Kytherians
a. joined the Navy as a means of obtaining good, steady employment
b. found their way to Australia, by virtue of being with the Navy - military or merchant.

Do you have photographs of fathers, uncles, grandfather's - during their navy service?]

Photos > Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by George Poulos on 28.10.2004

Harry Aliferis, with navy friend, Athens, 15th June, 1936.

Two years later, Harry would migrate to Australia.

[I include this entry for the tangential reason that a number Kytherians
a. joined the Navy as a means of obtaining good, steady employment
b. found their way to Australia, by virtue of being with the Navy - military or merchant.

Do you have photographs of fathers, uncles, grandfather's - during their navy service?]


An entry at History, subsection, Archives/Research outlines a brief biography of Harry Aliferis:

"Born: 13.11.1914, Lahi, Greece
Wife, Maria (nee, Dermatis), from Neapolis.
[Both villages located in Southern Greece, opposite Kythera].
Current address: Dover Heights, NSW.
[Both alive, as of Oct 2004.]

Harry Aliferis came to Australia in 1938 aged in his early 20s, having been sent by his father who saw few opportunities for him in Greece. On arrival, Aliferis worked as a cleaner in a butchers's shop.

In 1941 he started in partnership in a butcher shop on Albion Street, Sydney. Having acquired sufficient skills by the late 1940s, he set himself up in a butchery at 425 Oxford Street, Bondi Junction.

It was at this address that the Hellenic Talkies Coy Australasia could be found from 1951 to 1955. Realising that there were a number of Greek people in Sydney and other major centres, Aliferis, who was assisted by his father-in-law and his own brother, imported five Greek dialogue films from Finos Films in Greece. They cost £2000 for the hiring and screening rights.

The first attempt to screen them in a local hall was thwarted because it did not have a projection box and the film, being nitrate, was considered dangerous.

In Bronte Road, Hoyts owned the former Kings theatre and, in 1951, it was here that the Hellenic Talkies Coy Australasia first started. The films were also shown at Five Dock, Newcastle, Melbourne and Brisbane over the next few years.

Because Aliferis was unable to travel with the films, other arrangements had to be made for the screenings. Unfortunately, the operating costs affected the viability of the project and it was discontinued within a few years.

Aliferis was, in a way, 'before his time'. Before the close of the decade, an enterprising Cypriot Greek, Chris Louis, was importing foreign dialogue films and screening them to audiences in Sydney and Melbourne".

For other entries and photographs of Harry Aliferis, type Aliferis into the internal search engine

Photos > Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Arthur Sklavos on 11.10.2004

Unknown ??

I came across this photo with my dad but unfortunately he is not sure of date or time.We do recognise his very young sister in law Eleni sklavos fifth from the right.Can anyone shed some light?

Photos > Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Arthur Sklavos on 05.10.2007

A journey for a better Life

This photo was taken in 1927 as six young boys were about to embark on a Journey to Aust. The photographer is unknown and my father believes the photo was taken in Agia Pelagia before they boarded the boat. From Left to right they are
Xenofon Stathis
Peter Feros
Peter Prineas c/- Ballarat
George P.Sklavos (my father)
Dimitrios I.Frilingos
George C.Protopsaltis

Kosma Psaltis family history

Photos > Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Spyro Calocerinos on 22.09.2004

Mother and Son 1935

With my mother 1935

Photos > Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Spyro Calocerinos on 05.08.2004

King Paul and Queen Frederika in Hora 1948

Walking in Hora outside of "Estavromenos" church after a service held in that church.His next stop was the Scouts Hall in Hora.Scoutmasters were Andreas Fatseas(Maths teacher at high school) and Georgos Masselos (Physics teacher)

Photos > Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Spyro Calocerinos on 05.08.2004

King Paul,Queen Frederika and Mr.Marselos M.P.1948

King Paul wished to drive the jeep that was owned by Dr.Marselos M.P. on the way to Myrtidia. Dr. Marselos warns him about Kytherian roads 1948

Photos > Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Spyro Calocerinos on 03.08.2004

Unknown

Can anyone identify?Photographer unknown

Photos > Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Spyro Calocerinos on 23.10.2004

Michael Karpathakis

Michael was born in Symi 1912 while the island was still Italian, therefore arrived in Australia with an Italian passport. He was my wife's (Sadie's) father. Died 18/12/1961 in Sydney. Was a professional fisherman. Had many friends in the Immigration Department and assisted scores of Greeks coming to Australia working on ships, then "jumping" ship. He managed to get permits for them as well as passports later. He had many Kytherian friends.

Photos > Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Spyro Calocerinos on 31.07.2004

Calocerinos(kalokairinos) Valerios Yianni

 My father Valerios was well known in Kythera with his shop in Hora. Born 1893 died 1969.He was blind the later part of his life. His wife Maria met a tragic death while walking with him to Kapsali in 1962.The eikonostasi is just below the public school in Hora.

Photos > Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Spyro Calocerinos on 18.07.2004

Unknown Kytherian girls 1928

This photo was held by Pipitsa Semitecolos nee Kalokairinou(Calocerinos) from Hora.It is possible that the girl on the left was Pipitsa,but I never knew her until I met her in Sydney in 1950,so I can't recognise any of them. Can anyone please add to this?

Photos > Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Spyro Calocerinos on 24.09.2004

Pipitsa Semitecolos(Semos)nee Kalokairinou

 Pipitsa Calocerinos (Kalokairinou),was married to Peter Semos from Temora NSW.Peter,died 1949.Pipitsa was born 1919 and died 1986.They had four children.Philip,Valerios,Katerina and Peter. Later she married Anthony Cassimatis, who lives now at NSW Central Coast and enjoys good health.They had no children.

Photos > Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by Spyro Calocerinos on 22.09.2004

Calocerinos(kalokairinos) Yiannis Valeriou

 Second from left my grandfather Yiannis whom I never met.He died 1931,born in Alexandrades.

Photos > Vintage Portraits/ People

submitted by James Gavriles on 12.07.2004

Uncle Theodore Gavrilys with relatives

My Uncle Theodore Gavrilys on one of his many trips back to Kythera with some unknown relatives
Maybe someone can identify ?