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submitted by Greek-Australian Cafe Culture on 09.10.2014

Interior of the Black & White Milk Bar, Martin Place, Sydney / Mick Adams c.1932.

Meet the Milk Bar Kids

Adam Gerondis, as the grandson of Australia’s first milk bar owner, Adam Gerondis is milk bar royalty.
In 1932, Adam’s grandfather, Joachim Tavlaridis (who later became known as Mick Adams) opened the Black & White 4d Milk Bar at number 24 Martin Place, Sydney
.

The Australian milk bar may be disappearing from our streets, but Eamon Donnelly and Adam Gerondis are doing their bit to keep this much-loved icon alive in our memories.

EAMON DONNELLY

Artist, archivist and self-confessed milk bar junkie Eamon Donnelly would have had more toasted sandwiches and milkshakes than most.
For more than a decade, he’s been capturing Australia’s disappearing milk bars on camera – a project that’s taken him to over 200 milk bars, and resulted in thousands of images of fading signage, dusty shelves, paper straws and metal cups.
It’s a journey with its beginnings in Geelong in the eighties. As a young boy, Eamon would ride his bike down the back lane to a place known as ‘Dave’s’. “I’d have a pocket full of copper – in those days you could buy 100 lollies for a dollar,” he said. “Everyone in the neighbourhood knew Dave’s.”

About a decade ago, he went back to Geelong to find that Dave’s had gone, as had so many of the milk bars of his hometown. “There were just the old signs,” he said. “And I began to take pictures of them.” As a graphic artist he loves the faded colours, the typography, and the hand painting on the older signage. And yet his love of the milk bar extends beyond the artist’s appreciation for a good hand-painted Cornetto. Like so many Australians, he also has a deep nostalgia for the milk bars of our past. “They hark back to a time when everyone knew their neighbours, when there was more community. Often they were run by migrant families. Their kids were there after school and would translate for the parents.”
Most recently, he’s come to Sydney to capture the last of our local milk bars as part of his project for this year’s Art & About Sydney.
He visited The Rio in Smith Street, Summer Hill, and The Olympia on Parramatta Road, Stanmore, both of which have had their doors open for more than 60 years.
And when a milk bar is still serving customers, Eamon always makes sure he goes in and orders a toasted sandwich and a milkshake.
His favourite flavour? “Blue Heaven,” he says. “But no one has it here. I think it’s a Melbourne thing – it’s vanilla really, but there’s quite a bit of blue colouring involved.”

ADAM GERONDIS

As the grandson of Australia’s first milk bar owner, Adam Gerondis is milk bar royalty.
In 1932, Adam’s grandfather, Joachim Tavlaridis (who later became known as Mick Adams) opened the Black & White 4d Milk Bar at number 24 Martin Place, Sydney.

A little like the 1930s American drugstore soda parlours, The Black & White may have been the first venue in the world to focus exclusively on the milkshake, which was drunk standing up at the counter. It was a roaring success, with Adams and his staff reputedly serving thousands of people a week. Unfortunately the milk bar had closed by the time Adam was born – yet a love of the humble shake runs in his veins. Growing up, the Bates Milk Bar on Campbell Parade at Bondi Beach was his local favourite. “They even had one of my grandfather’s inventions there – the ‘Adam’s Correct Measure’,” he said. “It was used to measure out the correct amount of malt – and they used it right up until they closed in 2001. I now have it and I believe it’s the last one around anywhere.” Adam runs Moo Gourmet Burgers, a place that he says tries to bring back a touch of the old days, with all food made fresh daily in the store. “And great old fashioned milk shakes,” he said. “Served in the metal cups with a paper straw. No matter how many I make, I always think of my grandfather.”

THE AUSTRALIAN MILK BAR – PANEL DISCUSSION

Join Art & About Creative Director Gill Minervini as she leads a panel discussion on Australian milk bars. The discussion will explore the history of the milk bar in Australia with the 2014 Banner Gallery artist Eamon Donnelly and City of Sydney historian Dr Lisa Murray. Leonard Janiszewski and Effy Alexakis, who have been researching the history of Australia’s Greek cafés for over a quarter of a century will join the discussion and share their stories on the development of this iconic Aussie favourite.

When
Saturday 11 October / 2PM
Where
Customs House Library
Level 2, 31 Alfred Street, Circular Quay

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by Greek-Australian Cafe Culture on 09.10.2014

Eamon Donnelly. Artist, archivist and self-confessed milk bar junkie

MEET THE MILK BAR KIDS

August 15, 2014
The Australian milk bar may be disappearing from our streets, but Eamon Donnelly and Adam Gerondis are doing their bit to keep this much-loved icon alive in our memories.

EAMON DONNELLY

Artist, archivist and self-confessed milk bar junkie Eamon Donnelly would have had more toasted sandwiches and milkshakes than most.
For more than a decade, he’s been capturing Australia’s disappearing milk bars on camera – a project that’s taken him to over 200 milk bars, and resulted in thousands of images of fading signage, dusty shelves, paper straws and metal cups.
It’s a journey with its beginnings in Geelong in the eighties. As a young boy, Eamon would ride his bike down the back lane to a place known as ‘Dave’s’. “I’d have a pocket full of copper – in those days you could buy 100 lollies for a dollar,” he said. “Everyone in the neighbourhood knew Dave’s.”

About a decade ago, he went back to Geelong to find that Dave’s had gone, as had so many of the milk bars of his hometown. “There were just the old signs,” he said. “And I began to take pictures of them.” As a graphic artist he loves the faded colours, the typography, and the hand painting on the older signage. And yet his love of the milk bar extends beyond the artist’s appreciation for a good hand-painted Cornetto. Like so many Australians, he also has a deep nostalgia for the milk bars of our past. “They hark back to a time when everyone knew their neighbours, when there was more community. Often they were run by migrant families. Their kids were there after school and would translate for the parents.”
Most recently, he’s come to Sydney to capture the last of our local milk bars as part of his project for this year’s Art & About Sydney.
He visited The Rio in Smith Street, Summer Hill, and The Olympia on Parramatta Road, Stanmore, both of which have had their doors open for more than 60 years.
And when a milk bar is still serving customers, Eamon always makes sure he goes in and orders a toasted sandwich and a milkshake.
His favourite flavour? “Blue Heaven,” he says. “But no one has it here. I think it’s a Melbourne thing – it’s vanilla really, but there’s quite a bit of blue colouring involved.”

ADAM GERONDIS

As the grandson of Australia’s first milk bar owner, Adam Gerondis is milk bar royalty.
In 1932, Adam’s grandfather, Joachim Tavlaridis (who later became known as Mick Adams) opened the Black & White 4d Milk Bar at number 24 Martin Place, Sydney.
A little like the 1930s American drugstore soda parlours, The Black & White may have been the first venue in the world to focus exclusively on the milkshake, which was drunk standing up at the counter. It was a roaring success, with Adams and his staff reputedly serving thousands of people a week. Unfortunately the milk bar had closed by the time Adam was born – yet a love of the humble shake runs in his veins. Growing up, the Bates Milk Bar on Campbell Parade at Bondi Beach was his local favourite. “They even had one of my grandfather’s inventions there – the ‘Adam’s Correct Measure’,” he said. “It was used to measure out the correct amount of malt – and they used it right up until they closed in 2001. I now have it and I believe it’s the last one around anywhere.” Adam runs Moo Gourmet Burgers, a place that he says tries to bring back a touch of the old days, with all food made fresh daily in the store. “And great old fashioned milk shakes,” he said. “Served in the metal cups with a paper straw. No matter how many I make, I always think of my grandfather.”

THE AUSTRALIAN MILK BAR – PANEL DISCUSSION

Join Art & About Creative Director Gill Minervini as she leads a panel discussion on Australian milk bars. The discussion will explore the history of the milk bar in Australia with the 2014 Banner Gallery artist Eamon Donnelly and City of Sydney historian Dr Lisa Murray. Leonard Janiszewski and Effy Alexakis, who have been researching the history of Australia’s Greek cafés for over a quarter of a century will join the discussion and share their stories on the development of this iconic Aussie favourite.

When
Saturday 11 October / 2PM
Where
Customs House Library
Level 2, 31 Alfred Street, Circular Quay

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by Greek-Australian Cafe Culture on 09.10.2014

The Supa Bonza Store

Part of ART & ABOUT 2014: THE BANNER GALLERY. The MILK BAR.

[[picture:"image.jpg" ID:22602]]

When

19th September - 12th October 2014

produced by City of Sydney

If artist Eamon Donnelly had a pocket full of change, he’d take a trip back in time to the local milk bar and spend up big on cobbers, musk sticks and bananas…..

What

Passiona™, a mixed bag of lollies and a bottle of milk – remember when most suburban homes had a milk bar within walking distance? This much-loved local hub tells the story of an Australia built on immigration, small family businesses and neighbourhood communities. Art & About Sydney is bringing the milk bar back, with Eamon Donnelly’s photography images of this faded icon flying through our city streets on banners during September and October.

Who

Eamon Donnelly is an internationally acclaimed and award winning artist and illustrator who has worked for some of the world’s most recognisable publications and brands. For over a decade Donnelly has been photographing the Australian Milk Bar, meticulously documenting this endangered part of Australian culture before it disappears from the suburban landscape. He is also the founder of The Island Continent, an online treasure trove of Australian art, design, nostalgia and popular culture.

Where

Banners on: George Street, Martin Place, William Street, Oxford Street, Glebe Point Road and Redfern Street.

The Banner Gallery at World Square

World Square is a proud partner of Art & About Sydney. Visit World Square and see 20 large-scale photographic works exploring the iconic Australian Milk Bar by 2014 Banner Gallery artist, Eamon Donnelly.

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by Greek-Australian Cafe Culture on 09.10.2014

The Banner Gallery at World Square

World Square is a proud partner of Art & About Sydney. Visit World Square and see 20 large-scale photographic works exploring the iconic Australian Milk Bar by 2014 Banner Gallery artist, Eamon Donnelly.

World Square, 680 George St, Sydney

The Milk Bar, by artist Eamon Donnelly. Part of ART & ABOUT 2014: THE BANNER GALLERY.

When

19th September - 12th October 2014

produced by City of Sydney

If artist Eamon Donnelly had a pocket full of change, he’d take a trip back in time to the local milk bar and spend up big on cobbers, musk sticks and bananas…..

What

Passiona™, a mixed bag of lollies and a bottle of milk – remember when most suburban homes had a milk bar within walking distance? This much-loved local hub tells the story of an Australia built on immigration, small family businesses and neighbourhood communities. Art & About Sydney is bringing the milk bar back, with Eamon Donnelly’s photography images of this faded icon flying through our city streets on banners during September and October.

Who

Eamon Donnelly is an internationally acclaimed and award winning artist and illustrator who has worked for some of the world’s most recognisable publications and brands. For over a decade Donnelly has been photographing the Australian Milk Bar, meticulously documenting this endangered part of Australian culture before it disappears from the suburban landscape. He is also the founder of The Island Continent, an online treasure trove of Australian art, design, nostalgia and popular culture.

Where

Banners on: George Street, Martin Place, William Street, Oxford Street, Glebe Point Road and Redfern Street.

The Banner Gallery at World Square

World Square is a proud partner of Art & About Sydney. Visit World Square and see 20 large-scale photographic works exploring the iconic Australian Milk Bar by 2014 Banner Gallery artist, Eamon Donnelly.

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by DAILY TELEGRAPH on 29.09.2014

Bubblegum dispenser to the milk crates outside Cyril Robinsons milk bar

Story by IAN PATERSON

In Penrith Press.

Also in Daily Telegraph AUGUST 05, 2014, page 11

Photograph: Milk Bar Every attention is paid to detail, from the bubblegum dispenser to the milk crates. Picture Matt Sullivan.

Cyril Robertson creates life-size 1950s town in back yard
Town includes milk bar, newsagent and general store
Mr Robertson inspired by his youth in Penrith
A desire to recapture the simple joys of his youth has led a Sydney man to create a life-size replica of a small 1950s Australian town in his backyard.

Cyril Robinson has transformed his old office and shed into milk bar Run’a’Round Sue’s, a replica of the old fashioned milk bars he frequented in Penrith with his sweetheart in his youth.

“It’s just something that I like because I had a great time in that era,” Mr Robinson said of the milk bar, named in honour of his wife.

“They were some of the best times we had in the 50s and 60s. We were always at the milk bars and that’s where Sue and I would go after school every day.”

The inspiration to build his own milk bar on his 5 acre block in the Penrith region arrived 19 years ago, when Mr Robinson’s grand daughter was born.

But he hasn't restricted himself to recreating just one of his loves, with a town gradually sprouting at the back of his property.

“It was a few dummy front windows built on the outside of his garage and then the speed shop started filling up and began looking like a proper 1950s speed repair shop and it was like you had walked back into the 50s,” daughter Renai Willoughby said.

“Then he started building this (the milk bar) for the kids and it all became real.”

Mr Robinson said he wanted to give his grand kids a taste of his youth.

“I used to like sitting in the booths having a milkshake listening to the music and I would pay my threepence and play Crash Craddock, Runaround Sue and Del Shannon,” he said. “I just built it for the kids mainly.

“I use it for the grand kids and if people come out to visit I will have a cup of coffee in there or a beer, it’s great in the summer.

“The milk bars in those day had real character back then.”

Kylie's lost thong

Missing for almost a decade, the big thong ridden by Kylie Minogue in the closing ceremony of the Sydney Olympics has finally been found: in Mr Robinson’s tiny backyard town.

Ms Minogue’s iconic rubber thong has seen better days.

It was left at Mr Robinson’s property by a friend a few years ago. The find comes as Ms Minogue yesterday starred in the closing ceremony of the Glasgow Commonwealth Games.

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by DAILY TELEGRAPH on 29.09.2014

Cyril Robinson inside his milk bar

Story by IAN PATERSON

In Penrith Press.

Also in Daily Telegraph AUGUST 05, 2014, page 11

Photograph: The interior of Cyril Robinson’s milk bar takes him back to the 1950s. Picture Matt Sullivan.

Cyril Robertson creates life-size 1950s town in back yard
Town includes milk bar, newsagent and general store
Mr Robertson inspired by his youth in Penrith
A desire to recapture the simple joys of his youth has led a Sydney man to create a life-size replica of a small 1950s Australian town in his backyard.

Cyril Robinson has transformed his old office and shed into milk bar Run’a’Round Sue’s, a replica of the old fashioned milk bars he frequented in Penrith with his sweetheart in his youth.

“It’s just something that I like because I had a great time in that era,” Mr Robinson said of the milk bar, named in honour of his wife.

“They were some of the best times we had in the 50s and 60s. We were always at the milk bars and that’s where Sue and I would go after school every day.”

The inspiration to build his own milk bar on his 5 acre block in the Penrith region arrived 19 years ago, when Mr Robinson’s grand daughter was born.

But he hasn't restricted himself to recreating just one of his loves, with a town gradually sprouting at the back of his property.

“It was a few dummy front windows built on the outside of his garage and then the speed shop started filling up and began looking like a proper 1950s speed repair shop and it was like you had walked back into the 50s,” daughter Renai Willoughby said.

“Then he started building this (the milk bar) for the kids and it all became real.”

Mr Robinson said he wanted to give his grand kids a taste of his youth.

“I used to like sitting in the booths having a milkshake listening to the music and I would pay my threepence and play Crash Craddock, Runaround Sue and Del Shannon,” he said. “I just built it for the kids mainly.

“I use it for the grand kids and if people come out to visit I will have a cup of coffee in there or a beer, it’s great in the summer.

“The milk bars in those day had real character back then.”

Kylie's lost thong

Missing for almost a decade, the big thong ridden by Kylie Minogue in the closing ceremony of the Sydney Olympics has finally been found: in Mr Robinson’s tiny backyard town.

Ms Minogue’s iconic rubber thong has seen better days.

It was left at Mr Robinson’s property by a friend a few years ago. The find comes as Ms Minogue yesterday starred in the closing ceremony of the Glasgow Commonwealth Games.

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by DAILY TELEGRAPH on 29.09.2014

Why I built a life-size replica of a 1950s town in my backyard

Story by IAN PATERSON

In Penrith Press.

Also in Daily Telegraph AUGUST 05, 2014, page 11

Cyril Robinson, stands outside his milk bar in his small backyard town. Pictures: Matt Sullivan

Cyril Robertson creates life-size 1950s town in back yard
Town includes milk bar, newsagent and general store
Mr Robertson inspired by his youth in Penrith
A desire to recapture the simple joys of his youth has led a Sydney man to create a life-size replica of a small 1950s Australian town in his backyard.

Cyril Robinson has transformed his old office and shed into milk bar Run’a’Round Sue’s, a replica of the old fashioned milk bars he frequented in Penrith with his sweetheart in his youth.

“It’s just something that I like because I had a great time in that era,” Mr Robinson said of the milk bar, named in honour of his wife.

“They were some of the best times we had in the 50s and 60s. We were always at the milk bars and that’s where Sue and I would go after school every day.”

The inspiration to build his own milk bar on his 5 acre block in the Penrith region arrived 19 years ago, when Mr Robinson’s grand daughter was born.

But he hasn't restricted himself to recreating just one of his loves, with a town gradually sprouting at the back of his property.

“It was a few dummy front windows built on the outside of his garage and then the speed shop started filling up and began looking like a proper 1950s speed repair shop and it was like you had walked back into the 50s,” daughter Renai Willoughby said.

“Then he started building this (the milk bar) for the kids and it all became real.”

Mr Robinson said he wanted to give his grand kids a taste of his youth.

“I used to like sitting in the booths having a milkshake listening to the music and I would pay my threepence and play Crash Craddock, Runaround Sue and Del Shannon,” he said. “I just built it for the kids mainly.

“I use it for the grand kids and if people come out to visit I will have a cup of coffee in there or a beer, it’s great in the summer.

“The milk bars in those day had real character back then.”

Kylie's lost thong

Missing for almost a decade, the big thong ridden by Kylie Minogue in the closing ceremony of the Sydney Olympics has finally been found: in Mr Robinson’s tiny backyard town.

Ms Minogue’s iconic rubber thong has seen better days.

It was left at Mr Robinson’s property by a friend a few years ago. The find comes as Ms Minogue yesterday starred in the closing ceremony of the Glasgow Commonwealth Games.

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by Sydney Morning Herald on 23.09.2014

An artist's impression of the planned development by Easts group

Sydney Morning Herald

September 23, 2014

Anne Davies

The Easts Group, incorporating Easts Leagues club and the Sydney Roosters, has lodged a $100 million proposal to redevelop the Waverley Bowling Club into the new home for the Roosters with plans for two 10-storey residential towers atop a new licensed club, function centre and gym, administrative offices, a childcare centre, and a swimming pool for use as a school.

[[picture:"Nick-Politis-Roosterls-CEO.jpg" ID:22538]]

Easts chairman is Karaviti & Kytherian Nick Politis

A planning proposal was lodged by Easts Group with Waverley Council last week, seeking a change to the Local Environment Plan, to allow buildings up to 45 metres tall.

But like Wests Tiger's proposal to redevelop their site Rozelle into a high-rise tower, the group's plan is almost certain to be controversial with residents. The sleepy Waverley Bowling Club is in an area with predominantly single- or two-storey dwellings and small unit blocks.


An artist's impression of the planned development.

Easts Group chief executive Scott Bennetts told the Herald the proposal was at "a very early stage".

We are waiting to hear back from council and we plan some community consultations," he said.

Richard Francis-Jones, from FJMT Design is the architect for the project, which proposes two rounded towers and a sweeping, wave-shaped podium.

Mr Bennetts said there were several parts to the project.

"Obviously there is the commercial component, withich includes [about] 140 units, but there is also serviced apartments, the club and a function centre," he said. "The profit goes back into community facilities such as a learn-to-swim centre, a 70-place childcare centre and on-site training and administration facilities for the club."

He said Easts proposed to maintain one bowling green and keep room for bowling club members.

The Roosters are also seeking the council's views on using Waverley Oval for the Roosters' training midweek. The club already uses the oval for its Bondi United junior grades.

"It's about being able to provide facilities for the changing demographic," Mr Bennetts said. "Our learn-to-swim centre at Bondi Junction is full."

The Roosters have several heavy hitters on their board with expertise in business. The chairman is car dealer Nick Politis, while board members include Mark McInnes, formerly head of David Jones and now CEO of clothing brands Just Group, and Mark Bouris from Yellow Brick Road,

Waverley mayor Sally Betts said she did not know much about the proposal and would wait for an assessment by council staff.

"From what I have seen, some of it is wonderful and some of it not quite so wonderful," she said. "Waverley has a 3D mapping system, so we will know exactly what the shadowing and view impacts it has."

She said there were four bowling clubs in Waverley and all were struggling financially

Council would need to rezone the site from RE2 private recreation to B4 mixed use to allow Easts' grand plan to go ahead. The first step is for the council to review the proposals and then, because of its size, it would be referred to the NSW Planning Department for gateway approval, with a recommendation either to accept or reject from the council. A decision by council is not expected until the new year.

After that there would be a period of formal consultation with the community, but it is likely Easts will undertake community consultation in a few weeks.

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by Greek-Australian Cafe Culture on 22.09.2014

Milk bar icons make come-back on Sydney streets

Wednesday, September 17th, 2014

City of Sydney, Council

The milk bar is fast disappearing from Sydney streets, but award-winning artist and self-confessed milk bar junkie Eamon Donnelly is keeping its memory alive on banners across the city for this year’s Art & About Sydney.

Photographic images of the fading Australian icon will fly high over our city streets from 19 September to 12 October, showcasing the festival’s ‘endangered’ theme.

Eamon Donnelly has been capturing Australia’s disappearing milk bars on camera for more than a decade as part of The Island Continent digital gallery and archive. The project has taken him to more than 200 milk bars and resulted in thousands of images of fading signs, dusty shelves, paper straws and metal cups.

One hundred of these images will be displayed on 500 of the City’s banner poles usually reserved for advertising – forming Art & About’s popular Banner Gallery. It will line George, William, Oxford and Redfern Streets, as well as Martin Place and Glebe Point Road. A selection of 20 large-scale images will also be on display at World Square.

“Eamon’s work meticulously documenting this endangered part of Australian culture before it disappears from the suburban landscape was perfect for this year’s Art & About “endangered theme,” Lord Mayor Clover Moore said.

“The colour and vibrancy of his work along the streets of Sydney will surprise and delight in a way only Art & About can, using the city as its canvas.”

Eamon Donnelly said it was amazing how many people have a story to share about their local milk bar.

“For me growing up in Geelong at age seven, it was my first taste of independence, riding down the back lane to Dave’s for some mixed lollies, a milkshake, sausage roll or an ice-cream,” Eamon said.

A decade ago, he went back to Geelong to find that Dave’s had gone, as had so many of the milk bars of his home town.

“There were just the old signs and I began to take pictures of them,” he said. “It made me realise that something was happening within our suburban landscape, an Australian icon was disappearing like an ice-cream melting in the hot summer’s sun,” he said.

“The milk bar was Australia condensed to a corner business. It was family, community, friendly service, the migrant success story. You got your news of the world from there, the weekly food supplies, life advice from the owner who knew your name, you watched their children grow up, and they watched yours.”

Since the project started, Eamon Donnelly has been interviewing families that used to run the old milk bars and the ones that still exist.

Eamon came to Sydney to capture the last of our local milk bars for Art & About Sydney. Notable among these are The Rio in Summer Hill and The Olympia in Stanmore, both of which have had their doors open for more than 60 years.

He believes Sydney may have had the largest number of milk bars, starting in 1932 when Joachim Tablaridis, later known as Mick Adams, opened ‘Black and White 4d’ at 24 Martin Place.

The Black and White 4d is no longer there, but keeping its memory alive is Adam Gerondonis, the grandson of Australia’s first milk bar owner.

“The Banner Gallery is a popular part of the Art & About program. Lining the streets with images of our much-loved milk bars is just one way of celebrating our rich and varied culture,” Art & About Creative Director, Gill Minervini said.

Sydneysiders can also join Art & About Creative Director Gill Minervini as she leads a panel discussion on Australian milk bars at 2pm on Saturday 11 October at Customs House Library.

The discussion will explore the history of the milk bar in Australia with the 2014 Banner Gallery artist Eamon Donnelly and City of Sydney historian Dr Lisa Murray.

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by Greek-Australian Cafe Culture on 15.09.2014

Staff of the Central Cafe Blackall in1929

Cafes, along with hotels, played an important role in the social life of Blackall. Opened by the Cominos family in the early 1920s, the cafe was bought by the Logothelis

(Logos) Brothers. In this 1929 photograph we see the staff of the Central Cafe.

A visit to the cafe was a social highlight with its silver table settings, printed menus and waitresses in starched green uniforms. Patrons were introduced to American style food such malted milks, ice cream sundaes and sodas at the same time as these treats were being introduced in the
larger coastal cities such as Sydney.

The Logos brothers incorporated a newsagency on one side of the cafe. The Venardos and Aloysious families continued the traditions of the Greek cafe. These Greek families moved to larger cities to give their children educational and social opportunities. At the same time fast food became popular and the role of the Central Cafe in Blackall changed. The Central Cafe closed in the 1990s.

View download a copy of the history of the Central Cafe, from a plaque created by the Blackhall City Council, here:
Blackhall Plaque Central Cafe.pdf

Blackall is a small town and rural locality in the Blackall-Tambo Region in central west Queensland, Australia. Named after Sir Samuel Blackall, the second Governor of Queensland, it lies approximately 960 kilometres (600 mi) by road from the state capital, Brisbane. The town is situated on the Barcoo River and Landsborough Highway (Matilda Highway). At the 2011 census Blackhall had a population of 1,588. It is the service centre for the Blackall-Tambo Region. The dominant industry in the area is grazing.

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by Greek-Australian Cafe Culture on 15.09.2014

The general dining room of the Logos brothers Central Cafe, Blackhall.

Cafes, along with hotels, played an important role in the social life of Blackall. Opened by the Cominos family in the early 1920s, the cafe was bought by the Logothelis

(Logos) Brothers. In this 1935 photograph we see the general dining room of the Logos brothers Central Cafe.

A visit to the cafe was a social highlight with its silver table settings, printed menus and waitresses in starched green uniforms. Patrons were introduced to American style food such malted milks, ice cream sundaes and sodas at the same time as these treats were being introduced in the
larger coastal cities such as Sydney.

The Logos brothers incorporated a newsagency on one side of the cafe. The Venardos and Aloysious families continued the traditions of the Greek cafe. These Greek families moved to larger cities to give their children educational and social opportunities. At the same time fast food became popular and the role of the Central Cafe in Blackall changed. The Central Cafe closed in the 1990s.

View download a copy of the history of the Central Cafe, from a plaque created by the Blackhall City Council, here:
Blackhall Plaque Central Cafe.pdf

Blackall is a small town and rural locality in the Blackall-Tambo Region in central west Queensland, Australia. Named after Sir Samuel Blackall, the second Governor of Queensland, it lies approximately 960 kilometres (600 mi) by road from the state capital, Brisbane. The town is situated on the Barcoo River and Landsborough Highway (Matilda Highway). At the 2011 census Blackhall had a population of 1,588. It is the service centre for the Blackall-Tambo Region. The dominant industry in the area is grazing.

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by Greek-Australian Cafe Culture on 15.09.2014

Central Cafe, Blackhall, Queensland

Window displays in Blackhalls Central Cafe situated on Shamrock Street 1939


Cafes, along with hotels, played an important role in the social life of Blackall. Opened by the Cominos family in the early 1920s, the cafe was bought by the Logothelis

(Logos) Brothers. In this 1929 photograph Nick Logos stands outside his newly refurbished cafe after fire in the Barcoo Hotel next door had damaged the building.

A visit to the cafe was a social highlight with its silver table settings, printed menus and waitresses in starched green uniforms. Patrons were introduced to American style food such malted milks, ice cream sundaes and sodas at the same time as these treats were being introduced in the
larger coastal cities such as Sydney.

The Logos brothers incorporated a newsagency on one side of the cafe. The Venardos and Aloysious families continued the traditions of the Greek cafe. These Greek families moved to larger cities to give their children educational and social opportunities. At the same time fast food became popular and the role of the Central Cafe in Blackall changed. The Central Cafe closed in the 1990s.

View download a copy of the history of the Central Cafe, from a plaque created by the Blackhall City Council, here:
Blackhall Plaque Central Cafe.pdf

Blackall is a small town and rural locality in the Blackall-Tambo Region in central west Queensland, Australia. Named after Sir Samuel Blackall, the second Governor of Queensland, it lies approximately 960 kilometres (600 mi) by road from the state capital, Brisbane. The town is situated on the Barcoo River and Landsborough Highway (Matilda Highway). At the 2011 census Blackhall had a population of 1,588. It is the service centre for the Blackall-Tambo Region. The dominant industry in the area is grazing.

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by Greek-Australian Cafe Culture on 20.08.2014

Shakin' all over: how a Sydney milk bar brought the milkshake to the world

Food News, Sydney Morning Herald
August 18, 2014

George Poulos, 90, with his son Nik, has owned the Rio milk bar in Summer Hill since 1952. Photo: Wolter Peeters

Anna Patty

More than 80 years ago, when Joachim Tavlaridis opened his Black and White Milk Bar in Martin Place, the Greek migrant started a craze for the humble milkshake that swept Australia and, say researchers, popularised the iconic drink in the US.

Tavlaridis – also known as Mick Adams – didn't use ice-cream, but used his electric mixers to blend milk with fresh and dried fruit, cream, butter, eggs, chocolate, honey, caramel, malt and yeast.

The milkshake was promoted as a health food. But he also made a riskier version laced with rum called the ''bootlegger punch''.

On the first day the Martin Place establishment opened, in 1932, Tavlaridis' milk bar attracted a phenomenal 5000 customers, who piled around his counter to drink the tasty concoctions.

''Within five years of the Black and White milk bar opening in Martin Place, some 4000 milk bars were operating in Australia,'' says Leonard Janiszewski, who, along with his wife and fellow Macquarie University researcher Effy Alexakis, has tracked the development of the milk bar.

''There was a steady rise in the popularity of milkshakes from the 1930s.''
It took until a little later before the milkshake – known simply as a shake – took off in the US, but the researchers say it was, at least indirectly, Australia that triggered the mass appeal of the iconic beverage in there.

''US servicemen who came to Australia in the 1940s started drinking milkshakes here,'' Janiszewski said. ''In the same way that they introduced instant coffee to Australians, they took the popularity of the milkshake back to the United States.''

By the late 1950s, milkshakes rivalled tea as the most popular beverage, Janiszewski says. In those days, the milkshake was seen as a safe social choice for men to have with women in public.

‘‘It touched the lives of all Australians – males, females and youth,'' he said.Families and the youth culture embraced the milkshake as an enjoyable, affordable treat – a symbol of modernity and the good life.''

By the 1970s, the milkshake contained ice-cream, sugar, artificial colours and flavours.

Ninety-year-old Greek migrant George Poulos, who has been running the Rio milk bar in Summer Hill since the mid-1950s, still works six days a week from 9am till closing hour at 10pm. His only day off is Sunday.

He remembers selling hundreds of milkshakes during earlier days when the local picture theatre was thriving. He now runs his milk bar on his own.
''It keeps me young,'' he quips. ''I'm still making milkshakes.''

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by Kytherian Historical Record on 03.08.2014

Venardos family leaving Blackhall, 1953

The Longreach Leader, Friday 6th March, 1953, page 19

The Venardos family, who have conducted the Central Cafe in Blackhall for many years, will be leaving there shortly for Nambour, where they have purchased a picture theatre and dance hall. These are the Vogue Theatre and Diggers Hall, which are adjacent.

The purchase price is not disclosed but it is understood to be a large figure.

The move was hastened by the growing families of the brothers and the need to seek outlets for the employment of these members.

Mr Bill Venardos is at present in Nambour, and delivery of the new properties will be taken on the 23rd March.

They will not abandon their interests entirely in the Central Cafe, which will in future be conducted by Messrs Politis and Aloazos, a brother of Mr George Venardos, and brother-in-law of Mr Bill Venerados, respectively.

Mr Bill Venardos will be a frequent visitor to Blackhall from Nambour for some time.

He will be greatly missed by the football fraternity of Blackhall and the Central-West, having been the energetic and enthusiastic president of the Blackall Rugby League and Central Western Rugby for a number of years.

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by Saint George Leader on 30.07.2014

Food: Greek is great any way you choose it

By Callan Boys

St George Leader, July 29, 2014

Photograph: Pork power: Chef David Tsirekas of Kefi.


GREEK street food is having its time in the sun, with the arrival of some game-changing new eateries in St George and across Sydney.

Talented chefs such as David Tsirekas (ex Xanthi and Perama) are injecting integrity, technique and quality produce into Greek street food, and Sydney can't get enough of it.

"In Australia, there's burger joints everywhere but in Greece its all about the souvla houses," Tsirekas says.

"They're always at street level, so people can grab something quickly."

Tsirekas has brought his love of Greek street food to Kefi, a new tavern and souvlaki house next to the Kingsgrove railway line.

After the hatted-Xanthi shut its doors in March, Tsirekas saw Kefi as a new challenge.

"Fine dining is a confined style of eating where people are only concentrating on their own plate," he says.

"The idea of Greek food is that it's all about sharing. You want to cut into a big piece of braised meat and pass it around the table. I was trying to incorporate some of the street food elements at Xanthi. I had the meats on the spit and I was doing wraps at lunch but it wasn't popular enough."

St George Greek street food:

KEFI


Greek street food is all about the pork.

"Pork is the most-eaten meat in Greece, contrary to what everybody thinks, which is lamb," Tsirekas says.

"Lamb is only eaten on special occasions and holidays."

The pork at Kefi is flipping amazing.

"I'm here at 8am every morning," Tsirekas says. "Rather than pressed and processed meat, we slice our own pork and leave it to marinate for a couple of days in rosemary, sage, garlic and paprika."

Tsirekas marinates all Kefi's meat differently. Lamb becomes good mates with fresh thyme and oregano, and chicken spends quality time with basil and tarragon. The best part about all these marinades is each meat has a unique flavour and there's none of those confusing "is it chicken or pork" conversations when you get a takeaway of mixed souvla.

It also means Kefi has the best gyros (see panel right) in Sydney, hands down.

Kefi Souvlaki Pizza Bar is now open for trade.

The menu also features less traditional soft-shell crab wraps and very traditional kokoretsi (lamb offal wrapped in caul fat wrapped in lamb intestines).

It is at 1/231 Kingsgrove Road, Kingsgrove, 9554 4442.

If you've driven down Forest Road in Bexley any time since April, you might have noticed a queue of people snaking down the street.

Folks are flocking here en masse to worship at the altar of the gyro.

Gyradiko was the first of the new wave of gyro joints to open in Sydney.

Each night you'll find soccer mums, track-suited couples and barking old Greek men lining up for their choice of lamb or pork wrapped up with red onion, tzatziki, tomato and chips.

Take a lead from the regulars and grab your gyro to go.

Co-owner Kostas Giannakaros is not surprised by Gyradiko's early success.

"You need the right ingredients — quality pork, red tomatoes, onion, right amount of parsley and tzatziki done just the right way."

It is at 307 Forest Road,

Bexley, 0452 543 202.

ALL GOOD THINGS EATERY

Kritharaki of Queensland spanner crab, calamari, dashi, smoked kasari and squid ink skordalia, anyone? Or kurobuta pork neck with Cretan honeycomb, miso, salt and vinegar chicharron and leek ash? It sounds like there's a Japanese influence at All Good Things — because there is.

"We source the best meats NSW has to offer through Feather and Bone and use Japanese methods and ingredients to create a Greek menu," says head chef and co-owner Phillip Lakis.

Currently on a research trip in Greece, Lakis is set to launch a souvlaki-meets-yakitori menu in August.

The menu will feature stavros peppers with kefalograviera (sheep's milk cheese) sauce, octopus with ouzo salt, and wagyu tongue with stavros pepper salsa.

I shudder every time I hear "fusion" and in the wrong hands, this Greek-Japanese crossover could go awry.

However, Lakis was accepted for a stint at Noma (aka the world's best restaurant) before opening the restaurant, and if that's not a sign of good things, I don't know what is.

It is at shop 9-11, Mashman Avenue, Kingsgrove, 7903 0198.

GET YOUR GREEK ON

Souvlaki: (pictured) Small pieces of meat, usually on a stick or hand-held in a pita.

Kontosouvli: A short, sword-like skewer threaded with larger hunks of meat than a souvlaki.

Souvla: A whole carcass on the spit or simply larger portions of meat.

Gyro: Traditionally a coronary-inducing pita filled with pork, tomato, onion, parsley, tzatziki, chips and mustard.

Yeero: Same as above but written as such to stop Australians rhyming gyro with biro.

Spanakopita: A spinach and feta pastry. One of those great foods that works equally well for breakfast, lunch or dinner.

Loukoumades: Sweet, honey-drenched doughnut of the Gods.

What is your favouriate Greek food?

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by Saint George Leader on 30.07.2014

St George Milk bars' Greek origins revealed in exhibition

St George Leader

July 29, 2014.

Cafe society: Noel Kelly was a regular at Parry's Milk Bar in Kogarah. Picture: Jane Dyson

An exhibition on Australia’s Greek cafes at Hurstville Museum has rekindled fond memories. Maria Galinovic reports.


In the1940s, Zacharias Vretos Panaretos and his wife Theodora took over a shop at Kogarah near the railway station and opened a milk bar.

As Mr Panaretos used the name Jim Parry for business, the first Parry's Milk Bar was up and running.

Noel Kelly, 78, remembers it well. His family business, the St George Call newspaper, was "a stone's throw" from Parry's, so he was a regular.

"It was a gem; the only place open on the weekends and late at night," Mr Kelly said.

"It was a meeting place where you would go for a hot strawberry milkshake on a cold winter's night."

Young people of the day had a routine: a film starring Doris Day, Rock Hudson and Bing Crosby at the Victory Theatre on the other side of the railway line, then straight to Parry's for the American-themed food — the milkshakes, ice-cream sundaes, sodas and hamburgers.

"Everyone played sport, so we'd go to Parry's after the tennis, baseball and football at Jubilee Oval," Mr Kelly said.

He remembers wondering why the lights above the shop were left on at night in the lead-up to Christmas, Easter and Mother's Day.

"We weren't quite sure what was going on until we learned that one of the Parry brothers would sleep there to guard the shop as they had the biggest collection of boxed chocolates in the southern hemisphere," Mr Parry said.

"There was so much stuff, it needed to be guarded all night."

St George Call, which Mr Kelly joined in 1951, aged 15, as a hot metal compositor, also did printing.

"We used to print the church papers once a month and on this occasion someone from the St Paul's parish council had designed an advertisement for Parry's Milk Bar to go on the back page," he said.

"He had drawn a girl with very short shorts, sipping a milkshake — the parishioners saw red. This was not the kind of thing to be seen at the back of a parish newspaper."

Although the Kellys were bought out of the business they had owned since the 1920s — "there was talk my grandfather won it in a poker game" — Mr Kelly stayed on until 2000, by which stage the newspaper was gone and it was a printing outfit.

But his interest in things Greek started way before Parry's Milk Bar. Mr Kelly has the distinction of being the great, great, great grandson of a man believed to be the first free Greek to hit Australian shores.

"There were other Greeks but they were convicts," Mr Kelly said.

"He jumped ship in 1832 because of some trouble at home, married a 14-year-old Irish convict girl and they had 11 children."

The Parry family opened more milk bars: Zacharias opened Parry's at Caringbah in 1958 and his brother Peter took over the shop at Kogarah. Their other brother, Theo, opened one at Rockdale.

Jim Parry sold the Caringbah business in 1969 to Peter and Bill Cassimatis, who were also Greek.

They ran the milk bar for 36 years before retiring. Tim Downs and Doug Battye then took over.

Hurstville residents might also remember a Parry's milk bar in Forest Road, close to the Civic Theatre.

AMERICAN DREAM

Mr Kelly and other St George residents familiar with Parry’s milk bars contributed stories and memorabilia to be included in a photographic exhibition, Selling an American Dream: Australia’s Greek Cafe, which opens at Hurstville Museum and Gallery this Saturday.

The touring exhibition from In Their Own Image: Greek-Australians, a national project put together by Macquarie University, explores an important chapter in the development of Australian culture.

Greek cafes were known for their introduction of American food into communities right across Australia.

The exhibition can be seen until September 28.

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by Saint George Leader on 30.07.2014

St George Milk bars' Greek origins revealed in exhibition

St George Leader

July 29, 2014.

Theodore Panaretos (Parry) and staff at Rockdale Parry's, c. 1965. Picture: courtesy of Victor Panaretos.

An exhibition on Australia’s Greek cafes at Hurstville Museum has rekindled fond memories. Maria Galinovic reports.


In the1940s, Zacharias Vretos Panaretos and his wife Theodora took over a shop at Kogarah near the railway station and opened a milk bar.

As Mr Panaretos used the name Jim Parry for business, the first Parry's Milk Bar was up and running.

Noel Kelly, 78, remembers it well. His family business, the St George Call newspaper, was "a stone's throw" from Parry's, so he was a regular.

"It was a gem; the only place open on the weekends and late at night," Mr Kelly said.

"It was a meeting place where you would go for a hot strawberry milkshake on a cold winter's night."

Young people of the day had a routine: a film starring Doris Day, Rock Hudson and Bing Crosby at the Victory Theatre on the other side of the railway line, then straight to Parry's for the American-themed food — the milkshakes, ice-cream sundaes, sodas and hamburgers.

"Everyone played sport, so we'd go to Parry's after the tennis, baseball and football at Jubilee Oval," Mr Kelly said.

He remembers wondering why the lights above the shop were left on at night in the lead-up to Christmas, Easter and Mother's Day.

"We weren't quite sure what was going on until we learned that one of the Parry brothers would sleep there to guard the shop as they had the biggest collection of boxed chocolates in the southern hemisphere," Mr Parry said.

"There was so much stuff, it needed to be guarded all night."

St George Call, which Mr Kelly joined in 1951, aged 15, as a hot metal compositor, also did printing.

"We used to print the church papers once a month and on this occasion someone from the St Paul's parish council had designed an advertisement for Parry's Milk Bar to go on the back page," he said.

"He had drawn a girl with very short shorts, sipping a milkshake — the parishioners saw red. This was not the kind of thing to be seen at the back of a parish newspaper."

Although the Kellys were bought out of the business they had owned since the 1920s — "there was talk my grandfather won it in a poker game" — Mr Kelly stayed on until 2000, by which stage the newspaper was gone and it was a printing outfit.

But his interest in things Greek started way before Parry's Milk Bar. Mr Kelly has the distinction of being the great, great, great grandson of a man believed to be the first free Greek to hit Australian shores.

"There were other Greeks but they were convicts," Mr Kelly said.

"He jumped ship in 1832 because of some trouble at home, married a 14-year-old Irish convict girl and they had 11 children."

The Parry family opened more milk bars: Zacharias opened Parry's at Caringbah in 1958 and his brother Peter took over the shop at Kogarah. Their other brother, Theo, opened one at Rockdale.

Jim Parry sold the Caringbah business in 1969 to Peter and Bill Cassimatis, who were also Greek.

They ran the milk bar for 36 years before retiring. Tim Downs and Doug Battye then took over.

Hurstville residents might also remember a Parry's milk bar in Forest Road, close to the Civic Theatre.

AMERICAN DREAM

Mr Kelly and other St George residents familiar with Parry’s milk bars contributed stories and memorabilia to be included in a photographic exhibition, Selling an American Dream: Australia’s Greek Cafe, which opens at Hurstville Museum and Gallery this Saturday.

The touring exhibition from In Their Own Image: Greek-Australians, a national project put together by Macquarie University, explores an important chapter in the development of Australian culture.

Greek cafes were known for their introduction of American food into communities right across Australia.

The exhibition can be seen until September 28.

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by Sydney Morning Herald on 23.07.2014

Making old school new school: Kalimera Souvlaki Art, Oakleigh. Photo: Tim Grey

Greece's top street food gets a Melbourne makeover. Vego? Prawns? That's how we roll.

July 22, 2014

Jane Ormond


George Calombaris' souvlaki making tips

Ah, the good old souvlaki - that simple combination of fresh pita bread, char-grilled meat, a little salad and a dollop of tangy tzatziki. On paper it sounds light, fresh and healthy and yet this humble meal is often given greasy mistreatment and relegated to the shabby role of booze sponge, dispensed and gorged messily when you're either horribly hungover or well on your way to becoming so. But not any more.

Like a taco sold on a Mexican street corner, souvlaki is Greece's national street snack and, since Melbourne has the world's largest Greek population outside Greece, it's no wonder the souvlaki has a special, and unshakeable, place in our late-night hearts.

Here's a bit of souvlaki nerdery for you. Here, we think of souvlaki as referring to the whole beast - the meat, salad and pita - but the word ''souvlaki'' actually refers only to the skewers of meat. They started being sold from stands and shopfronts in Greece in the 1950s, but there is evidence dating back centuries of skewered meat being cooked over coals, so it's possible Socrates may have had a cheeky souva on his way home from a night on the philosophical turps. If you're a purist, you order a souvlaki pita or a gyros pita. In Athens and southern Greece, souvlaki is more commonly referred to as ''kalamaki'', meaning ''little reed'', so you would order a kalamaki pita in those parts.

The Melbourne souvlaki

Given this city's hefty Greek credentials, how authentic is a classic Melbourne souvlaki?

''For us, the original souvlaki is pita bread, pork, tzatziki, tomato, chips and onion. This is the real souvlaki. You come to Greece, this is what you'll get,'' says Thomas Deliopoulos who, along with wife Sylvia Gabriel, runs Oakleigh's buzzing Kalimera Souvlaki Art. Gabriel notes that sauces can vary from region to region and tzatziki is not always the automatic choice.

''Where we're from, in the north of Greece, you have a choice of dips. When I was a kid, I used to have homemade mustard.

''It's street food. For example, one electrician has one job and has to feed one family, so it's a complete meal, with protein, carbohydrates and vegetables.''

Melbourne's versions are also much bigger than the originals. Where we often serve unwieldy two-handers, rolled tightly in paper and ready to burst, the authentic version is smaller and should just be gently folded in your hand like a soft-shell taco.

''When I first came here and they wrapped it, I ate the paper,'' Deliopoulos says.

So why do we favour the classic lamb filling over the more authentic pork version here in bacon-crazy Melbourne?

''When the migrants came from Europe, lamb was very cheap,'' explains Gabriel.

''They could buy a whole lamb for a few dollars, so that's why they changed to use lamb, not because it was lamb in Greece.''

Deliopoulos's parents were both pig farmers.

''I know the anatomy of the pig. One pig is big, big story for one family, one village even. So we know very much the story of the pig.''

He pulls out a picture of a pair of pale, soft shoes with delicate laces. They are the shoes his grandfather made out of pig skin, the same grandfather who shared his secret marinade recipe with Thomas, the same marinade he bastes the souvlaki with here in Melbourne in 2014.

Deliopoulos uses only female pigs under 70 kilograms (male pig meat can have an off-putting smell and is better minced in dishes). He doesn't use pork belly, as it's too fatty.

He has pitas made to his recipe at a local bakery and has fresh oregano flown over from his parents' farm.

Street food goes inside

Even though souvlaki is essentially street food you can eat with one hand, that hasn't stopped a wave of souvlaki restaurants from springing up, and not fluorescent-lit takeaway joints, but pleasant spaces with energy, atmosphere and bright, clean food.

Kalimera has a casual, jovial atmosphere, with groups of friends clustered around repurposed wooden-wheel tables. Kalimaki in the city is a crisp white space with accents of scrubbed-back turquoise wood, while George Calombaris' Jimmy Grants in Fitzroy, with a brand-new offering in the Emporium Melbourne, is equal parts laid-back, buzzy and intimate, with low stools and a pumping takeaway window.

''What we do here is a new trend even in Greece,'' says Gabriel. ''Because of the financial crisis, people can't afford to go out to restaurants, so the fashion is to design a nice, trendy shop with really good, cheap food. So you combine quality with atmosphere, music … before, the souvlaki was nice, but the shops were nothing, but what we do here is the fashion in Greece too.''

Souva stars

Here are 10 favourites that showcase a souva for all seasons and Melbourne's enduring love of this perfect street food.

1. Kalimera Souvlaki Art

Making old school new school: This souvlaki restaurant recently expanded into the shop next door, so now you can sit in the rustic dining room with brightly painted wooden shutters, light bulbs dangling from thick pieces of looped rope and old black-and-white family photos. The pork souvlaki ($8) is the go-to dish, but the Cretan salad is a must too, as well as the tangy house dip.

41 Chester Street, Oakleigh, 9939 3912

2. Jimmy Grants

Nouveau souveau: Slip up a side street off Smith Street and look for the blue neon cross. Push on into this lively little shack spinning souvas for a new generation. The Patris ($9.80) has prawns, honey mayo and cucumber and comes with the added crunch of a hefty fistful of fresh mint and coriander, while the Homer ($7.50) features falafels with Greek yoghurt and Hellenic slaw.

113 St David Street, Fitzroy (also at Emporium Melbourne and a pop-up at 80 Collins Street)

3. Souvlaki King

King of the pub crawlers: Many a Brunswick Street reveller has wandered in during the wee hours (it's open until 5am at weekends) to sit among the laminated newspaper clippings and devour a no-nonsense, king-sized souvlaki. The Hangover is a standard number pumped up with added cheese, bacon and chilli.

311 Brunswick Street, Fitzroy, 9415 1217

4. Greek Street Food

Food truck souva: Greek Street Food started its engine in January this year and trades six days a week around town. Owned by the same fine folk who brought Pireaus Blues to Fitzroy, these super-authentic souvas - the Oink, the Cluck, the Bahh and the Veggie - use Mr Pitta breads and free-range meats. You can also get a side of chips tossed in oregano and feta, and you should.

greekstreetfood.com.au

5. Hellenic Bite

Cabbie's choice: If there's one group of people you can rely on for a good souva recommendation, it's Greek taxi drivers. A recent ride and recommendation from Yanni led to Richmond's Hellenic Bite which also feeds the lunchtime corporate crowd. It's a spotless little place with decorative olive oil cans, a Grecian mural on the wall and squat, juicy souvlaki ($12.50) on bread by Mr Pitta. Ask the friendly owner to squish a bit of one of their lush house-made salads in for good measure. (Thanks for the tip, Yanni.)

172 Swan Street, Richmond, 9428 7227 (Open Monday to Fridays 11am to 9pm)

6. The D's Souvlaki

Roadside find: Along the Airport West tram line, in a light industrial area, shines a juicy beacon called The D's Souvlaki, serving pleasingly plump, succulent and charry souvas ($10), as well as pitas doused in Nutella and strawberries ($7), to send you sweetly into the night.

97 Matthews Avenue, Airport West, 0404 818 137

7. Kalamaki

Vegetarian star: Falafels are the usual vegetarian fall-back but at white, bright Kalamaki in the CBD, you can get chickpea keftes with salad, tahini and yoghurt ($8), as well as a simple haloumi version ($8). Kalamaki also gets extra points for serving ''virgin tzatziki'', which saves you heading back to your desk with the workplace hazard of deathly garlic breath.

389 Lonsdale Street, Melbourne, 9602 4444

8. Demitri's Feast

Cafe style: Who says you can't have a dainty souvlaki for lunch? At Demitri's Feast, a jaunty Greek cafe, you can get plump pita swaddling tender calamari, with crisp rocket, flecks of pickled green peppers and - wait for it - ouzo aioli ($13).

141 Swan Street, Richmond, 9428 8659

9. Pete's Charcoal Stop

Local favourite: Wedged on an awkward corner, you'll find Pete's, cooking chicken and lamb over smoking coals. The Pete Special ($11) is the equivalent of the perfect hamburger with the lot - lamb or chicken (or both) with haloumi, an egg over-easy, chips, tomato, onion and lemon mustard sauce. It's smoky, tangy, oozy and crisp, and not too big either, so you can enjoy every roller-coasting mouthful. It ain't called Special for nothin'.

562 Mount Alexander Road, Ascot Vale, 9375 1169

10. Stalactites

Hall of fame: No list of souvlakis would be complete without a nod to Stalactites, that 24-hour eatery that has been at the heart of Melbourne's Greek precinct since 1978. Every local and every tourist has, at some time, shuffled into the doorway, waiting for a table and a straight-up souva ($12.50) at 3am. Just play nice while you're there, OK?

177-183 Lonsdale Street, Melbourne, 9663 3316

Make your own pita

In a large bowl, mix one cup hot water with two teaspoons instant yeast until the yeast dissolves. Add 2½ cups plain flour, two teaspoons salt and one tablespoon olive oil and knead the dough, either in a mixer with a dough hook or by hand on a floured board, until elastic. Place the dough in a lightly oiled bowl, cover with cling film and leave it to rise to twice its size (about an hour). Turn the risen dough out onto a floured surface, break into eight pieces and roll each piece into a disc about 20 centimetres in diameter and 0.5 centimetres thick.

Put a cast-iron frying pan on a medium heat with a little olive oil to coat. When the pan is hot, place the disc of dough in it and cook until bubbles start to appear. Turn it over and toast the other side for a couple of minutes, then flip it back and cook for another couple of minutes. It should be puffy and have nicely toasted spots on it.

Remove when done and repeat with the remaining pitas.

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by Greek-Australian Cafe Culture on 06.07.2014

How Greeks Made Milkshakes a National Drink in Australia

Photograph: Milk Bar sign from The Legend Espresso Café & Milk Bar Bourke Street, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, 1960s. Sign courtesy I. Nicolades, from the “In Their Own Image: Greek-Australians” National Project Archives, Macquarie University, Sydney.

According to Macquarie University researchers, documentary photographer Effy Alexakis and historian Leonard Janiszewski, Australia’s Greek milk bars transformed the humble milkshake into a national drink.

The pair have suggested that 5 years after Mick Adam’s (Joachim Tavlarides) creation of the “milk bar” in Sydney in November 1932, some 4,000 milk bars were operating in Australia (most were Greek-run), and that by the 1950s, milkshakes were confidently challenging tea as the most commercially popular light beverage of choice.

Alexakis and Janiszewski point out that commercial Greek involvement with milkshakes commenced in the United States during the late 19th century – particularly in the southern states.

In Australia, milkshakes were being sold in pubs and emporiums just as Greek chain migration was increasing to the Antipodes in the 1890s. Some of these Greek arrivals were from the United States and they took up selling milkshakes primarily on street corners – either shaking the ingredients (cold milk diluted with water and flavoured with vanilla powder) by hand, or with a hand-cranked machine (imported from the United States) that violently shook the contents, one or two glasses at a time. At this stage however, the drink was not exceptionally popular.

With Adams’ “milk bar” revolution, its status quickly changed – Adams promoted the milkshake as a healthy food, imported electric Hamilton Beach milkshake makers to provide speed, efficiency and multiplicity in the production, and then undercut by fivepence the price of milkshakes to customers.

Initially, male pub patrons flocked to milk bars (particularly for the bootlegger punch milkshake that contained a dash of rum essence). But it was the encroachment of the milkshake into Australian family life through the numerous, humble, suburban Greek-run milk bars, that not only sustained its longevity, but elevated its status to that of a national drink. During the 1950 and early 1960s, families and youth culture embraced the milkshake as an enjoyable, affordable treat – a symbol of modernity and the “good life” that it offered. But in doing so however, milkshakes themselves were transformed by booming commercial success, and the desire to not only maintain, but to further increase sales: what had initially been promoted as a health food by Mick Adams had become, by the 1970s, a concoction of fats, sugar and artificial colours and flavours. The Greek milk bar and its milkshake though had succeeded in challenging the dominance of tea as the preferred national light beverage. The Greek café would later play its part in the rise of coffee drinking.

Janiszewski and Alexakis discussed this interesting development in their Greek café and milk bar research in two lectures which took place in Sydney during April – part of the pair’s ongoing “Shakin’ the World Over: the Greek-Australian Milk Bar” series.

- See more at: http://au.greekreporter.com/2014/05/29/how-greeks-According to Macquarie University researchers, documentary photographer Effy Alexakis and historian Leonard Janiszewski, Australia’s Greek milk bars transformed the humble milkshake into a national drink.

The pair have suggested that 5 years after Mick Adam’s (Joachim Tavlarides) creation of the “milk bar” in Sydney in November 1932, some 4,000 milk bars were operating in Australia (most were Greek-run), and that by the 1950s, milkshakes were confidently challenging tea as the most commercially popular light beverage of choice.

Alexakis and Janiszewski point out that commercial Greek involvement with milkshakes commenced in the United States during the late 19th century – particularly in the southern states.

In Australia, milkshakes were being sold in pubs and emporiums just as Greek chain migration was increasing to the Antipodes in the 1890s. Some of these Greek arrivals were from the United States and they took up selling milkshakes primarily on street corners – either shaking the ingredients (cold milk diluted with water and flavoured with vanilla powder) by hand, or with a hand-cranked machine (imported from the United States) that violently shook the contents, one or two glasses at a time. At this stage however, the drink was not exceptionally popular.

With Adams’ “milk bar” revolution, its status quickly changed – Adams promoted the milkshake as a healthy food, imported electric Hamilton Beach milkshake makers to provide speed, efficiency and multiplicity in the production, and then undercut by fivepence the price of milkshakes to customers.

Initially, male pub patrons flocked to milk bars (particularly for the bootlegger punch milkshake that contained a dash of rum essence). But it was the encroachment of the milkshake into Australian family life through the numerous, humble, suburban Greek-run milk bars, that not only sustained its longevity, but elevated its status to that of a national drink. During the 1950 and early 1960s, families and youth culture embraced the milkshake as an enjoyable, affordable treat – a symbol of modernity and the “good life” that it offered. But in doing so however, milkshakes themselves were transformed by booming commercial success, and the desire to not only maintain, but to further increase sales: what had initially been promoted as a health food by Mick Adams had become, by the 1970s, a concoction of fats, sugar and artificial colours and flavours. The Greek milk bar and its milkshake though had succeeded in challenging the dominance of tea as the preferred national light beverage. The Greek café would later play its part in the rise of coffee drinking.

Janiszewski and Alexakis discussed this interesting development in their Greek café and milk bar research in two lectures which took place in Sydney during April – part of the pair’s ongoing “Shakin’ the World Over: the Greek-Australian Milk Bar” series.

- See more at: http://au.greekreporter.com/2014/05/29/how-greeks-made-milkshakes-a-national-drink-in-australia/#sthash.PRrQf5J0.dpuf

Photos > Cafes, Shops & Cinemas

submitted by Koula Veneris on 31.05.2014

The Riverina Cafe, Albury NSW

The Riverina Cafe in Dean St Albury was owned by Dimitrios Veneris and his sons George and John Veneris between 1954 and 1977. This photo of George was taken in the early 1970's.