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General History

History > General History

There is a history in all men's lives.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)


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History > General History

submitted by Neos Kosmos, Melbourne on 29.04.2007

Κυθηριακό "Τσιριγορικό" Αντάμωμα

[[picture:"Governor & Prof Aroney breaking eggsSMALL.jpg" ID:12575]]

Στη φωτογραφία ο καθηγητής Εµµανουήλ Αρώνης τσουγκρίζει πασχαλινό αυγό µε την Κυβερνήτη της Κουηνσλάνδης κα. Quentin Bryce. Αριστερά τους βρίσκεται ο Εντιµότατος Πρόξενος της Ελλάδας ∆η. Ράπτης ενώ δεξιά ο πρόεδρος του Κυθηριακού Συνδέσµου ...

History > General History

submitted by Peter Makarthis on 20.04.2007

Escape from Crete by 'Kyriakos' Charles Jager

p266
"Kythera's coming up" Traver's says and points to a faint outline etched on the western horizon.
Bathed in light from the rising sun, the long silhouette of Kythera slips by. Legend says that on its shores, Leda conceived Helen to Zeus in the guise of a swan;another that Aphrodite,born of foam,came to Kythera in a sea shell and Homer tells us that Kythera was the island from which Odysseus , beating north for home on Ithaca, was blown west for five days, off the map of the known ...

History > General History

submitted by The Philatelic Society Of Canberra Inc. on 14.03.2007

Stamps. The Ionian Islands. Treasure from the Mediterranean.

Very good article on the Stamps of the Ionian Islands, including Kythera, in

Capital Philately
November 2006 – VOL. 25, NO. 1.

Available as a .pdf file here:

Capital Philately 25 1 Ionian.pdf


The Philatelic Society of Canberra Inc.

(Founded 1932)

GPO BOX 1840
CANBERRA ACT 2601


History > General History

submitted by Kytherian Historical Record on 24.02.2007

Greek Slaves at Tunis in 1823.

The question of Kytherian slavery is seared deeply into the consciousness of most knowlegeable Kytherians.

The surname SKLAVOS (slave) is a common Kytherian surname. The name is a reminder (perhaps a memorial?) of an unconscionable practice that persisted throughout most of Kythera's history.

British humanitarians who had incorporated the abolition of slavery into their conception of Christianity, labored successfully to outlaw the British slave trade. This Bill passed ...

History > General History

submitted by Dean G Poulos on 06.11.2006

Letter from the Prime Minister of Australia, to Con George Poulos, my pappou.

On the occassion of Con & Dean & Sebastian (Tzortzo)Poulos's Big Fat Kytherian Birthday Party.

Held on Sunday 29th October, 2006, at the Alexander the Great Club in Marrickville, Sydney.

Pappou Con was 90 years of age.

Na mas ekatostissi!

This is every immigrants "dream" letter of validation at age 90.

To view/download a .pdf version of the letter:

History > General History

submitted by Greek Iconology on 04.11.2006

Double Headed Eagle iconology of Byzantium.

Double Headed Eagle and Greek Iconology. Overview from Wikepedia

It may seem surprising that one of the most recognizable (other than the cross) and beloved Greek symbols, the double-headed eagle, is not a part of the modern Greek flag or coat of arms (although it is officially used by the Greek Army, by the church of Greece, and was incorporated in the Greek coat of arms between 1925 and 1926). One suggested explanation is that, upon independence, an effort was made for political ...

History > General History

submitted by Greek Iconology on 04.11.2006

Flag of the Hellenic Republic of Greece.

[[picture:"Flag_of_Greece.png" ID:11784]]

Flag Ratio: 2:3 (Naval Flag 1822-1828, Sea Flag 1828-1969; 1975-1978, National Flag 1969-1975; 1978 to date)

The flag of Greece is based on nine equal horizontal stripes of blue alternating with white. There is a blue canton in the upper hoist-side corner bearing a white cross; the cross symbolizes Greek Orthodoxy, the established religion of the country. According to popular tradition, the nine stripes represent the nine ...

History > General History

submitted by Greek Iconology on 04.11.2006

The Coat of Arms of the Hellenic Republic of Greece.

[[picture:"Greek Coat of Arms.gif" ID:11782]]

The National Emblem of Greece consists of a blue escutcheon with a white cross totally surrounded by two laurel branches.

The emblem is painted or woven, mainly on the hats, uniforms and buttons of the military, the security forces etc.

The Greek national emblem was provided for by the Constitution of Epidauros of 1 January 1822 and was established by decree on 15 March of the same year. It was blue and white ...

History > General History

submitted by George N Leontsinis on 26.10.2006

Origin of the notions of Exo Dimos and Mesa Dimos.

The notions of Exo Dimos and Mesa Dimos arose historically out of the relationship between the old and sizable town of Ayios Dimitrios (which later came to be known as Paliochora, "the old town"), and the emergence of the town of Hora (to the South), and 3 other towns which constituted the islands main fortifications.

Ayios Dimitrios was the town sacked by Barbarossa in 1537.

pp. 46-47. The Island of Kythera. A Social History. (1700-1863). George ...

History > General History

submitted by Kytherian Newsletter Sydney on 14.10.2006

St Basil's Home. History.

From, The KYTHERIAN
The Newsletter of the

Kytherian Association of Australia
P0 Box A203,
South Sydney, NSW 2000

Join the Kytherian Association of Australia

March 2001
pp. 1, 9 & 10

Con Malanos has kindly written an article on the St Basil’s Homes for The Kytherian. Many of us do not ever ...

History > General History

submitted by Steve Frangos on 12.10.2006

The Greek Peddlers of New York City. Part Eight.

Steve Frangos, c. 2006

Contact, Steve Frangos

The late historian and folklorist Helen Zeese Papanikolas once told me of a conversation she had with Theodore Saloutos. Professor Saloutos was the noted American historian who had written, among many other books, the landmark ...

History > General History

submitted by Steve Frangos on 12.10.2006

The Greek Peddlers of New York City. Part Seven.

Steve Frangos, c. 2006

Contact, Steve Frangos

Ongoing abuse by a variety of native-born Americans against all the newly arrived Greek immigrants of the 1880 to 1920 era can not be questioned. But then neither can we deny the criminal action of a select number of Greek ...

History > General History

submitted by Steve Frangos on 12.10.2006

The Greek Peddlers of New York City. Part Six.

Steve Frangos, c. 2006

Contact, Steve Frangos

When I was small boy my yiayia told me that whenever one of the old Greek men entered the room I was to stand up and give him my chair. On more than one occasion, when I didn’t move fast ...

History > General History

submitted by Steve Frangos on 12.10.2006

The Greek Peddlers of New York City. Part Five.

Steve Frangos, c. 2006

Contact, Steve Frangos

‘Gaslight New York’ is the phrase meant to invoke that transition period of the 1880s into the 1890s. The 1890s, also known as the ‘Gay 90s,’ was the era that marks the beginnings of New York City as it is today. ...

History > General History

submitted by Steve Frangos on 12.10.2006

The Greek Peddlers of New York City. Part Four.

Steve Frangos, c. 2006



Crimes against the newly arrived Greek peddlers took many forms and by various attackers. It must be recalled that between 1880 and the very early 1900s, the average worker made a dollar to two dollars a day. Published reports document that some child workers made only $15.00 a year. Extortion, thief and trickery were only three ways in which the artful criminal could hook wink an unsuspecting citizen.

By returning to original ...

History > General History

submitted by Steve Frangos on 12.10.2006

The Greek Peddlers of New York City. Part Three.

Steve Frangos, c. 2006

Contact, Steve Frangos

From the late 1880s onward Greek peddlers quite literally fought to earn their daily bread. For those who scoff at such a claim we need only turn to the daily press of New York City. I think it is extremely important ...

History > General History

submitted by Steve Frangos on 12.10.2006

The Greek Peddlers of New York City. Part Two.

Steve Frangos, c. 2006

Contact, Steve Frangos

It is one thing to say “Greeks had to struggle to succeed in America,” and another to be able to quote reports from the New York Times of Greek immigrants fighting in the streets to stay alive. Documenting the attacks ...

History > General History

submitted by Steve Frangos on 12.10.2006

The Greek Peddlers of New York City. Part One.

Steve Frangos, c. 2006

Contact, Steve Frangos

Rough laborers and street peddlers are the two most enduring stereotypic images we have of Greeks who arrived in North America during the 1880s. Without turning too close an eye to the Greek colony’s composition ...

History > General History

submitted by George Kanarakis on 12.10.2006

The FIRST book published in Greek in Australia.

[[picture:"Kanarakis 1st Greek book.jpg" ID:11610]]

Neos Kosmos English Weekly, 28th February, 2000, p.6.

One of the important issues tabled at the three day conference was correcting a historical belief about the first book published in Australia in the Greek language.

The correction was made by Dr George Kanarakis from Charles Sturt University, who said the first book was one ti­tled Πραγματεία Περί Ηθικής ‘and ...

History > General History

submitted by Trifylleio Foundation on 11.10.2006

History of the Trifylleio Foundation. 50 Years Experience.

Dr. George D. Argyropoulos
General Secretary
September 2006
.

Contact, George D. Argyropoulos

The whole thing started in 1948, when this great Kythirian man, Nikolaos Trifyllis born in a little village called Trifyllianika ...